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Maya and the Robot

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From award-winning author Eve L. Ewing comes an illustrated middle grade novel about a forgotten homemade robot who comes to life just when aspiring fifth-grade scientist Maya needs a friend—and a science fair project. Maya’s nervous about fifth grade. She tries to keep calm by reminding herself she knows what to expect. But then she learns that this year won’t be anything From award-winning author Eve L. Ewing comes an illustrated middle grade novel about a forgotten homemade robot who comes to life just when aspiring fifth-grade scientist Maya needs a friend—and a science fair project. Maya’s nervous about fifth grade. She tries to keep calm by reminding herself she knows what to expect. But then she learns that this year won’t be anything like the last. For the first time since kindergarten, her best friends Jada and MJ are placed in a different class without her, and introverted Maya has trouble making new friends. She tries to put on a brave face since they are in fifth grade now, but Maya is nervous! Just when too much seems to be changing, she finds a robot named Ralph in the back of Mr. Mac’s convenience store closet. Once she uses her science skills to get him up and running, a whole new world of connection opens up as Ralph becomes a member of her family and Maya begins to step into her power. In this touching novel, Eve L. Ewing melds together a story about community, adapting to change, and the magic of ingenuity that reminds young readers that they can always turn to their own curiosity when feeling lost.


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From award-winning author Eve L. Ewing comes an illustrated middle grade novel about a forgotten homemade robot who comes to life just when aspiring fifth-grade scientist Maya needs a friend—and a science fair project. Maya’s nervous about fifth grade. She tries to keep calm by reminding herself she knows what to expect. But then she learns that this year won’t be anything From award-winning author Eve L. Ewing comes an illustrated middle grade novel about a forgotten homemade robot who comes to life just when aspiring fifth-grade scientist Maya needs a friend—and a science fair project. Maya’s nervous about fifth grade. She tries to keep calm by reminding herself she knows what to expect. But then she learns that this year won’t be anything like the last. For the first time since kindergarten, her best friends Jada and MJ are placed in a different class without her, and introverted Maya has trouble making new friends. She tries to put on a brave face since they are in fifth grade now, but Maya is nervous! Just when too much seems to be changing, she finds a robot named Ralph in the back of Mr. Mac’s convenience store closet. Once she uses her science skills to get him up and running, a whole new world of connection opens up as Ralph becomes a member of her family and Maya begins to step into her power. In this touching novel, Eve L. Ewing melds together a story about community, adapting to change, and the magic of ingenuity that reminds young readers that they can always turn to their own curiosity when feeling lost.

30 review for Maya and the Robot

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    In the past few years there have been some major conversations related to women in STEM particularly women of color in STEM. There have been major campaigns to encourage young women of color to consider STEM related fields as a career choice. Unsurprisingly, books play a major role in influencing, motivating, and encouraging youth. Maya and the Robot is a great example of Black girls in STEM that I wish I would have had growing up. Maya and the Robot starts with bang as Maya's robot creates a hug In the past few years there have been some major conversations related to women in STEM particularly women of color in STEM. There have been major campaigns to encourage young women of color to consider STEM related fields as a career choice. Unsurprisingly, books play a major role in influencing, motivating, and encouraging youth. Maya and the Robot is a great example of Black girls in STEM that I wish I would have had growing up. Maya and the Robot starts with bang as Maya's robot creates a huge and devastating mess in the school cafeteria. Assuming that readers have no idea what's going on, Maya takes them through the series of events that led up to this opening event. What is so amazing about this novel is that it tackles a number of different things like school age friendships, bullying, grief, insecurity/confidence, etc. It does so in a way that's accessible and appropriate for the target audience. Maya goes through some serious changes and learns how to find her voice after finding herself in a new classroom without her best friends. During this time, she acquires Ralph (the robot) from Mr. Mac whose son used to own and work on Ralph. Maya puts her science and technology skills to the test in order to get him working again. It's interesting that through this robot, Maya learns so much about herself and those around her. What's so great is that all the adults in Maya's life are extremely supportive of her goals in relationship to Ralph even the adults that Maya thinks don't notice or care about her. She has so much determination and passion and it was so great to see her make so many great strides to becoming a great scientist and a great friend. The writing of this is extremely accessible and easy to follow. Even the more science based aspects of the books especially those related to Ralph were easy to understand. One criticism that I do have of this book is that it reads young. While it is labeled as a middle grade novel, Maya's voice feels a tad bit on the younger side. Fifth grade is considered to be in the realm of middle grade; however, I don't see a lot of older middle grade readers picking this one up. Nevertheless, it is great representation of Black girls who love STEM. Although Maya does have issue with other students at school, I feel as though most of this book is focused on her success and love for science. It was fast paced and I really loved seeing everything come together in the end. Definitely give this one a try.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    Where can I get my own Ralph? I loved the inside look at Maya's research and applications of the scientific method to get him up and running. The neighborhood that Maya lived in was also a wonderful addition to the narrative. There are some tissue-worthy moments as well as some high-five opportunities. Includes some friendship do's and don'ts as well as a classroom teacher who does not seem to be a good match at first. No teacher is the perfect fit for every child, but that does not mean there a Where can I get my own Ralph? I loved the inside look at Maya's research and applications of the scientific method to get him up and running. The neighborhood that Maya lived in was also a wonderful addition to the narrative. There are some tissue-worthy moments as well as some high-five opportunities. Includes some friendship do's and don'ts as well as a classroom teacher who does not seem to be a good match at first. No teacher is the perfect fit for every child, but that does not mean there are not many opportunities to learn and grow in the classroom. Thank you to Kokila and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Maya lives in an apartment in the city with her mother and baby brother Amir, and visits with her dad on the weekends. She is really interested in science and technology and looking forward to 5th grade, until she realizes that her two best friends, MJ and Jada, have the cool science teacher while she is stuck with Ms. Rodriguez, who has the desks arranged in rows. Maya goes by her middle name instead of her first name, Patricia, but is too afraid to correct her t E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Maya lives in an apartment in the city with her mother and baby brother Amir, and visits with her dad on the weekends. She is really interested in science and technology and looking forward to 5th grade, until she realizes that her two best friends, MJ and Jada, have the cool science teacher while she is stuck with Ms. Rodriguez, who has the desks arranged in rows. Maya goes by her middle name instead of her first name, Patricia, but is too afraid to correct her teacher. Zoe, the most popular girl in the grade, gives her a hard time about this. Maya helps out Mr. McMillan, who runs a local variety store, after school, and when she is cleaning out a storage closet, she finds a robot (Ralph) that Mr. Mac's son, Christopher, had developed when he was younger. Knowing Maya is interested in working on such things, Mr. Mac helps Maya get it back to her home, where she starts to work on it. With some help and a little luck, she gets Ralph to work and starts to program him to do all sorts of interesting things, like greet people in other languages, grocery shop, and clean up things around the house. As the school science fair approaches, Maya decides to bring the robot, and finds out information about Mr. Mac's son as well as some of her classmates. Strengths: This started with quite a bang! The most common complaint I hear about books is that they don't have "anything happen", but this was funny and engaging from the very beginning, in the way that Dairman's All Four Stars was. I loved Maya's science interests, and her feelings of insecurity when she has to be in class away from her friends will resonate with readers. Her family and community are also supportive, and I want a shop like Mr. Mac's down the street from ME! Ralph the robot is awesome, even if his skills require a bit of suspension of disbelief. Even the backstory about Christopher is handled in a sensitive way. I love the bright cover! Weaknesses: This is just a bit young for my library. The inclusion recess, and of one teacher for all classes, makes this hard to sell to my older readers. 6th graders would pick it up, especially because of the great illustrations, but I don't see 7th or 8th graders being interested. What I really think: This was a very fun book, and it was great to see so much science and technology represented. I would definitely buy this for an elementary library, and it would make a great gift for a tech obsessed child.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin

    This middle-grades novel is so good! It's super engaging, has a great message, relatable characters, and would do well as a mentor text for lots of different skills and strategies. I am excited to use it as a read-aloud this year! This middle-grades novel is so good! It's super engaging, has a great message, relatable characters, and would do well as a mentor text for lots of different skills and strategies. I am excited to use it as a read-aloud this year!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I wish there were more books like this when I was a young reader! Maya is a shy, science-loving Black girl growing up in a working class Chicago neighborhood. When she discovers Ralph, a friendly homemade robot, she’s feeling lonely after being assigned to a different fifth-grade classroom from her two best friends. Ralph ultimately helps her learn more not just about science and technology, but also the power of friendship and the importance of believing in herself. This is a great book for ele I wish there were more books like this when I was a young reader! Maya is a shy, science-loving Black girl growing up in a working class Chicago neighborhood. When she discovers Ralph, a friendly homemade robot, she’s feeling lonely after being assigned to a different fifth-grade classroom from her two best friends. Ralph ultimately helps her learn more not just about science and technology, but also the power of friendship and the importance of believing in herself. This is a great book for elementary or middle school-age kids, especially if they’re interested in STEM. Thanks to Eve Ewing’s team for the advanced readers copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    What a great book! It was well-written, funny, and heart-warming. It dealt with a few different subjects but didn't feel bogged down by them. Those subjects include science, friends, school, and gun violence. I really hope we get to see more of Maya, her friends, and Ralph! What a great book! It was well-written, funny, and heart-warming. It dealt with a few different subjects but didn't feel bogged down by them. Those subjects include science, friends, school, and gun violence. I really hope we get to see more of Maya, her friends, and Ralph!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Franki Sibberson

    Loved this one--perfect for grades 3/4/5

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nerdette Podcast

    Such a sweet lovely book!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Magaly C.

    Maya lives in the city with her mom and baby brother, Amir, and her 5th-grade year is starting off very poorly. First, she has a difficult (somewhat boring) teacher. Next, she learns that her two best friends will not be in her class. Thirdly, she has to deal with Zoe who is unkind to her. So she has to try to make friends while also adjusting to a less friendly instructor (who calls her Patricia, even though everyone knows she goes by Maya!). However, 5th grade also means the school science fai Maya lives in the city with her mom and baby brother, Amir, and her 5th-grade year is starting off very poorly. First, she has a difficult (somewhat boring) teacher. Next, she learns that her two best friends will not be in her class. Thirdly, she has to deal with Zoe who is unkind to her. So she has to try to make friends while also adjusting to a less friendly instructor (who calls her Patricia, even though everyone knows she goes by Maya!). However, 5th grade also means the school science fair. Maya loves science, technology, engineering, and math and she is doubly excited when she finds Ralph in the back of Mr. Mac's store. This is a lovely, heartbreaking, and hopeful story about Maya dealing with loneliness, her community, and the evolution of friendships. Written from Maya's POV, we learn about her community as she does: in ways that transcend her typical interactions, but also through the lens of the adults around her. Maya begins to gain confidence in herself while also learning to find her voice and speaking up for herself. Eve Ewing touches on grief, loss, bullying, jealousy, and loneliness in a way that is relatable to middle-grade readers and will pull on the heartstrings of any adult tempered with humor and hopeful resilience of different characters. E-ARC provided by NetGalley.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Julie Overpeck

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Friendship, jealousy, loneliness, grief, finding your voice, resilience, and pursuing your interests are all themes tucked neatly into this story about a girl and her new mechanical companion. Maya’s best friends are in a different class this year, and for the first time, Maya is not looking forward to school. On top of that, Zoe is mean to her, and her teacher calls her by her first name instead of by Maya. But then, Maya finds a robot in the stock room while working at the store for Mr. MacMil Friendship, jealousy, loneliness, grief, finding your voice, resilience, and pursuing your interests are all themes tucked neatly into this story about a girl and her new mechanical companion. Maya’s best friends are in a different class this year, and for the first time, Maya is not looking forward to school. On top of that, Zoe is mean to her, and her teacher calls her by her first name instead of by Maya. But then, Maya finds a robot in the stock room while working at the store for Mr. MacMillan. She loves science and engineering, and this is exciting! She finds out that Mr. Mac’s son Christopher built the robot years ago, but Christopher is gone now, and Maya is not sure where he is. Maya gets the robot to work and all is well until sabotage at the science fair! This is a good story with heavy moments tempered with humor and fun. Maya learns that there is more to people than she can see on the outside, that Christopher was shot and killed 10 years ago and Mr. Mac is still really sad, that Zoe is mean because she’s jealous and thinks Maya’s life is perfect, that her teacher calls her the wrong name because she doesn’t know any different and Maya never spoke up to correct her. Highly recommended!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    I received an electronic ARC from PENGUIN GROUP Penguin Young Readers Group through NetGalley. Readers will connect with Maya from the first chapter. The book opens with a scene from the end of the story and then shifts to give readers the backstory. Maya is struggling with fifth grade as her only friends are in the other classroom and she feels left out and lonely. She doesn't feel like her teacher likes her, and she's being bullied by a classmate. Middle grade readers will identify with her and I received an electronic ARC from PENGUIN GROUP Penguin Young Readers Group through NetGalley. Readers will connect with Maya from the first chapter. The book opens with a scene from the end of the story and then shifts to give readers the backstory. Maya is struggling with fifth grade as her only friends are in the other classroom and she feels left out and lonely. She doesn't feel like her teacher likes her, and she's being bullied by a classmate. Middle grade readers will identify with her and with the other characters Ewing develops in this story. She assists Mr. Mac in his store and finds an old robot his son built. She gets to bring the robot (Ralph) home and studies Christopher's notes to learn how to bring it active. Through the remainder of the book, Maya continues Christopher's work and trains Ralph as a functioning AI being. Ewing brings readers in to be part of the family and friend circle as they see how Maya struggles to speak up for herself and then gains confidence to speak up for herself. She learns some valuable lessons about reaching out to her friends, being brave enough to speak with new people, and speaking up for herself with adults.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Devin

    “Community” is the word of the month at our school for September. I wish I would have read Maya and the Robot beforehand because it would have made a great schoolwide read-aloud. ⁣ ⁣ The book is written by Eve Ewing. From her bio, “Dr. Eve Louise Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people.” She is also a poet and visual artist. I truly love her “Community” is the word of the month at our school for September. I wish I would have read Maya and the Robot beforehand because it would have made a great schoolwide read-aloud. ⁣ ⁣ The book is written by Eve Ewing. From her bio, “Dr. Eve Louise Ewing is a sociologist of education whose research is focused on racism, social inequality, and urban policy, and the impact of these forces on American public schools and the lives of young people.” She is also a poet and visual artist. I truly love her work. Oh! And she won the 2020 Paul Engle Prize here in Iowa City. Ok, fine: one last thing, her dog’s name is Charlie Brown Christmas!⁣ ⁣ 𝘔𝘢𝘺𝘢 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘙𝘰𝘣𝘰𝘵 is set in Chicago and tells the story of a young girl who enjoys everything science. When helping at her neighborhood corner store, Maya discovers and is gifted a robot who was created by the store owner’s son. While learning about the robot and working on her science fair project AND trying to deal with her best friends not being in her class, Maya learns what it means to be a part of a helpful and caring community. 2nd grade +⁣

  13. 5 out of 5

    Demetrius Frazier

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and think this would be an excellent read for a Young Reader. The book handled important but sometimes sensitive topics like youth friendship, feelings of inadequacy, fitting in and violence appropriate to the level of the intended reader. The story line moved well and didn't linger on unnecessary tangents. The author weaved in some historical figures and science facts to potentially spark interest to other topics as well as solved conflicts between characters witho I thoroughly enjoyed this book and think this would be an excellent read for a Young Reader. The book handled important but sometimes sensitive topics like youth friendship, feelings of inadequacy, fitting in and violence appropriate to the level of the intended reader. The story line moved well and didn't linger on unnecessary tangents. The author weaved in some historical figures and science facts to potentially spark interest to other topics as well as solved conflicts between characters without villainizing either which I found refreshing. One note about the book is on some outlets the book is listed as a Young Readers (which I characterized as such in this review) book which over generalizes the reading level appropriate to the book. I believe the book is advanced elementary but can be used for middle grade readers that are not reading at level. The book's content is fun and light and might spark an uninterested middle grade reader to read more.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

    This book covered many more topics than I thought it would when I started reading it including science (STEM), friendship, prejudice, bullying, divorce, siblings, and more. Maya is a great girl who has a lot of changes facing her at the start of her 5th grade school year but she feels that the worst is that her two best friends are in another class. Before even seeing how it will work out, she believes she is now no longer their friend and feels terribly lonely in her class. Even though others a This book covered many more topics than I thought it would when I started reading it including science (STEM), friendship, prejudice, bullying, divorce, siblings, and more. Maya is a great girl who has a lot of changes facing her at the start of her 5th grade school year but she feels that the worst is that her two best friends are in another class. Before even seeing how it will work out, she believes she is now no longer their friend and feels terribly lonely in her class. Even though others are trying to make friends with her in the class, she doesn't see it. Instead, she uses her scientific knowledge to build on a gift she receives to make a robot friend. In some ways, it turns out wonderfully but not completely. I learned quite a bit along with Maya about robots and technology and empathized with her dilemmas.

  15. 4 out of 5

    The Keepers of the Books

    Patricia May Robinson goes by Maya. Maya’s friends are all in a different class. She’s scared to start 5th grade without them, and she’s not good at making new friends. After school, she likes to help Mr. Mac at the local convenience store. Then she finds a robot named Ralph in the storage room. Mr. Mac tells her she can keep Ralph and try to get him working. Maya’s parents reluctantly agree to their new robot pet. Soon Ralph becomes her school project. The characters are likable and engaging. T Patricia May Robinson goes by Maya. Maya’s friends are all in a different class. She’s scared to start 5th grade without them, and she’s not good at making new friends. After school, she likes to help Mr. Mac at the local convenience store. Then she finds a robot named Ralph in the storage room. Mr. Mac tells her she can keep Ralph and try to get him working. Maya’s parents reluctantly agree to their new robot pet. Soon Ralph becomes her school project. The characters are likable and engaging. The plot is a little dull, but readers who like robots, realistic fiction, and science will enjoy reading this book. 3.5 stars, Grades 1 to 5 Please note: This was a review copy given to us by NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. No financial compensation was received.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emilee (emileereadsbooks)

    Thank you PRH Audio for the gifted audiobook. Celebrating a black girl's interest in STEM and her intergenerational friendship, this book touches on themes of middle school struggles including friendships and bullying, sibling relationships, community safety, parental separation, and scientific curiosity. Maya is given a robot from her friend Mr. Mac. She gets it up and running and as she learns how to program the robot to navigate human interactions and tasks, she too is learning how to better i Thank you PRH Audio for the gifted audiobook. Celebrating a black girl's interest in STEM and her intergenerational friendship, this book touches on themes of middle school struggles including friendships and bullying, sibling relationships, community safety, parental separation, and scientific curiosity. Maya is given a robot from her friend Mr. Mac. She gets it up and running and as she learns how to program the robot to navigate human interactions and tasks, she too is learning how to better interact with the world and obstacles around her. This book was short and sweet but packs a punch in terms of how entertaining it is and how many life lessons it holds. Content Warning: Gun Violence (minor)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    With thanks to NetGalley and Kokila for an early copy in return for an honest review. Maya is struggling with 5th grade. She is not in the same class as her two best friends and because of their recess schedule she hardly sees them. When she is gifted a robot from Mr. Mac she learns to get the robot up and working. Lessons in friendship and being a friend follow for Maya. I would definitely recommend this book for kids with an interest in STEM or Tech and could see some fun follow-up activities re With thanks to NetGalley and Kokila for an early copy in return for an honest review. Maya is struggling with 5th grade. She is not in the same class as her two best friends and because of their recess schedule she hardly sees them. When she is gifted a robot from Mr. Mac she learns to get the robot up and working. Lessons in friendship and being a friend follow for Maya. I would definitely recommend this book for kids with an interest in STEM or Tech and could see some fun follow-up activities related to building a robot. Note for younger or more sensitive readers....there are references to gun violence (someone related to a character was shot and killed in the past).

  18. 5 out of 5

    LS Johnson

    Yeah for Maya! Loved this character who works with robots and pays attention to things at museums! Even though she was disappointed that her best friends were no longer with her in school, she still applied herself to her school work and kept herself busy with her own goals. Book shows healthy family dynamics. Lite bullying at school. Supportive neighborhood. Definitely recommending. I listen to a lot of audiobooks and enjoy those read by the author because they are invested in how the story sou Yeah for Maya! Loved this character who works with robots and pays attention to things at museums! Even though she was disappointed that her best friends were no longer with her in school, she still applied herself to her school work and kept herself busy with her own goals. Book shows healthy family dynamics. Lite bullying at school. Supportive neighborhood. Definitely recommending. I listen to a lot of audiobooks and enjoy those read by the author because they are invested in how the story sounds and can convey the intentions of the book. But if it’s not the author then Bahni Turpin is the next best thing. She brings every character to life. I really liked this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Finch

    An absolutely delightful middle-grade novel. I loved how effortlessly diverse it was, and how it incorporated issues without turning them into ISSUES. (E.g., Maya's parents don't live together, but it's just described as a matter of course and not a giant OMG BROKEN HOME discussion. The book even weaves in the reality of gun violence's effects on a community.) This book shows STEM activities as being fun, not just as good for getting a job when you grow up. It shows multiple people having multip An absolutely delightful middle-grade novel. I loved how effortlessly diverse it was, and how it incorporated issues without turning them into ISSUES. (E.g., Maya's parents don't live together, but it's just described as a matter of course and not a giant OMG BROKEN HOME discussion. The book even weaves in the reality of gun violence's effects on a community.) This book shows STEM activities as being fun, not just as good for getting a job when you grow up. It shows multiple people having multiple feelings and not quite knowing how to deal with them. It shows friendships growing apart, friendships growing stronger, and rivals growing into friends. I just loved it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Candice

    Sometimes you just need a friend, and that is the case with Maya, a fifth grade girl when she realizes that none of her friends will be in her classes this year. She finds a robot hiding in one of her classes and decides that she will put her programming skills to use. She fixes the robot and this opens up a whole new world for her. Maya learns that sometimes when you are struggling, you can use your curiosity and questioning skills to turn things around for you. This is a must read, especially Sometimes you just need a friend, and that is the case with Maya, a fifth grade girl when she realizes that none of her friends will be in her classes this year. She finds a robot hiding in one of her classes and decides that she will put her programming skills to use. She fixes the robot and this opens up a whole new world for her. Maya learns that sometimes when you are struggling, you can use your curiosity and questioning skills to turn things around for you. This is a must read, especially for STEM loving girls.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Afoma (Reading Middle Grade)

    Maya and the Robot is an engaging, illustrated middle grade book with strong STEM connections, about the struggles of forming and maintaining friendships. Besides Maya’s time with the robot, this story also features a predominantly Black cast and community, themes of parental separation, gun violence and a sweet intergenerational friendship. I would highly recommend this to fans of STEM books, robot stories, and books about friendship. Perfect for kids in the third grade and up. Read my full revi Maya and the Robot is an engaging, illustrated middle grade book with strong STEM connections, about the struggles of forming and maintaining friendships. Besides Maya’s time with the robot, this story also features a predominantly Black cast and community, themes of parental separation, gun violence and a sweet intergenerational friendship. I would highly recommend this to fans of STEM books, robot stories, and books about friendship. Perfect for kids in the third grade and up. Read my full review on my blog. Many thanks to the publisher for an eARC via NetGalley.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    This is a lovely and fun book! It does a gorgeous job exploring how Maya, a real scientist, deals with familiar elementary school hardships like change, friendship, bullies, and those moments where you first experience “grown-up” issues. I wished I would have had this to read when I was Maya’s age! I could not more highly recommend you gift this to young reader in your life (or perhaps a local school library)…after you read it yourself!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    *ARC An engaging story of an upper elementary science loving student trying to find a place to fit in when she is taken out of her comfort zone. With the support of her family and community she finds herself and her passion. There is plenty of humor to keep the story light but there is some good moral lessons tucked into it as well.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Loved this story about a nerdy fifth grade girl who absolutely loves science and knows a lot about it. She is struggling with friendship, and ends up discovering and helping to re-create a robot who helps her with her chores but also acts as a friend. It has some great depth to it while also being very kid friendly.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dominique

    Couldn’t recommend this more to kids who are devouring chapter books. It’s funny, thoughtful, smart, informative, and seamlessly weaves in nonbinary characters, disabled characters, Native scientists, hijabi kids and the ramifications of gun violence into one smart, sensitive, fun Black little girl. I am SO glad to have a book like this to give to my nieces.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    This book got me so heated that not every book has pictures in it! What's up with that!? [This book does not have a ton of illustration - just got me riled up thinking about a caregiver flipping through this and saying no because it has a few very cool illustrations that absolutely amplify the story of a young woman-of-color interested in STEM :)] This book got me so heated that not every book has pictures in it! What's up with that!? [This book does not have a ton of illustration - just got me riled up thinking about a caregiver flipping through this and saying no because it has a few very cool illustrations that absolutely amplify the story of a young woman-of-color interested in STEM :)]

  27. 5 out of 5

    Laurence Gander

    What a fantastic book. Perfect blend of muddle grade problems, inquisitiveness of science, heart and the value of persevering. Should be in every classroom and school library. Loved it!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. STEM, creativity, friendship, fun violence, perseverance, & robots… so much to discuss about this middle grade novel!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katy Lovejoy

    Not bad to kill time

  30. 4 out of 5

    A

    The nibling will love this

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