Hot Best Seller

Batman: The Definitive History of the Dark Knight in Comics, Film, and Beyond

Availability: Ready to download

Dive into the history of one of the greatest Super Heroes of all time with this deluxe book exploring the creation and legacy of the Dark Knight. Since his debut in Detective Comics in 1939, Batman has become an iconic part of American popular culture. From his early days as a master sleuth to his campy, TV-inspired “New Look” in the 1960s and gritty reinvention in the late Dive into the history of one of the greatest Super Heroes of all time with this deluxe book exploring the creation and legacy of the Dark Knight. Since his debut in Detective Comics in 1939, Batman has become an iconic part of American popular culture. From his early days as a master sleuth to his campy, TV-inspired “New Look” in the 1960s and gritty reinvention in the late twentieth century, Batman has remained popular as a rare superpowerless hero: a man with genius-level intellect, mastery of martial arts, and a singular, obsessive mission to rid his city of crime, whatever the cost to himself. This book celebrates Batman’s 80th Anniversary in 2019 and traces his history across eighty years of comics, cartoons, live-action TV shows, and major motion pictures exploring the history and legacy of the Caped Crusader through his many incarnations. Featuring exciting never-before-seen imagery and commentary from key writers, artists, filmmakers, and more, this book also includes a variety of removable insert items, providing a unique, immersive experience for fans. Comprehensive, compelling, and filled with previously unseen treasures, Batman: The Ultimate Visual History is the definitive guide to the legendary Dark Knight.


Compare

Dive into the history of one of the greatest Super Heroes of all time with this deluxe book exploring the creation and legacy of the Dark Knight. Since his debut in Detective Comics in 1939, Batman has become an iconic part of American popular culture. From his early days as a master sleuth to his campy, TV-inspired “New Look” in the 1960s and gritty reinvention in the late Dive into the history of one of the greatest Super Heroes of all time with this deluxe book exploring the creation and legacy of the Dark Knight. Since his debut in Detective Comics in 1939, Batman has become an iconic part of American popular culture. From his early days as a master sleuth to his campy, TV-inspired “New Look” in the 1960s and gritty reinvention in the late twentieth century, Batman has remained popular as a rare superpowerless hero: a man with genius-level intellect, mastery of martial arts, and a singular, obsessive mission to rid his city of crime, whatever the cost to himself. This book celebrates Batman’s 80th Anniversary in 2019 and traces his history across eighty years of comics, cartoons, live-action TV shows, and major motion pictures exploring the history and legacy of the Caped Crusader through his many incarnations. Featuring exciting never-before-seen imagery and commentary from key writers, artists, filmmakers, and more, this book also includes a variety of removable insert items, providing a unique, immersive experience for fans. Comprehensive, compelling, and filled with previously unseen treasures, Batman: The Ultimate Visual History is the definitive guide to the legendary Dark Knight.

30 review for Batman: The Definitive History of the Dark Knight in Comics, Film, and Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Akbar Hasan

    This was such a great book to read before turning in for the night (minus the fact that it would keep me up sometimes). I'm a big fan of both film and comics, and Batman and his world (which I also adore) are unique in the sense that they're giants in those two mediums. That cross-over made this read a really engaging one. It's incredible to learned the nuanced history of batman, his rise to fame, the transformation in creative themes and philosophies. To be able to get a peak behind the curtain This was such a great book to read before turning in for the night (minus the fact that it would keep me up sometimes). I'm a big fan of both film and comics, and Batman and his world (which I also adore) are unique in the sense that they're giants in those two mediums. That cross-over made this read a really engaging one. It's incredible to learned the nuanced history of batman, his rise to fame, the transformation in creative themes and philosophies. To be able to get a peak behind the curtain of some of the greatest batman features is greatly appreciated too. All the concept art, storyboards, character designs, from the burton movies and BTAS was great to see. It was surprising for me to learn how the campy atmosphere of the Adam West Batman show originated from the comics in the 50's, which were painting batman with that same color because of the comics code authority. One of the other takeaways for me was a reminder about the essence of batman and what really drives him; his actions stem from making sure that the tragedy he suffers from never happens to anyone else... and I agree with the writers and the artists who value how truly heroic that is.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Robert Greenberger

    Caveat: I am interviewed in this book so there's a slight bias. Andrew Farago and Gina McIntyre provide a done-in-one comprehensive 80th Anniversary survey all things Batman, from his inception to his current media saturation. We get the lowdown on the comics evolution, his changing nature over the decades, his arrival in serials to the 1966 series, and film incarnations. Attention is paid to the video games, which have had an outsized influence on the franchise (about the only thing I didn't kn Caveat: I am interviewed in this book so there's a slight bias. Andrew Farago and Gina McIntyre provide a done-in-one comprehensive 80th Anniversary survey all things Batman, from his inception to his current media saturation. We get the lowdown on the comics evolution, his changing nature over the decades, his arrival in serials to the 1966 series, and film incarnations. Attention is paid to the video games, which have had an outsized influence on the franchise (about the only thing I didn't know going into this). About the only thing not examined is his prose exploits, which to me is a glaring oversight. They have done extensive research and conducted dozens of interviews so it's a fairly balanced look at the character, his friends, and foes. It's a fast read for those, like me, intimately familiar with Batman. For others, I suspect it will be revelatory. If it's missing anything, is the final chapters lack the critical analysis found earlier in the book. As written, for example, it sounds like the DCEU films were universally beloved and successful. The physical book is large, printed on thick paper, gorgeously reproducing artwork and photography. Like the Vault books, it has bound=-in facsimiles, the coolest perhaps being the 1986 Bob Kane treatment for the developing feature film. I'd heard it existed but had never read it. If you're a Batman fan in any incarnation, this is well worth your time.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    Easily the heaviest book I've ever read. A comprehensive journey from Batman's first comic appearance through to present day. Lovingly made and gorgeously packaged. A must for any Batman fan. Slight caveats: it gives a lot of space to myriad animated series which may have been better spent concentrating on the comics; it lauds every inception, which is fine, but can't even bring itself to admit that Batman Forever and Batman & Robin are terrible films. Easily the heaviest book I've ever read. A comprehensive journey from Batman's first comic appearance through to present day. Lovingly made and gorgeously packaged. A must for any Batman fan. Slight caveats: it gives a lot of space to myriad animated series which may have been better spent concentrating on the comics; it lauds every inception, which is fine, but can't even bring itself to admit that Batman Forever and Batman & Robin are terrible films.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Major Ellison

    Definitely a must-read for any true Batman fan. From the very beginning of Batman in 1939 to the present day, Batman has gone through several changes and modifications. However, his unwavering commitment to the eradication of crime and dispense of justice has stayed consistent. Golden age (1939-1950) In this age, Batman was most commonly known as “the world's greatest detective”. He fought villains such as Hugo Strange, Joker, Catwoman, Penguin, Two-Face, Riddler, and Poison Ivy. Despite the high Definitely a must-read for any true Batman fan. From the very beginning of Batman in 1939 to the present day, Batman has gone through several changes and modifications. However, his unwavering commitment to the eradication of crime and dispense of justice has stayed consistent. Golden age (1939-1950) In this age, Batman was most commonly known as “the world's greatest detective”. He fought villains such as Hugo Strange, Joker, Catwoman, Penguin, Two-Face, Riddler, and Poison Ivy. Despite the high interest that readers showed, towards the end of the 40’s, there was a growing concern from parents, teachers, and clergy over the “edgy and graphic content” with the comics. As the once growing sales of the popular Batman comics dropped nationwide, to add insult to injury, a child psychologist and author by the name of Fredric Wertham attempted to paint Batman as the “root of juvenile delinquency”. This caused a committee known as Comics Code Authority (CCA). They were responsible for curbing the violent and “inappropriate” content that was published through comics. This brought in the new age of comics. Silver Age (1950-1970) Entering this age, interest and trust in Batman comics needed to be revived. To do this, the Dark Knight was written as a “family man”, as a man who worked openly with the police officers, and as a hero who talked openly with civilians in order to promote civil justice. For six years, Batman and Robin essentially became sci-fi heroes who dealt frequently with aliens. This age was instrumental for bringing the Caped Crusader to live TV, in which Batman actor, Adam West, starred in. He fought villains such as Bat-Mite, intergalactic aliens, and simple street criminals. By the end of the 60’s, however, the demographic of readers had started showing more interest in the “detective Batman”. The issue that is perceived to have closed out the Silver Age was Batman #217 which depicted “the Dark Knight striding past his tearful butler and proclaiming, ‘Take a last look Alfred–then seal up the Batcave…forever!’” This let the readers know that changes were on the horizon. Bronze Age (1970-1985) Moving to this age, Batman had shifted back to being more of the detective. The character and persona of Bruce Wayne was also developed more. Villains such as Man-Bat, Hugo Strange, Joker, Ra’s al Ghul, Talia al Ghul, Deadshot, and Killer Croc emerged showing a more serious side to Batman’s rogues gallery. Catwoman and Poison Ivy were also brought back after a hiatus in most of the Silver Age. The end of the Bronze age was decisively concluded when writer, Frank Miller, introduced his innovative, impressive, and gripping story of the Dark Knight Returns (1986). This story changed the way people saw Batman and Bruce Wayne. It gave a glimpse of what Gotham would look like without Batman and at times without Bruce Wayne. While DC officially has the Dark/Modern Age combined into the same timeline (1986-Present), and others have it split (1986-2011), I have chosen for this summary an unconventional separation between the two. Rather than thinking that the Modern Age replaced the Dark Age, I like to think that it was simply added onto and was a fulfillment to the Dark Age in 2000. Dark Age (1986-2000) In this age, Batman had now become a “darker” person. Frank Miller continued his writing with Batman: Year One. This went back and told Batman’s origin story. During this age, he did most of his work in the night and fought villains that murdered people, one of them being his own. There was no place in this age for a comedic Batman (although comedy and children’s episodes and shows were intentionally put in at times to lighten the mood). This age saw the rise of the Dark Knight in film in Tim Burton’s films, Batman and Batman Returns. Not too long after, Joel Schumacher introduced his Batman films, Batman Forever and Batman & Robin. While these latter two were not as successful and received poor reviews, the reemergence of Batman on the big screen had kept the Batman mania alive. Not only did the live action Batman pique interest, but Batman voice actor Kevin Conroy with the animated shows and movies brought in a new fan base. These included, Batman: The Animated Series (B:TAS), Mask of the Phantasm, and the Batman Beyond show. Batman in these films acted alone, without the Police, and dealt mostly with criminals in Gotham along with some of the darker villains from his rogues gallery. In the comics, Knightfall explored the darker corners of Batman which included villains such as, Spectre, Demon, Etrigan, and Swamp Thing. What I believe to have issued the Dark Knight from the Dark Age into the Modern Age is the comic events of No Man’s Land. In this story, Gotham is destroyed by an earthquake and has to be rebuilt. There is an emphasis on Batman’s humanity as well as the character development of Bruce Wayne. Modern age (2000-Present) Entering this age, unlike other “Ages”, the Dark Age was not left in the past, rather, it was kept and became the foundation for the Modern Age. Here, the events of No Man’s Land changed the landscape of Gotham. There were comics that dwelt on the failures of both Bruce Wayne and Batman like “Batman Hush”. Batman was in the midst of an evolution. Up to this point, there hadn’t been a live action Batman film since the 90’s. In 2005, Christopher Nolan started his Dark Knight Trilogy which epitomized the “Modern Age”. Acted by Christian Bale, Batman begins, The Dark Knight, and The Dark Knight Rises, brought Batman fans a man who dealt with real problems and villains with real and modern difficulties. Meanwhile, animation continued to grow in popularity with the new Batman animated series, the Lego movies, and the short run of “Beware the Batman”. This time period also issued in the next and modern era of video games. The Batman Arkham series provided fans with beautiful skylines and intricate choices and villains to fight. These included: Batman: Arkham Asylum in 2009, Batman: Arkham City in 2011, Arkham Origins in 2013, and Batman: Arkham Knight in 2015. In 2011, there was a radical re-start to the entire DC universe. There needed to be a quick merge to online and digital comic formatting. While Batman had the jump, all other superheroes and characters needed to be modernized. Utilizing the Flash’s desire to go back in time and save his mother, a time and story paradox was created, sending a ripple effect throughout the entire universe. The entire universe was reborn. In 2016, 4 years after Nolan’s trilogy concluded, Zack Snyder ushered in a live action take of both Frank Miller’s classic “The Dark Knight Returns”, and “The Death of Superman” storyline. He also took themes from his previous work entitled, Watchmen. He entitled this film, Batman v Superman. In this, Batman questions the morality of Superman. In his old and senile age, he questions if humanity can ever come to the point of goodness or if any alien has Earth in its best interests. In the end however, Batman sees that not only do aliens have similar stories as humans, but that there is goodness left, that his work in Gotham for over twenty years has not been in vain, and that this goodness must be protected and preserved.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim Lapetino

    This gigantic and beautiful tome really does justice to Batman, the Dark Knight, one of the most enduring characters in American pop culture. Even with more than 80 years of history to chronicle, Andrew Farago and Gina McIntyre do an amazing job threading the needle of capturing the essentials. They delve deep into Batman’s comic origins, films, and other onscreen adventures. As a lifelong Batman fan, I was impressed that they were able to dig into the essential history of the character with som This gigantic and beautiful tome really does justice to Batman, the Dark Knight, one of the most enduring characters in American pop culture. Even with more than 80 years of history to chronicle, Andrew Farago and Gina McIntyre do an amazing job threading the needle of capturing the essentials. They delve deep into Batman’s comic origins, films, and other onscreen adventures. As a lifelong Batman fan, I was impressed that they were able to dig into the essential history of the character with some depth without getting mired in minutiae or inane trivia. This is a difficult balance to strike, and they do it well. The book design is solid, with appropriate and representative art, capturing the ethos of the Dark Knight. My only quibble is that the tipped in attached elements of the publication—like script excerpts and the like—do little to add to the book from a design perspective. A minor issue, as the overall book is an amazing retelling of the character’s history.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chad Van deren

    A thorough and exhaustive history of The Batman, in all the best ways possible. From his creation to modern day tales. Encompassing comic books, movies, television and video games. Just what every Batman fan needs and craves. That being said, it took me time to finish as the physical size and weight of the book precluded me from reading it in bed or on the go, my preferred methods. I actually had to prepare my area before reading a chapter. All worthwhile for such a wonderful book. I'm extremely A thorough and exhaustive history of The Batman, in all the best ways possible. From his creation to modern day tales. Encompassing comic books, movies, television and video games. Just what every Batman fan needs and craves. That being said, it took me time to finish as the physical size and weight of the book precluded me from reading it in bed or on the go, my preferred methods. I actually had to prepare my area before reading a chapter. All worthwhile for such a wonderful book. I'm extremely happy to have it in my collection.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirk Jones

    This book is a must read for Batman fanatics. Not only is there information on every era, as well as Batman in movies, television, and video games, but there are many inserts which make this a wish list item for any Bat-fan.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tasha

    Amazing & great batman tell all.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David Lambert

    Great book, that was lovingly researched and brilliantly designed, and the art work was absolutely superb. Highly recommended if you're a Batman fan Great book, that was lovingly researched and brilliantly designed, and the art work was absolutely superb. Highly recommended if you're a Batman fan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Miguel Perez

  11. 5 out of 5

    LeeAnn Montemayor

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shreyas Banerjee

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rayfield

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rhys

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vora

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kathie Nur_mal_so

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jesús Neira

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mammy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Gross

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jason Tricker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jay

  23. 4 out of 5

    Geekdroll

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brett Landis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  27. 5 out of 5

    Steven Mitchell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo Esk

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marcus

  30. 4 out of 5

    Santiago Vazquez

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...