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Aurian

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In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the Artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathans and Phaerie. Aurian, the child of renegade Mages, finds In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the Artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathans and Phaerie. Aurian, the child of renegade Mages, finds herself sent to the city of Nexis to join the Academy and then train as a full Mage. Little does she suspect that she will quickly become entwined with a power struggle between Miathan, the Archmage, and the human inhabitants of Nexis. The only person to whom she can turn in Forral, Commander of the city's military garrison and friend of her dead father. But this friendship infuriates Miathan, and leads to a deadly conflagration, in which the first Artefact is revealed. Aurian's flight, with her servant Anvar, turns into both odyssey and rite-of-passage as she travels to the little-known Southern Kingdoms and begins to rediscover the history of the weapons which are the only hope against Miathan and Armageddon - The Artefacts of Power!


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In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the Artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathans and Phaerie. Aurian, the child of renegade Mages, finds In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the Artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathans and Phaerie. Aurian, the child of renegade Mages, finds herself sent to the city of Nexis to join the Academy and then train as a full Mage. Little does she suspect that she will quickly become entwined with a power struggle between Miathan, the Archmage, and the human inhabitants of Nexis. The only person to whom she can turn in Forral, Commander of the city's military garrison and friend of her dead father. But this friendship infuriates Miathan, and leads to a deadly conflagration, in which the first Artefact is revealed. Aurian's flight, with her servant Anvar, turns into both odyssey and rite-of-passage as she travels to the little-known Southern Kingdoms and begins to rediscover the history of the weapons which are the only hope against Miathan and Armageddon - The Artefacts of Power!

30 review for Aurian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    I now have a Booktube channel! Find me at: The Obsessive Bookseller [2.5/5 stars] Okay, so this book is not very recommendable… but I still enjoyed it. The thing I liked most about Aurian was it’s unconventionality. Written in 1994 before writing fantasy novels as a profession was really popular, Furey’s story does not follow a formulaic plot structure in the slightest. I’ve been to the writing conventions. I subscribe to advice newsletters from my favorite authors. The basic writing strategy thes I now have a Booktube channel! Find me at: The Obsessive Bookseller [2.5/5 stars] Okay, so this book is not very recommendable… but I still enjoyed it. The thing I liked most about Aurian was it’s unconventionality. Written in 1994 before writing fantasy novels as a profession was really popular, Furey’s story does not follow a formulaic plot structure in the slightest. I’ve been to the writing conventions. I subscribe to advice newsletters from my favorite authors. The basic writing strategy these days seem to be all the same ideas of how to structure your story to make money. While many authors are better at putting their own spin on it than others, it’s hard for me to ignore it some days. This is why I continued to remain intrigued by Aurian throughout the whole novel: it was so all over the place that I had no f&@$ing idea what was going to happen next, and that was oddly refreshing. The characters left a lot to be desired. Primarily because their behavior was unrealistic. They would swing from one dramatic emotional state to another at the drop of a hat. Very much like watching the rapid mood swings of a four year old. There was no subtlety or nuance to their behavior at all, just very black and white outlooks on things. They either loved fiercely or hated viciously. Often within the same couple of paragraphs. Then back again. It sort of reminded me of overdramatized classic silent films where the emotion had to be overdone to make sure it was conveyed correctly to the audience. Even though no one really acts that way, there’s no doubt in the readers mind what emotion the author was representing. It was also one of those books where the extreme emotional outbursts made me feel second-hand frustration on behalf of the characters involved, which wasn’t exactly pleasant. The characters also had very black-and-white thinking and would flip flop between these extremes with frightening ease. There was no subtly or nuance of character, nor any real significant growth because the changes in thoughts/behavior were abrupt and not earned through experience and logic. In some ways it felt like reading about a bunch of children, which kept me from connecting with any of the characters and took away from the maturity of the novel as a whole. As you can imagine, the dialogue followed in line with the character profiles – very basic. All of this did work well to convey the general emotion of the characters. You could definitely always tell exactly what they were feeling. I mentioned the plot meandered a lot. There seemed to be a lot of setup for certain events in the book, but every time I thought we were getting grounded into the meat of the story, something random would happen and we’d be back to establishing a new scenario. I had an idea what we were working towards by about the 75% mark, but even then it kept going with the tangents up to the very end. So, basically all of the things that together made it a fun unconventional read also made it hard to support. What’s more, the book is ONLY available in a mass market paperback with the world’s tiniest print or a ridiculously expensive hardcover. No ebook, no audiobook (in the US, anyway). Not that my review is gearing anyone to go pick one up. Recommendations: this is a great pick if you want a character-driven classic fantasy adventure novel with easy, flowing writing… provided that you don’t mind illogical and over-emotional characters. Dragon Rating: 2/10 stars (one for the cover, one for the 2/600 pages where there was actually a dragon) Via The Obsessive Bookseller at www.NikiHawkes.com Other books you might like (...better):

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol (StarAngel's Reviews) Allen

    Wow...just wow! It may be slow in the beginning but this is full of adventure, heart-ache, and love!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shera (Book Whispers)

    Sounds like any number of fantasy books out there. Aurian had the potential to be another boring A-typical book in the Fantasy genre. Before rereading this book, I had wondered how come this book had stuck in my mind for so long after reading it probably about six years ago. I was fairly young and thought maybe the impression was left from the inexperienced mind of a young reader. However, Furey has created one of the best epic fantasy books I have read. Taking the same old tale and turning it i Sounds like any number of fantasy books out there. Aurian had the potential to be another boring A-typical book in the Fantasy genre. Before rereading this book, I had wondered how come this book had stuck in my mind for so long after reading it probably about six years ago. I was fairly young and thought maybe the impression was left from the inexperienced mind of a young reader. However, Furey has created one of the best epic fantasy books I have read. Taking the same old tale and turning it into a refreshing new story. One of my favorite things about Aurian is all of the subplots that work themselves into the main idea. They all fit together somehow and it’s fun to see each one pull together and shape the story. The twist on fairies is really fun, and the history of the world is unique to see from different cultures. Especially once the reader is given the real facts. Every time you get more information on the world, other races, and cultures , it is like feeding an addiction. Meeting each of the powerful races of the elements is also a great treat, and I want more on the Skyfolk. Aurian is the main character, but it is told by the points of views of many different characters. I come up with ten right off the top of my head, but there are many more. Furey is so skilled that I never found myself bored as the story went from one character to the next. Even with all the back and forth between characters and plots, I didn't get lost. The names of the characters are very beautiful, and they are all different enough that I never get the characters mixed up. That has always been one of my pet peeves with fantasy books, all the names are so similar that you never know who you are reading about. My favorite part of this book isn’t the wonderful plot and story ideas, but it is the emotions. Furey has truly proven with this book. Her skill is making the characters real by thinking, feeling, and interacting with the world they are in. I’m not quite sure if I can properly explain it. Each character from our main heroine to the evil villain, or even just to a temporary character, has such depth and growth. Furey expertly deals with grief, the kinds of love there are, happiness, revenge, evil, and the change people go through as they live. She expertly shows how others can impact and change someone’s life. The great characterization is coupled by Furey’s rich writing. Every place that is described flows easily into the mind. Every character has a unique voice, and point of view, that never takes away, but adds to Furey’s style. She can easily wrench your heart with sorrow, and then have you chuckling with a humorous line. Bottom line: Even after all of these years, Furey’s book still manages to captive me. Aurian’s character depth and emotions are something that no reader should pass up. This book has one of the best love stories I have ever read. There are many plots to follow in this book, which I didn’t find over whelming as some readers might. If you read a lot it shouldn’t be too hard to differentiate and remember them. This is a series where you are not going to want to wait a long time in between reading the next book. Sexual content: Furey keeps it pretty clean. There are some sex scenes which are not detailed. A beginning to a rape scene, the author does not go into details.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    Maggie Furey's writing is erratic. She has a great storyline, but the books lack imagination and detail. Rather than describing actions, she tells you exactly what happened. Nothing like, "She reached her arm out towards the dancing light, fingers stretched forth, to gently clasp it in her hand". You get, "Aurian reached forward and grabbed the light". <--- Not taken word for word, but an example. She is brilliant with describing places, except she often forgets to let you know how it all fits t Maggie Furey's writing is erratic. She has a great storyline, but the books lack imagination and detail. Rather than describing actions, she tells you exactly what happened. Nothing like, "She reached her arm out towards the dancing light, fingers stretched forth, to gently clasp it in her hand". You get, "Aurian reached forward and grabbed the light". <--- Not taken word for word, but an example. She is brilliant with describing places, except she often forgets to let you know how it all fits together. Sure, the inn is to the side of the tavern, right next to the bakery, but is it the right, or the left? And all the little details, described so well, seem to have forgotten where they belong. This merchant's stall, in all it's detail and glory, never had a place allocated it in the description. I can picture it splendidly, but I'll never know if it was on the street, or at the side of the river, or floating in midair. Plus, she doesn't flesh out her writing nearly enough. There was enough plot here to sustain 3-4 novels of the same size, but everything felt rushed. She easily could have written an entire book on the events leading up to Miathan's folly with the Cauldron, but as it was, it was short, rushed, and over all too quickly. The magic system is ill-explained and hardly fleshed out. What the boundaries of the realm of possibility are with the magic is left unknown, even though the main character spent years of study with multiple tutors. Many times, the use of magic seems whimsical on average and convenient at best. The characters find themselves in a sticky situation, and voila, magic to the rescue! Aurian doesn't have access to magic, but she needs it? Now she does, because Aurian is just that awe-inspiring. The fact that the Magefolk are a dying race is both well-played out and very poorly done at the same time. There were less than a dozen to begin with, but with half of them dead, it's a wonder the race (and magic with it) will survive the series. Besides, it seems merely convenient to have one Mage of each talent, when they are all that is left in the world. And not just one, but both the main characters talent's encompass the whole spectrum? When this is such a rare ability, and it appears twice in the next to non-existant numbers of the MageFolk, you're left to wonder how much is purely convenience on the author's behalf. On a side note, her foreshadowing is so blatantly obvious that a third grader could pick it out. Anytime the author tries to hint at the future, you're left with a glaringly obvious plot-step. These "hints" could be re-written to be more subtle, or just be left out all together. Also, the books are riddled with spelling and grammatical errors, such as, "The fruit smiled delicious" instead of, "The fruit smelled delicious". A better editor wouldn't hurt in the slightest. But on the bright side, Maggie Furey has a captivating plotline that leaves me honestly wondering where they will go next. As well, she is brilliant with her character's emotions and development. Their interactions stay true to character throughout the books and feel real and well thought out. I'd love to see the books re-written, fleshed out, and given new life (honestly, I had thoughts of doing it myself, I was so annoyed with the books).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Krys

    I have had Aurian by Maggie Furey sitting on my shelves since 2004 - I know this because I pulled the receipt out of the book. It took me seven years to pick it up and seven days to finish it. Oh, the humanity. I haven't been in the mood for High Fantasy for a long time having converted to Urban Fantasy for the past few years. For those out of the loop, High fantasy has chicks with chain mail, or robes, (and Dragons!) on the covers. Urban Fantasy leans more towards leather and midriffs, and guns, I have had Aurian by Maggie Furey sitting on my shelves since 2004 - I know this because I pulled the receipt out of the book. It took me seven years to pick it up and seven days to finish it. Oh, the humanity. I haven't been in the mood for High Fantasy for a long time having converted to Urban Fantasy for the past few years. For those out of the loop, High fantasy has chicks with chain mail, or robes, (and Dragons!) on the covers. Urban Fantasy leans more towards leather and midriffs, and guns, or swords swinging... in the city (insert Joe Walsh here). But I run on. Urban Fantasy has been rocking my book world for a while now, so what made me pick this up? Simple, it's one of the 50 blue goal books for the year. In reading Aurian I am transported back to books I used to read more frequently, perhaps way back in 2004. I grew up wielding fake swords and spouting made up names while wearing a cape. Surprise anyone? Unlikely. Anywho, the book. The book. Aurian has grown up secluded from the world by her mageborn mother. Having withdrawn from the world after the death of her husband, Eilin is unnerved at the arrival of a swordsman named Forral. Forral has come to help and bonds immediately with Aurian, eventually teaching her to sword fight. When Aurian's powers begin to emerge it is Forral who convinces Eilin to send her to the Academy, a place for Magefolk to train. Sequestered and fearful of mortals Miathan, the Archmage, has it in his head to rule over them... even if there are only a handful of mages left. When bigotry reaches a fever pitch will Aurian be able to find it in herself to surmount the hatred? I enjoyed this. Quite a lot. It's been a minute since I have delved into High Fantasy but I took to it very easily. It's home for me in the genre world, after all. And what a ride Furey takes the reader on! Mages, and mortals, and whales, and telepathic cats, and lost objects, and gladiatorial arenas, and corrupt kings, and scheming women, and scheming men, and and and... it's quite a trip. I was also pleased to see some traditional mythology creeping in here. If I remember my Welsh Mythology correctly (The Mabinogion, The Chronicles of Prydain - holla!). There are symbols that turn up both in those pieces and in Maggie Furey's quartet; the Cauldron of the dead, the sword of power, a staff, a harp, a trip into the faerie realm. Sheesh, there's even a talking cat in Lloyd Alexander's books. One can argue that Furey is "stealing" from these myths, but since Welsh mythology in particular is so prevalent in contemporary fantasy it's hardly theft. Harry Potter is taking from these myths as well. I'm glad I read this instead of selling it for credit (as I thought of doing a while back). I will be reading the remaining books in the series... after a small break. But definitely. I wanted to hack off half a star for Furey's over usage of the phrase "indomitable will" but I'm not going to. It was the only thing I didn't like about the book. So there's that. 5 out of 5 stars. It's good, if you can find a copy. It's a little out of print right now. - review couresy of www.bibliopunkkreads.com

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shaitarn

    Probably slightly more than 3 stars, but not good enough to deserve 4. From the inside back cover: In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathan and the Phaerie. Aurian, child of renegade Mages, finds herself sent to the city of Ne Probably slightly more than 3 stars, but not good enough to deserve 4. From the inside back cover: In ages past, there had been four magical weapons, fashioned to be used only by the Magefolk. But their history had been lost, together with the artefacts themselves, in the Cataclysm which had wrought changes on land and water alike. Lost also had been the history of the Magefolk, and the Winged Ones, the Leviathan and the Phaerie. Aurian, child of renegade Mages, finds herself sent to the city of Nexis to join the Academy and then train as a full Mage. Little does she suspect that she will quickly become entwined with a power struggle between Miathan, the Archmage, and the human inhabitants of Nexis. The only person to whom she can turn is Forral, Commander of the city's military garrison and friend of her dead father. But this friendship infuriates Miathan, and leads to a deadly conflagration in which the first Artefact is revealed. Aurian's flight, with her servant Anvar, turns into both odyssey and rite-of-passage as she travels to the little known Southern Kingdoms and begins to rediscovery the history of the weapons which are the only hope against Miathan and Armageddon - The Artefacts of Power! First published in 1994, this is an old-fashioned fantasy book and perhaps consequently is fairly trope-y. The conflict between good and evil is a stark one, with no shades of grey to confuse the issue. Our main character, Aurian, is verging on Mary-Sue territory: she is one of the 'girl with all the gifts' types (most mages only have one or two of the four elemental magical powers, Aurian, of course, has all four) and her defining (and only?) fault is her pride, which can lead her to be stubborn and argumentative. Mages themselves are pretty Mary-sue/Gary-Stu-ish: (view spoiler)[they can understand any languages, communicate telepathically, and can't drown: if they're underwater their lungs can switch to drawing oxygen from the water (of course, this could just be a handy way for the author to write herself out of a corner - am I too cynical?). (hide spoiler)] A lot of the things that happened in this book made me roll my eyes, either at the stupidity of some of the characters (Anvar, I'm looking at you), or at the sheer predictability of the plot. Some of the magic didn't make sense either: the elemental magic is something I can understand, but there's also healing magic and a 'preservation magic' that's used to protect the Academy's archives somehow, but we're never told how this works exactly. And yet, despite all that I tore through this book at a rate of knots. Despite all it's arguable faults, the book had a genuine readability about it, the quality that makes you think 'just one more chapter!' for quite a while. This book is probably a good choice for those just starting with fantasy (it has something of a YA vibe about it, in a good way) who are unfamiliar with the traditional tropes of the genre or those who enjoy the works of Brooks and Feist. I'll probably read the other three books in the series at some point in the future, but I'm in no hurry to do so now, I must confess.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    When my sister-in-law, Felicia, first recommended this to me, I was a little hesitant. I've read a lot of fantasy, and even though there are a lot of authors I haven't read, I'm pretty well-versed in fantasy. And I'd never heard of this book, or the author. I figured if it was good, I would have heard of it. But it was good. Excellent, in fact--and here I sit, trying to figure out why this book isn't more well known. I would put Maggie Furey on par with some of my favorite fantasy authors: Robin When my sister-in-law, Felicia, first recommended this to me, I was a little hesitant. I've read a lot of fantasy, and even though there are a lot of authors I haven't read, I'm pretty well-versed in fantasy. And I'd never heard of this book, or the author. I figured if it was good, I would have heard of it. But it was good. Excellent, in fact--and here I sit, trying to figure out why this book isn't more well known. I would put Maggie Furey on par with some of my favorite fantasy authors: Robin Hobb, Lynn Flewelling, Katharine Kerr, George R.R. Martin (okay, maybe not quite at Martin's magnificent level). The writing was solid; even though it's a fairly long book, there was not one spot where I felt like it was dragging. It jumped from one point of view to the next, barely giving me time to catch my breath before I was plunged into another action-packed scene. But it's strength was also it's weakness, for me, although it was very minor and hardly dampened my enjoyment. There were times when a chapter ended, and the POV switched, and I didn't like it. I wanted to get back to the other characters story to see what happened. That's not a sign of weakness in the author, though. Just a lack of patience in this reader. The ending was a bit abrupt, but since it's the start of a series, I was expecting it. But Aurian is not a book that can be read as a standalone. Now I've got to get the second book to see what happens, and although I usually hate when authors leave books so open ended (forcing me to read more of their books), the writing here was so good that I really don't mind. I would definitely recommend this to fantasy readers, especially if you like any of the authors I've mentioned above.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Elo

    Ok, I’m DNFing Aurian...it’s bad and reading about women hating on each other so easily while being so indulgent towards men is painful to read... I know this was written in the 90s but really, I can’t force myself reading further than 250 pages that were already painful. The villains I’ve seen to far are so over the top evil and bad it’s laughable and also painful to read. It actually made me cringe more than once. This book has been laying on my TBR pile forever and as many others recently, I f Ok, I’m DNFing Aurian...it’s bad and reading about women hating on each other so easily while being so indulgent towards men is painful to read... I know this was written in the 90s but really, I can’t force myself reading further than 250 pages that were already painful. The villains I’ve seen to far are so over the top evil and bad it’s laughable and also painful to read. It actually made me cringe more than once. This book has been laying on my TBR pile forever and as many others recently, I feel disappointed with fantasy. It’s difficult to find a good series these days, either new or older and it’s frustrating because when it’s well done, it’s my favorite genre. Being formulatic in itself, I don’t mind tropes and a good « classic » fantasy story when it’s well done but it can be over the top and really bad quickly. Which I think is the case with Aurian. The characters are badly written, over the top, one dimensional, whereas the setting could have been interesting if the Mages were not so unsympathetic and arrogant from the start, without any nuance nor depth, while the heroine is the classic perfectly powerful every one love and want (I don’t like the Mary Sue term but...Aurian fits the category well, in a bad way). Yet she has no appeal and is so gullible and annoying, it’s another reason to make you cringe. So I will not force myself to finish it and it will probably join the next pile to go to the library. At least, I’m clearing up my shelves and I haven’t invested in the whole series at once. Silver lining.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Mac

    NB: Clearing my nostalgia-stars in preparation for upcoming reread. :) ORIGINAL REVIEW: {4 stars} Here's another fantasy I read many moons ago, so I can't speak to quality aside from nostalgic value. But I really liked it at the time -- enough that I tucked it into the keeper box, regardless of not having any other books in the series. I'm not sure why I didn't finish the saga; I distinctly recall researching at the library to jot down titles (because who needs study hall to work on term papers? B NB: Clearing my nostalgia-stars in preparation for upcoming reread. :) ORIGINAL REVIEW: {4 stars} Here's another fantasy I read many moons ago, so I can't speak to quality aside from nostalgic value. But I really liked it at the time -- enough that I tucked it into the keeper box, regardless of not having any other books in the series. I'm not sure why I didn't finish the saga; I distinctly recall researching at the library to jot down titles (because who needs study hall to work on term papers? Bite me, Crime & Punishment), but for some reason they never materialized. Since I was a teenager, it's likely there were cash flow issues. :P As for specifics, who knows. The cheesy, eye-catching cover caught my attention on a huge wall of paperbacks, & I remember an angsty romance between the young heroine & the middle-age badass who was her guardian-turned-lover. I also remember them having sex on the floor, & there was no HEA. (What can I say -- even before I knew what a bodice ripper was, I was groping for Teh Melodramaz. :D) But other than that...nope, drawing a blank. Hopefully this saga will hold water in my jaded adult years, but it remains to be seen whether I can comprehend the world-building & magical stuff without revisiting this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I first read this book at fourteen and was convinced then that it was the greatest fantasy book ever written. It hits every tropey fantasy pleasure - talking cats, a magical centre of learning, gladiator arenas, mysterious dragons, winged people, sword training, multiple love stories - and mixes them all into a fantasy cocktail shaker formed of the standard 'quest for artefacts to save/destroy the world'. The main villain is as cacklingly melodramatic as you'd expect; he could work through The E I first read this book at fourteen and was convinced then that it was the greatest fantasy book ever written. It hits every tropey fantasy pleasure - talking cats, a magical centre of learning, gladiator arenas, mysterious dragons, winged people, sword training, multiple love stories - and mixes them all into a fantasy cocktail shaker formed of the standard 'quest for artefacts to save/destroy the world'. The main villain is as cacklingly melodramatic as you'd expect; he could work through The Evil Overlord's List to tick off all his accomplishments but his pen would probably run out before he reached the end. At fourteen this was all very satisfying, but these things don't always hold up. I hadn't reread Aurian in years but picked it up recently thinking I'd read a chapter. 611 pages (of *small* font too; this book is a brick) later, found myself ordering the second book on Amazon because I'd lost my copy... even though I'm still not how much I enjoyed the reread. The characters are still mostly likable (except when they're cardboard cutouts like the Distracted Mother, the Ice Queen, the Scheming Brother), and the better ones have their share of both sympathetic and flawed qualities. Zanna's subplot is still one of the best (at fourteen I was as convinced as her that Yanis was The Best Option; only on rereads as an adult did it dawn on me how heavily Furey sets him up as a dumb prettyboy that Zanna is much too good for. How she lets the tragedy of that storyline play out in later books is also one of the series' noteworthy achievements). The conflicted manipulations of characters like Harihn are also interesting, if a little too convenient plotwise on several occasions. The magic usage falls somewhere between as-powerful-as-needed-for-the-plot and believably-exhausting ends of the spectrum - there are learning curves, immovable obstacles and consequences for trying too much and no one's moving entire mountains with a thought, but there's also more than a couple of logically-this-character-should-be-dead saving the day flourishes. If you can handwave these off, the magic system as a whole mostly follows satisfyingly consistent rules. Which really is the best approach to the entire book. If you can handwave the little annoyances such as the (severe!!) abuse of exclamation marks, cackling of the villains, and the occasional bending of believability, there's a lot to find satisfying here. The world building is intricate without being a constant info dump, with political, economic, and social structures all layered in. The POV switches are easy to follow and, unusually for such a long book, I rarely found myself bored by any of the subplots. Okay yes, the length could have a hundred or so pages knocked off just by dialling down the descriptions and detail of characters travelling from place to place, but none of it is such a struggle to get through that I considered skipping any of it. The main love story is handicapped by not being the first relationship established as the book's One True Pairing, but Furey acknowledges this and gives it time to grow into something in its own right. It's a refreshing change from other fantasy novels that set up the main relationships as the only love that character ever has and ever will have (and a trend that's also reflected in the relationships formed or reformed among the rest of the characters). All in all, this book isn't quite the stellar achievement I thought it was at fourteen but it's not just another by-the-numbers high fantasy epic either. The usual tropes are done in a satisfying way, even if they're not groundbreaking, and most of my problems were with the unnecessary writing flourishes rather than the plot itself. If you like high fantasy, there are much worse books to pass a few days with.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Beena

    DNF at 43% I read this when I was 14 and remember loving it, but as an adult the love is definitely gone. I gave it my best shot for the sake of that memory but I wasn't enjoying it and it was very slow-paced. It didn't even give me that nostalgic feeling whilst reading, I just found it so bad. The writing is too old-fashioned for my liking. There's no nuance between the character's actions and emotions; they're too simplified and one dimensional. It's almost children's storylike- I've currently b DNF at 43% I read this when I was 14 and remember loving it, but as an adult the love is definitely gone. I gave it my best shot for the sake of that memory but I wasn't enjoying it and it was very slow-paced. It didn't even give me that nostalgic feeling whilst reading, I just found it so bad. The writing is too old-fashioned for my liking. There's no nuance between the character's actions and emotions; they're too simplified and one dimensional. It's almost children's storylike- I've currently been doing a buddy read of The Song of the Lioness Quartet by Tamora Pierce and it's almost comparable. It's a very traditional fantasy, the good characters are the heroes and heroines, the bad characters are the classic evil villains. It's very predictable and full of tropes; Aurian has an affinity for all the elements of magic- manages to bring forth rain without any training in weather magic *eye roll*- is a master swordsmistress having conveniently had the best swordsman tutor her, can communicate with animals, is the first mage to befriend mortals....you get the picture. Miathan is the evil old-mage who hates mortals and plots to rule the world whilst lusting after Aurian. I don't mind a classic good against evil fantasy tale, apart from the fact there's no tension or mystery to the story, nothing to keep you on the edge of your seat- it travels through all the character's viewpoints revealing all their thoughts, feelings and plans and it left me feeling bored. I bought the whole series second-hand thinking I would love it again; luckily they were cheap, looks like it's off to the charity shop with them. I also read The Belgariad Series by David Eddings at around 12/13 which gives me the impression I probably won't enjoy that again either. It just doesn't stand up against the fantasy I've read as an adult so far.

  12. 4 out of 5

    David - proud Gleeman in Branwen's adventuring party

    Before Harry Potter, there was this series featuring a young wizard who is brought to a magical school to realize her potential. The biggest difference between "Aurian" & "Harry Potter"...in Aurian's case, the greatest evil in her land just happens to be the headmaster of the school! (So basically, this series would be like if Hogwarts was run by Voldemort!) Overall, "Aurian" was a great read. Aurian is a very compelling heroine, and her enemies are deliciously-evil. However, the book does suffer Before Harry Potter, there was this series featuring a young wizard who is brought to a magical school to realize her potential. The biggest difference between "Aurian" & "Harry Potter"...in Aurian's case, the greatest evil in her land just happens to be the headmaster of the school! (So basically, this series would be like if Hogwarts was run by Voldemort!) Overall, "Aurian" was a great read. Aurian is a very compelling heroine, and her enemies are deliciously-evil. However, the book does suffer from some pacing problems at parts, particularly the action sequences, which sometimes feel rushed and end way too quickly. Still, despite not being perfect, the Aurian saga may be a great find for anyone currently going through Harry Potter withdrawl.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Freya

    This was a fun book to read and a very good start to a series! Definitely has a feel of 90's fantasy novels to it - sort of Aurian and her merry band of friends out to save the world. It isn't all 4 friends cheering about friendship and plans in a tavern with tankards of ale (though there is some of that), there are darker elements to the story, but the story does progress at a good clip and it doesn't feel as dark and gritty as a lot of more recent fantasy - I suppose there are good and bad side This was a fun book to read and a very good start to a series! Definitely has a feel of 90's fantasy novels to it - sort of Aurian and her merry band of friends out to save the world. It isn't all 4 friends cheering about friendship and plans in a tavern with tankards of ale (though there is some of that), there are darker elements to the story, but the story does progress at a good clip and it doesn't feel as dark and gritty as a lot of more recent fantasy - I suppose there are good and bad sides to this, and I think I found it a nice break from some of the recent writing styles I've been reading. The characters are quite well fleshed out and I'm looking forward to see where Aurian and Co. head next on their epic questing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    I read this series - The Artefacts of Power some years ago and whilst revising and tidying my bookshelves found all four books again, so I have just re-read the first book in the series. The genre is fantasy based on the basic good versus evil theme. It an easy to read book with lots of twists and turns and an engrossing, enchanting and exciting plot. Aurian is a red haired Mage and she is the main protagonist in a book full of strong female characters. Her characters are always interesting. Mag I read this series - The Artefacts of Power some years ago and whilst revising and tidying my bookshelves found all four books again, so I have just re-read the first book in the series. The genre is fantasy based on the basic good versus evil theme. It an easy to read book with lots of twists and turns and an engrossing, enchanting and exciting plot. Aurian is a red haired Mage and she is the main protagonist in a book full of strong female characters. Her characters are always interesting. Magic and mystery includes dragons, fighting, a love interest and a bereavement. I loved it all over again.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Regan Norris

    I only finished this book because I wanted to see how bad it could get. I do not understand how this got published. The last 50-100 pages seemed to be an endless loop of the heroine and her lover arguing and then getting depressed. And the singing whale-mages... no. There may be a way to sell those, but this author didn't do so. I kept my copy for years to remind how low the bar can be, should I ever actually write anything. I only finished this book because I wanted to see how bad it could get. I do not understand how this got published. The last 50-100 pages seemed to be an endless loop of the heroine and her lover arguing and then getting depressed. And the singing whale-mages... no. There may be a way to sell those, but this author didn't do so. I kept my copy for years to remind how low the bar can be, should I ever actually write anything.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lilly

    Once again I am ~ conflicted ~. I really really like the plot. I like the world and some of the characters but I just cannot fully enjoy the story because of all the blatant sexism and racism some of the characters are displaying. This is a magical made up world (created by a woman nonetheless) so why do I have to read about old crusty men lusting after 15 year old girls? Will not continue with the series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Amber Silver

    One of my first steps into the realm of fantasy, Maggie Furey's Aurian is a book filled with dynamic characters woven around a plot riddled with magic and intrigue. I recommend Aurian to anyone with a fondness for fantasy. One of my first steps into the realm of fantasy, Maggie Furey's Aurian is a book filled with dynamic characters woven around a plot riddled with magic and intrigue. I recommend Aurian to anyone with a fondness for fantasy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Krystal

    My mum introduced me to this series years ago and I read it probably four times in two years. Very addictive, fantastic characters, loved every second! Unique ideas but enough common fantasy elements (wizards, dragons, etc.) to keep it within the ideals of lovers of the fantasy genre.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I'm only 5 or so chapters in, but I'm quitting this one. I was having trouble picking it up, and when I did pick it up it was a struggle to read even 10 pages. After this last book I read by the author I just don't see this as worth continuing. I won't be reading this author again. I'm only 5 or so chapters in, but I'm quitting this one. I was having trouble picking it up, and when I did pick it up it was a struggle to read even 10 pages. After this last book I read by the author I just don't see this as worth continuing. I won't be reading this author again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    Nope .. i disagree with some of the reviews.. strong female lead.. good book... the series itself thou did lose steam toward the end :(

  21. 4 out of 5

    YıldızA

    I read this when I was 15 and loved it, but it also felt a little disturbing how author always have same type of couple with big age gaps. I think thats her thing. Except that, its very gripping..

  22. 4 out of 5

    Chander Govindarajan

    Here is the thing, the magic and world settings are off. They have to tweaked more to get the story in track. Possible minor spoilers for the first 100 pages of the book. Regarding magic, Aurian is the daughter of a Fire Mage and an Earth Mage, and clearly has not studied the other forms. But suddenly, she can channel the fury of a mob to form rain by bring in clouds from the sea, that is, perform a Wind-Water feat that apparently the resident Weather Mage could not. Not buying this. Regarding wo Here is the thing, the magic and world settings are off. They have to tweaked more to get the story in track. Possible minor spoilers for the first 100 pages of the book. Regarding magic, Aurian is the daughter of a Fire Mage and an Earth Mage, and clearly has not studied the other forms. But suddenly, she can channel the fury of a mob to form rain by bring in clouds from the sea, that is, perform a Wind-Water feat that apparently the resident Weather Mage could not. Not buying this. Regarding world, the Magefolk population slider is way to the left. There are a total of 7 Mages in the city (that is supposed to be the capital of the realm) including our titular Aurian. If, we are going with this baseline; nothing that follows make sense. (Unless, the total population of the capital is like 50 people, which does not make too much sense.) How do the mages hold any power in the functioning of the city? Why is there an Archmage to govern 6 other mages? Why are they the bad guys when they consume food (seriously, how much extra food are 7 people going to consume)? Why are the normal folks so angry when they refuse to perform healing magic (the Mages have a grand total of 1 healer who clearly states that she does not have the time/energy to heal everyone)? Why is there so much in-fighting between 7 people? What "power" are they fighting for?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ria the Wannabe Librarian

    I can’t believe that I’ve never discovered this author before. She should be sitting up next to Patricia A. McKillip, Anne McCaffrey, Mercedes Lackey, Andre Norton, and other high-end fantasy authors that write so beautifully and vividly, it’s as though you’re actually a part of the story! Each page if filled with such depth that I lingered over this book for several days. It’s 600+pages felt more like 16,000+pages due to the sheer amount of characterization and world-building. I wish that I cou I can’t believe that I’ve never discovered this author before. She should be sitting up next to Patricia A. McKillip, Anne McCaffrey, Mercedes Lackey, Andre Norton, and other high-end fantasy authors that write so beautifully and vividly, it’s as though you’re actually a part of the story! Each page if filled with such depth that I lingered over this book for several days. It’s 600+pages felt more like 16,000+pages due to the sheer amount of characterization and world-building. I wish that I could write as well as this author, for she is truly one of my new favorite authors, and I am so glad that I own a copy of this book, but I checked on google and there are some with far better covers that I am intent on buying as well. Not that the covers matter, of course, but it’s another thing to work on collecting and owning for my bookish room! This will sit on my treasured favorites shelf. It’s going to be right between Kathleen E. Woodiwiss, Patricia McKillip, Elizabeth Wein, and several several others. I’m hoping to get the rest of the series of Aurian, because damn this is some fine story-telling here!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Omnius

    An effort was made...I guess. This book has been on my “to read pile” for a while and after glancing over the positive reviews here I finally decided to give it a go. Even though i finished the book in two days i wouldn't recommend it at all. It was like watching a car crash and not being able to look away. At best you could call it an introduction to fantasy for young tennagers. Being more realistic it's just a horrible book with subpar writing and the most shallow and one dimensonal characters An effort was made...I guess. This book has been on my “to read pile” for a while and after glancing over the positive reviews here I finally decided to give it a go. Even though i finished the book in two days i wouldn't recommend it at all. It was like watching a car crash and not being able to look away. At best you could call it an introduction to fantasy for young tennagers. Being more realistic it's just a horrible book with subpar writing and the most shallow and one dimensonal characters I have ever come across. Good pacing is pretty much all the book has going for it; the actions moves along very quickly (perhaps too quickly) and if you are willing to accept the bogus story and abundance of deus ex machina moments it rarely gets boring. The world building shows hints of promise but doesn’t blossom into anything worthwile and isn’t particularly inspired to begin with. I am kind of horrified at the obscene fascination I felt while reading this book and now that it is over I just feel violated. In closing: Unless you want to satisfy some deep, dark and most certainly unnatural desire I wouldn’t touch the book with a ten foot pole.

  25. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Metcalf

    A classic book from my youth, I'd read it obsessively through junior high and high school. Full of adventure, a hot-headed mage, and twists and turns with heart-wrenching moments, I'd loved Aurian. Only recently have I found this book again (thank you, library sale!), and reading through it again has only reminded me of how much this series shaped my youth. That being said, it tends to tell more than show, but given the time it was written, and the publishing process back then, I'm not surprised A classic book from my youth, I'd read it obsessively through junior high and high school. Full of adventure, a hot-headed mage, and twists and turns with heart-wrenching moments, I'd loved Aurian. Only recently have I found this book again (thank you, library sale!), and reading through it again has only reminded me of how much this series shaped my youth. That being said, it tends to tell more than show, but given the time it was written, and the publishing process back then, I'm not surprised. It's still a richly imagined, detailed world, with dynamic characters that continue to grow and evolve.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mariclair Smit

    This has to be one of my favourite fantasy books of all time. I have read it several times and each time I fall in love with Aurian, Forral and Anvar all over again. The tragedy and love between these characters are captivating. And Maggie Furry writes brilliantly. She keeps you on the edge of your seat and pulls you into this this imaginary world of magic!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Yusuf Motara

    It's OK. Straight-up mindless fantasy, linear sort of a plot with few surprises. It's just competent enough to be entertaining, even though you can pretty much see how Book 4 is going to look like after you've gone halfway through Book 1. It's OK. Straight-up mindless fantasy, linear sort of a plot with few surprises. It's just competent enough to be entertaining, even though you can pretty much see how Book 4 is going to look like after you've gone halfway through Book 1.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua White

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Have read this before and can't help fall in love with Aurian both as a book and a character she is so strong, kind, and brave. I feel she really shows that women can make it on their own even if they had a partner before and lost them. Have read this before and can't help fall in love with Aurian both as a book and a character she is so strong, kind, and brave. I feel she really shows that women can make it on their own even if they had a partner before and lost them.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Northern One

    Another series that I read as a kid, translated to Swedish. Back then, I loved it. Now? No idea, which is why I haven't set a rating to it. Sooner or later I'll have to read the original and see if it's I find it as enjoyable nowadays, as an adult. Another series that I read as a kid, translated to Swedish. Back then, I loved it. Now? No idea, which is why I haven't set a rating to it. Sooner or later I'll have to read the original and see if it's I find it as enjoyable nowadays, as an adult.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Litisha Hayes

    My dad borrowed this book from the library when I was 13, I was bored so I decided why not - to this day one of my favourite books/series, I now own my own copies and they are well read

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