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Vegetable Simple: A Cookbook

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From one of the world's most renowned chefs, 110 essential recipes that bring out the beauty of vegetables, simply prepared. Eric Ripert is the co-owner of the acclaimed restaurant Le Bernadin, and the winner of countless Michelin stars. He is well known for his exquisite, clean, seafood-centered cuisine, but now, in Vegetable Simple, he turns his singular culinary imaginat From one of the world's most renowned chefs, 110 essential recipes that bring out the beauty of vegetables, simply prepared. Eric Ripert is the co-owner of the acclaimed restaurant Le Bernadin, and the winner of countless Michelin stars. He is well known for his exquisite, clean, seafood-centered cuisine, but now, in Vegetable Simple, he turns his singular culinary imagination to vegetables. Lately, Ripert has found himself reaching for vegetables as his main food source--and doing so, as is his habit, with great intent and care. In the 110 recipes in this book, Ripert brings out their beauty; their earthiness, their nourishing qualities, and the many ways they can be prepared. From his sweet pea soup to his watermelon pizza, from his fava bean and mint salad to his mushroom Bolognese and his roasted carrots with harissa, Eric Ripert articulates a vision for vegetables that are prepared simply, without complex steps or ingredients, allowing their essential qualities to shine and their color and flavor to remain uncompromised. A gorgeous guide to the way we eat today.


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From one of the world's most renowned chefs, 110 essential recipes that bring out the beauty of vegetables, simply prepared. Eric Ripert is the co-owner of the acclaimed restaurant Le Bernadin, and the winner of countless Michelin stars. He is well known for his exquisite, clean, seafood-centered cuisine, but now, in Vegetable Simple, he turns his singular culinary imaginat From one of the world's most renowned chefs, 110 essential recipes that bring out the beauty of vegetables, simply prepared. Eric Ripert is the co-owner of the acclaimed restaurant Le Bernadin, and the winner of countless Michelin stars. He is well known for his exquisite, clean, seafood-centered cuisine, but now, in Vegetable Simple, he turns his singular culinary imagination to vegetables. Lately, Ripert has found himself reaching for vegetables as his main food source--and doing so, as is his habit, with great intent and care. In the 110 recipes in this book, Ripert brings out their beauty; their earthiness, their nourishing qualities, and the many ways they can be prepared. From his sweet pea soup to his watermelon pizza, from his fava bean and mint salad to his mushroom Bolognese and his roasted carrots with harissa, Eric Ripert articulates a vision for vegetables that are prepared simply, without complex steps or ingredients, allowing their essential qualities to shine and their color and flavor to remain uncompromised. A gorgeous guide to the way we eat today.

30 review for Vegetable Simple: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie DeMoss

    Vegetable simple is a lovely cookbook with gorgeous pictures that provides recipes for vegetables that can be done often in the simplest and freshest ways. My favorite so far is the romaine caesar gratin, where you actually broil the parmesan on the top of the romaine before serving. Ingenious idea. I also want to try the Vidalia Onion Risotto and Vegetable Lasagna. In the summer when garden tomatoes are available I plan to try Tomato Croque Sel. There are a few recipes that are not as simple as Vegetable simple is a lovely cookbook with gorgeous pictures that provides recipes for vegetables that can be done often in the simplest and freshest ways. My favorite so far is the romaine caesar gratin, where you actually broil the parmesan on the top of the romaine before serving. Ingenious idea. I also want to try the Vidalia Onion Risotto and Vegetable Lasagna. In the summer when garden tomatoes are available I plan to try Tomato Croque Sel. There are a few recipes that are not as simple as the title implies, but overall this book uses recipes with fresh ingredients and simple methods to help you prepare wonderful and healthy food. I received a free copy of this book from the publishers via Netgalley. My review is voluntary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This is a gorgeous gourmet cookbook that delivers exactly what it promises -- it's all veggies (though some are stretches, like popcorn and nuts) and the recipes are written refreshingly simply even when they are decidedly upscale. There is a gorgeous photo for every recipe. Most require few ingredients and let the produce shine, though sometimes exotic ingredients or specialty tools are required. It will work well for vegetarians and vegans (something you can't always assume, since many chefs u This is a gorgeous gourmet cookbook that delivers exactly what it promises -- it's all veggies (though some are stretches, like popcorn and nuts) and the recipes are written refreshingly simply even when they are decidedly upscale. There is a gorgeous photo for every recipe. Most require few ingredients and let the produce shine, though sometimes exotic ingredients or specialty tools are required. It will work well for vegetarians and vegans (something you can't always assume, since many chefs use copious animal products even in their vegetable recipes), and for folks who are paleo, gluten free, etc. for the most part. No nutritional information is provided. I read a temporary digital ARC of this book via NetGalley.

  3. 5 out of 5

    =^.^= Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: November 9, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is once again closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and Date reviewed/posted: November 9, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is once again closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. From one of the world’s most renowned chefs, 110 essential recipes that celebrate the beauty, simplicity, and elegance of vegetables NAMED ONE OF THE BEST COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR BY PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Eric Ripert is the chef and co-owner of the acclaimed restaurant Le Bernardin, and the winner of countless Michelin stars, well known for his exquisite, clean, seafood-centred cuisine. But lately, Ripert has found himself reaching for vegetables as his main food source—and doing so, as is his habit, with great intent and care. In Vegetable Simple, Ripert turns his singular culinary imagination to vegetables: their beauty, their earthiness, their nourishing qualities, and the many ways they can be prepared. From vibrant Sweet Pea Soup to Fava Bean and Mint Salad, from warming Mushroom Bolognese to Roasted Carrots with Harissa, Eric Ripert articulates a vision for vegetables that are prepared simply, without complex steps or ingredients, allowing their essential qualities to shine and their colour and flavour to remain uncompromised. Complete with gorgeous photos by renowned photographer Nigel Parry, this is a necessary guide for the way we eat today. The first time my parent's PSW cooked them asparagus for dinner, she did not know how to cook it so she boiled it .... for AN HOUR. This book surprised me by being by M. Ripert as he is the ocean-food chef extraordinaire. But this book is amazing - great ideas for what many would call side dishes that could easily be the star of the meal: that fava bean and mint salad is calling my name!!! As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🍅🥕🥔🍄🥑

  4. 4 out of 5

    meghann

    I really thought this cookbook would be for me. I'm a gluten free vegetarian with food allergies, so I make mainly vegetable dishes. I thought this would be a book of literally simple vegetable dishes that would inspire me to try new ways of enjoying this staple of my diet, but that's not what I discovered. I think if you find cooking relaxing and don't mind spending your evening doing it as well as spending the money on a long list of ingredients for each dish, then you may get a lot from this. I really thought this cookbook would be for me. I'm a gluten free vegetarian with food allergies, so I make mainly vegetable dishes. I thought this would be a book of literally simple vegetable dishes that would inspire me to try new ways of enjoying this staple of my diet, but that's not what I discovered. I think if you find cooking relaxing and don't mind spending your evening doing it as well as spending the money on a long list of ingredients for each dish, then you may get a lot from this. I have an autoimmune disease. Tired is my baseline, and I'm often too exhausted to cook/eat. So I focus on delicious vegetable dishes that take like 20 minutes from start to eating and don't require me spending a fortune on a long list of ingredients. If I'm prepping and cooking for over an hour, I'm going to be so freaking tired after and not want to eat anyways. So this book was not for me. Plus a lot of the recipes were quite rich and called for lots of butter and cream and involved eggs, which I don't eat. There were also a lot of mushroom recipes. For some reason mushrooms are associated with vegetarians, but there are those of us who do not like them. These recipes tended to be quite fancy and required tools I don't have and ingredients like sheep's milk yogurt. Some of these recipes were beautiful to look at but would not be filling. Like a beet broth with a single thin slice of beet floating in it, or a seasoned tomato. Again, I'm sure these would be impressive at a dinner party and taste great, but there was literally only one recipe I wanted to try. I'm glad I got this from the library before buying it. I am so surprised that I've found many more recipes in traditional cookbooks that I can adapt to my dietary needs than I found in this all vegetable one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kerry Pickens

    This is a interesting cookbook with lots of beautiful photography, but I don't think it's for the average person. When you start adding truffles to your recipes, then you limit your audience. I am trying to eat more vegetables because they are healthy, and to be honest meat has gotten really expensive. So I eat a lot of pasta and vegetables, but the recipes in this cookbook are beyond my budget. This is a interesting cookbook with lots of beautiful photography, but I don't think it's for the average person. When you start adding truffles to your recipes, then you limit your audience. I am trying to eat more vegetables because they are healthy, and to be honest meat has gotten really expensive. So I eat a lot of pasta and vegetables, but the recipes in this cookbook are beyond my budget.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I love vegetables, so I was excited to check out this cookbook. But, there wasn't a lot of recipes I wanted to try. I also found it odd that a book about vegetables had the very first recipe using microwave popcorn. It's REALLY easy to make popcorn on the stovetop and it doesn't have all the chemicals, etc that microwave popcorn does. Overall, it was just OK. I think there are better vegetable-focused cookbooks out there. I love vegetables, so I was excited to check out this cookbook. But, there wasn't a lot of recipes I wanted to try. I also found it odd that a book about vegetables had the very first recipe using microwave popcorn. It's REALLY easy to make popcorn on the stovetop and it doesn't have all the chemicals, etc that microwave popcorn does. Overall, it was just OK. I think there are better vegetable-focused cookbooks out there.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sascha

    Unless you eat a plant-based diet, you may consider vegetables just as the side dishes to fill in next to whatever meat and starch you’re having. Eric Ripert’s Vegetable Simple elevates vegetables to the stars of the meal, but simple stars with simple preparation so that the flavor of the vegetable is enhanced–not overwhelmed. Vegetable Simple is filled with beautiful photographs of tantalizing vegetable meals. As I read over the pages, stopping on a halved juicy tomato that has been baked with a Unless you eat a plant-based diet, you may consider vegetables just as the side dishes to fill in next to whatever meat and starch you’re having. Eric Ripert’s Vegetable Simple elevates vegetables to the stars of the meal, but simple stars with simple preparation so that the flavor of the vegetable is enhanced–not overwhelmed. Vegetable Simple is filled with beautiful photographs of tantalizing vegetable meals. As I read over the pages, stopping on a halved juicy tomato that has been baked with an herbes de provence crust, I am thinking of summer and how a freshly picked tomato will taste with this simple preparation. The mushroom bolognese in a nest of tagliatelle. And can you imagine the taste of Watermelon Pizza with olives, feta and mint? Vidalia Onion Risotto? Vegetable Lasagna where the noodle are zucchini. There are so many delicious-sounding recipes like Eggplant Au Poivre for those of us who would once order the meat version whenever possible. Besides the chapters devoted to vegetables, Ripert has also included some of his favorite beverages and desserts. Summertime will definitely contain Frosé–frozen rosé. And Cherry Clafoutis, a fresh cherry custard dessert! I highly recommend Vegetable Simple for everyone who is already eating a plant-based diet as well as those who want to incorporate more vegetables into their diet. This cookbook will certainly demonstrate one of the easier and tastier ways to do it. Also, the recipes will definitely enhance the repertoire of vegetarian cooks. I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

    Vegetable Simple: A Cookbook is what the title implies—a collection of very simple recipes for cooking vegetables. The early recipes felt too simple: things I already knew how to make or could make without instruction. The later recipes grow increasingly interesting without getting intimidatingly complex. If you do a lot of vegetarian cooking already, this book may not teach you much that's new. If you know someone making the switch to vegetarianism—or who simply wants to eat more, delicious veg Vegetable Simple: A Cookbook is what the title implies—a collection of very simple recipes for cooking vegetables. The early recipes felt too simple: things I already knew how to make or could make without instruction. The later recipes grow increasingly interesting without getting intimidatingly complex. If you do a lot of vegetarian cooking already, this book may not teach you much that's new. If you know someone making the switch to vegetarianism—or who simply wants to eat more, delicious vegetables—this book is exactly what's needed. I received a free electronic review copy of this book for review purposes from the publisher via NetGalley; the opinions are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    4 Stars What I liked: This is a book about vegetables! It doesn’t take long for vegetables at our dinner table to get boring. So, this book helped me add some interest to this dreaded portion of the meal. I’ve been able to try a few of the recipes and they are easy to follow and delicious! What I did not like: A few of the recipes require specialized equipment that I do not have and or uncommon ingredients that I cannot find here in my small town. That being said, it means there will always be a r 4 Stars What I liked: This is a book about vegetables! It doesn’t take long for vegetables at our dinner table to get boring. So, this book helped me add some interest to this dreaded portion of the meal. I’ve been able to try a few of the recipes and they are easy to follow and delicious! What I did not like: A few of the recipes require specialized equipment that I do not have and or uncommon ingredients that I cannot find here in my small town. That being said, it means there will always be a recipe to try someday if I can find that ingredient or the means to get my hands on the equipment! All in all, I really like having a book on my recipe shelf that is dedicated to vegetables. When I’m meal planning it is right by my side so I don’t have to grimace at another can of green beans. Thank you!! I won a free copy of this book in a Goodreads Giveaway.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Mckenna

    Excellent Cookbook. I love them, especially with new veggie recipes. I have used most of these ingrédients, but fall in a rut where I cook similar recipes. This is from a Chef at Le Bernadin, and I was so lucky to have eaten at the restaurant once. Most of these recipes, if you have some cooking skills, you will do well with. My favorite were Coconut Toasted, Baby Leak Potato Soup, Videla Onion Risotto, and Spicy Sautéed Shitakes. Those were the more interesting to me to try, but most of the rec Excellent Cookbook. I love them, especially with new veggie recipes. I have used most of these ingrédients, but fall in a rut where I cook similar recipes. This is from a Chef at Le Bernadin, and I was so lucky to have eaten at the restaurant once. Most of these recipes, if you have some cooking skills, you will do well with. My favorite were Coconut Toasted, Baby Leak Potato Soup, Videla Onion Risotto, and Spicy Sautéed Shitakes. Those were the more interesting to me to try, but most of the recipes are not that difficult. Imagine, a little practice, but most look absolutely delicious! Thank you NetGalley and Eric Ripefert for an ARC of this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    A gorgeous new cookbook by the brilliant Eric Ripert! Don't be daunted by this highly acclaimed chef though, all of these recipes are simple enough for any level of home cook. Short ingredient lists and simple instructions that highlight and elevate these glorious vegetables. Thank you to Random House Publishing and NetGalley for allowing me to preview this cookbook. My review is voluntary and all opinions are my own. A gorgeous new cookbook by the brilliant Eric Ripert! Don't be daunted by this highly acclaimed chef though, all of these recipes are simple enough for any level of home cook. Short ingredient lists and simple instructions that highlight and elevate these glorious vegetables. Thank you to Random House Publishing and NetGalley for allowing me to preview this cookbook. My review is voluntary and all opinions are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Hurst

    First, thank you Penguin Random House publishing for giving me this wonderful cookbook via a Goodreads giveaway! Eric Ripert keeps his word providing simple vegetable recipes. My mouth watered reading through it and I have a page long list to incorporate into family meals. There are a handful of decadent desserts included as well. I cannot wait to start making these French inspired dishes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    Simple recipes that don’t require many ingredients as the star is the vegetable. This is not low fat or vegan cookbook, but for anyone who is looking to eat more of nature’s bounty. Rippert makes it effortless along with beauty shots of the dishes, which were really my favorite part of the book since we eat with our eyes first.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    Vegetable Simple by Eric Ripert. That is the essence of this cookbook and of all the recipes enclosed therein. Ripert is a Michelin-starred chef at New York City’s Le Bernardin. He was born and raised in France, became a traditionally trained French chef, and now he’s written a cookbook that celebrates vegetables in their most pure, delicious form. Ripert is known for his seafood recipes. Le Bernardin is known for fish, and Ripert confesses that fish is his passion. But he’s been spending time l Vegetable Simple by Eric Ripert. That is the essence of this cookbook and of all the recipes enclosed therein. Ripert is a Michelin-starred chef at New York City’s Le Bernardin. He was born and raised in France, became a traditionally trained French chef, and now he’s written a cookbook that celebrates vegetables in their most pure, delicious form. Ripert is known for his seafood recipes. Le Bernardin is known for fish, and Ripert confesses that fish is his passion. But he’s been spending time lately studying vegetables, remembering the fresh produce from his summers in Provence, the colors and flavors bursting through with every bite. And he wants to take what he’s learned as a professional chef and find ways to bring forward those bright flavors though recipes that highlight the best of these ingredients without asking too much time or energy of the cook. These are the recipes he makes at home for his family and friends, and now he’s opening up his home kitchen to the rest of us. With recipes for appetizers and snacks, sides, mains, and even desserts, Ripert uses simple processes and the freshest produce he can find to create these elegant recipes that emphasize flavor and health as well as heartiness and beauty. The recipes are as simple as a perfectly ripe tomato, cut in half, seasoned and covered in olive oil to a hollandaise sauce served over poached asparagus. There is a simple baked sweet potato as well as a Vietnamese Pho with almost 2 dozen ingredients for the broth and garnish. There are the vegetable recipes you expect to see—Baba Ganoush, Cole Slaw, Israeli Couscous Salad, Ratatouille, and Carrot Cake. But there are also surprises like the End of Summer Tomato “Tea,” Chickpea Salad, Vidalia Onion Risotto, Chili, Spaghetti Pomodoro, Black Truffle Quesadillas, Ferran Adria Potato Foam, and Sticky Toffee Pudding. While many of these vegetable dishes seem simplistic, they are based on decades of work in professional chefs, recommendations from chefs around the world, the rustic French vegetable dishes of Ripert’s childhood, and the inspiration of local farmer’s markets. All of these come together to inspire a collection of recipes that will satisfy the appetites of those who choose to be vegetarian or vegan, those wanting to add more produce to their diets for their own health or for that of the planet, and for those who simply come to the table hungry and want the best tasting food they can get. I love this gorgeous short cookbook, and if I have any complaint, it’s the choice to omit an index at the end. But otherwise, the honesty of the recipes, the beauty of the photography, and the sophistication of the flavors draw me in and make me want to try a bunch of these beautiful recipes and make them staples in my kitchen. (And not just the one for Chocolate Mousse. But definitely the one for Chocolate Mousse.) Egalleys for Vegetable Simple were provided by Random House Publishing Group through NetGalley, with many thanks.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Vicky

    I love cookbooks. Let’s get that out there first. I love trying new recipes or even visiting old ones with new twists. I am not a chef by any stretch of the imagination. I am a simple home cook who likes trying out new things. But I do not love reading a cookbook that even on the first page lists ingredients I’ve never heard of, can’t be found in my local stores, or are so expensive, I’d have to mortgage my home to afford them. Unfortunately, that’s what some of the recipes in this book have. Do I love cookbooks. Let’s get that out there first. I love trying new recipes or even visiting old ones with new twists. I am not a chef by any stretch of the imagination. I am a simple home cook who likes trying out new things. But I do not love reading a cookbook that even on the first page lists ingredients I’ve never heard of, can’t be found in my local stores, or are so expensive, I’d have to mortgage my home to afford them. Unfortunately, that’s what some of the recipes in this book have. Don’t get me wrong, there are some amazing recipes in here, like: Flash-cured Cucumbers. Aigo Boulido (Garlic soup), Vegetable Pistou, and more. I am eager to try them. But…the first recipe was for Yuzu-citrus Popcorn. I had to look up what Yuzu was (a Japanese citrus fruit) – and can only get it online. There’s nothing like that where I live. Or shichimi togarashi. Most of the recipes are much simpler with easy-to-find ingredients that are affordable, and there are tons of beautiful color pictures to accompany the recipes. Each recipe includes the list of ingredients, number of servings, and directions. What they don’t include are the time it takes to prepare the dish or nutrient information. For recipes that require special equipment, that is also listed. I did like the Tips & Guidelines at the end as well as the Seasonal produce guide. Those are really helpful. And the book contains not just vegetable side-dishes, but main meals and desserts—all vegetable based—as well. So…a balance of pluses and minuses in this book. It would definitely fit in a kitchen of someone who loves “fancy” food, even though this is “Vegetable Simple”. There are some really good recipes in here—actually a lot of them—but I wouldn’t purchase this for a simple cook without access to some higher-end ingredients. I would, however, purchase it as a gift for foodie friends. And I know I am going to enjoy trying some of these recipes for myself and my family. Disclaimer: Disclosure of Material: I received a final and/or advanced reader copy of this book with the hope that I will leave my unbiased opinion. I was not required to leave a review, positive or otherwise, and my opinions are just that… My Opinions. I am posting this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising”. My thanks to Goodreads and Random House for providing this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leah M

    Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book. I am offering my honest opinion voluntarily. I was intrigued by the idea of a book devoted solely to the preparation of vegetables by the chef of a Michelin-starred restaurant. Before starting, I was half expecting the recipes to involve complicated lists of difficult-to-find ingredients, with impossible to follow directions that would be far past my skill level. However, I was so pleasantly surprised to find that this really is a Thank you to NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book. I am offering my honest opinion voluntarily. I was intrigued by the idea of a book devoted solely to the preparation of vegetables by the chef of a Michelin-starred restaurant. Before starting, I was half expecting the recipes to involve complicated lists of difficult-to-find ingredients, with impossible to follow directions that would be far past my skill level. However, I was so pleasantly surprised to find that this really is a cookbook full of simple recipes featuring vegetables. The book starts out by explaining why vegetables are so important to the author, and closes with a quick guide about how to select and clean vegetables, with special emphasis on the seasons in which specific vegetables are available in the Northern Hemisphere. There's such a variety of cultural influences in the recipes - Asian, Middle Eastern, European, and Latin American. Nearly every ingredient listed can easily be found in my local supermarket, and the few that aren't can still be found easily by visiting an Asian supermarket. Each recipe is preceded with a stunning photograph, giving me a visual idea of what to expect, and there were so many recipes that I bookmarked. While vegetables are the star of the show, there are a few recipes featuring fruits as well, so there's a dessert section as well, and a few recipes for alcoholic beverages as well. The recipes run the gamut from appetizers to dessert, with everything in-between, and makes me excited to pick up some ingredients and give these recipes a try. It's perfect for everyone, including vegans and vegetarians.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Truly a gorgeous book, but I won't be cooking from it. Some of the recipes are so simple that they're not really recipes. (Cut a perfectly ripe tomato in half, season with salt and pepper and drizzle with a high quality olive oil. Eat.) Nigel Parry's photos are the best part and they'll inspire readers to search out and eat seasonal vegetables. But even if Eric Ripert tells me to eat zucchini noodles, I just don't wanna. Read it if you want to fall in love with produce, be inspired to eat simply a Truly a gorgeous book, but I won't be cooking from it. Some of the recipes are so simple that they're not really recipes. (Cut a perfectly ripe tomato in half, season with salt and pepper and drizzle with a high quality olive oil. Eat.) Nigel Parry's photos are the best part and they'll inspire readers to search out and eat seasonal vegetables. But even if Eric Ripert tells me to eat zucchini noodles, I just don't wanna. Read it if you want to fall in love with produce, be inspired to eat simply and put vegetables at the front of your meal and page through gorgeous full-page photos. I received a copy of this book from the publisher for review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ann Marie

    A special thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing for the ARC for this wonderful cookbook. I absolutely love vegetables and these are recipes from by Eric Ripert who has a Michelin Star so look no further especially if you LOVE these simple but delicious recipes for beautiful vegetables cooked in a myriad of ways and done rather easily and I easily give it 5 stars! Delightful and Delicious!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    Vegetable Simple by Eric Ripert exudes a love for flavorful, in-season vegetables. The recipes are straightforward and easily reproduced at home. There is a sprinkling of more complicated recipes for gourmet enthusiasts. I was a bit intimidated by the artistic presentation of the dishes in the book. However, when I read the recipes and realized that we already cook like this in my home, I was hooked! Nigel Parry photographed the dishes for Vegetable Simple. The photographs are absolutely stunning Vegetable Simple by Eric Ripert exudes a love for flavorful, in-season vegetables. The recipes are straightforward and easily reproduced at home. There is a sprinkling of more complicated recipes for gourmet enthusiasts. I was a bit intimidated by the artistic presentation of the dishes in the book. However, when I read the recipes and realized that we already cook like this in my home, I was hooked! Nigel Parry photographed the dishes for Vegetable Simple. The photographs are absolutely stunning. I hope this sets the bar for cookbook photography everywhere. I pre-ordered the physical book. I cannot wait to hold it in my hands and look at the full-page photography! Some of the most interesting parts of Vegetable Simple are Eric Ripert’s personal stories. Food is a natural part of our lives. A taste or smell can evoke memories from childhood, a vacation, or time spent with family. These beautiful bits made it feel like I was having a conversation with Eric and sharing in his personal food journey. I am an average home cook who loves good food. My 14-year-old daughter is a pescetarian, and I adore exploring new recipes with her. We love growing our own produce and eating fresh from the garden. My finished dishes do not look as elegant as Eric Ripert’s works of art. I can live with that as long as they taste as good! Each recipe includes a personal note from the author, a full-page photograph of the finished product, equipment needed, and clear directions. I was intrigued to find recipes and techniques that I have never heard of—for example, Flash-Cured Cucumbers. I picked three recipes from the book to try: Roasted Cauliflower, Flash-Cured Cucumbers, and Aigo Boulido Broth (Garlic Soup). Recipes I Made: Flash-cured Cucumbers – I am a huge fan of cucumbers. This is a simple technique that adds just the right amount of salty flavor. One area where this cookbook shines is letting the home cook in on professional secrets to make our lives easier and tastier. Roasted Cauliflower – I usually think of cauliflower as rather bland, so I was really excited to try this dish. The cauliflower was moist and delicious. I didn’t get the charred bits on mine in the roasting process, and I see this as a great excuse to try again! I loved the shichimi togarashi seasoning. It was unexpected and flavorful. I will definitely make this dish again! Aigo Boulido Broth (Garlic Soup) – This is a dish I would have never thought of on my own. We put it into mugs and sipped it like a hot tea. Mmmmm! Delicious! It is best warm. Once it cooled, the taste was stronger and slightly bitter. Vegetable Simple describes it as a refreshing soup that French farmers enjoy after a long day in the fields. I can definitely see that, and I will surely be making this again. I may experiment with other combinations as well. I wonder what basil and garlic would taste like? I saved the garlic cloves and used them in a fish dish later that evening. Waste not, want not! More Recipes I want to try from Vegetable Simple: Grated Carrot Salad Chickpea Salad Cold Basil Pasta Salad Steamed Vegetable Dumplings Grilled Eggplant Miso Sauteed Pea Shoots Hong Kong Style Bok Choy with Soy-Ginger Vinaigrette Corn Cake with Blueberry Compote Frozen Espresso Souffles Sticky Toffee Puddings and so many more! How Does this Cookbook Measure Up? This is the checklist that I use to evaluate a cookbook. You can use this as a quick reference to see if this cookbook is right for you. Features I Look for in a Cookbook: Delicious Recipes - ✅ Recipes are Easy to Follow - ✅ Inspires Me to Cook - ✅ Beautiful Photography - ✅ Gorgeous pictures! Pictures of Every Recipe - ✅ Easy to Find Ingredients - Mostly Nutritional Information for Every Recipe - None Number of Servings for Every Recipe - ✅ Personal Stories (share your heart) - ✅ Recipe and Ingredient Index - ✅ Metric Conversion Chart - None Substitution Chart - None Source: I received a free digital copy of Vegetable Simple at my request in exchange for an honest review. I pre-ordered the physical book because I must own this book!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    I received a copy of this through a Goodreads Giveaway and was excited to discover some new ideas and inspiration for vegetable-centered dishes from a chef I've seen appearing on various TV shows. At first glance the stunning photography by Nigel Parry really pops out and grabs the appetite. However, flipping through the recipes made me realize this isn't the type of cookbook recipes that I first thought there would be. Popcorn... plantain chips... toasted coconut... cucumbers with some salt... I received a copy of this through a Goodreads Giveaway and was excited to discover some new ideas and inspiration for vegetable-centered dishes from a chef I've seen appearing on various TV shows. At first glance the stunning photography by Nigel Parry really pops out and grabs the appetite. However, flipping through the recipes made me realize this isn't the type of cookbook recipes that I first thought there would be. Popcorn... plantain chips... toasted coconut... cucumbers with some salt... Well, I guess 'simple' is right there in the title. You microwave some popcorn and add an interesting spice/herb/fat mixture. You cut some plantains, or buy some shaved coconut, and put them in the oven. You take cucumbers and put on some salt. Do we need a recipe book for this? Well, perhaps one does. Some out there don't really know many vegetables. You might see them in the store or get adventurous and grow them in a garden, but have no real idea how best to possibly enjoy them. Even if you have had them, that doesn't mean you know each technique - even if simple - that might change them subtly into a delicious surprise. I've never had a rutabaga, for instance, but maybe I could try this rutabaga gratin now. The salted cucumbers are a good example of a simple thing that seems obvious and needless, but reveals its import upon inspection. Ripert describes a Japanese technique that enhances the cucumber flavor while also providing a firm texture to them. How do you apply salt? How long? What do you do after, leave the salt on, or remove? Simple things, but it might change how you enjoy cucumbers, or cause you to realize you like a vegetable that was always insipid for you before. For the popcorn recipe Ripert even recommends just using the microwave, but then gives ideas for flavorings that will elevate into something that would easily impress a movie-night date. It's meant to take something obvious and common, and inspire it toward something unique and memorable. Now, not all the recipes in here are so simple, and despite the title, some are actually somewhat complex, particularly in terms of number of ingredients. But there are soups, salads, dips, stews, quesadillas, dumpling, savory parfaits, foams, desserts, and those single vegetable showcases. I look forward to trying the French breakfast radishes (from my garden) with butter and salt. I'd also like to make the Vietnamese Pho or Herb falafel for a dinner one night. Some of the recipes in here don't really feature vegetables - particularly in the deserts (e.g. chocolate mousse), but could classify as vegetarian at least. Carrot cake of course makes it in, as well as several fruit-based items. The recipes are followed by a tips and guidelines section that echo some of the main points made in Ripert's introduction. An index is included at the end. The one significant criticism I have of the cookbook is that there is neither a table of contents, nor is the book clearly divided into sections. The recipes do follow an order that contains elements of category of dish or seasonality, but this doesn't seem completely consistent or clearly demarcated. The index can help, but a list of recipes at the start would have been useful as well. This is a cookbook I'll be keeping and turning through often to find easy little ways to enjoy my vegetables in novel ways.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I should start by admitting how big a fan I am of Chef Eric Ripert, having eaten his food on one memorable occasion and enjoyed his many television appearances over the years with the late Anthony Bourdain. So, I was excited for the chance to read a book that might provide a deeper insight into his personality and culinary process. However, I was also a little wary at the outset because far too frequently I have found that cookbooks by celebrity chefs can be shallow vanity projects not worthy of I should start by admitting how big a fan I am of Chef Eric Ripert, having eaten his food on one memorable occasion and enjoyed his many television appearances over the years with the late Anthony Bourdain. So, I was excited for the chance to read a book that might provide a deeper insight into his personality and culinary process. However, I was also a little wary at the outset because far too frequently I have found that cookbooks by celebrity chefs can be shallow vanity projects not worthy of time they require to digest. Happily, Vegetable Simple rises far beyond that level. As Ripert himself admits in an introductory essay, a cookbook featuring vegetables might seem like a curious choice for someone who has built his career and reputation around cooking fish. It is not strange at all, as it turns out, given his appreciation for the simplicity and beauty of well-executed plant-based dishes that he developed from cooking with his parents and grandparents as a boy growing up in France. In fact, Ripert makes a passionate case that vegetables deserve to be central ingredients in their own right, a position that he has increasingly adopted in his own cooking. His aim with this project is showcase the flavors and qualities of those products. Overall, Vegetable Simple does just that. The book contains more than 100 separate recipes covering the gamut of courses from salads and appetizers to main dishes and desserts. Just as comprehensive is the range of vegetables and fruits he includes, from the well-known (potatoes, carrots, zucchini, tomatoes) to the less common (rutabaga, endive, delicata squash). Before each recipe, he offers a brief description of what makes it special, as well as, in some cases, what his personal connection is to the dish. These charming passages were almost too brief but provided great insight into just how much he loves his craft. Each of the recipes is also beautifully illustrated with a color photograph of the finished dish. There are some real standouts among this collection, although I suspect that each reader will have their own list of which are the winners. For me, the most appealing recipes tended to include the heartier courses, such as Mushroom Bolognese, Vietnamese Pho, Vegetable Pistou, Green Asparagus Tempura, and Warm Golden Beets, Aged Balsamic. Honestly, though, I am not sure that there is a single recipe in the volume that I would not be happy to try at least once. The only real criticism I have is that some of the preparation and cooking instructions seemed surprisingly involved; I guess “simple” can be a relative concept for an accomplished chef. Nevertheless, this is a cookbook that I will enjoy using for a long time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Jack

    A Chef’s Ode to Vegetables As a “mostly” vegetarian with aspirations to be vegan, I love me some good, simple recipes that star vegetables. This is precisely what esteemed Le Bernardin chef Eric Ripert has delivered in this cookbook. The photographs are gorgeous—shiny, colorful vegetables glistening with juices or oil—making you want to create and eat the food seen. As promised by the title, the recipes are indeed simple, most only having a few ingredients—though you will have to make an effort t A Chef’s Ode to Vegetables As a “mostly” vegetarian with aspirations to be vegan, I love me some good, simple recipes that star vegetables. This is precisely what esteemed Le Bernardin chef Eric Ripert has delivered in this cookbook. The photographs are gorgeous—shiny, colorful vegetables glistening with juices or oil—making you want to create and eat the food seen. As promised by the title, the recipes are indeed simple, most only having a few ingredients—though you will have to make an effort to get some of them as they are not pantry staples, like a variety of good quality fresh olives or atypical vinegars. Similarly, the preparations are relatively straightforward. Above the ingredients, you'll find any special equipment needed. Good knife skills or a food processor can replace some of the more unusual equipment, like a mandolin or mortar and pestle. As one who has long enjoyed reading cookbooks like a book, I appreciated the chef's wonderfully written headnotes that give more insight into ingredients, preparation, or the recipe itself. You'll find many of the usual vegetable recipe suspects here, like baba ganoush and tapenade, but you'll also find more unusual combinations like Warm Potato and Goat Cheese Parfaits and Grilled Corn, Elote Style. What I love is that even though Eric Ripert is a world-renowned chef, he doesn't look down on things like frozen peas or canned chickpeas or hearts of palm, appreciating not only their convenience but also quality. The book is loosely organized, going from appetizers to desserts. In the introduction, the chef says this is intentional, as he needs you to simply flip through it and be inspired to create a simple menu based around vegetables. I can say he has certainly inspired me, and I look forward to trying many of these delicious-sounding and beautiful-looking recipes where vegetables are the star. I received a free copy of this book, but that did not affect my review. My book blog: https://www.readingfanaticreviews.com

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    One of my major complaints about eating out as a vegetarian is the lack of dishes based just on vegetables. A lot of times you go to a restaurant and the only vegetarian option will be something with a faux meat just standing in for the meat in their regular dish. Many of these dishes rely on the meat for flavor so when you take that it you end up with a bland, tasteless dish. That's why I was so excited to see this cookbook. I want recipes about vegetables. This cookbook came out of the realiz One of my major complaints about eating out as a vegetarian is the lack of dishes based just on vegetables. A lot of times you go to a restaurant and the only vegetarian option will be something with a faux meat just standing in for the meat in their regular dish. Many of these dishes rely on the meat for flavor so when you take that it you end up with a bland, tasteless dish. That's why I was so excited to see this cookbook. I want recipes about vegetables. This cookbook came out of the realization that the author was cooking fish in minimalist ways to best show off the flavor of the fish. He decided to take that same approach with vegetables. The recipes here are very simple. Each is designed to show off the ingredients at peak seasonality and flavor. There are several I would like to try. Watermelon pizza is similar to a watermelon and mint salad I make but arranged in pizza form. There is a apple dish slowly baked in caramel that sounds amazing. I want to try Flash-Cured Cucumbers and making my own Mushroom Consumee. There are simple ways to try some vegetables I don't eat a lot that make me want to try them. Endives and bok choy get seasoned and grilled. Plantains get sauteed instead of fried. The photography is also amazing. It isn't the typical beauty shots of each finished dish. There are close ups of parts of the dish or portraits of the vegetables used. It is a beautiful book to flip through. This review was originally posted on Based On A True Story

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jan Priddy

    Perhaps 4.5 stars because I am still on the fence about keeping it. Absolutely the most beautiful cookbook I have held with a full page photo opposite and entertaining brief introductions to each recipe. The chef clearly has impressive credentials—and the food looks scrumptious—but perhaps he needed a better editor. Popcorn was the first recipe, microwaved (yuck) but with grated citrus peel and the photo was so good. Ripert won me over completely a few pages later with the hummus recipe because h Perhaps 4.5 stars because I am still on the fence about keeping it. Absolutely the most beautiful cookbook I have held with a full page photo opposite and entertaining brief introductions to each recipe. The chef clearly has impressive credentials—and the food looks scrumptious—but perhaps he needed a better editor. Popcorn was the first recipe, microwaved (yuck) but with grated citrus peel and the photo was so good. Ripert won me over completely a few pages later with the hummus recipe because he does not assume I will use canned chickpeas, though that option is included. The salads all look wonderful! I love golden beets and balsamic vinegar reduction (page 146), but again, I never discard peels of my fresh organic veg. It might be prettier, but not better tasting, and nutrients would be lost. Vegetarian pho and roasted delicata squash! He is particularly fond of white pepper. And his harissa-roasted carrots are not peeled or stemmed? Then why peel the beets? The zucchini pancakes look too good to resist! But . . . "16 large heads bok choy" for four people? The photo shows baby bok choy (I have four in my fridge), but even then, four per person is a lot! I love this veg and served one each with onion/mushroom/tofu stir-fried just last night, but two? The dressing sounds divine, but I wonder what Asian market he has been to that he believes this photo shows a "large" veg. Fully grown bok choy are on a scale with cabbages. And, oh dear. The polenta recipe mentions heating water and milk, but no quantity of water is listed. And he also peeled Yukon gold potatoes. Never! The few errors and omissions were not terribly reassuring. But I found tempting recipes. I thank the gift of this advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Books & Basta

    Thank you to Random House & Net Galley for my review copy. Vegetable Simple, A Cookbook by Eric Ripert, elucidates culinary creativity with nourishing vegetables, providing 110 unpretentious everyday recipes. This cookbook will be published in April 2021 and has already been named one of the best cookbooks of the year by Publishers Weekly. The author includes professional tricks that enhance simple cooking processes, which yields a big difference in the end result. Throughout, these recipes turn Thank you to Random House & Net Galley for my review copy. Vegetable Simple, A Cookbook by Eric Ripert, elucidates culinary creativity with nourishing vegetables, providing 110 unpretentious everyday recipes. This cookbook will be published in April 2021 and has already been named one of the best cookbooks of the year by Publishers Weekly. The author includes professional tricks that enhance simple cooking processes, which yields a big difference in the end result. Throughout, these recipes turn into an undeniable, satisfying sophistication on simple vegetables and flavors that work well together, including notes of fresh earth. The New York-based, legendary photographer, Nigel Parry, adds an artistic dimension and an aesthetic appeal to this cookbook. From start to finish, this compilation of recipes will inspire readers to savor the combination of ingredients in each dish. Vegetable Simple is a restorative reminder for the essential pursuit of simple pleasures, offering perspective for the world to seem a little less grim in uncertain times by returning to the spirit of back to the basics.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vicki

    Vegetable Simple is a gorgeous cookbook. Yes, that's the word I want to use: gorgeous. The full-page photos are the motivation to follow a recipe. And I did, several actually. For example, we've been talking about making the corn we see at the farmer's market for years, but just haven't gotten there. When I saw the photo and recipe for Grilled Corn Elote Style, we finally did it. And it was tasty. As the title suggests, most of the recipes are "simple". If you're one of those people that puts on Vegetable Simple is a gorgeous cookbook. Yes, that's the word I want to use: gorgeous. The full-page photos are the motivation to follow a recipe. And I did, several actually. For example, we've been talking about making the corn we see at the farmer's market for years, but just haven't gotten there. When I saw the photo and recipe for Grilled Corn Elote Style, we finally did it. And it was tasty. As the title suggests, most of the recipes are "simple". If you're one of those people that puts on dinner parties for a dozen without blinking, maybe not the right book for you. If you're someone that enjoys food and wants to make something to be proud of, then YES, for you! Although there are a few that were not easy enough for me to attempt yet or looked a little too different for what I think my husband would eat (like 'Warm Potato, Goat Cheese Parfaits'). This book will remain on our kitchen counter until we've made many more of the recipes we've tagged. Here are the others we did do, all of them yummy and easy too: 'Roasted Bell Pepper Salad' and 'Whole Roasted Garlic' And my favorite was 'Baked Cremini, Snail Butter'. Yum!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    This book was received as an ARC from Random House Publishing Group - Random House in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. I am well familiar with Chef Eric Ripert as a reoccurring judge on Top Chef and familiar with his restaurant Le Bernardin. Even though he is a world renown seafood chef, it was surprising to me that his latest cookbook was starring vegetables as the main course. But, when I opened the book and saw the most innova This book was received as an ARC from Random House Publishing Group - Random House in exchange for an honest review. Opinions and thoughts expressed in this review are completely my own. I am well familiar with Chef Eric Ripert as a reoccurring judge on Top Chef and familiar with his restaurant Le Bernardin. Even though he is a world renown seafood chef, it was surprising to me that his latest cookbook was starring vegetables as the main course. But, when I opened the book and saw the most innovative recipes I have ever seen, I knew I was in for a real treat. I am trying to incorporate more vegetables into my diet and this is a creative way to get them in. All of the recipes look delicious but I really want to try the Romaine Gratin and the Potato Leek Soup. I know this will be a future candidate for our future cooking demo. We will consider adding this title to our TX Non-Fiction collection at our library. That is why we give this book 5 stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle | musingsbymichelle

    I really enjoyed the layout and simplicity of many of these recipes. The title explains exactly what this book entails. Ripert's book really opens up the world of easy vegetable side dishes and main courses. He includes recipes that don't require many ingredients nor a lot of prep or supplies. He also explains techniques in an accessible way. I was pleasantly surprised that there was a desert section at the end too! There is a deep appreciation for vegetables and the ways they can be enjoyed. I I really enjoyed the layout and simplicity of many of these recipes. The title explains exactly what this book entails. Ripert's book really opens up the world of easy vegetable side dishes and main courses. He includes recipes that don't require many ingredients nor a lot of prep or supplies. He also explains techniques in an accessible way. I was pleasantly surprised that there was a desert section at the end too! There is a deep appreciation for vegetables and the ways they can be enjoyed. I can't wait to see a copy of this book in person because the digital copy doesn't do the pictures justice. Also, I appreciated how there was a list of produce by season at the end of the book. My one critique is that the recipes don't seem to be divided into any clear sections other than the deserts at the end and a random part where multiple mushroom dishes were listed. I personally would have found more value if they were arranged by salads, soups, appetizers, main courses, and deserts or maybe type of produce such as all the gratin or all the mushroom recipes are next to each other.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary Hess

    Anyone who has encountered Eric Ripert through media knows of his modesty and quiet charm, and anyone fortunate enough to have dined at his restaurants (not yet, fingers crossed!) could reasonably expect any cookbook he would produce to reflect the author’s character and expertise. This beautiful cookbook does both. The recipes work; Ripert himself says it best: “...my goal is to showcase their natural flavors and qualities, so simplicity is key. Keeping the recipes in this book easy and uncompl Anyone who has encountered Eric Ripert through media knows of his modesty and quiet charm, and anyone fortunate enough to have dined at his restaurants (not yet, fingers crossed!) could reasonably expect any cookbook he would produce to reflect the author’s character and expertise. This beautiful cookbook does both. The recipes work; Ripert himself says it best: “...my goal is to showcase their natural flavors and qualities, so simplicity is key. Keeping the recipes in this book easy and uncomplicated allows me to serve a variety of them at once with minimal effort.” If you want cheffy flourish and recipes that take hours to prepare, this is not the book for you. If discovering the simple pleasure of a vegetable-forward meal that doesn’t require giving your life over to the kitchen, this is it. A special nod to the photographer Nigel Parry. Inspiring for sure, as we assuredly do eat with our eyes first.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    With fresh ingredients, simple is often best. This is the theme throughout the book including the recipes, a few of which use ingredients many of us do not have on hand due to geographical locations and climate. However, most are seasonally obtainable. The recipes themselves are very simple and lovely. Highlighting "lowly" vegetables is a fabulous idea...and why not? Eric Ripert has always been one of my favourite chefs. I have all but one of his books. His forte is seafood but I am so glad of hi With fresh ingredients, simple is often best. This is the theme throughout the book including the recipes, a few of which use ingredients many of us do not have on hand due to geographical locations and climate. However, most are seasonally obtainable. The recipes themselves are very simple and lovely. Highlighting "lowly" vegetables is a fabulous idea...and why not? Eric Ripert has always been one of my favourite chefs. I have all but one of his books. His forte is seafood but I am so glad of his foray into vegetables! Some of the recipes are so simple they hardly seem recipes such as Flash-Cured Cucumbers. One can certainly create simple yet refined dishes. I've made several recipes similar to those in this book but there were new ones, too. Today I am inspired to make Caramelized Walnuts (often make caramelized nuts but this is different) and Chickpea Salad (oh, my, what a flavour profile!). In future I will make many others including Marinated Olives, Shaved Fennel and Parmesan Salad (what a combination!); Roasted Bell Pepper Salad; Romaine, Caesar Gratin; Warm Potato, Goat Cheese Parfaits; Vidalia Onion Risotto; Black Truffle Tartine (live part time in truffle country in Europe); Spicy Sauteed Shitakes; Grilled Corn Elote Style; Stuffed Zucchini Flowers (this recipe contains a few differences from mine...can taste them already!); Braised Leeks Ravigote and Frozen Espresso Souffles. Some may SEEM from the titles to be posh (and a few are) but the vast majority are not. They are also not technically challenging. Ripert also shares tips at the end. The photography is nearly edible! This book ought to fulfill anyone's vegetable food cravings...many delightful flavours and textures here. You do not need to be an experienced cook to make these recipes. I love how Ripert uses ingredients and techniques to enhance flavour and elevate the ordinary to extraordinary. My sincere thank you to Random House Publishing Group and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC of this superb book in exchange for an honest review. Much appreciated.

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