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A Brief Guide to Self-Help Classics: From How to Win Friends and Influence People to The Chimp Paradox

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From Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People, published in 1936, which has sold over 30 million copies to date, to the mind management programme of Professor Steve Peters' The Chimp Paradox, a concise and insightful guide to seventy of the most influential self-help books ever published An entertaining, accessible companion, for readers of self-help books a From Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People, published in 1936, which has sold over 30 million copies to date, to the mind management programme of Professor Steve Peters' The Chimp Paradox, a concise and insightful guide to seventy of the most influential self-help books ever published An entertaining, accessible companion, for readers of self-help books and sceptics alike. The titles include classics on achieving success, confidence and happiness, mindfulness, how to change your life, self-control, overcoming anxiety and self-esteem issues and stress relief. The chronological arrangement of the titles reveals the intriguing story of how early self-improvement titles were succeeded by increasingly personality-based, materialistic titles and shows how breakout classics often influenced other titles for decades to come. Each book is summarised to convey a brief idea of what it has to offer the interested reader, while a 'Speed Read' for each book delivers a quick sense of what each writer is like to read and a highly compressed summary of the main points of the book in question. This is a work of reference to dip into, that acknowledges that some of the most powerful insights into ourselves can be found in texts that aren't perceived as being 'self-help' books, and that wisdom and consolation can be found in the strangest places.


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From Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People, published in 1936, which has sold over 30 million copies to date, to the mind management programme of Professor Steve Peters' The Chimp Paradox, a concise and insightful guide to seventy of the most influential self-help books ever published An entertaining, accessible companion, for readers of self-help books a From Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People, published in 1936, which has sold over 30 million copies to date, to the mind management programme of Professor Steve Peters' The Chimp Paradox, a concise and insightful guide to seventy of the most influential self-help books ever published An entertaining, accessible companion, for readers of self-help books and sceptics alike. The titles include classics on achieving success, confidence and happiness, mindfulness, how to change your life, self-control, overcoming anxiety and self-esteem issues and stress relief. The chronological arrangement of the titles reveals the intriguing story of how early self-improvement titles were succeeded by increasingly personality-based, materialistic titles and shows how breakout classics often influenced other titles for decades to come. Each book is summarised to convey a brief idea of what it has to offer the interested reader, while a 'Speed Read' for each book delivers a quick sense of what each writer is like to read and a highly compressed summary of the main points of the book in question. This is a work of reference to dip into, that acknowledges that some of the most powerful insights into ourselves can be found in texts that aren't perceived as being 'self-help' books, and that wisdom and consolation can be found in the strangest places.

49 review for A Brief Guide to Self-Help Classics: From How to Win Friends and Influence People to The Chimp Paradox

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Ning

    Better off reading 65 self-help books than relying on the author’s summaries. James M. Russel did inject his personal views of the each book rather than being objective of the premises to give us a brief guide.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wendy (Lassinthelibrary)

    Very entertaining and funny.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jen

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rendell

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ramanpreet

  8. 4 out of 5

    Donna Mae

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pauwie

  10. 4 out of 5

    gramakri

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jayce

  12. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Petelin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trudy

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brett Cownley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ela Carmela

  16. 5 out of 5

    Saba Aburayash

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gita

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  19. 4 out of 5

    Gavin White

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vishal singh

  21. 4 out of 5

    Riri

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  23. 4 out of 5

    Akvile

  24. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Hallahan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason

  26. 4 out of 5

    Phil Roberts

  27. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Thorpe

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shu

  29. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miel Ulryck

  31. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  32. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

  33. 5 out of 5

    Serafin Danessa

  34. 5 out of 5

    Vrai

  35. 4 out of 5

    Pumsish

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Yoo

  37. 4 out of 5

    Fernando Moreira

  38. 5 out of 5

    Cristina

  39. 4 out of 5

    Fadoosh Abu Saud

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Stone

  41. 5 out of 5

    Lainie

  42. 5 out of 5

    Book Worm

  43. 4 out of 5

    Kahina

  44. 4 out of 5

    Robin

  45. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Choules

  46. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Taylor

  47. 4 out of 5

    Ruben

  48. 5 out of 5

    Podzina

  49. 4 out of 5

    Lina

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