Hot Best Seller

Reinventing the Enemy's Language: Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America

Availability: Ready to download

This long-awaited anthology celebrates the experience of Native American women and is at once an important contribution to our literature and an historical document. It is the most comprehensive anthology of its kind to collect poetry, fiction, prayer, and memoir from Native American women. Over eighty writers are represented from nearly fifty nations, including such natio This long-awaited anthology celebrates the experience of Native American women and is at once an important contribution to our literature and an historical document. It is the most comprehensive anthology of its kind to collect poetry, fiction, prayer, and memoir from Native American women. Over eighty writers are represented from nearly fifty nations, including such nationally known writers as Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan, Leslie Marmon Silko, Lee Maracle, Janet Campbell Hale, and Luci Tapahonso; others — Wilma Mankiller, Winona LaDuke, and Bea Medicine — who are known primarily for their contributions to tribal communities; and some who are published here for the first time in this landmark volume.


Compare

This long-awaited anthology celebrates the experience of Native American women and is at once an important contribution to our literature and an historical document. It is the most comprehensive anthology of its kind to collect poetry, fiction, prayer, and memoir from Native American women. Over eighty writers are represented from nearly fifty nations, including such natio This long-awaited anthology celebrates the experience of Native American women and is at once an important contribution to our literature and an historical document. It is the most comprehensive anthology of its kind to collect poetry, fiction, prayer, and memoir from Native American women. Over eighty writers are represented from nearly fifty nations, including such nationally known writers as Louise Erdrich, Linda Hogan, Leslie Marmon Silko, Lee Maracle, Janet Campbell Hale, and Luci Tapahonso; others — Wilma Mankiller, Winona LaDuke, and Bea Medicine — who are known primarily for their contributions to tribal communities; and some who are published here for the first time in this landmark volume.

30 review for Reinventing the Enemy's Language: Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aubrey

    4.5/5 White men put flesh on dinosaur bones to reconstruct the entire animal, to show they are smarter than the animal they construct out of their own egos. They do the same thing with us by rewriting our history. They do not have to be right, they only have to do the act itself. -Scott Kayla Morrison ("Kela Humma" (Red Hawk)), Choctaw, 'An Apokni by Any Other Name Is Still a Kakoo' If you've been following #NoDAPL at all, you'll know that a recent presidential decision has effectively halted c 4.5/5 White men put flesh on dinosaur bones to reconstruct the entire animal, to show they are smarter than the animal they construct out of their own egos. They do the same thing with us by rewriting our history. They do not have to be right, they only have to do the act itself. -Scott Kayla Morrison ("Kela Humma" (Red Hawk)), Choctaw, 'An Apokni by Any Other Name Is Still a Kakoo' If you've been following #NoDAPL at all, you'll know that a recent presidential decision has effectively halted construction of a oil pipeline too toxic for white suburban communities but, apparently, just right for indigenous reservations. This victory seems, perhaps, in the wake of 2016's unique nightmare before the holidays less than it could have been, but it still marks a triumph in the midst of the horror that is 500+ years of rape in terms both archaic and otherwise. Seizure of another's property. Land grab. Woman grab. Children grab. Cultural eradication. Kill the indigenous, save the man. Treaties put into place two centuries and more in place that, despite having been violated less than a week letter, still control the language with which the original inhabitants of what is currently known as the Americas use to refer themselves. Should they refuse this language, they come under the threat of being stripped of what little they have left. What, then is there left to be done? I feel that writing is an act of survival. But there is more than my own survival that is at stake. These days I feel a kind of urgency to reconstruct memory, annihilate the slow amnesia of the dominant culture, and reclaim the past as a viable, if painful entity. -Janice Gould, Maidu Joy Harjo. Janet Campbell Hale. Paula Gunn Allen. Velma Wallis. Leslie Marmon Silko. Elizabeth Cook-Lynn. Linda Hogan. Beth Brant. Wilma Mankiller. Louise Erdrich. These are reinventers of the enemy's language that I and a sizable number of other enemies have come into contact with without having read this compilation. Muscogee. Couer D'Alene. Laguna. Sioux. Athabascan. Crow Creek Sioux. Chickasaw. Mohawk. Cherokee. Turtle Mountain Chippewa. These are the nations I and a sizable number of other enemies are still swallowing up. Scott Kayla Morrison aka Kela Humma, Choctaw. Susan Power, Yanktonnai Sioux. Janice Gould, Maidu. Jeannette Armstrong, Okanagan. These are reinventers of the enemy's language that I found 'striking' and, perhaps mistakenly, believe other enemies have not yet come into with. There are many others, and because I pushed too hard when it came to which women owned their names in artistry and which ones didn't, I can neither create nor ameliorate their author profiles on this particular website. That is probably for the best, though. I already conduct too much free labor for this corporatized library as is. More than half of the states composing the US owe their linguistic sustainability to the indigenous people, metaphorical roots which do little to combat sequestering in reservations and genocide everywhere else. It's not the only reason why I still get friend requests from people with whom a share nearly 300 works, of which a mere three are by women of color, but the situations run on the same fuel. Within the already sunken realm of writings by women of color there is still yet further stratification, and I will admit to having fallen into their trap while devoting two thirds of 2016's reading to this oft neglected but still hierarchical demographic. Good intentions will always pave the road in hell if they are ever considered anything more than a work in progress. I didn't feel rebellious. I felt honest. In the other world of the preparatory school I attended, experience felt abstract, refracted through the distancing process of intellectual analysis. -Susan Power, Yanktonnai Sioux The half star I took off of this is for arbitrary reasons such as personal aesthetics when it comes to compilations such as these, as well as the fact that I couldn't follow my transient reading footprint with a more stable digital directory one. As such, I leave the shinier one up top unmarked, as there is a vast difference between positive ratings for the sake of socioecononmic prosperity and boosting works in order to actively resist annihilation. Nowadays, it is possible for works such as Weweni and Sanaaq to exist, so perhaps the Overton window can be pushed past the need to reinvent the enemy and into the right to exist on less lethally linguistic terms. However, that won't happen on its own, or in a vacuum, or without effort which should rightfully rest on the shoulders of those who rendered the language lethal in the first place, not those doing their best to survive it. #NoDAPL continues on despite assurances of victory, for that is only one branch of the beast sunk into the heart of myriad peoples, and such monstrosities always sleep with one of many eyes open. I watched rocks hurled and smashed into cars of old Mohawk men women and children on a bridge in Montreal and the million-dollar rock slide blockages on ten BC roads after stones rained down rock cliffs on police lifting human blockades protecting the slow disintegration of bones into sand resting under headstones on Liliwat land -Jeanette Armstrong, Okanagan, 'I Study Rocks'

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam Poole

    I can't put into words how great this is. Essential, varied, undeniable, painful, funny, enlightening, outstanding. Every page kept me wanting more. Couldn't put it down. Everyone should read this anthology. Understanding the wreckage caused by colonialism that is so relentlessly ignored is crucial; ignoring it is not just inappropriate, it's foolish. These women are strong, inventive and brilliant. The whole anthology is strong and unrelenting I can't put into words how great this is. Essential, varied, undeniable, painful, funny, enlightening, outstanding. Every page kept me wanting more. Couldn't put it down. Everyone should read this anthology. Understanding the wreckage caused by colonialism that is so relentlessly ignored is crucial; ignoring it is not just inappropriate, it's foolish. These women are strong, inventive and brilliant. The whole anthology is strong and unrelenting

  3. 4 out of 5

    Antigone

    While it is difficult to contend with a title and certain contributions that bristle with such fierce and territorial exclusion, it is perhaps important to note that this is precisely the experience of so many Native American women in our society. Other-footing the shoe initiates the beginnings of a communicative balance and, I found, helps to bridge the distance between two very disparate encounters with life in the United States. This collection of work is, for the most part, quite superb and While it is difficult to contend with a title and certain contributions that bristle with such fierce and territorial exclusion, it is perhaps important to note that this is precisely the experience of so many Native American women in our society. Other-footing the shoe initiates the beginnings of a communicative balance and, I found, helps to bridge the distance between two very disparate encounters with life in the United States. This collection of work is, for the most part, quite superb and I would recommend it to any brave soul struggling for survival in what seems, at times, to be a coldly pre-determined world.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tu

    Reinventing the Enemy's Language is the first time a collection of Native American Women's writing has been published. Every poem, story, essay has been carefully thought out and put together with a deep respect for the Nations. This book is a must read for all who are interested in America's original people. Reinventing the Enemy's Language is the first time a collection of Native American Women's writing has been published. Every poem, story, essay has been carefully thought out and put together with a deep respect for the Nations. This book is a must read for all who are interested in America's original people.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jacob McCann

    Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is the ultimate compilation of indigenous women’s writings and their respective works that span from numerous authors capturing a number backgrounds each providing a unique and profound take on issues and themes prevalent in Indigenous cultures that would often go marginalized or unnoticed entirely in a modern American society. While the authors here are an eclectic bunch from numerous corners of America, they all emphasize common themes of identity and the prese Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is the ultimate compilation of indigenous women’s writings and their respective works that span from numerous authors capturing a number backgrounds each providing a unique and profound take on issues and themes prevalent in Indigenous cultures that would often go marginalized or unnoticed entirely in a modern American society. While the authors here are an eclectic bunch from numerous corners of America, they all emphasize common themes of identity and the preservation of culture in an era where these voices are simply not heard or fall upon deaf ears. Poems featured here range from light hearted and humorous to ones that will make you question the good of humanity but each and everyone has a message to share and a story to tell. The fascinating thing about this anthology is that each one is an act of cultural preservation. These author’s experiences are translated into writing where they’ll be forever more, exposed to the public in all of their glory and honesty. Like all works of literature, they lead themselves to interpretation, everyone will get something different or latch onto a particular theme or idea unlike anyone else. Just as these authors have accumulated and composed experiences themselves, you as a reader will experience something all to yourself. By sharing their stories, those of us who have no foot in Native tradition can get a glimpse into the joy, sorrow, and struggles that are prevalent in the livelihoods of indigenous peoples from all over. This book helped me step outside myself and embrace the complexities of a culture outside my own and I’m a more worldly person for it. I would highly recommend this anthology, my personal favorite is “Confession”, this is one of those poems that makes you squirm in your seat throughout its duration. Don’t fight or deliberately avoid that “squirm” sensation, allow yourself to conceptualize and empathize with the stories these author’s so graciously shared with us, if you're open to it, you too will experience something profound that has been so often glossed over and lost to the passage of time.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Talitha

    Full disclosure- I haven't read all of this book cover to cover (I'm in college, what is free time?), but from the sections that I have read, I can confirm that this is a thoughtfully and expertly curated collection. It's the type of book that could keep a person occupied for years, because there's so much great work contained in this collection. I love how the authors recognize and acknowledge that this book is written in the enemy's language (English), because language can be such an important Full disclosure- I haven't read all of this book cover to cover (I'm in college, what is free time?), but from the sections that I have read, I can confirm that this is a thoughtfully and expertly curated collection. It's the type of book that could keep a person occupied for years, because there's so much great work contained in this collection. I love how the authors recognize and acknowledge that this book is written in the enemy's language (English), because language can be such an important part of culture, and many Indigenous people have been forced to lose their original languages. The very language which they speak is a reminder of the wrongs their ancestors suffered due to Colonialism. I also found the title to help me frame the collection better; as a white American, it's sometimes easy to view Colonialism as a thing of the past, and think that the conflict between the two cultures is over and done with, while for a lot of Native American people, the conflict is still a daily struggle and the psychological and structural effects of Colonialism are an enemy they still face. Some of the writers in this collection-- such as Jennifer Pierce Eyen, who wrote "Wuski A-Baw-Tan (A New Dream)", and Laura Tohe, who wrote "She was Telling it This Way", find ways to highlight this conflict by weaving their ancestral languages into their work, thereby preserving the part of their culture that exists in that language. Both Eyen and Tohe reinvent the enemy’s language by making English the non-privileged language in their poems, which creates a cultural experience that non-Native readers may be very unused to, since they find they are unable to understand the full meaning of the poems presented to them due to a cultural difference. By highlighting the cultural difference, the conflict between the two cultures is revealed. Others write purely in the English language, but reinvent the language in other ways, using it as a vehicle to criticize Colonialism and embrace their Native cultures. All strategies work effectively, and all of the work I've read in this collection is exceptional. I look forward to further reading of this collection.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    This anthology is an amazing and impactful representation of Native stories from all different walks of life. The excerpts I read from Reinventing the Enemy’s Language were extremely impactful. I’d say there was two that stuck out to me the most, those being The Housing Poem and Confession. The Housing Poem gives you so much substance in such a small amount of words. It really shows you the amount of ‘punch’ words really do have. Being a middle-class white person, I can’t say I have any ounce of This anthology is an amazing and impactful representation of Native stories from all different walks of life. The excerpts I read from Reinventing the Enemy’s Language were extremely impactful. I’d say there was two that stuck out to me the most, those being The Housing Poem and Confession. The Housing Poem gives you so much substance in such a small amount of words. It really shows you the amount of ‘punch’ words really do have. Being a middle-class white person, I can’t say I have any ounce of an idea what life is like for a Native family living in unfortunate circumstances. We get a glimpse into the lives of a family living together in a small apartment that is very under-developed. We also learn a lot about the definition of family in regards to different people. Everyone has a different definition of family, and we get to see here what it can mean to other people in difference to us readers. Confession also really packs a punch. A Native woman is recalling an experience she had as a young child (basically ‘confessing’ to an assault that happened to her at a very young age). The ways she tells the story shows that she is ashamed, and that it is something she shouldn’t talk about. She feels immense guilt from the situation, even though she was just five years old. These are just two of the many stories this book tells. I also really like the fact that most of the essays and poems showcased have a bit of history about the author beforehand. If you’re reading, those are not something you want to skip over. A lot of times, they can give a lot more context into the purpose of the writing itself. Not only are so many Native voices represented, but they all have stories very different- yet they all have universal truths. I think it’s really important for something like this to be read and understood by everyone. The sovereignty present in this book is important for everyone to hear.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Hale

    “Reinventing The Enemy’s Language” edited by Joy Harjo and Gloria Bird with help from Patricia Blanco, Beth Cuthand, and Valerie Martinez. Out of these readings, there were a couple that stuck out to me: "99 things to do before you die" by nila northSun and "The Constellation of Angels" by Anita Endrezze. Both of these, a poem and an essay, had so much depth to them, leaving our readers filled with interesting insights and questions. With "99 things to do before you die" by nila northSun the tex “Reinventing The Enemy’s Language” edited by Joy Harjo and Gloria Bird with help from Patricia Blanco, Beth Cuthand, and Valerie Martinez. Out of these readings, there were a couple that stuck out to me: "99 things to do before you die" by nila northSun and "The Constellation of Angels" by Anita Endrezze. Both of these, a poem and an essay, had so much depth to them, leaving our readers filled with interesting insights and questions. With "99 things to do before you die" by nila northSun the text is set up as a “bucket list” of sorts, jotting down what the author believes should be done before she dies, but as the list goes on we see a change in perspective from the author as she decides the wishes she had in the beginning were not practical. The list continues by the author now recording more small scale desires, more realistic such as “curl up in a bed with a good indian novel” and the author shows her humor with the line following this wish stating “better yet, curl up in bed with a good indian novelist”. The main lesson or overall message from this poem we agreed was that happiness can come in everyday tasks and that bigger (desires) doesn’t always mean better. However, with“"The Constellation of Angels" by Anita Endrezze, readers dive into an essay filled with surprises about a Native girl named Mary. Readers see Mary’s strength throughout this text as she endures physical, mental, and emotional damage from her husband and his actions. With such serious content, the text is put together rather poetically creating a beautiful, realistic series of events that can be relatable to many different kinds of audiences. Both of these excerpts from this book unravel life truths and realities for Native women, and I highly suggest all women to read this since it showed important life lessons. A theme of loss (of life and one’s self) is common in this book, and most people who have lost someone or struggle with their identity can get something from these readings.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John Doe

    I am a current student at the University of Nebraska Lincoln taking a class called Intro to Native American Literature. When looking at the assigned passages it looked too confusing and I didn't think I was going to like or learn much from it, I was wrong. There was one passage in "Reinventing the Enemy's Language: Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America" by Joy Harjo that changed my whole perspective on the lives of Native Americans and it was "The Border State Patrol" by Leslie M I am a current student at the University of Nebraska Lincoln taking a class called Intro to Native American Literature. When looking at the assigned passages it looked too confusing and I didn't think I was going to like or learn much from it, I was wrong. There was one passage in "Reinventing the Enemy's Language: Contemporary Native Women's Writings of North America" by Joy Harjo that changed my whole perspective on the lives of Native Americans and it was "The Border State Patrol" by Leslie Marmon Silko (1994). Leslie Silko made many good points and informed me that Native Americans DO NOT have the same rights that Americans do and that is what angers me. You can easily tell by just reading it that us, her audience, is trying to get through our heads that we are not treating Native Americans with the kind of respect that we treat others with. My step-dad and I have been face to face with Native Americans on the reservation when we built them a new library. They were so kind that they would come to us everyday with sandwiches and drinks and asked us if we need anything else to just call them, now why would they do that? They would do that because they are good people! Everybody thinks they are the enemy because of the rumors that have gone around our society and we as kids have been raised to think that they are bad people when they actually are not. That is exactly what the Border Patrol is doing in the passage, discriminating and it is so hard to read. I know I only talked about one passage in the book but all together I am glad that I got to learn more about the lives that the Native Americans have to live and Leslie Marmon Silko did a great job at teaching it to me. That is why I would recommend this book to anybody who wants to learn the story of Native Americans and learn more about their lives.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joe Matt

    Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is a powerful collection of works from many different Native American women authors. These women write about what they know and are able to show the reader some of the problems they face in everyday life. Most of the stories and poems are beautifully written and intensely thought provoking. One of my favorites is The Constellation of Angels which tells the story of a woman who faces violence and racism on a daily basis. Violence and poverty are apparent in many Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is a powerful collection of works from many different Native American women authors. These women write about what they know and are able to show the reader some of the problems they face in everyday life. Most of the stories and poems are beautifully written and intensely thought provoking. One of my favorites is The Constellation of Angels which tells the story of a woman who faces violence and racism on a daily basis. Violence and poverty are apparent in many of the stories throughout the book. Many of the authors come from rough backgrounds and this shows in their raw, open style of writing that makes it hard not to let out some feeling while reading. Because these women are writing about what they know, the unfiltered storytelling creates a collection that sends a message of survival and defiance. The anthology as a whole is an act of rhetorical sovereignty. All the stories are about trying to stay alive in a world where they are not accepted for who they are. These women are writing from their experiences and knowledge and showing anybody who reads their words that what was done to their ancestors is still having adverse effects on the present. The racism and sexism that is still present is made apparent in many of these stories and paints a horrific picture of what these women are forced to go through. However, by writing about these experiences and leaving nothing out, they are performing an act of defiance against the people that put them into their current predicament in the first place. This book is for anybody that wants to get a look into the harsh life many Native American women go through. With the whole thing being short stories and poems, there are many different perspectives and styles of writing on display that help keep the reader turning pages. Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is well worth the read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Stunning. This book was published in 1997, but it is not at all outdated. It is just as relevant and important as it was when written. The book is a mix of memoir, poetry, and a smaller amount of fiction. Each piece has a short introduction to the author. Most authors identify themselves by nation, clan, community, ancestors, parents. Those of us whose ancestors came from other continents do not, cannot, have the kind of continuity of community that these women do - even though we disrupted their Stunning. This book was published in 1997, but it is not at all outdated. It is just as relevant and important as it was when written. The book is a mix of memoir, poetry, and a smaller amount of fiction. Each piece has a short introduction to the author. Most authors identify themselves by nation, clan, community, ancestors, parents. Those of us whose ancestors came from other continents do not, cannot, have the kind of continuity of community that these women do - even though we disrupted their communities, they still have that sense, or have worked to rebuild it. And the stories show a value system that rates people, nature, and family as much more important than money and accumulating things. The quality of writing is uniformly excellent. Some of the authors are well known and some are not; all of them contribute valuable stories. The editors did a great job. The book gives the reader a sense of what it is like to be a woman and a native in modern times, and a sense of the history of how it got this way. The book is organized into four sections: The Beginning of the World; Within the Enemy: Challenge; Transformation: Voices of the Invisible; and Dreamwalkers: The Returning. This structure, and the pieces chosen for each section, makes sense and gives a kind of progression. Each section is excellent. There's a lot about the tragedy of the Indian schools (which required kids to speak only the enemy's language) and the culture clash even when the person chooses to get the standard western education. There's an excellent piece on the evolution on the AIM movement. And so much more. And many glimpses of family life: happy, tragic, evolving. At over 550 pages, it is not a quick read, but it is well worthwhile.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Baylee

    Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is a great book to read, you do not have be Indian women to read this book because I am not an Indian women but I enjoyed reading it too. I was required to read this book my English class, but we did not read all of it, we just read q few parts and I really enjoyed it. Before reading this book, I was not a huge fan of poetry. It wasn't because I didn't enjoy it, it was more because I didn't understand always what the author was trying to say or tell when writing Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is a great book to read, you do not have be Indian women to read this book because I am not an Indian women but I enjoyed reading it too. I was required to read this book my English class, but we did not read all of it, we just read q few parts and I really enjoyed it. Before reading this book, I was not a huge fan of poetry. It wasn't because I didn't enjoy it, it was more because I didn't understand always what the author was trying to say or tell when writing it. After reading the poems I did though, that completely changed the outlook of it for me. One of my favorite poems was “Confession” by Alice Lee. It is a very powerful poem in a short amount of words. The girl being talked about in this poem is going through Rhetorical Sovereignty. She seems too be on her own throughout the whole poem and has to grow up knowing what had happened when she was younger. Almost every poem as a meaning to it and I felt that, the Reinventing the Enemy’s Language is a great book to read in a college level class. It opens the mind of us readers to question why or how this may have happened. Overall I thought this book was a great book to read, only when reading parts of it. I could always picture what the authors of the poems were experiencing and I felt almost as if I were right there beside them. Poetry had never been something that sparked my interest but after taking a deeper look at different poems, I do have a better interest and I hope you as readers agree with me, after reading this book. Poetry is a great way to express feelings but in a short and meaningful way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    This book is one of the most eye opening, slap in the face novels I have ever read in my life! “Reinventing the Enemy’s Language” is a compilation of writings by different Native women. This book is an example of a term known as “survivance”. This term is a combination of the words survival and defiance. Through the stories you find that a lot of these women have survived events that you can’t even imaging and the fact that they are writing and sharing their stories is an act of defiance. They This book is one of the most eye opening, slap in the face novels I have ever read in my life! “Reinventing the Enemy’s Language” is a compilation of writings by different Native women. This book is an example of a term known as “survivance”. This term is a combination of the words survival and defiance. Through the stories you find that a lot of these women have survived events that you can’t even imaging and the fact that they are writing and sharing their stories is an act of defiance. They are saying “You do not have control over me.” These women are taking their situations and turning them into power. They are setting an example to younger Native women facing these issues, telling them that they will make it through and that they are not alone. The book touches on very traumatic topics such as, poverty, discrimination, and abuse, but it never gets boring because each woman’s story is completely different. So, even though you are reading similar themes each story is different and it is written in all kinds of mediums. Some stories are written as poems some as short stories. This book has become one of my favorite books of all time. Every element of this book changes you, it gives you new perspectives, new experiences, and really opens your eyes to the problems Native women face and hoe extreme the problems they face are.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tiffanie Dorale

    Rhetorical Sovereignty at its Finest This book is somewhat inspiring to me. Being a woman sometimes you don’t really feel that your voice is heard and that is one thing that I loved about this book. This book is entirely written by female authors and they did a wonderful job. There are stories that are about anything and everything. From trauma to a simple recipe this book really captures the Native American culture and I would definitely not shy away from it just because it is written by all wom Rhetorical Sovereignty at its Finest This book is somewhat inspiring to me. Being a woman sometimes you don’t really feel that your voice is heard and that is one thing that I loved about this book. This book is entirely written by female authors and they did a wonderful job. There are stories that are about anything and everything. From trauma to a simple recipe this book really captures the Native American culture and I would definitely not shy away from it just because it is written by all woman (that means you boys!). This book really gives voices to women from across the nation, which I believe is great because having to have read this for a class, I was not to thrilled at first. But I understood later why this book is so important. It gives writers, and Native American, female writers the opportunity to tell and share their stories which is why I think this is really rhetorical sovereignty at its finest.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Renyé

    Amazing book. You learn about human beings, and of course about American Indian women. But you also lean about the problems with naming and language, the one that prevails in our culture, excluding so many people, trying to harm so many people. There are poems, stories, anecdotes, there is herstory, analysis… There are also some writers, like Joy Harjo, who's been the first native writer to be awarded a most important poetry prize in the USA. Harjo is a musician and composer too. I have a few of Amazing book. You learn about human beings, and of course about American Indian women. But you also lean about the problems with naming and language, the one that prevails in our culture, excluding so many people, trying to harm so many people. There are poems, stories, anecdotes, there is herstory, analysis… There are also some writers, like Joy Harjo, who's been the first native writer to be awarded a most important poetry prize in the USA. Harjo is a musician and composer too. I have a few of her poetry books. I don't share the spiritual part, but I love her writing anyway. This is another question in our demented cultural upbringing: we are taught we need to like what reflects the identity of the "team" we are supposed to be in.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Heading each piece, the writer names the nation to which they belong—it feels like defiance against the taxonomic table of contents that typifies the western itch to classify and anthologize. Different values too. When the dominant culture asserts its might by saying “I am [Italian/American/whatever]”, instead to say, I belong to ______ nation- I am of my people. The title comes back to me again and again: Reinventing the Enemy's Language. To become expert in something that contributes nothing o Heading each piece, the writer names the nation to which they belong—it feels like defiance against the taxonomic table of contents that typifies the western itch to classify and anthologize. Different values too. When the dominant culture asserts its might by saying “I am [Italian/American/whatever]”, instead to say, I belong to ______ nation- I am of my people. The title comes back to me again and again: Reinventing the Enemy's Language. To become expert in something that contributes nothing of value or enrichment to yourself, only for its use to blunt the blows of your oppressor. What damning work in these stories. Imagine what’s told in Native tongue when they don’t have to explain things to me.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Wonderful compilation of Native women writers!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Can I give it 3.5? Most contributors wrote one piece, so the poets got a lot less density.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Christina Karvounis

    Excellent. Moving and creative.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Margo

    One of the most coherent, inspiring and honest books I've read. Women's voices are always the most powerful for me. One of the most coherent, inspiring and honest books I've read. Women's voices are always the most powerful for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I vote for kitchen tables as an excellent place to generate collaborative works such as this--a collection from various tribes and women discussing the challenges of integrating the Indian culture with the modern American culture and the outcome of these clashes and celebrations of gender roles. The Editors have assembled a comprehensive collection of authors and writings.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Cutcha Risling Baldy

    Am gonna write this one up for my website also. Have a question about the decision on "identity" in this book and representation of "federally recognized" versus "non recognized." More to come at http://cutchabaldy.weebly.com Am gonna write this one up for my website also. Have a question about the decision on "identity" in this book and representation of "federally recognized" versus "non recognized." More to come at http://cutchabaldy.weebly.com

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rekha

    This reads like a who's who of Native American women writers. If you want a small taste of a big spectrum, this is a good pick. This reads like a who's who of Native American women writers. If you want a small taste of a big spectrum, this is a good pick.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    an excellent selection of writings...very important.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Excellent!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Saya

    Read half but even taking into account that the women weren't professional writers, I found it a bit clunky. Read half but even taking into account that the women weren't professional writers, I found it a bit clunky.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mishap

    Contemporary native women's writing (well, the 90's) featuring stories, essays, and all manner of amazing works. Contemporary native women's writing (well, the 90's) featuring stories, essays, and all manner of amazing works.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Perea

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rain

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...