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How to Write Killer Fiction

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1880284626|9781880284629. How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense published in the year 2003. The author of this book is Carolyn Wheat . page displaying collection of Carolyn Wheat books here. This is the Paperback version of the title "How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense ". How 1880284626|9781880284629. How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense published in the year 2003. The author of this book is Carolyn Wheat . page displaying collection of Carolyn Wheat books here. This is the Paperback version of the title "How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense ". How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense is currently Available with us.


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1880284626|9781880284629. How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense published in the year 2003. The author of this book is Carolyn Wheat . page displaying collection of Carolyn Wheat books here. This is the Paperback version of the title "How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense ". How 1880284626|9781880284629. How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense published in the year 2003. The author of this book is Carolyn Wheat . page displaying collection of Carolyn Wheat books here. This is the Paperback version of the title "How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense ". How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & the Roller Coaster of Suspense is currently Available with us.

30 review for How to Write Killer Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Helen Power

    This book is so incredibly useful! It’s chock-full of examples, great ideas for twists and plot developments in mystery novels. The book has everything that you should consider when drafting and writing, outlining key story arcs for suspense and mystery fiction (even spending some time discussing the hero’s journey formula). There’s even some time spent on grammar towards the end of the book, though if you’re looking for a book on grammar, I would recommend finding a book dedicated solely to tha This book is so incredibly useful! It’s chock-full of examples, great ideas for twists and plot developments in mystery novels. The book has everything that you should consider when drafting and writing, outlining key story arcs for suspense and mystery fiction (even spending some time discussing the hero’s journey formula). There’s even some time spent on grammar towards the end of the book, though if you’re looking for a book on grammar, I would recommend finding a book dedicated solely to that topic. 5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Armand Rosamilia

    This book was released in 2003, which gave me pause. Would the information still be relevant nearly 20 years later? Yes. Thankfully. While the last chapter or two delves into agents, publishing and a few out of date ideas, overall it is worth it for the first 170 pages. A ton of great ideas and information to write the best mystery or suspense story you can, and I went through my copy with a highlighter and post-it notes and will be referring to this again and again.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

    A solid compilation of basic information that all writers of mystery and suspense need to know. Some of it's a little basic, but the book is overall quite helpful. However, most of the stuff Wheat discusses has more to do with plotting than actual writing. Actual writing tips for helping strengthen your prose take up only three or four pages. Wheat obviously has a great passion for mystery/suspense fiction, and she writes with an enthusiasm that I found to be incredibly infectious. After finishi A solid compilation of basic information that all writers of mystery and suspense need to know. Some of it's a little basic, but the book is overall quite helpful. However, most of the stuff Wheat discusses has more to do with plotting than actual writing. Actual writing tips for helping strengthen your prose take up only three or four pages. Wheat obviously has a great passion for mystery/suspense fiction, and she writes with an enthusiasm that I found to be incredibly infectious. After finishing this, I immediately went to Amazon.com to pick up a new detective novel for my Kindle. I also downloaded the first mystery computer game I could find (an oldie called PHANTASMAGORIA 2: PUZZLE OF FLESH). Now I can't stop thinking about detectives, murder, clues, and serial killers--a definite sign that this book was worth the $14 cover price.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lourdes Venard

    How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & The Roller Coaster of Suspense, by Carolyn Wheat, is one of those must-read books for new authors writing in the genre. Wheat, an accomplished mystery writer, divides the book into three parts. After describing the differences between mystery and suspense, the first part delves into mysteries and their basic ingredients, such as the “cover-up” (why the killer must continue killing), fair play, hiding clues in plain sight, and when the absenc How to Write Killer Fiction: The Funhouse of Mystery & The Roller Coaster of Suspense, by Carolyn Wheat, is one of those must-read books for new authors writing in the genre. Wheat, an accomplished mystery writer, divides the book into three parts. After describing the differences between mystery and suspense, the first part delves into mysteries and their basic ingredients, such as the “cover-up” (why the killer must continue killing), fair play, hiding clues in plain sight, and when the absence of a clue is a clue itself. She explains the structure of a mystery and different types of endings. Part 2 looks at suspense novels and how to engineer the “roller-coaster effect.” She looks at the hero’s journey and how this informs suspense writing. There’s an invaluable lesson in these chapters as she deconstructs Robert Crais’ Hostage, using the book’s plot to show how to structure a thriller. Yes, there may be spoilers if you haven’t read Hostage, but it’s a terrific lesson. That alone is worth the price of this book. Part 3 looks at the writing process, both for those who outline and for pantsers (Wheat calls them blank-pagers). Wheat covers writing scenes, narrative, tension, and even parts of speech (nouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs–and when to use them or not use them). The best part of this book are the examples she uses from various novels, and the summations she includes in easy-to-digest lists and tables. If you’re writing in the genre, this is a worthwhile addition to your library.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

    I didn’t exactly read this cover to cover, but it gave me a lot to think about when it comes to mystery and suspense and the differences between them. It contained some of the best explanation and examples of different genres that I’ve seen. I’m always on the lookout for some sort of definitive list of genres to use as categories on my blog, and this gave me a good place to start. It also helped me narrow down what exactly I’m trying to write. This was a good Kindle purchase, and I’m sure I will I didn’t exactly read this cover to cover, but it gave me a lot to think about when it comes to mystery and suspense and the differences between them. It contained some of the best explanation and examples of different genres that I’ve seen. I’m always on the lookout for some sort of definitive list of genres to use as categories on my blog, and this gave me a good place to start. It also helped me narrow down what exactly I’m trying to write. This was a good Kindle purchase, and I’m sure I will use it as a reference in years to come.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John

    Before I begin my review of this book, I should state for clarification, once again, in case it's not clear, who I am, meaning what my background fiction writing is. I have been what I will call, "a serious aspiring fiction writer/novelist since about 2007. I have not written any complete novel manuscripts, although I have started and even come close to completing at least a half-dozen. I have however written and "published" numerous short stories. I have been studying fiction writing in a serio Before I begin my review of this book, I should state for clarification, once again, in case it's not clear, who I am, meaning what my background fiction writing is. I have been what I will call, "a serious aspiring fiction writer/novelist since about 2007. I have not written any complete novel manuscripts, although I have started and even come close to completing at least a half-dozen. I have however written and "published" numerous short stories. I have been studying fiction writing in a serious and more formal way though since 2009. I am stating all this to let you have a context for this review and my previous reviews. I have taken numerous classes on fiction writing generally and novel writing specifically and I have read and utilized dozens of books on the subject. For me it is now just a matter of having a manuscripts accepted I am mainstream publisher, I have not seriously considered self publication. Although maybe I should. :-) The book that I'm reviewing here it's actually one that I've had on my own shelf quite some time. I apparently started reading it a long time ago. However, my marginalia indicates that I thought I should pause because that time that I started I felt it was over my head. Now that is not the case. :-) I guess I'm saying this as another way of indicating that, again, I don't think that this book is an appropriate starting place for neophyte fiction writers. By' neophyte fiction writers' I mean those who have never taken and completed a more fundamental introductory workshop fiction writing. There are books for that, if you can't take a live class, which I think are better for beginners, and I have already reviewed some of them. One is by Haley Ephron, the everything book on writing your first novel. a 2nd one is James and Frey's How to Write It There Good Novel I. A third and perhaps better option for complete beginners who can't take a live class would be Writing Fiction Step-By-Step by Josip Novakovitch this book is the closest thing I've seen when novel writing course between the covers of a book. But even prior to that I would recommend Novakovitch's fiction writing workshop. While this is admittedly more geared to short stories, is a good idea to get a few short stories under your belt before you try and write 330 page novel. Anyway you get the point Caroline wheat's excellent book that I am reviewing here is not for 'beginners,' those who haven't studied and tried anything before. I don't think wheat realizes it, but she just assumes too much and uses too much writer speak terminology. All of that having been said this is an excellent book for the non-beginner, the person who has decided that they want to seriously try to draft up their first complete mystery or thriller novel. This book covers both mysteries and thrillers. If you think you know the difference, I would still recommend that you read wheat's introduction and first chapter first. In those she goes through the differences very specifically, in ways that some other authors who write about miscreants really writing to not do. It is clear that Carolyn wheat has stood in front of writing students and explained the ins and outs of the two different genres to anxious aspiring writers. It is also clear that she is widely read in her genres and that she loves them. You really do know the difference between a mystery and thriller is not necessarily read this book from front to back. I did not read it that way, and I still ended up reading 80% of it at least. I know that I'm trying to draft a thriller so I focused on what I'll call her unit II on thrillers and not her unit III, the writing process. There is also a reading list in the back of the book you should check out and maybe you should check it out first. Especially if you are not yet widely read the mystery and thriller genre, I would suggest you go through the book, see which books she uses as her exemplars and read or at least scan them first. As I said I don't think this book is really best used, reading it from front to back, every page. But it is an essential reference, I think for those who were trying to write either a mystery or a thriller. Also, your reading this book you might also want to read alongside it one of wheat's mystery or thriller novels. I think she will eventually be declared a Grand Master. :-) She can certainly dissect the mystery and thriller writing process very well. One other suggestion anyone reading this book should also read, How to Write a Damn Good Thriller or How to Write a Damn Good Mystery Also by James N Fry. I think Frey And Wheat should be read side-by-side nearly so, since there is constructive overlap, but each of them also discusses issues that the other one forgets to mention. Carolyn wheat's description of the differences between the structure of a mystery in the structure of a thriller, is far superior to the one given by Frey, for one example. But on the other hand wheat's book is so short that it feels like it skips over important points that Frey covers in great depth.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric Beaty

    If you've ever been confused about how to write a best-selling story, then Carolyn Wheat's book is the best place to start. Simply fun to read, easy to understand, and conversational in nature, this book will not leave you feeling disappointed. Wheat's book is one of the few I have read which has is truly helped me understand concepts such as writing in Three Act Structure, plotting a book, and the fundamentals of writing best-selling mystery and suspense novels. I've checked it out twice from my If you've ever been confused about how to write a best-selling story, then Carolyn Wheat's book is the best place to start. Simply fun to read, easy to understand, and conversational in nature, this book will not leave you feeling disappointed. Wheat's book is one of the few I have read which has is truly helped me understand concepts such as writing in Three Act Structure, plotting a book, and the fundamentals of writing best-selling mystery and suspense novels. I've checked it out twice from my local library, and I've decided to go ahead and purchase a copy since they're available at such cheap rates almost everywhere you look. One of the few books I could read it over and over again and still enjoy it as if it was the first time. Seriously, give this book a try; you absolutely will not regret it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debra Williams

    Years ago, perhaps 10-12, I found this book in a used book store in FL. It is autographed to Wendy, by the author. I almost didn't buy it, but I returned to the shelf and got it along with several other books that day. This is one of the best purchases I've ever made. At the time, I had no idea that one day I would be an author of mysteries with my own book available on Goodreads. As a Christian author, I have to insert, but God knew. This book is full of gems for the mystery writer. In my copy, Years ago, perhaps 10-12, I found this book in a used book store in FL. It is autographed to Wendy, by the author. I almost didn't buy it, but I returned to the shelf and got it along with several other books that day. This is one of the best purchases I've ever made. At the time, I had no idea that one day I would be an author of mysteries with my own book available on Goodreads. As a Christian author, I have to insert, but God knew. This book is full of gems for the mystery writer. In my copy, I've highlighted, underlined, or starred many lines. This is a must-have for your bookshelf if you write mysteries of any kind. Highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    David

    A lot of great ideas for aspiring writers of mystery novels and thrillers. Much of what Carolyn Wheat writes in this writing primer seems like common sense, but in today's market, it's much easier to get a book published than it is to actually write a good book--so what may SEEM like common sense, clearly isn't. Publishing has changed dramatically since this book was written in 2003, so the chapter on getting published is a bit out-dated, the chapters preceding that section serve as valuable les A lot of great ideas for aspiring writers of mystery novels and thrillers. Much of what Carolyn Wheat writes in this writing primer seems like common sense, but in today's market, it's much easier to get a book published than it is to actually write a good book--so what may SEEM like common sense, clearly isn't. Publishing has changed dramatically since this book was written in 2003, so the chapter on getting published is a bit out-dated, the chapters preceding that section serve as valuable lessons for new writers and great reminders for experienced writers who wander off track.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anita (Hearts and Whodunits)

    This book is chock full of information on mystery and suspense fiction writing. It could be used for a writing seminar. It goes through the essential elements of the story and includes advice on the editing process. A very good read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Enjoyed this book on the writing craft for mystery and suspense. Wheat pulls out great examples in print and provides creations of her own to drive home the teaching elements. But it wasn’t all about the teaching—it is an entertaining read. Definitely inspiring.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    Rating: 3.5. Useful. Slightly dated in the examples given.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Larry Edwards

    As an author and editor, I recommend this book highly. It lays out in clear, concise words, what's needed to write a mystery, suspense, thriller. As an author and editor, I recommend this book highly. It lays out in clear, concise words, what's needed to write a mystery, suspense, thriller.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Elena Smith

    Answered every question I ever asked about writing crime fiction, in addition to the questions I hadn’t thought of yet.

  15. 5 out of 5

    W.A. Holmes

    An enjoyable introduction to writing crime novels. She begins with the two basic types of crime novels, how the protagonist would differ for each type, and what reaction the reader of either type expects. Lots of examples.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peach

    Difference between mystery and suspense 👌🏼

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Valjan

    I shy away for how-to books because I think “method” is particular to each person. No two people see a car accident the same way. No two readers read the same book the same way. Fellow writer Susan Fleet, author of the Frank Renzi series, directed me to Wheat’s book. There are two unfortunate problems when writers see this book: 1) they think the book won’t help them because they are not a mystery-suspense guy or gal, or 2) they start reading it and they think, “Well, that is self-evident. Tell I shy away for how-to books because I think “method” is particular to each person. No two people see a car accident the same way. No two readers read the same book the same way. Fellow writer Susan Fleet, author of the Frank Renzi series, directed me to Wheat’s book. There are two unfortunate problems when writers see this book: 1) they think the book won’t help them because they are not a mystery-suspense guy or gal, or 2) they start reading it and they think, “Well, that is self-evident. Tell me what I don’t know.” That’s the beauty of this book: everything is in one place; and even if you think that you have got a handle on the genre or the writing gig, you will learn something BECAUSE this book is about good writing, plot development, and pacing that is applicable to any genre. A reviewer criticized the book for being light on thriller. I disagree: thriller is nothing more than suspense as a function of plot and sub-plot paced out, and Carolyn Wheat explains that very clearly. Before you read the book cover to cover, open up to pages 60-61, where she explains the 4-Part Arc System. Yes, read the rest of the book, but laminate these two pages. The author leaves it up to you as to how you best to demonstrate those principles so that it is not paint-by-numbers. The principles are sound. As for her Arc System, my only quibble is about the use of flashbacks. I think that readers are smart; some are visual learners, while others are auditory and kinesthetic, so flashbacks should be used with care. Engage all the senses -- that is my point. Also, the non-linear narrative structure can work in the hands of a master, but is clumsy in the hands of someone less competent (I used flashback twice in my Roma Series (Roma, Underground, Chapters 5 and 14, and there I took a chance, because neither section advanced the plot, but it conveyed a lot about the characters and their values). Wheat points readers to contemporary entertainment (Law & Order, for one example) and lists must-read authors in the mystery-suspense-thriller genre. In short, the book gives sound advice and is a master-class of the ARC System and variations on a theme. Again, it isn’t about Genre: a good story well told is a good story, and that, my friends, requires good writing. Period.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I have always been fascinated by books. Be it reading one, writing one, or just simply holding one in my hands, knowing that the information it withholds has a lot more value than its physical appearance would suggest. For some, this value is unmatched, for others it is never revealed. For Carolyn Wheat, author of How to Write Killer Fiction, it is undoubtedly the first. Even for those whose main genre of choice happens not to be mystery, she provides a clear, enjoyable read. Before I opened the b I have always been fascinated by books. Be it reading one, writing one, or just simply holding one in my hands, knowing that the information it withholds has a lot more value than its physical appearance would suggest. For some, this value is unmatched, for others it is never revealed. For Carolyn Wheat, author of How to Write Killer Fiction, it is undoubtedly the first. Even for those whose main genre of choice happens not to be mystery, she provides a clear, enjoyable read. Before I opened the book, my first thought was that this is going to be either a huge list of instructions with some thrown-in examples, or a collection of advices coming from famous authors, who we could never identify with, unless one of them happens to be our favourite. Even then, a few years later, working on our first book, we could hardly recall any usable information. After finishing the first chapter, I realized with delight that I was wrong: it was neither of these. The book is well thought-out, and it might worth reading. I was not disappointed. Drawing on the author's own experiences and existing books, it is full of great advice on almost every aspect of mystery writing, trying to accomodate for the most common writer types. Avoiding typical mistakes, devising plot, clues, characters, settings, even sub genres: it is all included. The style is fluid and flowing, the examples are easy to follow. Parts of a mystery novel is revealed drop by drop, and if we have never felt fascination for any mystery author, this is surely going to change now. As a bonus, we even get an insight into editing and publishing, and declaring a book "finished". The best part, however, is that even those who think that writing should come from inside, without using the already accepted rules of this particular genre are not forced to follow all of this. These are not set rules. This book is here to help, but if you know what works for you, as the author says, "toss it away and write from your gut".

  19. 4 out of 5

    John

    I saw this book on the website of a local bookstore. I've been interested in learning more about the mystery and suspense forms for a while. The summary caught my eye, so I went down to the store and picked it up. I found the prose direct and to the point. Wheat organized the book in a format that is easy to follow and brings the reader the sought after information rather rapidly. The book does not skimp on details though. She is thorough with providing examples, explanations and reviewing inform I saw this book on the website of a local bookstore. I've been interested in learning more about the mystery and suspense forms for a while. The summary caught my eye, so I went down to the store and picked it up. I found the prose direct and to the point. Wheat organized the book in a format that is easy to follow and brings the reader the sought after information rather rapidly. The book does not skimp on details though. She is thorough with providing examples, explanations and reviewing information to reinforce her point. Wheat addresses the forms of mystery and suspense separately, dividing each into four arcs. Once she is through talking about the two genres, she talks about different writing styles: Outlines and Blank-Pagers. The strengths and weakness of each are discussed in detail. I found this section to be particularly enlightening, as I have tried both forms in my effort to find my own rhythm. Her insight hit home. This is a great book to add to a writer's library. I would not limit it to mystery or suspense writers, but those who seek to understand these genres for their own enrichment. For me, the book was a good buy.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cherese A. Vines

    How To Write Killer Fiction by Carolynn Wheat is an excellent introduction to writing mystery and suspense novels. I was only vaguely aware that mystery and suspense could be two distinctive types of works though closely related. In a mystery, whatever kind, there is a puzzle for the hero to solve. In a suspense, it is a "nightmare" for the hero to survive and come out a changed person. There have been a few books that merged both types, but for the most part they stay separate. Wheat is very rea How To Write Killer Fiction by Carolynn Wheat is an excellent introduction to writing mystery and suspense novels. I was only vaguely aware that mystery and suspense could be two distinctive types of works though closely related. In a mystery, whatever kind, there is a puzzle for the hero to solve. In a suspense, it is a "nightmare" for the hero to survive and come out a changed person. There have been a few books that merged both types, but for the most part they stay separate. Wheat is very readable, clear and entertaining as she talks you through what makes a mystery a mystery and suspense a suspense. The only thing I was lost on was arcs. But this was not a book about the technical parts of writing like arcs and characterizations and themes. This book teaches the parts of the journey that a mystery/suspense hero makes and how to keep your readers interested and guessing how the hero will solve the crime and/or make it to the end. I highly recommend this to any fiction writer. It has a lot of good advice that crosses genre lines. I borrowed this book from the library. I've had it for like 2 months. I'm going to go buy my own copy. This is a great writing tool!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael Atencio

    I own just about every how-to book on writing mysteries, horror and thrillers. I've bought them mostly from Writer's Digest How To collection, Amazon.com or from a local bookstore. My library is extensive to say the least and I've read them all piecemeal or completely depending upon what I needed at the moment. That's why I was surprised with How To Write Killer Fiction by Carolyn Wheat. Of all the books I own, most turn out to be vague reference tomes that resemble each other literally. Especia I own just about every how-to book on writing mysteries, horror and thrillers. I've bought them mostly from Writer's Digest How To collection, Amazon.com or from a local bookstore. My library is extensive to say the least and I've read them all piecemeal or completely depending upon what I needed at the moment. That's why I was surprised with How To Write Killer Fiction by Carolyn Wheat. Of all the books I own, most turn out to be vague reference tomes that resemble each other literally. Especially the Writer's Digest set. This book wonderfully explains the nuances of mystery writing for the novice up to the expert. If you buy this reference work, you'll have made a great investment to your collection as well to your writing skill sets of fiction, mystery and horror. An absolute must have for new authors of any genre.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Edmund

    I won't say How to write KILLER Fiction contains the most insightful of writing advice, Most of the book focusses on describing mystery and thriller techniques of tried authors, which is kinda helpful, but also in a sense is telling wanna-authors what NOT to do as this has already been done. There are smatterings of good advice. Towards the end, however, in the 'general' section, KILLER starts to feel like Filler, and I recommend time strapped readers skip this section, unless this is first how-t I won't say How to write KILLER Fiction contains the most insightful of writing advice, Most of the book focusses on describing mystery and thriller techniques of tried authors, which is kinda helpful, but also in a sense is telling wanna-authors what NOT to do as this has already been done. There are smatterings of good advice. Towards the end, however, in the 'general' section, KILLER starts to feel like Filler, and I recommend time strapped readers skip this section, unless this is first how-to write book they've seen, and don't know that adverbs are the black-jelly beans of authoring.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Denise Hartman

    Several people in writers' circles encouraged me to read this book and I'm glad I bought a copy of my own. It compares mysteries to a funhouse in a carnival and suspense/thrillers to a roller coaster ride. It really helped me clarify which kind of books I'm writing and was a huge benefit in brainstorming some new features in my almost finished book as well as the one I'm outlining and about to start. Good stuff for writers! Several people in writers' circles encouraged me to read this book and I'm glad I bought a copy of my own. It compares mysteries to a funhouse in a carnival and suspense/thrillers to a roller coaster ride. It really helped me clarify which kind of books I'm writing and was a huge benefit in brainstorming some new features in my almost finished book as well as the one I'm outlining and about to start. Good stuff for writers!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    This was an absolutely indispensable guide to mystery writing. Anyone who is thinking about writing a mystery should read this book first. There was so much great, practical advice on how both mystery and thriller genres (and sub-genres!) work. She had lots of stuff about how to structure either kinds of these genre stories. She even had a suggested outline for your own story. Really great stuff. If I get my story published I'm going to write a thank-you note to Ms. Wheat. This was an absolutely indispensable guide to mystery writing. Anyone who is thinking about writing a mystery should read this book first. There was so much great, practical advice on how both mystery and thriller genres (and sub-genres!) work. She had lots of stuff about how to structure either kinds of these genre stories. She even had a suggested outline for your own story. Really great stuff. If I get my story published I'm going to write a thank-you note to Ms. Wheat.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mary Chrapliwy

    This is a very basic book that contains separate sections for mystery, suspense/thrillers, and some basic writing instructions. Even though this book didn't hold any surprises for me, I did get a couple ideas that will likely help me with the current and final revision of my novel. She also stated something so true about writing the middle of your novel, which I've added to my favorite quotes. This is a very basic book that contains separate sections for mystery, suspense/thrillers, and some basic writing instructions. Even though this book didn't hold any surprises for me, I did get a couple ideas that will likely help me with the current and final revision of my novel. She also stated something so true about writing the middle of your novel, which I've added to my favorite quotes.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Hargett

    This was a helpful read on the process involved in writing a mystery or a thriller. It had some very helpful condensed and focused suggestions. I recommend it for anyone that's writing something that deals with suspense. This was a helpful read on the process involved in writing a mystery or a thriller. It had some very helpful condensed and focused suggestions. I recommend it for anyone that's writing something that deals with suspense.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brion Salazar

    There is some good insight here. Much more towards the theory and generalities of writing, than specific how to information. I did feel like much of the information was honest talk from a writer as opposed to the common inspirational information you will find in other books on writing.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Good stuff for writers. I tried reading it in the Kindle edition, but kept getting lost as the publisher made no attempt to modify the book's layout for the digital world. So if you're going to read it, you'll probably want to get it in print. Good stuff for writers. I tried reading it in the Kindle edition, but kept getting lost as the publisher made no attempt to modify the book's layout for the digital world. So if you're going to read it, you'll probably want to get it in print.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    There are a lot of 'how to' books for writing mystery, but this one distinguishes itself by the discussion of mystery vs suspense vs thriller. Also notable is the discussion of approaches to writing--Outliners vs Blank Pagers. There are a lot of 'how to' books for writing mystery, but this one distinguishes itself by the discussion of mystery vs suspense vs thriller. Also notable is the discussion of approaches to writing--Outliners vs Blank Pagers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Graham & Wolf The Uncanny

    We hope to add this one to our collection (we borrowed it from the library), as it has a number of very helpful tips in it. The author discusses both mystery books & suspense novels, both of which we're interested in. We hope to add this one to our collection (we borrowed it from the library), as it has a number of very helpful tips in it. The author discusses both mystery books & suspense novels, both of which we're interested in.

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