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The CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games

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Spread over more than 500 pages, CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games reviews over 400 seminal games from 1975 to 2015, covering the role-playing classics we all know and love such as Ultima, Wizardry, Fallout and Mass Effect – all brought to life with vibrant and engaging in-game images. Each entry also shares articles on the genre, mod suggestions and hints Spread over more than 500 pages, CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games reviews over 400 seminal games from 1975 to 2015, covering the role-playing classics we all know and love such as Ultima, Wizardry, Fallout and Mass Effect – all brought to life with vibrant and engaging in-game images. Each entry also shares articles on the genre, mod suggestions and hints on how to run the games on modern hardware. The book is completely by written by fans, AAA developers, indies, journalists, modders and industry personalities such as Chris Avellone, Ian Frazier, Scorpia, Ferhegón, Richard Cobbett, Brian ‘Psychochild’ Green, Durante, George Weidman and Tim Cain, to name but a few. In line with the project's non-profit nature, all of the author's profit will be donated to the Vocação charity in Brazil. Vocação helps kids and teenagers from poor areas to get education and employment, who then go on to help others around them to do the same, changing the community for the better.


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Spread over more than 500 pages, CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games reviews over 400 seminal games from 1975 to 2015, covering the role-playing classics we all know and love such as Ultima, Wizardry, Fallout and Mass Effect – all brought to life with vibrant and engaging in-game images. Each entry also shares articles on the genre, mod suggestions and hints Spread over more than 500 pages, CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games reviews over 400 seminal games from 1975 to 2015, covering the role-playing classics we all know and love such as Ultima, Wizardry, Fallout and Mass Effect – all brought to life with vibrant and engaging in-game images. Each entry also shares articles on the genre, mod suggestions and hints on how to run the games on modern hardware. The book is completely by written by fans, AAA developers, indies, journalists, modders and industry personalities such as Chris Avellone, Ian Frazier, Scorpia, Ferhegón, Richard Cobbett, Brian ‘Psychochild’ Green, Durante, George Weidman and Tim Cain, to name but a few. In line with the project's non-profit nature, all of the author's profit will be donated to the Vocação charity in Brazil. Vocação helps kids and teenagers from poor areas to get education and employment, who then go on to help others around them to do the same, changing the community for the better.

30 review for The CRPG Book: A Guide to Computer Role-Playing Games

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kalin

    Indispensable. Let my notes convince you. I've boldfaced (and will keep boldfacing) the games and mods I recommend strongly. ~ Does this sound familiar to anyone? Countless companies also followed Activision, becoming third-party developers and publishing their own games. Most were of terrible quality or cheap copies of popular titles. Atari themselves also had poor standards, with failures like its crude port of Pac-Man and the infamous E.T. game. Still, profit was at a record high and companies & Indispensable. Let my notes convince you. I've boldfaced (and will keep boldfacing) the games and mods I recommend strongly. ~ Does this sound familiar to anyone? Countless companies also followed Activision, becoming third-party developers and publishing their own games. Most were of terrible quality or cheap copies of popular titles. Atari themselves also had poor standards, with failures like its crude port of Pac-Man and the infamous E.T. game. Still, profit was at a record high and companies & retailers kept betting on ever-increasing sales for the holidays of 1982. However, customers got so burnt out that they stopped buying. Left with massive dead stocks and no way to recover their investments, the US market crashed in 1983. What was a 3 billion dollar business in 1982 barely made 100 million in 1985. Video games went from prized products directly to bargain bins, and the US console industry was for all purposes dead. Very much the same thing happened to Bulgarian gamebooks in 1998. Oversaturating the market with new titles of questionable quality (at the average rate of one per week) coincided with the general financial crisis of 1997, print runs dropped tenfold, and the gamebook genre virtually vanished for more than ten years. Of course, the arrival of CRPG to Bulgaria also contributed. ~ Stuart Smith's The Return of Heracles sounds like an impressive specimen from the early era of CRPG: There is a relatively shocking degree of non-linearity in the game, as you can choose everything from which Greek hero to play (Perseus, Hippolyta, Jason, Acchiles, Odysseus, etc), how many characters you’ll control (anywhere from one to all 19 of them) and whether you’ll spend your time trying to avoid combat or killing every character you meet. Some combat is unavoidable, as the purpose of the game – completing the Twelve Labors of Heracles – does necessitate fights such as the traditional slaying of the Hydra and the Nemean Lion. But you are free to try to duck and weave your way around the vast majority of characters, and there are even wholly optional areas in the game. The learning aspect should definitely be emphasized; charming vignettes explain various myths and historical information, and characters come to life even with the hardware limitations of the time. ~ As I browsed playthroughs of games mentioned in the book, I came across The CRPG Addict, Chester Bolingbroke's blog. Now I wonder if there's much point in continuing with the book. (Well, there certainly is for the titles that were released in the 90s and later. At least until Bolingbroke catches up with them.) ~ Escape from Hell sounds like a game that would have gone a long way--and long before Dante's Inferno or Devil May Cry (the originals). Incidentally, while looking for representations of Hell in games, I stumbled on Fear Effect , which looks surprisingly mature ... and I don't mean the nudity. ;) I was impressed by both the writing and the variety of game mechanics. ~ It's a day off today, so I'm reading through Chester Bolingbroke's entries on Fate: Gates of Dawn. Yes, all of them. ~ Based on the following paragraph (but more on an excited comment I read on Bolingbroke's blog), I should find a playthrough of The Summoning: But where The Summoning shines is in its story. On your way through the dungeon, you’ll meet many characters and learn a lot about both your enemies and your benefactors, as well as the world in general. The game features not one, but two shocking twists –that is, in the best-case scenario. (In a large anthology like this one, few writers are stellar enough to capture the brilliance of a game in a handful of sentences. But it's a great starting point for sure.) Addendum: I tried The Summoning but didn't like the writing. ~ Check Ultima VII, Betrayal at Krondor and Superhero League of Hoboken's writing. Addendum: Of all three, only Superhero League of Hoboken appealed to me, with its wacky superheroes and wackier quests. A nice deconstruction of the genre. ~ The entry on Fallout 2 reminded me that I've never given the game a proper chance. So I went to Youtube and found ... this. Grunk! (But seriously: would anyone write this sort of brilliant imbecility ever again?) ~ Is uncontrollable babbling a viable combat option? Can a planetary object be a viable party member? Is male exotic dancing a reliable way to earn money in RPGs? How come one of the best Japanese RPGs was developed in the west? Play Anachronox and all of the above will be answered. Well ... let's check it out. ;) ... Oh yes. The camerawork is amazing, and the slang is worthy of note-taking. Now let's get back to drubbing those squabs and deadbeats. :D ... OMG. One of your party members can literally be an entire planet .... ~ Try the following Neverwinter Nights mods: Daniel Muth's Aribeth's Redemption, for the romance, and Baldecaran's Cave of Songs, Honor among Thieves and The Prophet Trilogy, for the writing. Also: - Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines, with a generic character vs. a Malkavian, for the craziness; - The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky + Second Chapter, for the NPCs' conversations and arcs. - Knights of the Old Republic 2, for Kreia: Indisputably, KotoR 2’s greatest achievement is the character of Kreia and her unique perspective on the Star Wars universe. A former Jedi, now acting as the protagonist’s mentor, she shares very original and interesting opinions on nature of the Force, alongside with a questionable, but well intentioned morality. For her, not only the concept of “the will of the Force” negates any notion of personal choice, but “the balance of the Force” makes the everlasting Light Side versus Dark Side conflict completely meaningless and unwinnable. Even the greatest good, achieved by greatest sacrifices will go to waste because eventually a greater evil will have to emerge so the balance may be preserved. Any goodness done would go away, but it’s side effects, deaths and suffering will stay, so the final score would always be negative. Therefore, the Force influence on all living things is negative, and the “good versus evil” battle brings only destruction on an immense scale. Kreia expresses a mix of Nietzschean/Spencerian morality, has strong opinions on everything and loves manipulating people to do her biding. Addendum: I couldn't find a playthrough of NWN: Aribeth's Redemption, and I wasn't impressed by Cave of Songs (the minuscule font of the conversations was a serious aggravation, quickly sapping my desire to explore further). KOTOR 2 was also underwhelming, especially since it was written by Chris Avellone. (The more time passes, the less I believe Avellone can repeat the pinnacle of Planescape: Torment. Such things are perhaps meant as a one-time gift, like "A Rose for Ecclesiastes" and Roger Zelazny. Yet hope springs eternal ....) The two parts of The Legend of Heroes: Trails in the Sky do have their funny, heartwarming or cathartic moments. Overall, however, there's too much story for those moments to really shine. Vampire: The Masquerade - Bloodlines is indeed superbly written, not just for the alliterative madness of Malkavians but for rather unexpected examples of conflict transformation such as this one. ~ Danny Ledonne's Super Columbine Massacre RPG! is a really daring experiment, which raises a lot of pertinent questions. I don't like the writing enough to call it a successful experiment, but I applaud the effort. (The encounters with the various characters in hell were pretty funny too. ;) ~ The following paragraph persuaded me to try Way of the Samurai 4, even more than the widely branching narrative and the multiple unlockable events: What can also be a bit too much is the tone of the game. Previous games in the series always had some humor and over the top characters, but here it often approaches extreme levels of wackiness, with a Lolita-like ambassador, a knight named Megamelons, a trio of sadistic sisters who love torture and a silly “night encounter” mini-game where you must sneak into your lover’s bed at night. Whaddaya mean, "a bit too much"? This is the Japanese! :D Addendum: Actually, it isn't the over-the-top humor but the humanism and desire for mutual understanding that makes the game such a rare delight. At least in what is known as the true ending. ~ Oh the Japanese: Neptunia is set in the world of Gamindustri, where four nations--Lowee, Lastation, Leanbox and Planeptune--are locked in an eternal conflict called the Console War. The first three nations clearly represent the Wii, Playstation and Xbox consoles, while the last one is a reference to the SEGA Neptune, a canceled console from the 90s. There's also an anime adaptation. Hmmm. Addendum: The game does have its meta giggles, such as this gig about being *censored* and fan service. But they don't seem to be frequent enough to justify reading through the whole thing.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    This massive book is a labor of love for the fans of computer RPGs (Role Playing Games) with listings, history, backstories, and reviews of almost every single RPG out there, from the glorified DOS days of the late 70s, the pixelated innocence of the 90s, to the massive blockbusters of today. There is a whole cast of writers for this, so you do get a wide variety of writing styles, and as such the quality varies (according to reader preferences, I have no doubt). I really enjoyed travelling thro This massive book is a labor of love for the fans of computer RPGs (Role Playing Games) with listings, history, backstories, and reviews of almost every single RPG out there, from the glorified DOS days of the late 70s, the pixelated innocence of the 90s, to the massive blockbusters of today. There is a whole cast of writers for this, so you do get a wide variety of writing styles, and as such the quality varies (according to reader preferences, I have no doubt). I really enjoyed travelling through the history, seeing which games succeeded, which failed, which spawned massive legacies and which faded away, and which changed the entire fabric of the genre (love ya, Bioware!). But mostly I just appreciated immersing myself in a universe of my favorite games with other fans who love them too. I didn't read every one of the 526 pages in this book, disclaimer. I read every entry for games I've played (way more than I realized) and all the ones I knew of or wanted to play or even just tickled a memory. So yeah, hundreds and hundreds of games. Dang, I may have an RPG problem! It's available for free HERE, as of February 2018.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Oliver

    The CRPG book is a tome that collects hundreds of RPGs from 1975 to 2015 and effectively forms the history of that entire genre. I can say that I was thrilled to go through it because the presentation was brilliant and it was quite interesting to see where the genre came from. Once the book got closer to the late 90s my curiosity got a boost by large bouts of nostalgia because nearly every game I had enjoyed as a kid was represented there. I definitely loved the game selection and the amount of The CRPG book is a tome that collects hundreds of RPGs from 1975 to 2015 and effectively forms the history of that entire genre. I can say that I was thrilled to go through it because the presentation was brilliant and it was quite interesting to see where the genre came from. Once the book got closer to the late 90s my curiosity got a boost by large bouts of nostalgia because nearly every game I had enjoyed as a kid was represented there. I definitely loved the game selection and the amount of them was staggering. Every game had a page or two dedicated to it and it was filled with high-quality screenshots, basic information, and a pretty sizeable piece of writing that usually commented on the significance of the game. One of my favourite things I saw there was that they always brought out the best mods for older games and I thought it was a wonderful initiative that helped the modding community. While I was pretty positive on the entire bind-up in general there is one single thing I would like to comment on. Technically the pieces that were written under every game classify as reviews. My problem with that was that the author did not keep to a single reviewer and it was really apparent that some of these people approached games very differently. This created a bit of an uneven experience for the reader and I believe I would have enjoyed the book slightly more if the texts had been written in a more see-through way (You could really tell when one of the reviewers had been annoyed with a game) Nevertheless, this was a minor annoyance compared to the overall journey and I can definitely recommend this to any video game enthusiast.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    I wrote a review of this and Goodreads ate it, so I'm grumpy now and will probably keep this short. I didn't read every page of this book, but I'm going to review it anyway because it's not really that kind of book. It's more of a coffee table book that you flip through during a commercial break or when bored. This is an overview of the entire history of computer role playing games that goes through a truly astonishing number of games from Beneath Apple Manor to Pillars of Eternity. It's written I wrote a review of this and Goodreads ate it, so I'm grumpy now and will probably keep this short. I didn't read every page of this book, but I'm going to review it anyway because it's not really that kind of book. It's more of a coffee table book that you flip through during a commercial break or when bored. This is an overview of the entire history of computer role playing games that goes through a truly astonishing number of games from Beneath Apple Manor to Pillars of Eternity. It's written by fans and insiders of RPGS, including people such as Chris Avellone and Tim Cain. Unfortunately it doesn't have an index for authors so if you want to find one particular writer's articles you have to flip through the book page by page. The articles cover the game's place in history, its strengths and weaknesses, and whether it's worth seeking out now. It also includes write-ups of notable DLC's and expansions, and a feature of some of the more notable mods. Overall, it's a delightful and nostalgic look back at a genre of video games that have been important to me for the vast majority of my life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    vonblubba

    A book written by CRPG fans, for CRPG fans. It's probably not the most comprehensive text on the subject ("Dungeons & desktops" comes to mind), but it's definitly the most captivating read. A nostalgic travel back in time to the afternoons spent behind a C64 playing Ultima V. I couldn't ask for more. A book written by CRPG fans, for CRPG fans. It's probably not the most comprehensive text on the subject ("Dungeons & desktops" comes to mind), but it's definitly the most captivating read. A nostalgic travel back in time to the afternoons spent behind a C64 playing Ultima V. I couldn't ask for more.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    If you have any interest in the history of computer RPGs, I straight-out cannot think of a better book on the subject. Going from the very beginnings of the genre (the mid-'70s, and the PLATO--a computer I'd never even heard of, prior to reading this), and going all the way to about 2015, this is a comprehensive, almost exhaustive look at how RPGs have evolved, featuring the notable hits, the hidden gems, the flat-out weird titles, and the flops. My Steam wishlist has grown considerably, with ti If you have any interest in the history of computer RPGs, I straight-out cannot think of a better book on the subject. Going from the very beginnings of the genre (the mid-'70s, and the PLATO--a computer I'd never even heard of, prior to reading this), and going all the way to about 2015, this is a comprehensive, almost exhaustive look at how RPGs have evolved, featuring the notable hits, the hidden gems, the flat-out weird titles, and the flops. My Steam wishlist has grown considerably, with titles I may have missed out on forever, if I hadn't given The CRPG Book a read. Pretty much every page was a joy--from revisiting games I haven't played in probably 30 years, to discovering titles I'd never heard of before. And each entry is accompanied by a nice variety of screenshots, making for a very attractive book. Really, the only thing that marred the experience at all were typos that cropped up every now and then. But those are a minuscule price to pay for the wealth of history on display here. The CRPG Book is great. I don't know what else to say.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chrysostomos Tsaprailis

    A noble compendium of the Genre, a truly passionate work of love from players and dedicated fans to their own ilk (though the book is of definitive value to an audience interested in the history of CRPGs). Separated in half-decade chapters, it covers computer role-playing games from their nebulous late-60s/early 70s pre-history to the mid-'10s. Each chapter contains a context establishing introduction before presenting a plethora of games from each particular era. 1 to 2 pages are devoted to eac A noble compendium of the Genre, a truly passionate work of love from players and dedicated fans to their own ilk (though the book is of definitive value to an audience interested in the history of CRPGs). Separated in half-decade chapters, it covers computer role-playing games from their nebulous late-60s/early 70s pre-history to the mid-'10s. Each chapter contains a context establishing introduction before presenting a plethora of games from each particular era. 1 to 2 pages are devoted to each title, each text being a presentation of the game interspersed with trivia. Most of the texts feel alive, dripping with passion and longing (even unfulfilled, in the case of games that did not lived up to expectations). Plus, an appendix full of lists. Plus, it is freely distributed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephan

    Excellent collection of the history of PC CRPG's, written from a mostly critical standpoint. Minor complaint is that I did encounter a fair number of grammar and sentence structure errors. But that doesn't take away that this is one of a kind in covering the history from the early videogame crpg's all the way to the modern ones, including recommendations on how to get said games working, recommended mods, and sometimes added developer commentary. Excellent collection of the history of PC CRPG's, written from a mostly critical standpoint. Minor complaint is that I did encounter a fair number of grammar and sentence structure errors. But that doesn't take away that this is one of a kind in covering the history from the early videogame crpg's all the way to the modern ones, including recommendations on how to get said games working, recommended mods, and sometimes added developer commentary.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve Agland

    I've learnt something new about myself. I'm the sort of person who will read a 500 page book reviewing every major computer role-playing game in (english-speaking) history (and many minor ones), cover to cover. This is available for free online and I started reading out of curiosity, and found it a refreshing alternative to the usual Twitter doomscrollling that I default to when idling on my phone. I've only ever played a handful of these games (and the more accessible ones at that), and will li I've learnt something new about myself. I'm the sort of person who will read a 500 page book reviewing every major computer role-playing game in (english-speaking) history (and many minor ones), cover to cover. This is available for free online and I started reading out of curiosity, and found it a refreshing alternative to the usual Twitter doomscrollling that I default to when idling on my phone. I've only ever played a handful of these games (and the more accessible ones at that), and will likely only play a few more, but there's something fascinating about a niche creative industry striving and iterating in search of the most immersive fantasy adventure experience. Trying to find the best way to tell an epic story with the reader as the protagonist. A lot changed between 1980 and 2016 in both the tech and business. Well, that's an understatement. So there's a gradual but fascinatingly substantial evolution in RPGs over that time. That said, they can get a little same-y from time to time and I allowed myself to skip the occasional review that didn't seem to have an interesting hook. Anyway, the best thing about this book is that it exists. Historical surveys like this take games that seemed weird or banal at the time of release and put them in the perspective of an global artform in rapid, passionate and unpredictable development. Now I need to peruse the generous Further Reading section at the end and select my next social media diversion.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Lambert-Maberly

    It's rare that a book can be so exactly what I wanted. It's huge (500+ pages), and each page is large, so the authors can fit several pictures, and even better, quite a bit of text on each page. It's exactly the right ratio of text and image. What it is, essentially, is a set of reviews of these games from earliest beginnings to shortly before present day (2015ish it stops). What's particularly impressive is that it was written by committee but has a consistent tone throughout. The reviews are c It's rare that a book can be so exactly what I wanted. It's huge (500+ pages), and each page is large, so the authors can fit several pictures, and even better, quite a bit of text on each page. It's exactly the right ratio of text and image. What it is, essentially, is a set of reviews of these games from earliest beginnings to shortly before present day (2015ish it stops). What's particularly impressive is that it was written by committee but has a consistent tone throughout. The reviews are clear—they make it evident what was good, bad, or indifferent about all aspects of every game discussed. If there are modifications available that improve gameplay, they discuss them. It's engaging, dense, well-researched (I can't imagine playing that many games, all the way through, so as to capture the right screen shots and review them), even with a handful of colleagues (talk about forming a party to make light work of quests!) My only quibble is an overuse of terms (e.g. JPRG, eroge, blobber) that a casual reader might not understand. Turns out there's a glossary at the back, but it doesn't cover all terms, and I didn't know about it until it was too late. (Note: 5 stars = amazing, wonderful, 4 = very good book, 3 = decent read, 2 = disappointing, 1 = awful, just awful. I'm fairly good at picking for myself so end up with a lot of 4s).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nikolis Asimakis

    A phenomenal book, a collective project of passion that talks about the history of gaming, focused in one specific genre, CRPGs. Throughout the pages you'll read about many known RPGs and how they shaped the genre to even more not-well known ones that range from good titles, to mere curiosities that a fan of the genre might want to check out. It even goes so far as to have a specific section for notable JRPGs, Fan-translations and even cancelled projects, as well as an extensive "further reading A phenomenal book, a collective project of passion that talks about the history of gaming, focused in one specific genre, CRPGs. Throughout the pages you'll read about many known RPGs and how they shaped the genre to even more not-well known ones that range from good titles, to mere curiosities that a fan of the genre might want to check out. It even goes so far as to have a specific section for notable JRPGs, Fan-translations and even cancelled projects, as well as an extensive "further reading" list. All in all, this is a phenomenal book (in lack of an alternate description of that magnitude) that you could either read digitally for free or opt to buy the really good quality hardback available, the earnings of which go to charity.

  12. 4 out of 5

    André Bernhardt

    If you need some more coffee table books regarding the games industry this is your weapon of choice (but this can also be said about the biggest part of the Bitmap Books portfolio - eternal love). Actually you can read everything for free as well as the PDF is public but it feels like a nice trip on memory lane to stumble through this nicely printed and coloured collection of CRPGs. Double page for bigger titles - one page for smaller ones. Maybe the reviews are a bit flawed as different writer m If you need some more coffee table books regarding the games industry this is your weapon of choice (but this can also be said about the biggest part of the Bitmap Books portfolio - eternal love). Actually you can read everything for free as well as the PDF is public but it feels like a nice trip on memory lane to stumble through this nicely printed and coloured collection of CRPGs. Double page for bigger titles - one page for smaller ones. Maybe the reviews are a bit flawed as different writer mostly wrote about their favourites but still it is nice to get some inspiration or meet old friends (like Pool of Radiance - SSI Gold Box Games - also eternal love).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Wouter

    The single best book on computer role playing games I have ever seen. And one of the most comprehensive, too. It's beautiful, heavy, full of nostalgia and angry rpgcodex reviewers (gotta love those guys). I don't know what else to write, except that maybe it is not for everyone. I for one am first and foremost a CRPG player, even if I managed to stray off the path with a Nintendo Switch and too little time to revisit all classics. I'm not sure whether it's an enjoyable compendium to youngsters The single best book on computer role playing games I have ever seen. And one of the most comprehensive, too. It's beautiful, heavy, full of nostalgia and angry rpgcodex reviewers (gotta love those guys). I don't know what else to write, except that maybe it is not for everyone. I for one am first and foremost a CRPG player, even if I managed to stray off the path with a Nintendo Switch and too little time to revisit all classics. I'm not sure whether it's an enjoyable compendium to youngsters (OK Boomer...)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heider Carlos

    Okay, when I say I've read it I'm kinda cheating, cause I've skipped around 30% of the reviews. It's just that there are many rebiews about games that I know too well... It's amazing what a community can do. There's a lot of typos, and even some wrong information. But it's a massive, impressive book, totally free and full of tips about the best mods or how to run the games. I'd recommend to anyone interested not only in RPGs but games as a media. Okay, when I say I've read it I'm kinda cheating, cause I've skipped around 30% of the reviews. It's just that there are many rebiews about games that I know too well... It's amazing what a community can do. There's a lot of typos, and even some wrong information. But it's a massive, impressive book, totally free and full of tips about the best mods or how to run the games. I'd recommend to anyone interested not only in RPGs but games as a media.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Geweke

    This is a work of love. Love for computer RPGs. Made by over 100 volunteers and published for free. And all presented in textbook quality layout. After a short introduction it has over 400 reviews of games. There were some surprising views in the reviews I read, but highly enjoyable. And some games I did not expect. I will 100% check again if I need some refresher about a game in this Gamers Bible.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mirael

    It's marvellous, it's free and it is absolutely overwhelming. The only thing I would hold against the authors is that it's clear that they grew up mostly in the 80's and 90's, so there is not much love for newer titles and almost fanatical adoration of "rougelike" games, but it was still extremely informative and inclusive. It's marvellous, it's free and it is absolutely overwhelming. The only thing I would hold against the authors is that it's clear that they grew up mostly in the 80's and 90's, so there is not much love for newer titles and almost fanatical adoration of "rougelike" games, but it was still extremely informative and inclusive.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Travis Webber

    The individual articles are only adequately written, and there are typos galore. But the overall effect and usefulness of this collection were far satisfying than its parts. Hats off to Mr. Pepe for coordinating this effort. (One note: if you don't already play CRPGs, I can't imagine there would be anything here of interest to you.) The individual articles are only adequately written, and there are typos galore. But the overall effect and usefulness of this collection were far satisfying than its parts. Hats off to Mr. Pepe for coordinating this effort. (One note: if you don't already play CRPGs, I can't imagine there would be anything here of interest to you.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Amazingly comprehensive collection of reviews of CRPGs up to 2015. Includes some great editorial content too. It is presented in a very attractive huge hardback binding with a silk style bookmark - a true 'tome of the ages' for forgotten CRPG gems. Definitely worth the (quite cheap) price of getting a physical copy in my opinion. Amazingly comprehensive collection of reviews of CRPGs up to 2015. Includes some great editorial content too. It is presented in a very attractive huge hardback binding with a silk style bookmark - a true 'tome of the ages' for forgotten CRPG gems. Definitely worth the (quite cheap) price of getting a physical copy in my opinion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Arjen

    This is not a perfect book; it contains too much errors for that. It also has a tendency to focus on the gameplay aspects, rather than explaining what the game is about. Regardless, it's a good read to become (more than) familiar with CRPGs. This is not a perfect book; it contains too much errors for that. It also has a tendency to focus on the gameplay aspects, rather than explaining what the game is about. Regardless, it's a good read to become (more than) familiar with CRPGs.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tamás

    I'd give it 3 & a half stars , but rounded it up in appreciation of the effort. I'd give it 3 & a half stars , but rounded it up in appreciation of the effort.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    Just delightful!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lady Makaveli

    Every gamer into rpgs needs this book, in my opinion. Amazingly researched and awe inspiring... 10 stars!!!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Javier Viruete

    An essential book if you are a CRPG fan.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Philip Gipson

    Could have left off earlier, maybe ending with the '00s? Overall though, it really fired up my love of CRPGs and gave me several new titles to put on the backlog. Could have left off earlier, maybe ending with the '00s? Overall though, it really fired up my love of CRPGs and gave me several new titles to put on the backlog.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe Colistro

    Loved it. Great reference and full of nostalgia. They also do a great job with interesting and useful sidebars on how to play classic games on modern machines, which mods are worth using, etc.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Raymond

    I absolutely loved this. Even as an avid gamer, I'd say at least 50% of the games here were new to me. I absolutely loved this. Even as an avid gamer, I'd say at least 50% of the games here were new to me.

  27. 5 out of 5

    myriac

    this book is a precious gem.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Diego

    This book is the reason Goodreads should have a six star rating system. It a fucking masterpiece!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eric Nagurney

    Writing's more inconsistent than either the JRPG or Adventure game books. Still very good! Writing's more inconsistent than either the JRPG or Adventure game books. Still very good!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tommie Haag

    A fantastic trip down memory lane, in a book which breathes quality from start to end. I loved it. Every page of it.

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