Hot Best Seller

The Essentials of Prayer [Annotated, Updated Edition]: How Christians Ought to Pray

Availability: Ready to download

New, updated, and annotated edition. And the very God of peace sanctify you completely, that your spirit, soul, and body be preserved whole without reprehension for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23) Christians who pray well, who bring the largest things to pass, and who move God to do great things, are those who are entirely given over to God in New, updated, and annotated edition. And the very God of peace sanctify you completely, that your spirit, soul, and body be preserved whole without reprehension for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23) Christians who pray well, who bring the largest things to pass, and who move God to do great things, are those who are entirely given over to God in their praying. God wants, and must have, all that there is in us. We must be wholehearted people through whom he can work out his purposes and plans concerning us. God must have us in our entirety. No double-minded people need apply. No vacillating person can be used. No person with a divided allegiance to God, the world, and self can do the praying that is needed. Holiness is wholeness, and so God wants holy people – wholehearted and true – for his service and for the work of praying. This book challenges the reader to first make sure he is ready to pray, and it also shows from Scripture when and how we ought to pray. E. M. Bounds examines the lack of prayer and its causes, but he also includes examples of answered prayer to give hope to those who feel like their prayers aren't being answered. Some may experience guilt for their lack and inconsistency of prayer, but sincere Christians will also be stirred in their heart to pray, and to pray well. About the Author Edward McKendree Bounds was born in Shelby County, Missouri, on August 15, 1835, and died on August 24, 1913, in Washington, Georgia. He was admitted to the bar in 1854 at the age of nineteen, but left the profession five years later when he answered the call of God to the ministry. Beginning in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, he became the chaplain of the 5th Missouri Regiment of the Confederacy. Bounds married Miss Emmie Barnett of Eufaula, Alabama, in 1876. By this union, he became the father of two daughters, Celeste and Corneille, and a son, Edward, who died at the age of six. His wife Emmie died in 1886, and later Bounds married Miss Hattie Barnett, Emmie’s cousin. Together they had six children: Samuel, Charles, Osborne, Elizabeth, Mary, and Emmie. However, Charles died at the age of one, so in the end, the family consisted of seven children. After serving several important churches in St. Louis and other places to the south, Bounds became editor of the St. Louis Christian Advocate for eight years and, later, associate editor of The Nashville Christian Advocate for four years. The trial of his faith came while he was in Nashville, and he quietly retired to his home without even asking for a pension. His principal work in Washington, Georgia (his home), was rising at four o’clock in the morning and praying until seven o’clock. He filled a few engagements as an evangelist during the eighteen years of his life work in Washington, Georgia.


Compare

New, updated, and annotated edition. And the very God of peace sanctify you completely, that your spirit, soul, and body be preserved whole without reprehension for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23) Christians who pray well, who bring the largest things to pass, and who move God to do great things, are those who are entirely given over to God in New, updated, and annotated edition. And the very God of peace sanctify you completely, that your spirit, soul, and body be preserved whole without reprehension for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. (1 Thessalonians 5:23) Christians who pray well, who bring the largest things to pass, and who move God to do great things, are those who are entirely given over to God in their praying. God wants, and must have, all that there is in us. We must be wholehearted people through whom he can work out his purposes and plans concerning us. God must have us in our entirety. No double-minded people need apply. No vacillating person can be used. No person with a divided allegiance to God, the world, and self can do the praying that is needed. Holiness is wholeness, and so God wants holy people – wholehearted and true – for his service and for the work of praying. This book challenges the reader to first make sure he is ready to pray, and it also shows from Scripture when and how we ought to pray. E. M. Bounds examines the lack of prayer and its causes, but he also includes examples of answered prayer to give hope to those who feel like their prayers aren't being answered. Some may experience guilt for their lack and inconsistency of prayer, but sincere Christians will also be stirred in their heart to pray, and to pray well. About the Author Edward McKendree Bounds was born in Shelby County, Missouri, on August 15, 1835, and died on August 24, 1913, in Washington, Georgia. He was admitted to the bar in 1854 at the age of nineteen, but left the profession five years later when he answered the call of God to the ministry. Beginning in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, he became the chaplain of the 5th Missouri Regiment of the Confederacy. Bounds married Miss Emmie Barnett of Eufaula, Alabama, in 1876. By this union, he became the father of two daughters, Celeste and Corneille, and a son, Edward, who died at the age of six. His wife Emmie died in 1886, and later Bounds married Miss Hattie Barnett, Emmie’s cousin. Together they had six children: Samuel, Charles, Osborne, Elizabeth, Mary, and Emmie. However, Charles died at the age of one, so in the end, the family consisted of seven children. After serving several important churches in St. Louis and other places to the south, Bounds became editor of the St. Louis Christian Advocate for eight years and, later, associate editor of The Nashville Christian Advocate for four years. The trial of his faith came while he was in Nashville, and he quietly retired to his home without even asking for a pension. His principal work in Washington, Georgia (his home), was rising at four o’clock in the morning and praying until seven o’clock. He filled a few engagements as an evangelist during the eighteen years of his life work in Washington, Georgia.

30 review for The Essentials of Prayer [Annotated, Updated Edition]: How Christians Ought to Pray

  1. 5 out of 5

    William Schrecengost

    A good short book on the basics of prayer. You can read it for free through Aneko Press, they've been publishing a lot of these old Christian books as ebooks and audiobooks and they've been quite the blessing. A good short book on the basics of prayer. You can read it for free through Aneko Press, they've been publishing a lot of these old Christian books as ebooks and audiobooks and they've been quite the blessing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bright

    Only if the Church will return to its source of power; Prayer is the main thing not an extracurricular activity of for the mediocre Christian. Praise the Lord!! There are remnants upon the walls of the Nations who will not hold their peace until they have travailed like a woman in labor.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    This book wasn't what I expected. It would be more aptly titled "why a Christian ought to pray" instead of "how". Bounds shows how prayer is intertwined with many other aspects of life (trials, tribulation, thanksgiving, humility, works of God, missions, sanctification, etc) and how important our prayer life is in all these areas (how they build each other up). However, there is very little practical application or advise. It is still a decent read; interesting and still quite relevant for today This book wasn't what I expected. It would be more aptly titled "why a Christian ought to pray" instead of "how". Bounds shows how prayer is intertwined with many other aspects of life (trials, tribulation, thanksgiving, humility, works of God, missions, sanctification, etc) and how important our prayer life is in all these areas (how they build each other up). However, there is very little practical application or advise. It is still a decent read; interesting and still quite relevant for today, even if I don't agree with 100% of his theology.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    This was the first time I've read E.M. Bounds. That might disappoint some of my friends since no less than a lot of them recommended Bound's work on prayer. With all the hype, I was expecting somewhat of a letdown. I was pleasantly proven wrong. This pairs well with Rushdoony and Andrew Sandlin on prayer. This was the first time I've read E.M. Bounds. That might disappoint some of my friends since no less than a lot of them recommended Bound's work on prayer. With all the hype, I was expecting somewhat of a letdown. I was pleasantly proven wrong. This pairs well with Rushdoony and Andrew Sandlin on prayer.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emma Read

    Relevant today as it was when it was written It's hard to believe this was written in the 19th Century. The subjects are so relevant today and so relatable. A must for every Christian who wants to pray more and who doubts that the power of prayer is only for gifted people. A very encouraging read. Relevant today as it was when it was written It's hard to believe this was written in the 19th Century. The subjects are so relevant today and so relatable. A must for every Christian who wants to pray more and who doubts that the power of prayer is only for gifted people. A very encouraging read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany

    While the older language style may be less appealing to some, the content is good and remains true.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Racheal L.

    Life changing book for me

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terry W. West

    One of the best writers on prayer I have read thus far.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andy Bintoro

    the book interconnected life in prayer with fruit of spirit. how should a character of man with prayer's life. not that practical, but make us evaluate our life. the book interconnected life in prayer with fruit of spirit. how should a character of man with prayer's life. not that practical, but make us evaluate our life.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Kelley

    In another of his classic books, Bounds once again shows his expertise on the subject of prayer. Despite having lived in the late 1800s, I find that most of his talk on the state of affairs relating to culture is still relevant today. He uses a direct, no-nonsense approach in condemning certain behaviors of Christians that still apply to Christians today, and yet his compassion for his brethren is so apparent in his heartfelt pleas for holiness. With honesty and insight that we should bring into In another of his classic books, Bounds once again shows his expertise on the subject of prayer. Despite having lived in the late 1800s, I find that most of his talk on the state of affairs relating to culture is still relevant today. He uses a direct, no-nonsense approach in condemning certain behaviors of Christians that still apply to Christians today, and yet his compassion for his brethren is so apparent in his heartfelt pleas for holiness. With honesty and insight that we should bring into today's culture, Bounds talks about the essential elements of prayer. The author covers subjects like the attitude of humility and the need of the whole man being in prayer to the key components that make up the type of prayer that pleases God, With two chapters covering what troubles mean to the prayer life and how they should draw us to the closet of prayer to ask of God, this book covers an array of essentials that every Christian should have in mind when he or she goes in to pray. This book is written with a slightly more verbose vocabulary, having been composed in the late 1800s to the early 1900s, but this is a great book for those who want to know what the key parts of prayer are. Bounds makes it clear that there is no formula for the perfect prayer, but that adding in the components that he mentions will make it a fuller, richer time with God. I would recommend this to Christians who want to know more about what is essential to prayer.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharntrel S. McKever

  12. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

  13. 4 out of 5

    Geauxtarabelle

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kay

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lacy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nate Brotzman

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scott Petty

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah A.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Luke

  20. 5 out of 5

    Winnice Walker

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maura Neill

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sabrina Cousins

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Stevens

  24. 5 out of 5

    Inioluwa

  25. 4 out of 5

    Todd Nicholson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lyn

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Akers

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Le

  29. 5 out of 5

    Johnny G

  30. 4 out of 5

    Hugo

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...