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Get Coding 2! Build Five Computer Games Using HTML and JavaScript

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Ready to learn how to code a game? Get an introduction to programming with this fun and accessible guide. Learn HTML and JavaScript. Design and build five interactive computer games. Create cool graphics. Code simple artificial intelligence. This appealing guide, covering essential coding concepts, offers an ideal introduction to all these activities and more. By following Ready to learn how to code a game? Get an introduction to programming with this fun and accessible guide. Learn HTML and JavaScript. Design and build five interactive computer games. Create cool graphics. Code simple artificial intelligence. This appealing guide, covering essential coding concepts, offers an ideal introduction to all these activities and more. By following simple step-by-step instructions and completing five exciting missions, aspiring programmers are invited to code well-known games such as tic-tac-toe and table tennis, then customize their projects to test their skills.


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Ready to learn how to code a game? Get an introduction to programming with this fun and accessible guide. Learn HTML and JavaScript. Design and build five interactive computer games. Create cool graphics. Code simple artificial intelligence. This appealing guide, covering essential coding concepts, offers an ideal introduction to all these activities and more. By following Ready to learn how to code a game? Get an introduction to programming with this fun and accessible guide. Learn HTML and JavaScript. Design and build five interactive computer games. Create cool graphics. Code simple artificial intelligence. This appealing guide, covering essential coding concepts, offers an ideal introduction to all these activities and more. By following simple step-by-step instructions and completing five exciting missions, aspiring programmers are invited to code well-known games such as tic-tac-toe and table tennis, then customize their projects to test their skills.

30 review for Get Coding 2! Build Five Computer Games Using HTML and JavaScript

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cat Strawberry

    This is a brilliant book that’s well worth getting for any kids, or even adults, who’ve always wanted to code and create their own videogames! ‘Get Coding 2’ is the second book, with the first covering simple programing language and introducing kids into creating their own website and other things. This book focuses on making games though and it’s amazing what you learn. The book, a paperback, is smaller than A4 in size but heavy to hold due to the thick glossy pages inside. The pages are colour This is a brilliant book that’s well worth getting for any kids, or even adults, who’ve always wanted to code and create their own videogames! ‘Get Coding 2’ is the second book, with the first covering simple programing language and introducing kids into creating their own website and other things. This book focuses on making games though and it’s amazing what you learn. The book, a paperback, is smaller than A4 in size but heavy to hold due to the thick glossy pages inside. The pages are colourful and very easy to read with some text, pictures and borders on every page. After the introduction the book is split into five different sections, each with the information on how to code a different game. I love how the book is arranged with the characters and the cat, and how readers are made to feel like they are helping to win a contest by helping the characters in the book to create/code these games. It makes doing the work of coding even more fun and I like the way the code is easily explained. Date: March 1, 2019Author: (Kitty) Cat Strawberry - Meow! 0 Comments — Edit Title: Get Coding 2! Build five computer games using HTML & Javascript Author: David Whitney Illustrator: Duncan Beedie Publisher: Walker Books Genre: Children’s non-fiction, educational – computer coding Book format: Paperback Sweet Strawberries: Sweet StrawberrySweet StrawberrySweet StrawberrySweet StrawberrySweet Strawberry Description: Design and build five interactive computer games, create graphics and code simple artificial intelligence to play against. Covering essential coding concepts, this fun guide is an ideal introduction to Internet programing. Build the games by following simple step-by-step instructions and completing five exciting missions. Test your new skills by customizing your projects. *Free copy provided by publisher for review… Review: This is a brilliant book that’s well worth getting for any kids, or even adults, who’ve always wanted to code and create their own videogames! ‘Get Coding 2’ is the second book, with the first covering simple programing language and introducing kids into creating their own website and other things. This book focuses on making games though and it’s amazing what you learn. The book, a paperback, is smaller than A4 in size but heavy to hold due to the thick glossy pages inside. The pages are colourful and very easy to read with some text, pictures and borders on every page. After the introduction the book is split into five different sections, each with the information on how to code a different game. I love how the book is arranged with the characters and the cat, and how readers are made to feel like they are helping to win a contest by helping the characters in the book to create/code these games. It makes doing the work of coding even more fun and I like the way the code is easily explained. Get Coding 2 book page image one ©The Strawberry Post There are five different simple games to code: noughts and crosses, snake, table tennis (think Pong), an endless runner and finally a side scorlling platformer. Each game might seem difficult to make, at first, but the book breaks down the steps into easy ways. I’ve always wanted to learn how to code games since I was sixteen but have always been confused by programing language, however this book has made it so easy to understand everything. Each section of a game is explained seperately, such as constructing the player, making the game board, programing basic AI, etc. and everything is so easy to understand. Each line of coding needed to make up the whole game is explained and I can actually understand it so well that I feel confident enough to go back into the game code and be able to change something such as the background or adjust the speed, etc. as I understand the basic lines of code. Every game’s code is both explained and then written down, with the final entire code printed towards the end of each chapter. This gives kids a chance to make sure they’ve coded their game correctly and then be able to try it out for themselves! I can’t believe how simple this book makes coding seem, and for any children with even a small interest in the subject, I’d really recommend they read this as it will certainly get them coding and interested even more in the subject. The last chapter features a side-scrolling platformer, a bit like a Mario or Sonic game, but a lot of the code for that can only be found online either to download or to view when finished. I can understand the reason for this as the code is incredibly big, but I find it a shame that the book can’t explain a little more about creating more comple games yourself. However it’s still a great book to introduce kids to the world of coding games and it’s a good book for adults who are new to the topic too! Overall a brillliant book. I’d recommend both Get Coding books for everyone, but especially this one if, like me, you’re a fan of videogames and want to learn how to make them yourself! -Thanks to Walker Books for a free copy for review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Floyd

    This book is aimed at the middle school child who wants a gentle introduction to coding. It accomplishes that goal - but little else. The writing style is suitable for the child in 5th through 8th grade. It may be a bit much for younger children (unless very talented). Older teens might feel like they are being talked down to. Some adults may find the presentation helpful (this reader did) if they can overlook the obvious tone of the book aimed at younger readers. All the code needed to complete This book is aimed at the middle school child who wants a gentle introduction to coding. It accomplishes that goal - but little else. The writing style is suitable for the child in 5th through 8th grade. It may be a bit much for younger children (unless very talented). Older teens might feel like they are being talked down to. Some adults may find the presentation helpful (this reader did) if they can overlook the obvious tone of the book aimed at younger readers. All the code needed to complete the five projects discussed in the book are included in the book and online. The reader could easily just copy and paste the code if they are visual learners. As a tactile learner, this reader found it better to actually type in the code presented in the book. Basic descriptions are given for the formats of each statement, but few details are given for the meaning behind the statements. To truly understand the language, the student will need another resource or a knowledgeable instructor. I first ran into this with project 1 when trying to create a tic-tac-toe board on screen. For example, the layout is created using HTML and CSS. The need for a second style statement (see page 29) to create three rows of boxes of three boxes is still not clear to me. Also, the browser gave different output than shown in the text before adding the second style (the book has nine horizontal boxes, Chrome produced nine vertical boxes). Adding the second style statement corrected the problem - but it left me confused. The book is great for playing around with code, but not for learning to code. I would give the book 3-½ stars, but will round up given the book’s intended audience. ______________ This review is based on a free electronic copy provided by the publisher for the purpose of creating this review. The opinions expressed are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Fyo

    I received a free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review. This is a neat introduction to programming games, with five simple experiments that demonstrate important basic functions of HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript. According to the book's website, it's targeted at readers who have some experience in coding-- I would say this previous experience would have to include JS (which I've never done before though I have done HTML and CSS), I assume the first book is specifically for beginners of al I received a free ARC from NetGalley in exchange for a fair review. This is a neat introduction to programming games, with five simple experiments that demonstrate important basic functions of HTML5, CSS, and JavaScript. According to the book's website, it's targeted at readers who have some experience in coding-- I would say this previous experience would have to include JS (which I've never done before though I have done HTML and CSS), I assume the first book is specifically for beginners of all three. My main issue with this book is the font/design of the code examples themselves. There are some pieces of text where I could not quite distinguish the code from the main text, or what new code was to be inserted into the existing document. I have bad eyesight so this may be more my own issue, though if so the design needs to be more accessible. That's really the only weak point of this book. The rest is colorful and cute and the explanations are very good and I feel like I might actually be ready to tackle JS later this semester in computer science class. I definitely recommend for someone just starting out in coding and interested in game development. Another plus is the website, which has each step of the code that's shown in the book so you can compare yours to the correct code easily, or have a place to restart if something goes wrong.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    "Get Coding 2!" teaches teens and adults how to use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to code five different old-style games: tick-tack-toe, snake, table tennis, an endless runner, and a side-scrolling platform game. The author teaches coding by breaking down the steps needed to create each game. He explained what game element you want to add next to create the game, how you can code that, and how that coding element works. He then walked you through adding each chunk of code to the html file (with the "Get Coding 2!" teaches teens and adults how to use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to code five different old-style games: tick-tack-toe, snake, table tennis, an endless runner, and a side-scrolling platform game. The author teaches coding by breaking down the steps needed to create each game. He explained what game element you want to add next to create the game, how you can code that, and how that coding element works. He then walked you through adding each chunk of code to the html file (with the exact code provided) until you have a completed game. By the end of each game, you've learned some new coding skills and other ways to use previously learned skills. You learn how to create 2D graphics, use object literals and arrays, make the game tick, process keyboard input, add moving or changing game elements, and more. By the end, you should understand enough to be able to modify the code to create variations of the game. However, I don't think the explanations were thorough enough that you could then code a completely new game from a blank text file by yourself. Still, this is a fun way to start learning for a beginner! I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Parkhill

    This book takes students step-by-step through coding with HTML and JavaScript to build interactive, browser-based games : Noughts and Crosses (or tic-tac-toe), Snake, Table Tennis, Endless Runner, and Side-Scrolling Platformer game. I found the book very informative, sure to appeal to readers who are into coding. A storyline about a coding club trying to enter a gaming "Hackathon" serves as framework to the projects; readers may relate to trying to defeat rivals who are dismissive of challengers This book takes students step-by-step through coding with HTML and JavaScript to build interactive, browser-based games : Noughts and Crosses (or tic-tac-toe), Snake, Table Tennis, Endless Runner, and Side-Scrolling Platformer game. I found the book very informative, sure to appeal to readers who are into coding. A storyline about a coding club trying to enter a gaming "Hackathon" serves as framework to the projects; readers may relate to trying to defeat rivals who are dismissive of challengers. I look forward to introducing this book to my library's readership. (I received an ARC of this book through LibraryThing Early Reviewers)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Norman

    Actual rating: (A+) 4.9 *so close to getting an A++* There's almost nothing bad to write about this book other than | One misleading image b u t _ _|__ This helped me i m p r o v e | A l o t | Other wise AND THIS DESERVES AN A+ WITHOUT ANOTHER WORD OF THIS POEM. P.S. Did you know that the poem was even shaped in an A+? Actual rating: (A+) 4.9 *so close to getting an A++* There's almost nothing bad to write about this book other than | One misleading image b u t _ _|__ This helped me i m p r o v e | A l o t | Other wise AND THIS DESERVES AN A+ WITHOUT ANOTHER WORD OF THIS POEM. P.S. Did you know that the poem was even shaped in an A+?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Dressler

    This is a great book to spend reading with young kids interested in Coding. My daughter, who loves all things STEM and STEAM, sat with me intently listening to the book, while asking a TON of questions! Using a book written for younger children is a great way to introduce Java and html, without having to find a show on tv/netflix to watch. By reading, students create stronger memories of the content shared. This is definitely a book we are going to keep around!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Witch-at-Heart

    This is a great intro to beginning programming. The games are fairly simple and fun for younger children. I found this to be be a great eat to refresh some of my waning coding skills and it gave me a chance to create something I could use with the grandkids. I received this book from NetGalley for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    I requested this book because I wanted to improve my knowledge of HTML and JavaScript. i can say this book was really useful as the example and the explanations are clear and well written. It's really useful and I think it's great for both children and adult. Highly recommended! Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine. I requested this book because I wanted to improve my knowledge of HTML and JavaScript. i can say this book was really useful as the example and the explanations are clear and well written. It's really useful and I think it's great for both children and adult. Highly recommended! Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    Coding is so much fun!

  11. 5 out of 5

    PottWab Regional Library

    E

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ro Scott

    This was so fun creating these games with my grandkids. Thank you for making such an easy to understand book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Smithy

    This is supposed to be a children's book but it is really confusing. This is supposed to be a children's book but it is really confusing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Neal Makh

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sophia Murphy

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Beno Matyas

  18. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  19. 4 out of 5

    Riley

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shiki

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  22. 5 out of 5

    Eshan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Seamus Mc Michael

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

  25. 5 out of 5

    Desirae

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mrs June

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hanno Schwartz

  28. 4 out of 5

    Yulia Oksenenko

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Bridge

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    My review of this book will appear soon on the CBCA's Reading Time web site, readingtime.com.au My review of this book will appear soon on the CBCA's Reading Time web site, readingtime.com.au

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