Hot Best Seller

Queer X Design: 50 Years of Signs, Symbols, Banners, Logos, and Graphic Art of LGBTQ

Availability: Ready to download

The first-ever illustrated history of the iconic designs, symbols, and graphic art representing more than 5 decades of LGBTQ pride and activism. Beginning with pre-liberation and the years before the Stonewall uprising, spanning across the 1970s and 1980s and through to the new millennium, Queer X Design celebrates the inventive and subversive designs that have powered The first-ever illustrated history of the iconic designs, symbols, and graphic art representing more than 5 decades of LGBTQ pride and activism. Beginning with pre-liberation and the years before the Stonewall uprising, spanning across the 1970s and 1980s and through to the new millennium, Queer X Design celebrates the inventive and subversive designs that have powered the resilient and ever-evolving LGBTQ movement. The diversity and inclusivity of these pages is as inspiring as it is important, both in terms of the objects represented as well as in the array of creators; from buttons worn to protest Anita Bryant, to the original 'The Future is Female' and 'Lavender Menace' t-shirt; from the logos of Pleasure Chest and GLAAD, to the poster for Cheryl Dunye's queer classic The Watermelon Woman; from Gilbert Baker's iconic rainbow flag, to the quite laments of the AIDS quilt and the impassioned rage conveyed in ACT-UP and Gran Fury ephemera. More than just an accessible history book, Queer X Design tells the story of queerness as something intangible, uplifting, and indestructible. Found among these pages is sorrow, loss, and struggle; an affective selection that queer designers and artists harnessed to bring about political and societal change. But here is also: joy, hope, love, and the enduring fight for free expression and representation. Queer X Design is the potent, inspiring, and colorful visual history of activism and pride.


Compare

The first-ever illustrated history of the iconic designs, symbols, and graphic art representing more than 5 decades of LGBTQ pride and activism. Beginning with pre-liberation and the years before the Stonewall uprising, spanning across the 1970s and 1980s and through to the new millennium, Queer X Design celebrates the inventive and subversive designs that have powered The first-ever illustrated history of the iconic designs, symbols, and graphic art representing more than 5 decades of LGBTQ pride and activism. Beginning with pre-liberation and the years before the Stonewall uprising, spanning across the 1970s and 1980s and through to the new millennium, Queer X Design celebrates the inventive and subversive designs that have powered the resilient and ever-evolving LGBTQ movement. The diversity and inclusivity of these pages is as inspiring as it is important, both in terms of the objects represented as well as in the array of creators; from buttons worn to protest Anita Bryant, to the original 'The Future is Female' and 'Lavender Menace' t-shirt; from the logos of Pleasure Chest and GLAAD, to the poster for Cheryl Dunye's queer classic The Watermelon Woman; from Gilbert Baker's iconic rainbow flag, to the quite laments of the AIDS quilt and the impassioned rage conveyed in ACT-UP and Gran Fury ephemera. More than just an accessible history book, Queer X Design tells the story of queerness as something intangible, uplifting, and indestructible. Found among these pages is sorrow, loss, and struggle; an affective selection that queer designers and artists harnessed to bring about political and societal change. But here is also: joy, hope, love, and the enduring fight for free expression and representation. Queer X Design is the potent, inspiring, and colorful visual history of activism and pride.

30 review for Queer X Design: 50 Years of Signs, Symbols, Banners, Logos, and Graphic Art of LGBTQ

  1. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Arizpe Strobel

    Oh my goddddd I love this book so much. Shout out to my #1 Garrett for getting this for me from Draw Down Books last year. It’s one of my favorites and when we have a real coffee table one day it’ll stay there! Queer X Design is an inclusive, comprehensive, and very well-done examination of the history and evolution of LGBTQ+ design, art, flags, typography, logos and other imagery. My favorite thing about it is that this is not your usual shallow design book of concept art that you can just flip Oh my goddddd I love this book so much. Shout out to my #1 Garrett for getting this for me from Draw Down Books last year. It’s one of my favorites and when we have a real coffee table one day it’ll stay there! Queer X Design is an inclusive, comprehensive, and very well-done examination of the history and evolution of LGBTQ+ design, art, flags, typography, logos and other imagery. My favorite thing about it is that this is not your usual shallow design book of concept art that you can just flip through while waiting on someone and then put down; it’s got very real images made by and for very real groups and movements, and each image comes with an informative and well-researched blurb of historical context. It is a true example of the intersection of design, activism, and rebellion. And when I say comprehensive, I mean that it focuses on every era from pre-Stonewall to the present, and includes every one of us! You will learn about Gilbert Baker’s original Pride Flag design and its new, current versions, BLK magazine which was a magazine around for a short period in the late 80s focusing on Black LGBTQ news, the deep sentiment and pain behind the AIDS Quilt, and subversive protest art from over the decades. If you’re like me and typically repelled by history books, you will absolutely love this one and how accessible and engaging it is. Please look out for this one and try to purchase it from an independent bookseller like Draw Down if you are interested!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    3.5 As it says on the tin, Queer X Design covers 50-ish years of queer graphic design history. It's informative in that it brought up a lot of designers, artists, campaigns, and projects I both have learned about in my time as both an art history major and a graphic design major, but I also learned about a lot of new designers and graphic art that I either hadn't known about or barely knew of. It's laid out by decade, but I think I would have preferred it to be laid out by common categories and t 3.5 As it says on the tin, Queer X Design covers 50-ish years of queer graphic design history. It's informative in that it brought up a lot of designers, artists, campaigns, and projects I both have learned about in my time as both an art history major and a graphic design major, but I also learned about a lot of new designers and graphic art that I either hadn't known about or barely knew of. It's laid out by decade, but I think I would have preferred it to be laid out by common categories and topics instead. It does feel like it doesn't take a particularly analytical or conceptual stance, however, and instead feels more cursory and introductory in what it includes. Overall, a quick, comprehensive look at some popular queer graphic design over the last few decades.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    A nice overview of queer graphic design - it's basically exactly what it sounds like. However, it seems at times to be scattered (maybe grouping designs by genre/topic rather than decade would have helped this), and it has so many typos as to be distracting. Hence, four stars. A nice overview of queer graphic design - it's basically exactly what it sounds like. However, it seems at times to be scattered (maybe grouping designs by genre/topic rather than decade would have helped this), and it has so many typos as to be distracting. Hence, four stars.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    A thought-provoking look at the varied and creative ways in which LGBTQ+ people have used design to critique and shape cultural conversations about gender, sexuality, and identity. Author Andy Campbell has selected a rich, representative collection of items from the early 1900s through the present and provides brief but insightful descriptions of each. I was especially interested to learn about the development and evolution of the pride flag, which was originally designed by Gilbert Baker. If an A thought-provoking look at the varied and creative ways in which LGBTQ+ people have used design to critique and shape cultural conversations about gender, sexuality, and identity. Author Andy Campbell has selected a rich, representative collection of items from the early 1900s through the present and provides brief but insightful descriptions of each. I was especially interested to learn about the development and evolution of the pride flag, which was originally designed by Gilbert Baker. If anything, I’d like to learn more about all of the items in this book, but this is a great starting point.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marco

    I the think this was a good and comprehensive collection of designs and symbols of queer history, but it did not provide an in depth analysis or review for most designs. I think it was inclusive in the designs and artists it did feature, but I felt I learned more names and tibbits of history than I did design theory and it's intersection with queer history. I think it's still an important book and am glad it was published, however, it's a mere introduction to the wonderful world of queer design. I the think this was a good and comprehensive collection of designs and symbols of queer history, but it did not provide an in depth analysis or review for most designs. I think it was inclusive in the designs and artists it did feature, but I felt I learned more names and tibbits of history than I did design theory and it's intersection with queer history. I think it's still an important book and am glad it was published, however, it's a mere introduction to the wonderful world of queer design.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian Kovesci

    I’m obsessed with this book. 🏳️‍🌈

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    An amazing book to finish 2019 with - it leaves me wondering what the major design symbols will be in the 20s. The actual book is really thorough, without being overkill - it’s easy to dip in and out of, accessible to those who might not be LGBTQ+ themselves, and the layout is super clear.

  8. 5 out of 5

    kory.

    overall i find this pretty interesting and informative. content/trigger warnings; general discussions/mentions of homophobia, lesbophobia, transphobia, f slur, d slur, t slur, outdated language, hate crimes, sexual assault, murder, police violence, racism, antisemitism, aids, death, sex, reason for four stars: pride flags are the most known, visible, and memorable queer imagery, yet the only flags that got their own specific page with histories are the rainbow, leather, bi, and trans flags. every overall i find this pretty interesting and informative. content/trigger warnings; general discussions/mentions of homophobia, lesbophobia, transphobia, f slur, d slur, t slur, outdated language, hate crimes, sexual assault, murder, police violence, racism, antisemitism, aids, death, sex, reason for four stars: pride flags are the most known, visible, and memorable queer imagery, yet the only flags that got their own specific page with histories are the rainbow, leather, bi, and trans flags. every other flag is just pictured in one chapter all together, with zero mention of who created them, when, and what they mean. (the intersex flag was explained in the intro to the pride flag chapter, and the pan flag was explained at the end of the bi flag page.) so. super disappointed about that.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    This is a great collection of queer designs and history. It’s very America orientated in regards to the history and the designs, but it was still really interesting. The book is separated by decades, and although it jumped from identity to identity, I’m glad that it covered more than just the LG. However, there did seem to be a few bits where certain things spilled over into different decades, for example in the 1990’s section, there were a few pieces of information from 2010’s, which sometimes f This is a great collection of queer designs and history. It’s very America orientated in regards to the history and the designs, but it was still really interesting. The book is separated by decades, and although it jumped from identity to identity, I’m glad that it covered more than just the LG. However, there did seem to be a few bits where certain things spilled over into different decades, for example in the 1990’s section, there were a few pieces of information from 2010’s, which sometimes felt a bit out of place. I would love to see another book like this, maybe separated by identities so it would be easier to read up about certain identities of the community. Overall, really enjoyed this book and I found it really interesting and insightful.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Read in bits and pieces over a couple months; it was definitely more substantive than the coffee-table-book appearance lets on but the depth of the text varies a lot between different items. Mostly what I loved here was the diversity of design within the pages - everything from protest art to corporate advertising, drag show posters to gender-neutral restroom signage, and of course a whole array of pride flags and symbols. Of course no book like this could be 100% comprehensive, but the author's Read in bits and pieces over a couple months; it was definitely more substantive than the coffee-table-book appearance lets on but the depth of the text varies a lot between different items. Mostly what I loved here was the diversity of design within the pages - everything from protest art to corporate advertising, drag show posters to gender-neutral restroom signage, and of course a whole array of pride flags and symbols. Of course no book like this could be 100% comprehensive, but the author's effort to represent as many different expressions of queerness as he could is clear.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    Overall it was really comprehensive. The language used wasn't too dry and kept things accessible to the reader. I wouldn't have minded seeing some more protest signage, however I understand why it wasn't focused on as much. Also gotta love learning about the lesbian marketing by Subaru because guess which queer woman just bought a Subaru without knowing the implications? Yep, this one. Overall it was really comprehensive. The language used wasn't too dry and kept things accessible to the reader. I wouldn't have minded seeing some more protest signage, however I understand why it wasn't focused on as much. Also gotta love learning about the lesbian marketing by Subaru because guess which queer woman just bought a Subaru without knowing the implications? Yep, this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    Queer X Design provides a cursory glance at some historical Queer Design in the United States. While the collection starts off strong, it isn’t nearly long enough to go into much depth or analytical detail. It also probably works better as a coffee table book than an eBook (I borrowed the Kindle version from my public library).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Nicole C

    Another book that should be required reading. Heck, I’m fairly new to the queer community (within the last 15 years) and there’s so much of this I never knew. Basically if you’re not a white cisgender able-bodied male, your community’s history remains fringe (incrementally less so now, but still.)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kara Nevle

    Informative and poignant. I would recommend this to just about anyone that wants to know more about how design speaks to its audience. I love that the author addresses the disservices that the community bring on to one another and is unafraid to call our historical revisionism.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Samira

    Quick read, succinct and pretty intersectional.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Extremely informative and absolutely visually stunning.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ✌︎ lua ☺︎

    If you didn't already know, graphic design is my passion~~ Spending this time expanding my love of visual communication design has been an exercise in learning that learning never stops. Queer X Design is a look into the historical imagery that has shaped our cultural movements. From the Pride Flag designed by Gilbert Baker to the new typeface designed in memory of him. This book is a reminder to myself that graphic design isn't just about advertisement. It can change minds, express i If you didn't already know, graphic design is my passion~~ Spending this time expanding my love of visual communication design has been an exercise in learning that learning never stops. Queer X Design is a look into the historical imagery that has shaped our cultural movements. From the Pride Flag designed by Gilbert Baker to the new typeface designed in memory of him. This book is a reminder to myself that graphic design isn't just about advertisement. It can change minds, express ideas, and give voice to the voiceless. Most of these iconic designs started from grassroots operations. Now they've been adopted and have come to represent so much more than their original intent. Not only does this book lay out the history of queer design, it brings to light the struggle of visibility the LGBTQ+ community has always faced. It's also a reminder that we've come a long way and still have a ways to go. I recommend this book to not only designers but those who want to know the context behind some of the iconography capable of galvanizing passion.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sebastián Arcos

    As a graphic designar and queer activist this a must read. Is not only about how design evolved on the queer culture but also how it helps to shape our identity and pride. For empalme the pocket lawyer evidence how a publication can help and change people life and rights.

  19. 5 out of 5

    William

  20. 5 out of 5

    Greyson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Flungoutofspace (CMJW)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aric Furfaro

  23. 5 out of 5

    Noa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Mellard

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hunter Madden

  26. 5 out of 5

    Em Ironstone

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jen Albano

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

  29. 5 out of 5

    Espen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura Wallace

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...