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Alan Turing: The Life and Legacy of the English Computer Scientist Who Became World War II’s Most Famous Codebreaker

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*Includes pictures *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Sometimes, it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no one can imagine...” – Alan Turing The year is 1930. The United States is still freshly reeling from the cataclysmic stock market crash the previous October, and is desperately *Includes pictures *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Sometimes, it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no one can imagine...” – Alan Turing The year is 1930. The United States is still freshly reeling from the cataclysmic stock market crash the previous October, and is desperately attempting to claw its way out from the slippery pits of the Great Depression. 4,000 miles away, British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald is struggling himself to prevail over a reality that is as irremediable as it is inextricable: preserving the Gold Standard and providing adequate aid to the poor and unemployed, the latter of which there were reportedly two million of by year's end. The situation in the United Kingdom is comparably dim, for not only had the British also been affected by the crash, they had yet to recover from the lasting wounds of the First World War. It would not be uncommon to see a mob of fuming men posted outside of a labor exchange or the so-called “instructional centers” introduced by Prime Minister MacDonald. These men were armed with not guns, but with placards the length of their torsos. “RELEASE US FROM HUNGER,” one placard screamed in bold letters. “WE DEMAND WINTER RELIEF,” read another. In another part of town, a number of impoverished families awaited their measly share of gruel, provided to them by a makeshift soup kitchen. The scenes became even more depressing following the setting of the sun. If one took a stroll through the streets of the “rough” neighborhoods, they would see countless silhouettes, large and small, camping out in alleyways, street corners, and embankments, huddled up in a futile attempt to escape the biting frost of winter. It was amidst this bleak atmosphere that a peerlessly profound young mind in South West England first envisioned a concept so momentous that it ultimately led to the creation of what is now considered the world's first computer. This young man was none other than Alan Turing, who was far from the suave, pipe-puffing dandy that many might associate with such a grand and futuristic idea. At the same time, Turing was hardly the kind of two-dimensional, stereotypically bookish character whose light bulb suddenly went off during an experiment binge either. On the contrary, Alan was a gauche and grief-stricken 17-year-old schoolboy who would channel all the pain and confusion from his poignant heartbreak into his tireless research, paving the path for the deeply transformative Computer Age. Alan Turing: The Life and Legacy of the English Computer Scientist Who Became World War II’s Most Famous Codebreaker looks at the life of one of World War II’s unsung heroes. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Alan Turing like never before,


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*Includes pictures *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Sometimes, it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no one can imagine...” – Alan Turing The year is 1930. The United States is still freshly reeling from the cataclysmic stock market crash the previous October, and is desperately *Includes pictures *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents “Sometimes, it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no one can imagine...” – Alan Turing The year is 1930. The United States is still freshly reeling from the cataclysmic stock market crash the previous October, and is desperately attempting to claw its way out from the slippery pits of the Great Depression. 4,000 miles away, British Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald is struggling himself to prevail over a reality that is as irremediable as it is inextricable: preserving the Gold Standard and providing adequate aid to the poor and unemployed, the latter of which there were reportedly two million of by year's end. The situation in the United Kingdom is comparably dim, for not only had the British also been affected by the crash, they had yet to recover from the lasting wounds of the First World War. It would not be uncommon to see a mob of fuming men posted outside of a labor exchange or the so-called “instructional centers” introduced by Prime Minister MacDonald. These men were armed with not guns, but with placards the length of their torsos. “RELEASE US FROM HUNGER,” one placard screamed in bold letters. “WE DEMAND WINTER RELIEF,” read another. In another part of town, a number of impoverished families awaited their measly share of gruel, provided to them by a makeshift soup kitchen. The scenes became even more depressing following the setting of the sun. If one took a stroll through the streets of the “rough” neighborhoods, they would see countless silhouettes, large and small, camping out in alleyways, street corners, and embankments, huddled up in a futile attempt to escape the biting frost of winter. It was amidst this bleak atmosphere that a peerlessly profound young mind in South West England first envisioned a concept so momentous that it ultimately led to the creation of what is now considered the world's first computer. This young man was none other than Alan Turing, who was far from the suave, pipe-puffing dandy that many might associate with such a grand and futuristic idea. At the same time, Turing was hardly the kind of two-dimensional, stereotypically bookish character whose light bulb suddenly went off during an experiment binge either. On the contrary, Alan was a gauche and grief-stricken 17-year-old schoolboy who would channel all the pain and confusion from his poignant heartbreak into his tireless research, paving the path for the deeply transformative Computer Age. Alan Turing: The Life and Legacy of the English Computer Scientist Who Became World War II’s Most Famous Codebreaker looks at the life of one of World War II’s unsung heroes. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Alan Turing like never before,

30 review for Alan Turing: The Life and Legacy of the English Computer Scientist Who Became World War II’s Most Famous Codebreaker

  1. 5 out of 5

    joan barry

    Thank you for publishing Alan Turing'story The injustice of relatively recent acts distorts the vital gifts Alan Turing have to the cause of freedom and enlightenment. He suffered much at the hands of people whose lives were saved by his genius. How sad! Thank you for publishing Alan Turing'story The injustice of relatively recent acts distorts the vital gifts Alan Turing have to the cause of freedom and enlightenment. He suffered much at the hands of people whose lives were saved by his genius. How sad!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Wood

    War hero It not just guns that win wars, great dedication and tragic circumstance. A man that was ahead of his time

  3. 4 out of 5

    Steve Schinke

    A short summary, decent for what it was intended to be.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amitabh Mishra

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lynette

  6. 4 out of 5

    Albert

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeramie J Curtice

  8. 5 out of 5

    DWIGHT WALLER

  9. 5 out of 5

    jon williams

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rupin Chaudhry

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael H. Quicker

  12. 4 out of 5

    Francis A. Corcoran

  13. 4 out of 5

    William R.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hugo Alves

  15. 4 out of 5

    Baissi

  16. 5 out of 5

    m.c.andersen

  17. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bob Emmons

  19. 5 out of 5

    R. DE JAGER

  20. 4 out of 5

    richard heddleston

  21. 4 out of 5

    James J Laughlan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Roberts

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Macleod Pollock

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Hartmann

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ganeshan

  26. 4 out of 5

    charlie

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tami Campbell-Bishop

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anghel Villamarzo

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  30. 5 out of 5

    Skye

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