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Women on Food

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Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera.   Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring esteemed food journalists and thinkers, including Soleil Ho, Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Carla Hall, Samin Nosrat, Racha Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera.   Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring esteemed food journalists and thinkers, including Soleil Ho, Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Carla Hall, Samin Nosrat, Rachael Ray, and many others, this compilation illuminates the notable and varied women who make up the food world. Exploring issues from the #MeToo movement, gender bias in division of labor and the workplace, and the underrepresentation of women of color in leadership, to cultural trends including food and travel shows, the intersection of fashion and food, and the evolution of food writing in the last few decades, Women on Food brings together food’s most vital female voices.  


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Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera.   Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring esteemed food journalists and thinkers, including Soleil Ho, Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Carla Hall, Samin Nosrat, Racha Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera.   Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring esteemed food journalists and thinkers, including Soleil Ho, Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Carla Hall, Samin Nosrat, Rachael Ray, and many others, this compilation illuminates the notable and varied women who make up the food world. Exploring issues from the #MeToo movement, gender bias in division of labor and the workplace, and the underrepresentation of women of color in leadership, to cultural trends including food and travel shows, the intersection of fashion and food, and the evolution of food writing in the last few decades, Women on Food brings together food’s most vital female voices.  

30 review for Women on Food

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    Charlotte Druckman gathers a wide swath of women who have food-related careers. There are essays published here for the first time, interviews with specific characters, and group answers to some of her questions. There is most definitely a certain amount of tension in these pages - female chefs are always asked about the female part of being chefs. So even in this attempt to bring more attention to them, they are forced into this position of answering the questions they always answer. And the ans Charlotte Druckman gathers a wide swath of women who have food-related careers. There are essays published here for the first time, interviews with specific characters, and group answers to some of her questions. There is most definitely a certain amount of tension in these pages - female chefs are always asked about the female part of being chefs. So even in this attempt to bring more attention to them, they are forced into this position of answering the questions they always answer. And the answers are both important/expected and unimportant/mundane. At one point, Charlotte asks them about how being female has impacted their career and almost to a face, all chefs of color are quick to respond that they are seen as their race first. (I sense Charlotte may have learned something about her own assumptions, based on her reflective essay on complicity, including her own, that is included later in the collection.) This took me a long time to read and it is probably best as a coffee table book, one you pick up and read bits from, rather than trying to read it cover to cover. But I've added many restaurants to visit, cookbooks to try, publications to read, from the names in these pages. I had a review copy so I can't quote directly but one of my favorite moments was when Charlotte asked which genres of food writing that are (erroneously) consistently assigned to men, and Jordana Rothman responds that she hopes to never read another article about a "bro discovering noodles." Hahahaha. One essay I really enjoyed was "The Months of Magical Eating" by Tienlon Ho, about the medicinal nature of Chinese cuisine, a relationship between the writer and her father, and her pregnancy. Another one was "Trapped In, Dining Out" by Osayi Endolyn, depicting what it is like to eat alone at a restaurant as a woman of color. (Spoiler alert - it is super frustrating and full of intrusive white people.) I'm not a member of the Abrams Dinner Party this year, but I know those that are got this book this season! I got a review copy from the publisher through Edelweiss this time. There were a few pages that didn't display well in my eARC but I'm assuming it looks gorgeous in print. This comes out October 29, 2019, but I finished it early so I could include it in an upcoming foodie recommendations episode of the Reading Envy Podcast.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nursebookie

    Thank you to Netgalley, Author and Editor, and Publisher for allowing me to review this ebook as an ARC. This book is divided into a series of essays and questionnaires, as an anthology of women chefs and food writers. The book features notable celebrity chefs: Rachael Ray, Nigela Lawson and about 115 other women chefs/celebrities. This is a very good read for those interested in any read regarding #metoo movement, the evolution of food through the decades, and other foodie momentos! I am certai Thank you to Netgalley, Author and Editor, and Publisher for allowing me to review this ebook as an ARC. This book is divided into a series of essays and questionnaires, as an anthology of women chefs and food writers. The book features notable celebrity chefs: Rachael Ray, Nigela Lawson and about 115 other women chefs/celebrities. This is a very good read for those interested in any read regarding #metoo movement, the evolution of food through the decades, and other foodie momentos! I am certainly a fan if this and would be gifting this to my foodie buddies!! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  3. 4 out of 5

    =^.^= Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera. Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring est I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. Women on Food unites the radical, diverging female voices of the food industry in this urgent, moving, and often humorous collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, illustrations, quotes, and ephemera. Edited by Charlotte Druckman and featuring esteemed food journalists and thinkers, including Soleil Ho, Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Carla Hall, Samin Nosrat, Rachael Ray, and many others, this compilation illuminates the notable and varied women who make up the food world. Exploring issues from the #MeToo movement, gender bias in division of labor and the workplace, and the underrepresentation of women of color in leadership, to cultural trends including food and travel shows, the intersection of fashion and food, and the evolution of food writing in the last few decades, Women on Food brings together food’s most vital female voices. This was an interesting read despite my not knowing who most of the writers were. Food is such a polarizing subject with the "no gluten because it is poison BS" (vs. the rare people with Coeliac disease), the no carb camps, the raw-foodies, the Keto Bullter-roofers, the Gwyneth Paltrow GOOP army and the Beyond Meat type products that are so processed, how can this Frankenfood actually be good for you? (BTW, did you know that the largest fake meat company in Canada is owned by a slaughterhouse company??) It is not a sit-down and read it through kind of book (I can easily read a 300 or so page book in an hour) - I like that it is in chapters and sections that can be savoured and chosen to not read if need be (in case that the subject doesn't interest you). I do need to say something, though --- although this in no way affected me giving it the "perfect" rating it deserves. ********Would there ever be a book about men's thought on food? Is it a polarizing issue for them? No. Sure, people like Michael Pollan and the late, great, Anthony Bourdain have written on food and a LOT of men have written cookbooks. Sean Brock, for one, writes on food in his wonderful books "Heritage" and the upcoming 'Sean Brock's South - Essential Recipes and New Explorations" but his gender is never an issue. Is it not setting women back a bit to, well, complain and go on and on about it? As I often say, "Poop and get off the pot and get on with your life!******** Okay, so I need to do a rant and rave about the cover. I hate it. It reminds me of Meghan Markle/The Duchess of Sussex and her writing in bananas on her Instagram coyly saying she was bagging Prince Harry and the ridiculous messages she wrote on bananas at that women's shelter. (The photos are attached to my Facebook review if you don't want to google them!) AND...name me one woman these days who will eat potatoes without guilt over the carbs. LOL. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by Millennials on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it ☕🎂 🥓🧀🥧 NOTE: I STILL cannot link this review to LinkedIn - there is something wrong with the linking/programming and it will not happen.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eve Stark

    This anthology of written works by women on the topic of food is very interesting. I've read some of the authors before in the anthologies released by "The Best American Series" but it was nice to see an anthology that focuses on female voices specifically. For all the years of being relegated to the kitchen, women continue to be surprisingly underrepresented in the world of professional food critics, chefs, and restaurateurs, save television cooking shows focused on teaching the home cook. This This anthology of written works by women on the topic of food is very interesting. I've read some of the authors before in the anthologies released by "The Best American Series" but it was nice to see an anthology that focuses on female voices specifically. For all the years of being relegated to the kitchen, women continue to be surprisingly underrepresented in the world of professional food critics, chefs, and restaurateurs, save television cooking shows focused on teaching the home cook. This anthology helps to bring forth some of those influential voices. A huge thank you to editor Charlotte Druckman, all the 115 writers who allowed their works to be published in this volume, Abrams Press, and NetGalley for allowing me the privilege to access a digital copy of this book in advance of its release. --UPDATE: 10/22/2019 EDITED PER CLARIFICATION -- I received a clarification in the comments that all of the pieces have been previously unpublished. Therefore, I have edited my previous review to clarify that I have read some of the authors before in previous anthologies. Although I stand by the comment that some of the pieces seemed familiar, it's highly likely that I simply just remember an author and a previous telling of a story (or I'm completely mistaken - it's happened before). Thank you, Rosie, for the correction.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This is a really unique book that highlights women's voices related to food. Comprised of essays, interviews, and short Q&A's topics from food memories, the #metoo movement, and how women writers and chefs are treated differently than their male counterparts are all covered in some way and sometimes in many ways throughout this book. At first it felt choppy and slow, but for me it picked up steam along the way. I'll be honest the majority of the people represented were people I wasn't familiar w This is a really unique book that highlights women's voices related to food. Comprised of essays, interviews, and short Q&A's topics from food memories, the #metoo movement, and how women writers and chefs are treated differently than their male counterparts are all covered in some way and sometimes in many ways throughout this book. At first it felt choppy and slow, but for me it picked up steam along the way. I'll be honest the majority of the people represented were people I wasn't familiar with, but there were several that I did know of and either way I enjoyed the majority of the book. There were a few essays or interviews I didn't care for or ended up skimming, but overall I really liked it and while eye-opening, it's still sad that in this day and age women are still being under-paid, under-represented, and seen as sexual objects while working. If feminism and cooking are two of your favorite things then this book is a must read. Some quotes I liked: [answering the question "do you think there are certain genres of food writing...that are consistently assigned to women?"] "Has any 'How to get a quick and easy meal on your table' story ever been pitched or written by a man? Or is it solely to the working or stay-at-home moms?" - Jasmine Moy (p. 32) "By the 1920s, an American housewife on a modest income might have access to a gas oven, a technology that is surely one of the greatest advances in the history of cooking. After centuries of building a life around the smoke and inconvenience of a fire, cooks could now switch the flame on or off at will. Yet, as [Ruth Schwartz] Cowan observes, the truly labor-saving technology would have been effective birth control. 'When there are eight or nine mouths to feed (or even five or six), cooking is a difficult enterprise, even if it can be done at a gas range.'" (p. 260) "Perhaps the real problem with the concept of 'labor-saving' in the kitchen is that it tries to answer the wrong question. Instead of asking, 'How can we cancel out this work?' we could instead try to ask, 'How can we reward and recognize this work, and the person who does it?' Cooks have never been given anything like their full due." (p. 263) "During the last installment of the argument that my husband and I have on-and-off about housework, he told me I had to find a way to start doing less. He didn't, of course, mean that we should hire someone to help us with shopping or cooking or laundry or organization; he meant I should start caring less about what we eat and what our house looks like: the bagged-salad approach. It echoed something I read years earlier in an essay by a feminist writer whose name I can't remember about the wages-for-housework movement. The author wrote that she'd conditioned herself to accept untidiness in order to stop herself from using housework as a way to procrastinate and keep herself from doing her important work...I'm up against it either way; it is my problem, because I'm the one who cares. And I think, fuck you!!" (p. 271) [answering the question "What are some questions you really hate being asked?"] "How I juggle it all. How I handle being away from my kids when I go on a book tour. Men never get asked this. Nobody asks a man on a business trip if he's sad to be away from his kids. How I cook with kids underfoot (because I work from home, everyone assumes I'm a stay-at-home mom, no matter how consistently I've said this is not the case)." - Deb Perelman (p. 318)

  6. 5 out of 5

    ShaunMS

    This is a fantastic and raw collection of a range of voices and opinions, covering professional kitchen work, home cooking, eating in a restaurant while single and Black, growing food, recipe writing, food criticism, food-based philanthropy and more. There are essays, quips, a few recipes, interviews—basically long-form reading when you want it, a series of blurbs when you don't. Honestly, one of the things that sold me on this collection was the interview of Rachael Ray, someone who doesn't get This is a fantastic and raw collection of a range of voices and opinions, covering professional kitchen work, home cooking, eating in a restaurant while single and Black, growing food, recipe writing, food criticism, food-based philanthropy and more. There are essays, quips, a few recipes, interviews—basically long-form reading when you want it, a series of blurbs when you don't. Honestly, one of the things that sold me on this collection was the interview of Rachael Ray, someone who doesn't get taken very seriously in the food world, especially after being punched down by some very big names. I don't follow Rachael Ray myself, but damn if she didn't have a lot to say, and Druckman does a fantastic job positioning Ray as a legit entrepreneur, a lifelong food lover, and someone who clearly has food ideas that resonate with a lot of people. More generally, Druckman has done great work as an editor building a huge tent in which a lot of different women—some of them pissed off and many likely to disagree with each other—are heard and respected. That includes women who insist that gender has never played a role in how they were treated in the food industry. The result is an incredibly vibrant, exciting book that offers loads to think about when it comes to food, race, feminism, moms and grandmas, agriculture, and on and on.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leslie aka StoreyBook Reviews

    This book is a little different because it has stories and insights from women writers, chefs, critics, television stars, and eaters along with short snippets on a variety of subjects from truths about mothers, failing up and down, misconceptions about strong women in various fields, interviews with various women. and even some thank you notes to those that helped out these women along the way. This book is not meant to be consumed in one sitting but rather savored like an amazing dessert or a fi This book is a little different because it has stories and insights from women writers, chefs, critics, television stars, and eaters along with short snippets on a variety of subjects from truths about mothers, failing up and down, misconceptions about strong women in various fields, interviews with various women. and even some thank you notes to those that helped out these women along the way. This book is not meant to be consumed in one sitting but rather savored like an amazing dessert or a fine wine. I wanted to share a few thoughts from various women about what type of food they wanted to cook but were told they couldn't or made to feel like they couldn't just because they were a woman. "Carving a turkey? Maybe...but I could have if I really wanted to." - Ana Bortun "Ice cream in 1996." - Jeri Britton Bauer "When first starting, I wanted to learn everything.  Butchering in particular was not as friendly to women. So that was the one area I felt people would make you feel like couldn't do it." - Dianna Daoheung "Anything on the grill....GRRRR" - Christina Tosi

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kayo

    You know when you go to a restaurant and the menu is so huge and there's so much to look at and it just gets to much? Well, this is that book. Not impressed. Thanks to Goodreads for the giveaway. While I got the book for free, it had no bearing on the rating I gave it. You know when you go to a restaurant and the menu is so huge and there's so much to look at and it just gets to much? Well, this is that book. Not impressed. Thanks to Goodreads for the giveaway. While I got the book for free, it had no bearing on the rating I gave it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    The editor is occasionally a little too self-consciously woke, but I really, really enjoyed this book. Beautifully written essays by a variety of writers who I didn't know but will definitely follow now and fascinating perspectives on being a woman in all aspects of the business of food. The editor is occasionally a little too self-consciously woke, but I really, really enjoyed this book. Beautifully written essays by a variety of writers who I didn't know but will definitely follow now and fascinating perspectives on being a woman in all aspects of the business of food.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Vincent

    This is one of the best books I've ever read, and almost certainly my favorite food related book. (Although that feels weird to say since this book is about so much more than food) Below were my favorite parts, but in general almost everything was great and essential reading. The breadth of perspectives and the intersectionality inherent in this book are really special. I really hope a lot of people, white men especially, read this book. Tienlon Ho's "The Months of Magical Eating" Priya Krishna's " This is one of the best books I've ever read, and almost certainly my favorite food related book. (Although that feels weird to say since this book is about so much more than food) Below were my favorite parts, but in general almost everything was great and essential reading. The breadth of perspectives and the intersectionality inherent in this book are really special. I really hope a lot of people, white men especially, read this book. Tienlon Ho's "The Months of Magical Eating" Priya Krishna's "Father's Day" Korsha Wilson's "Survival Pending Revolution" (This might be the most essential story?) Osayi Endolyn's "Trapped in, Dining Out" (Or maybe this one?) Bee Wilson's "Labor Saving" (really really really loved this) Cathy Erway's response to the question of "what's the best thing since sliced bread" Conversation with Preeti Mistry Von Diaz's "Sitting Still" Charlotte Druckman's "The C-Word" and accompanying responses (I'm not a woman, so I don't want to hijack/conflate too much here. But reading other stories of complicitness/internalization and confronting that resonated a lot with me and my own struggles.) Mari Uyehara's "How Fashion Hijacked the Food World" (This is also incredible) Soleil Ho's "Ms Pac-Man's Revenge!" Conversation with Devita Davison Ok, so I listed like half the book. But seriously, it's great and impossible to filter.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Editor Charlotte Druckman has compiled an interesting and comprehensive collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, and much more about women in the world of food. These include writers, chefs, critics, and others in the food industry. It is a good book to enjoy in parts. I particularly enjoyed the questionnaire sections where various women would be polled on a topic, such as "What's the best thing since sliced bread?" I also enjoyed some of the interviews, particularly Rachel Ray's story. Editor Charlotte Druckman has compiled an interesting and comprehensive collection of essays, interviews, questionnaires, and much more about women in the world of food. These include writers, chefs, critics, and others in the food industry. It is a good book to enjoy in parts. I particularly enjoyed the questionnaire sections where various women would be polled on a topic, such as "What's the best thing since sliced bread?" I also enjoyed some of the interviews, particularly Rachel Ray's story. It has gotten better for women in a field dominated by men but it is still a bit of a battle. I worked in restaurants for many years and saw a lot of this firsthand. I think any woman considering a career in the food industry would benefit from reading this. I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joan

    Definitely a mixed bag of material, some really interesting, like the account of the rivalry between legendary restaurant critics Mimi Sheraton and Gael Greene, and an interview with Racheal Ray, but so much rather boring navel gazing and kvetching when Charlotte Druckman asks women working in the food world various questions and they give their responses. The design of the book is troublesome. It's a paperback, but big and heavy, printed on a thick stock and with lots of space that could be bett Definitely a mixed bag of material, some really interesting, like the account of the rivalry between legendary restaurant critics Mimi Sheraton and Gael Greene, and an interview with Racheal Ray, but so much rather boring navel gazing and kvetching when Charlotte Druckman asks women working in the food world various questions and they give their responses. The design of the book is troublesome. It's a paperback, but big and heavy, printed on a thick stock and with lots of space that could be better used to reduce the size of the book. I literally had a hard time holding it for more than an hour. Definitely worth reading if you skip what you find less than appealing, and if you can prop the book on a cookbook stand and read it at a table so you don't have to hold it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    "When I flip through magazines and see the names of women chefs, ones who may not fit into an ideal of beauty, get a best restaurant nod without their faces shown only to be rarely mentioned again, while style-conscious bloggers and lightweight figures receive a seemingly disproportionate amount of coverage, I wonder if amidst all this beautifully designed rah-rah food feminism we've moved forward or back". Mari Uyehara's piece in this collection is spot on in articulating what I have been thinki "When I flip through magazines and see the names of women chefs, ones who may not fit into an ideal of beauty, get a best restaurant nod without their faces shown only to be rarely mentioned again, while style-conscious bloggers and lightweight figures receive a seemingly disproportionate amount of coverage, I wonder if amidst all this beautifully designed rah-rah food feminism we've moved forward or back". Mari Uyehara's piece in this collection is spot on in articulating what I have been thinking a lot about women in food and on food. Also agree wholeheartedly with Sadie Stein (sorry MFK Fisher, but also not sorry!) A great and important read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    pianogal

    This book started out a little slow for me. Sometimes the question and answer segments were kind of hard to wade through. But starting with the Carla Hall interview to the end, I thought the book picked up quite nicely. My only complaint is that maybe, after 400 pages, we were start to beat the dead horse a little with the whole "don't judge me cuz I'm a women" trope. They weren't wrong, but I felt like that had been asked and answered already. Overall, good read. This book started out a little slow for me. Sometimes the question and answer segments were kind of hard to wade through. But starting with the Carla Hall interview to the end, I thought the book picked up quite nicely. My only complaint is that maybe, after 400 pages, we were start to beat the dead horse a little with the whole "don't judge me cuz I'm a women" trope. They weren't wrong, but I felt like that had been asked and answered already. Overall, good read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jesica DeHart

    My perspective on food has expanded to envelope a unique collective community of women telling their own stories. Brave women forging their voices, rights, representation, creativity and sense of connection with each other and those they feed. The book presents and reads like a conversation and diaglogue that is at times deeply vulnerable, funny and thought provoking. I invite you to pick this book up and join the conversation.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pam Frederick

    The book provided a fascinating insight into the minds and life of professional women in the food industry. Each section can be read alone so I could easily read about one chef for example and read another section at a later time. I strongly recommend this book for women interested in the food industry. I learned a lot about the talent required for success.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    Great great, dense collection of pieces by and about women food writers, reporters and chefs. Entertaining, serious, fun and informative. Aside from a take-down of MFK Fisher, I loved it. It's the kind of book you never really finish reading. Great great, dense collection of pieces by and about women food writers, reporters and chefs. Entertaining, serious, fun and informative. Aside from a take-down of MFK Fisher, I loved it. It's the kind of book you never really finish reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. It's is comprised of little vignettes & essays regarding women & their relationship to food. I enjoyed this book. It's a little choppy & doesn't flow well at times, but otherwise is very entertaining & insightful. I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. It's is comprised of little vignettes & essays regarding women & their relationship to food. I enjoyed this book. It's a little choppy & doesn't flow well at times, but otherwise is very entertaining & insightful.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Portia

    If you are interested in eating, cooking, cook books, food writing and restaurants and are concerned with woman issues this a good book to read. I obtained it through a Goodreads win, and I am glad.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This book is important. It has a lot of entertaining stories and interviews, but it also tackles sexism and racism head on, something that is sadly still needs to be talked about more.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary Tharp

    Alot of good information.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Pulignani

    Great book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I love this book so much. Borrowed it from the library and will have to get my own copy. Full of so many great things!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Cindywho

    I was lucky to have a long time to read the large book of essays on food writing. Too many to remember/list but I was especially moved by the C-word (complicity) by Druckman.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    The author does a good job at the beginning of the book explaining that this is a collection of stories and thoughts. She practically says, although doesn't use these exact words, "Maybe you should think about reading this slowly and not 'straight through'." I didn't listen - I read it straight through and by the end I was very ready to be done. That's on me. Here's what is excellent about the book - the questions that are asked of the women are incredibly thoughtful and their responses are equal The author does a good job at the beginning of the book explaining that this is a collection of stories and thoughts. She practically says, although doesn't use these exact words, "Maybe you should think about reading this slowly and not 'straight through'." I didn't listen - I read it straight through and by the end I was very ready to be done. That's on me. Here's what is excellent about the book - the questions that are asked of the women are incredibly thoughtful and their responses are equally thoughtful. I liked the Q/A portions of the book and how the questions easily flowed out of the answers like a true conversation. Some of the essays really grabbed me, others were fine, and some I could've done without. The cover art is magnificent.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  28. 5 out of 5

    Erica Sorrels

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sujie Kim

  30. 4 out of 5

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