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The Greyhound of the Baskervilles: A New Take on A Classic Mystery

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This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’s different? Well, it’s a little shorter, a little leaner, a little less verbose in some sections. But the chief difference is that it’s now narrated by This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’s different? Well, it’s a little shorter, a little leaner, a little less verbose in some sections. But the chief difference is that it’s now narrated by a dog. A greyhound, in fact, named Septimus. In this new edition, he tells his story of how he became “The Greyhound of the Baskervilles.”


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This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’s different? Well, it’s a little shorter, a little leaner, a little less verbose in some sections. But the chief difference is that it’s now narrated by This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’s different? Well, it’s a little shorter, a little leaner, a little less verbose in some sections. But the chief difference is that it’s now narrated by a dog. A greyhound, in fact, named Septimus. In this new edition, he tells his story of how he became “The Greyhound of the Baskervilles.”

30 review for The Greyhound of the Baskervilles: A New Take on A Classic Mystery

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    A fun take on the Sherlock Holmes classic tale "The Hound of the Baskervilles". The premise is the same as the original except that it is now narrated by Holmes' rescue greyhound Septimus. Septimus is much like any domesticated animal in that he has a preoccupation with sleeping and food, but he also displays a fine mind like his master. Heroic when it counts, I really enjoyed Septimus' take on what is my favourite Sherlock Holmes tale. I received a free ecopy of this novella from the author via A fun take on the Sherlock Holmes classic tale "The Hound of the Baskervilles". The premise is the same as the original except that it is now narrated by Holmes' rescue greyhound Septimus. Septimus is much like any domesticated animal in that he has a preoccupation with sleeping and food, but he also displays a fine mind like his master. Heroic when it counts, I really enjoyed Septimus' take on what is my favourite Sherlock Holmes tale. I received a free ecopy of this novella from the author via a Prolific Works giveaway. I have voluntarily chosen to review the book and the gifting in no way influences my review/rating, which reflects my honest opinion.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lis Carey

    This is Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles," only slightly altered. This time it's narrated by a previously unmentioned character, Septimus, Holmes' rescue greyhound. It's Septimus who tells us the story this time, and being a dog, he often has useful bits of information that he can't easily share with the humans. Being a greyhound, this is sometimes fine details seen at a distance, such as the little hooks holding on the fake beard of the man in the cab who had been following S This is Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Hound of the Baskervilles," only slightly altered. This time it's narrated by a previously unmentioned character, Septimus, Holmes' rescue greyhound. It's Septimus who tells us the story this time, and being a dog, he often has useful bits of information that he can't easily share with the humans. Being a greyhound, this is sometimes fine details seen at a distance, such as the little hooks holding on the fake beard of the man in the cab who had been following Sir Henry Baskerville. Septimus accompanies Watson, when they travel to Baskerville Hall with Dr. Mortimer and Sir Henry, and they quite competently do their job of keeping Sir Henry safe while getting acquainted with the neighborhood. The story doesn't change except in details, and in Septimus' heroic role in the climax of the story. But I have to say that I really like Septimus, who is very much a real dog, with the alertness, observation skills, and attitude you'd expect of a good greyhound. I can't claim this is an essential read for a Holmes fan, but I enjoyed it. If I do have one complaint, it's the same one I have about Doyle's original. The thing I object to is unchanged from the original--the fact that Mortimer's expert knowledge of and enthusiasm for bone and facial structure, amply demonstrated on his first visit to Holmes at Baker Street, means that he could not possibly have overlooked the vital clue that Holmes found when he finally visited Baskerville Hall. And if he noticed, why didn't he tell Holmes? It suggests the possibility that he played some role i the plot, or the villain had something on him that kept him quiet. It's very odd, and frankly bizarre that Holmes seemingly never picked up on that inconsistency. Part of me demands an explanation, but I still love this story. And, of course, Septimus. I love Septimus. Recommended. I bought this novella.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ellen

    Clever take on a great classic. Loved the story from the greyhounds perspective.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emmalynn

    Pretty imaginative writing it from the greyhound’s perspective :) A retelling of the classic with a little fun bits thrown in.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tony Parsons

    London, England. 221 Baker St. Mr. William “Sherlock” Scott Holmes (Scotland Yard consulting detective) & Dr. John Hamish Watson (husband, Sherlock's BMF, MD, author/writer) were discussing 1884, Dr. James Mortimer (elderly medical, MRCS, Charing Cross Hospital CCH) engraved walking cane. Dr. James Mortimer showed Mr. William “Sherlock” Scott Holmes & Dr. John Hamish Watson a 1742, Devon County Chronicle manuscript, Devonshire, county, West Country England UK about the death of Sir Charles Baske London, England. 221 Baker St. Mr. William “Sherlock” Scott Holmes (Scotland Yard consulting detective) & Dr. John Hamish Watson (husband, Sherlock's BMF, MD, author/writer) were discussing 1884, Dr. James Mortimer (elderly medical, MRCS, Charing Cross Hospital CCH) engraved walking cane. Dr. James Mortimer showed Mr. William “Sherlock” Scott Holmes & Dr. John Hamish Watson a 1742, Devon County Chronicle manuscript, Devonshire, county, West Country England UK about the death of Sir Charles Baskerville (Baskerville Hall). Hugo Baskerville was madly in love with a maiden who he/13 cronies later carried her off. She had managed to escape & chase on horseback continued across the moors. Hugo encountered the Hounds of the Baskerville. Sir Henry Baskerville (nephew) met with Mr. Holmes & Dr. Watson. I do not receive any type of compensation for reading & reviewing free books from publishers & authors. Therefore, I am under no obligation to write a positive review, only an honest one. An awesome book cover, great font & writing style. A very professionally written “Sherlock” Holmes classic mystery book. It was quite easy for me to read/follow from start/finish & never a dull moment. There were no grammar/typo errors, nor any repetitive or out of line sequence sentences. Lots of exciting scenarios, with several twists/turns & a huge description list of unique characters, settings, facts etc. to keep track of. This could also make another great “Sherlock” Holmes classic mystery movie, or better yet a mini-TV series. To be continued. There is no doubt in my mind this is an extremely easy rating of 5 stars. Thank you for the free author; Albert's Bridge Books; BookFunnel; PDF book Tony Parsons MSW (Washburn)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul Smith

    I was intrigued by the premise, but sadly I didn't find it really lived up to it's promise. Several times when reading this, I just plain forgot that the narrator was supposed to be the newly invented 'Septimus', and it jarred when you suddenly remembered it wasn't Watson talking, but the dog. It adds some humour and brevity to a very familiar tale, but somehow it loses something in the telling. The addition of Septimus didn't really do much for me, and apart from taking a key role in the resolu I was intrigued by the premise, but sadly I didn't find it really lived up to it's promise. Several times when reading this, I just plain forgot that the narrator was supposed to be the newly invented 'Septimus', and it jarred when you suddenly remembered it wasn't Watson talking, but the dog. It adds some humour and brevity to a very familiar tale, but somehow it loses something in the telling. The addition of Septimus didn't really do much for me, and apart from taking a key role in the resolution of the case, he may as well not be there. I'd hoped that Septimus would take more of a lead in the case, and maybe turn out to be the brains behind Watson's investigations that he takes credit for in the original, but mostly Septimus just curls up on the hearth rug and does little else. Nice try at an alternative telling of one of the most famous stories in the Holmes canon, but I'll stick with the original.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    I wanted a quick, easy read after I finished my previous book ,so chose this one. It turned out to be just what I needed. This is essentially Arthur Conan Doyle's famous story, "The Hound of the Baskervilles", with the same characters, plot, and sections of Doyle's prose. The main difference is that the narrator is Septimas, a greyhound belonging to Sherlock. He has a keen mind, and is smarter than Watson. Like all dogs, he loves to sleep and eat but loves a good mystery too. He also has a great I wanted a quick, easy read after I finished my previous book ,so chose this one. It turned out to be just what I needed. This is essentially Arthur Conan Doyle's famous story, "The Hound of the Baskervilles", with the same characters, plot, and sections of Doyle's prose. The main difference is that the narrator is Septimas, a greyhound belonging to Sherlock. He has a keen mind, and is smarter than Watson. Like all dogs, he loves to sleep and eat but loves a good mystery too. He also has a great understanding of his master. A fun, gentle parody of the original story.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Meet Septimus Holmes This retelling of the Hound of the Baskervilles is done by Septimus Holmes, Sherlock 's greyhound. Septimus is very involved in bringing the villain to his end. It is a cute concept, but in the end it is just a retelling of the original story. If you know the story well, it gets tedious. Meet Septimus Holmes This retelling of the Hound of the Baskervilles is done by Septimus Holmes, Sherlock 's greyhound. Septimus is very involved in bringing the villain to his end. It is a cute concept, but in the end it is just a retelling of the original story. If you know the story well, it gets tedious.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Not Much Added The author told the story through the POV of Holmes's pet greyhound, Septimas. It was an interesting concept but it didn't work for me. with one exceptional incident, Septimus didn't add any real value or insight. Being familiar with the original version may have played a part in this. Not Much Added The author told the story through the POV of Holmes's pet greyhound, Septimas. It was an interesting concept but it didn't work for me. with one exceptional incident, Septimus didn't add any real value or insight. Being familiar with the original version may have played a part in this.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bert

    This is a fun introduction to AC Doyle and to Sherlock Holmes. It is perfect for younger audiences, and is yet an interesting revisit for adults. Narration was very very nice. Listened using Chirpbooks.com.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Grey

    Very well-crafted remake of a classic A. Conan Doyle mystery. Told from the perspective of Holmes' greyhound (who knew he had one), it provides an interesting perspective on human interactions. And, of course, the greyhound gets his hound. Very well-crafted remake of a classic A. Conan Doyle mystery. Told from the perspective of Holmes' greyhound (who knew he had one), it provides an interesting perspective on human interactions. And, of course, the greyhound gets his hound.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maryellen J.

    An enjoyable tale Charming rendition of the Classic. I admit, though, that I was familiar enough with the story that I skimmed between observations by the greyhound. But nonetheless quite enjoyable. Recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Poppy

    The Greyhound of the Baskervilles by John Gaspard. If Doyle's 'Hound of the Baskervilles' is missing anything it's missing a bit of fun. This. Book is fun. Septimus, the greyhound is the narrator & perfectly in tune with mr holmes. I've read all of Doyle's (Watson's);work on Holmes & found this a delightful new addition. The Greyhound of the Baskervilles by John Gaspard. If Doyle's 'Hound of the Baskervilles' is missing anything it's missing a bit of fun. This. Book is fun. Septimus, the greyhound is the narrator & perfectly in tune with mr holmes. I've read all of Doyle's (Watson's);work on Holmes & found this a delightful new addition.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ladonne House

    Great What a great and entertaining take on an old classic!! I couldn't put it down!! Witty, interesting and so much fun!! Great What a great and entertaining take on an old classic!! I couldn't put it down!! Witty, interesting and so much fun!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Micky

    Read it around 40 years ago love it. Couldn't say if I still would like it though Read it around 40 years ago love it. Couldn't say if I still would like it though

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jim Higgins

    4.5 stars (audiobook)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Niki

    an enjoyable parody

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    As a greyhound owner and lover, I thought this was a cute, quick read. Love the name Septimus for a greyhound!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    The hound of the Baskervilles retold by Sherlock Holmes greyhound called Septimus.. that’s all.. it’s brilliant! #mystery #dog #sherlockholmes #England #beatthebacklog

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary Ann Seidman

    I never read the original book, I was supposed to in High School, but that didn't happen. I did like the story and I loved the dog. I don't have a greyhound, I have a cat, but I thought the dog was the best thing in the story. I have read other Sherlock Holmes stories and I do like the style so if there was another book like this one I would read it. I never read the original book, I was supposed to in High School, but that didn't happen. I did like the story and I loved the dog. I don't have a greyhound, I have a cat, but I thought the dog was the best thing in the story. I have read other Sherlock Holmes stories and I do like the style so if there was another book like this one I would read it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie Dale Keck

    Not kindle unlimited {some of John Gaspard's are though} but I happened across it from some freebie promotion, as did The Ambitious Card, and also saw Tell Them It's A Dream Sequence which is KU so have it up at the moment as well. From my rating, assume can tell really enjoyed it. This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’ Not kindle unlimited {some of John Gaspard's are though} but I happened across it from some freebie promotion, as did The Ambitious Card, and also saw Tell Them It's A Dream Sequence which is KU so have it up at the moment as well. From my rating, assume can tell really enjoyed it. This is new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic mystery, “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” It's the same story. Mostly. That is, it contains the same characters, the same action, and much of the same dialogue. What’s different? Well, it’s a little shorter, a little leaner, a little less verbose in some sections. But the chief difference is that it’s now narrated by a dog. A greyhound, in fact, named Septimus. In this new edition, he tells his story of how he became “The Greyhound of the Baskervilles.”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    An Interesting Spin on Sherlock Holmes I initially chose this book as I was looking for a book with a greyhound, and wasn't sure what to expect as I hadn't read any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's works previously. I have to say, I was pulled into the story quickly, and found it difficult to put down each night before turning off the lights to allow our own Greyhounds the opportunity to sleep (not that something like light in their eyes would bother them). A good story was enhanced,in my opinion, by An Interesting Spin on Sherlock Holmes I initially chose this book as I was looking for a book with a greyhound, and wasn't sure what to expect as I hadn't read any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's works previously. I have to say, I was pulled into the story quickly, and found it difficult to put down each night before turning off the lights to allow our own Greyhounds the opportunity to sleep (not that something like light in their eyes would bother them). A good story was enhanced,in my opinion, by having the tale told by the hound of Sherlock Holmes. I can only hope that at some point in time Mr.Shepard returns to the world of Sherlock and Septimus for another rousing tale.

  23. 5 out of 5

    John E Mack

    I can't rate one of the greatest mysteries ever written as less than a "4", but this book disappointed me. Advertised as the story of "The hound of the Baskervilles" as told by Sherlock Holmes ' dog, it is really just Conan Doyle's text with snide comments of the dog in the Book. To paraphrase another Holmes classic, the dog did nothing in the book. That is the curious incident. How much better this book would have been if the author had ditched Conan Doyle's text and told the story in the voice I can't rate one of the greatest mysteries ever written as less than a "4", but this book disappointed me. Advertised as the story of "The hound of the Baskervilles" as told by Sherlock Holmes ' dog, it is really just Conan Doyle's text with snide comments of the dog in the Book. To paraphrase another Holmes classic, the dog did nothing in the book. That is the curious incident. How much better this book would have been if the author had ditched Conan Doyle's text and told the story in the voice of the dog-- a story in which he plays an active role.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

    Meet Septimus, a previously unknown member of the Watson-Holmes detecting team. Septimus is a greyhound, and yes, this is another entry in dog-as-narrator genre . Neither sappy or comical, this is a gently amusing retelling of Doyle's famous story. The "slimming down" by Mr Gaspard doesn't hurt a bit. Meet Septimus, a previously unknown member of the Watson-Holmes detecting team. Septimus is a greyhound, and yes, this is another entry in dog-as-narrator genre . Neither sappy or comical, this is a gently amusing retelling of Doyle's famous story. The "slimming down" by Mr Gaspard doesn't hurt a bit.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    ***** Take the original, put it in the hands of a skilled abridgement editor, rewrite that abridged edition from the viewpoint of Sherlock's own intelligent greyhound, and voila! Now you know the basics of this short book that enjoyed so much! ***** Take the original, put it in the hands of a skilled abridgement editor, rewrite that abridged edition from the viewpoint of Sherlock's own intelligent greyhound, and voila! Now you know the basics of this short book that enjoyed so much!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Eth...if you love The Hound of the Baskervilles by A. C. Doyle you know the entire story...no different, not a character eliminated or added and charming greyhound that is smarter than Watson, who is jealous and has a place in Sherlock's cold heart. Pass on it. Eth...if you love The Hound of the Baskervilles by A. C. Doyle you know the entire story...no different, not a character eliminated or added and charming greyhound that is smarter than Watson, who is jealous and has a place in Sherlock's cold heart. Pass on it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Campbell

    I loved this book. More novels should be written (or tweaked! ;) ) in the POV of a greyhound. Here is the review I wrote on my blog: https://thegeekybooklady.wordpress.co... I loved this book. More novels should be written (or tweaked! ;) ) in the POV of a greyhound. Here is the review I wrote on my blog: https://thegeekybooklady.wordpress.co...

  28. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    Entertaining retelling of the Hound of the Baskervilles, narrated by Septimus, a Greyhound. A few Americanisms (eg kibble, cilantro) seemed a little jarring and out of place but did not detract from the overall story.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Margo James

    Sherlock Holmes and his dog? Well, why not. It is a great retelling of the famous “Hound of the Baskervilles”. Hearing the story from the dog’s perspective gives greater insight into Holmes method of deduction. Enough said, read and enjoy!

  30. 5 out of 5

    James G Frost

    Fun Story It's definitely worth reading. Septimus is a good match for Sherlock Holmes! The book is from the dog's point of view. Fun Story It's definitely worth reading. Septimus is a good match for Sherlock Holmes! The book is from the dog's point of view.

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