Hot Best Seller

From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way

Availability: Ready to download

A wise and insightful exploration of human navigation, what it means to be lost, and how we find our way. How is it that we can walk unfamiliar streets while maintaining a sense of direction? Come up with shortcuts on the fly, in places we've never traveled? The answer is the complex mental map in our brains. This feature of our cognition is easily taken for granted, but it A wise and insightful exploration of human navigation, what it means to be lost, and how we find our way. How is it that we can walk unfamiliar streets while maintaining a sense of direction? Come up with shortcuts on the fly, in places we've never traveled? The answer is the complex mental map in our brains. This feature of our cognition is easily taken for granted, but it's also critical to our species' evolutionary success. In From Here to There, Michael Bond tells stories of the lost and found--Polynesian sailors, orienteering champions, early aviators--and surveys the science of human navigation. Navigation skills are deeply embedded in our biology. The ability to find our way over large distances in prehistoric times gave Homo sapiens an advantage, allowing us to explore the farthest regions of the planet. Wayfinding also shaped vital cognitive functions outside the realm of navigation, including abstract thinking, imagination, and memory. Bond brings a reporter's curiosity and nose for narrative to the latest research from psychologists, neuroscientists, animal behaviorists, and anthropologists. He also turns to the people who design and expertly maneuver the world we navigate: search-and-rescue volunteers, cartographers, ordnance mappers, urban planners, and more. The result is a global expedition that furthers our understanding of human orienting in the natural and built environments. A beguiling mix of storytelling and science, From Here to There covers the full spectrum of human navigation and spatial understanding. In an age of GPS and Google Maps, Bond urges us to exercise our evolved navigation skills and reap the surprising cognitive rewards.


Compare

A wise and insightful exploration of human navigation, what it means to be lost, and how we find our way. How is it that we can walk unfamiliar streets while maintaining a sense of direction? Come up with shortcuts on the fly, in places we've never traveled? The answer is the complex mental map in our brains. This feature of our cognition is easily taken for granted, but it A wise and insightful exploration of human navigation, what it means to be lost, and how we find our way. How is it that we can walk unfamiliar streets while maintaining a sense of direction? Come up with shortcuts on the fly, in places we've never traveled? The answer is the complex mental map in our brains. This feature of our cognition is easily taken for granted, but it's also critical to our species' evolutionary success. In From Here to There, Michael Bond tells stories of the lost and found--Polynesian sailors, orienteering champions, early aviators--and surveys the science of human navigation. Navigation skills are deeply embedded in our biology. The ability to find our way over large distances in prehistoric times gave Homo sapiens an advantage, allowing us to explore the farthest regions of the planet. Wayfinding also shaped vital cognitive functions outside the realm of navigation, including abstract thinking, imagination, and memory. Bond brings a reporter's curiosity and nose for narrative to the latest research from psychologists, neuroscientists, animal behaviorists, and anthropologists. He also turns to the people who design and expertly maneuver the world we navigate: search-and-rescue volunteers, cartographers, ordnance mappers, urban planners, and more. The result is a global expedition that furthers our understanding of human orienting in the natural and built environments. A beguiling mix of storytelling and science, From Here to There covers the full spectrum of human navigation and spatial understanding. In an age of GPS and Google Maps, Bond urges us to exercise our evolved navigation skills and reap the surprising cognitive rewards.

30 review for From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way

  1. 5 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    Absolutely terrific. The cover has four separate reviews saying 'fascinating' and that really is the word. One of those extraordinary books that explains something so deep in the psyche you've never actually noticed it before. (I've been married for fifteen years and I've only just realised quite how profoundly my husband and I fail to communicate about directions and how they work.) Genuinely enthralling, often moving in the personal stories told, and a bit worrying in that we're all becoming s Absolutely terrific. The cover has four separate reviews saying 'fascinating' and that really is the word. One of those extraordinary books that explains something so deep in the psyche you've never actually noticed it before. (I've been married for fifteen years and I've only just realised quite how profoundly my husband and I fail to communicate about directions and how they work.) Genuinely enthralling, often moving in the personal stories told, and a bit worrying in that we're all becoming so reliant on satnav and the blue dot. I will be making more of an effort to exercise my hippocampus (aka notice where I'm going) in future. One of those books that forces you to read bits out to people and sticks in your mind for weeks or months.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    There have been a rush of books recently about navigation and the brain. Including, rather confusingly Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the WorldWayfinding, released about 18 months before this one. This is a great trend, and did mean I was already familiar with most of the substantial examples - many of which are taken from Indigenous Navigation - Inuit hunting techniques, Pasifika navigation, the Guggu Yumithir use of cardinal points in language - and others include t There have been a rush of books recently about navigation and the brain. Including, rather confusingly Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the WorldWayfinding, released about 18 months before this one. This is a great trend, and did mean I was already familiar with most of the substantial examples - many of which are taken from Indigenous Navigation - Inuit hunting techniques, Pasifika navigation, the Guggu Yumithir use of cardinal points in language - and others include the London Tube Map, the tragic case of Geraldine Largay who died on the Appalachian Trail and the pernicious effect of GPS on the brain. I was wary, in this sense, going in that this book would simply retread ground already covered, but Bond quickly disarmed me with a strong dive into explaining the neural mechanisms of our sense of place - grid cells and boundary neurons. Bond has a clear style of explanation and does not shy away from the harder science content. Bond also tackles the question of gendered differences in navigation at more length than I had read elsewhere - he takes a firm 'too much social noise to identify biological difference ' line and his focus on the neuroscience also means much of the material looking at how our overall cognitions is affected by being lost and disoriented has been the most memorable for me. Bond's clear empathy with Alzheimer's sufferers, whose desire to 'wander' he argues is a way of managing an ever shifting sense of space, and sections on nursing home design could have been digressions but formed much of the heart of the book. This were enhanced by discussions about how different demographics deal with being lost - and the fact that we all tend to panic move, when we should stay still. His sections comparing London (a city with landmarks so recognisable you always know where you are, but almost impossible to work out how to get elsewhere) to Manhatten (a city on a grid easy to theoretically how to move, but very hard to orient yourself in) and the subsequent different methods of street navigation were engrossing. I'm not sure I'd recommend this as the first stop for those less interested in reading about neurons - Bond has not deeply consulted with Indigenous peoples in the book, and so this material is inevitably more light on compared with the aforementioned Wayfinding by MR O'Connor, and also Sea People: The Puzzle of PolynesiaSea Peoples, and he doesn't look beyond human cognition - Incredible Journeys: Exploring the Wonders of Animal Navigation covers both human and non-human systems, but I find myself strongly recommending all of this ouvre for understanding a little more what it is to be human in this world. In particular, I am struck by how we have redefined, as a Western society, intelligence in terms of what we need to develop, use, manage and explore technology. Elements of intelligence such as memory, navigation, observation and contextual problem solving are not well measured in IQ tests, and are generally understood to have declined in tech-heavy societies. Not only can this pose a racist lens to discussions about intelligence, but it might bode ill for our survival in case of a technology collapse - something much more palpable after a simple virus has stopped the world, that it might have seemed before.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tonstant Weader

    From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way is a fascinating exploration of how we learn to find our way as children and how we may risk unlearning it from lack of use thanks to GPS or from the damage of Alzheimer’s Disease. Through that arc of life, Bond explores the different ways we think about finding our way and what parts of the brain are likely to be involved. I recently read “The Address Book” by Deirdre Mask. In it, Mask wrote about legible cities and the idea f From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way is a fascinating exploration of how we learn to find our way as children and how we may risk unlearning it from lack of use thanks to GPS or from the damage of Alzheimer’s Disease. Through that arc of life, Bond explores the different ways we think about finding our way and what parts of the brain are likely to be involved. I recently read “The Address Book” by Deirdre Mask. In it, Mask wrote about legible cities and the idea fascinated me, so when I learned of From Here to There, I just had to read it. It did not disappoint one little bit. It began by looking at how we wander and how the exploratory freedom has been whittled away over recent generations. This is a bit of a personal hobbyhorse and I feel sad for kids who don’t have the freedom to run about all over as I used to do. Bond also explains how this all plays out in our heads. He is scrupulous in separating what is known from what is surmised and explains how scientists know what they know and why they think what they think. He also writes about getting lost and how so much of being lost is the panic of realizing you don’t know where you are. It was illuminating for me. I have never felt lost. I have occasionally not know where I was but knew how to know without difficulty. He also writes about some of the extraordinary navigators and how they are so good at what they do. It boils down to two words, pay attention. He also talks about city design and how it can make a city legible (Paris) or not (London) and even how that applies to architecture and buildings such as the beautiful Seattle Library that is lovely to look at and notoriously difficult to navigate. The final chapters focus on the losses of Alzheimer’s and how we might be undergoing our hippocampus now we have GPS. What are the implications there – and what might exercising our hippocampus do for us. I really loved From Here to There a lot. It’s a fascinating subject and while I felt a bit in the weeds learning about the different cells and where they were hiding, even when it was the most technical, it was easy enough to understand. It would have been nice to have the illustrations right in place rather than having to flip back to look, but that’s just picking nits in an excellent book. I love the way Bond writes about the wayfinding. You can tell he loves the topic and is passionate about it. I also love how he finds illustrations from real life to explain the concepts. He makes even the more abstracted information understandable and interesting. He has a way of bringing science back to the people and how it interacts with their lives. I received a copy of From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way from the publisher for review. From Here to There: The Art and Science of Finding and Losing Our Way at Harvard University Press Michael Bond author site https://tonstantweaderreviews.wordpre...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosamund

    Fascinating material on the neuroscience and psychology of finding our way and getting lost.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tim Holcombe

    Man I loved reading this book! I have always been an advid maphound and geography enthusiast. I have memorized the lat / Lon of my current and childhood homes and thoroughly enjoy navigating and exploring the world around. I think it is a timely read, coming at a time when smartphones have essentially reached market saturation and GPS-based navigation has been widely adopted for the past two decades or so with a focus on how that may not be a totally positive development. I hope to teach my daug Man I loved reading this book! I have always been an advid maphound and geography enthusiast. I have memorized the lat / Lon of my current and childhood homes and thoroughly enjoy navigating and exploring the world around. I think it is a timely read, coming at a time when smartphones have essentially reached market saturation and GPS-based navigation has been widely adopted for the past two decades or so with a focus on how that may not be a totally positive development. I hope to teach my daughter to achieve a level of navigational prowess so she can face the world with confidence and independence. I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys maps, navigation, anthropology, neuroscience, and the great outdoors!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate Vane

    As someone with quite a poor sense of direction I was intrigued to read Wayfinding. Written by science journalist Michael Bond. It takes you through every aspect of the science and psychology of knowing where you are and where you are going. Bond begins with the innate processes in the brain that help us orientate (and those that can undermine us) – the role of the hippocampus and the cells which help us form cognitive maps. He considers how we learn to navigate, writing about how children first As someone with quite a poor sense of direction I was intrigued to read Wayfinding. Written by science journalist Michael Bond. It takes you through every aspect of the science and psychology of knowing where you are and where you are going. Bond begins with the innate processes in the brain that help us orientate (and those that can undermine us) – the role of the hippocampus and the cells which help us form cognitive maps. He considers how we learn to navigate, writing about how children first learn their sense of direction through exploration and improvisation. Sadly the more restricted lives of children now means they may not develop those skills. Bond explains that the two main techniques people use for wayfinding are egocentric and spatial. The egocentric method means plotting a journey from where you are now, knowing, for example that you have to take the first left and the second right. Good navigators are more likely to take a spatial approach – they have a birds-eye view of a place. They are constantly alert to features in the landscape and their relation to each other. Bond discusses the way wayfinding and memory interact – think of, say, memory palaces. We often store memories by thinking about the place where we were when we made them – not just that romantic beach holiday, but mundane ones. To remember where you put your keys, you might think back to where you were when you last had them. I also think that the sense of helpless incredulity I feel when I’m lost is similar to that when you lose an object – you no longer trust the evidence of your senses, convinced that inanimate objects are conspiring against you to not be where they should. Loss of sense of place is a key feature of dementia. Evidence shows that for people with Alzheimer’s, loss of spatial awareness is detectable before memory loss. Bond suggests that the desire to wander shown by many people with dementia arises out of a feeling of being lost and trying to return to somewhere they can recognise, in much the same way as people who are literally lost do. Our mental wellbeing and our sense of where we are in the world are inextricably bound. Many metaphors we use for our emotional state relate to location – lost, found, grounded, adrift, at home. We talk about close friends and distant relatives. There is also a suggestion that strengthening the connections in the brain that deal with wayfinding might be protective against dementia. Emergency services and rescue teams have made use of the growing body of research on how people react when they are lost and where they go. One finding Bond cites is that when people panic, they have a tendency to keep walking. We can recognise that understandable desire to do something. What actually happens is they end up walking in circles. The advice from the experts is to stay in one place. One story Bond describes is particularly moving. Gerry Largay went missing on the Appalachian Trail. She was an experienced walker who did everything right but sadly she was not rescued. Her body (and her journal giving an account of her final days) were only found two years later. I found Wayfinding fascinating. It’s an accessible read for a non-scientist. The one part I found challenging was the section on the neuroscience, but it became clearer as I read the rest of the book – and I was interested enough to go back and read it again after I finished. This book has actually changed my behaviour. I have made more of an effort to develop a spatial view on my lockdown walks, not just to appreciate interesting buildings or trees or gardens, but to take note of how they relate to each other. Once we are able to visit unfamiliar places again, I will hopefully become a better navigator, thanks to Wayfinding! * I received a copy of Wayfinding from the publisher via Netgalley.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mike Phelan

    Really enjoyed this and learned a lot! I was expecting a shallow pop science history, but Bond goes in depth into the neuroscience of path finding and sense of direction. Great chapters on how kids navigate their world and links between Alzheimer's/dementia and sense of place. Really enjoyed this and learned a lot! I was expecting a shallow pop science history, but Bond goes in depth into the neuroscience of path finding and sense of direction. Great chapters on how kids navigate their world and links between Alzheimer's/dementia and sense of place.

  8. 5 out of 5

    thebreakfastbooks

    When was the last time you strolled aimlessly through an unfamiliar place ? Or tried to find your way without following the blue dot on Google maps? (While safely distancing of course.) In Wayfinding, Michael Bond details what spatial cognition is and how it has shaped humanity for the past thousand years. He goes into the latest neuroscientific research, describing what is currently known about how rodent's brains (and supposedly also ours) process space. And, equally important, how this spatial When was the last time you strolled aimlessly through an unfamiliar place ? Or tried to find your way without following the blue dot on Google maps? (While safely distancing of course.) In Wayfinding, Michael Bond details what spatial cognition is and how it has shaped humanity for the past thousand years. He goes into the latest neuroscientific research, describing what is currently known about how rodent's brains (and supposedly also ours) process space. And, equally important, how this spatial code is relevant for anchoring us in our lives and our memories. He goes further, by tying navigating, wayfinding and exploring into a much bigger picture, namely the history of humanity. I loved the chapters in which he takes a look at how languages and social interaction revolve so much around exchanging knowledge about our surroundings. This topic is very dear to me, as it is closely related to the research I do. I was so happy to see how the authors doesn't gloss over more complex aspects - there's nothing better than a popular science book that explains the facts well, rather than making bold claims that the people behind the research would shake their heads about. Even better, he shows how areas of research can span so many different disciplines - in Wayfinding it's not just about the basic science but also how this knowledge could be used for prevention of Alzheimer's and dementia, and aids with rescue searches of lost persons. And how often helpful technology like GPS might make us lazy at exploration and wayfinding - behaviours that have been driving currents in the history of humanity.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vivien

    Abandoned. Got halfway through chapter 4 and I was just asking, why? So boring. Not the topic, but they way it was presented.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Found the first 3 chapters very difficult to get though and inaccessible. Glad I stuck with it though as the rest of the book was much easier to understand, and the topic fascinating.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Gerry O'Malley

    This is a well-written book but half of it is a fairly boring neuroanatomy lecture about rat neurons. The whole book reads like a 225-page New Yorker article - something Malcolm Gladwell might write. The chapters that focus on the psychology of people when they are lost and the things that cause them to make an already bad situation even worse are fascinating, as are the chapters comparing getting lost in the wilderness versus the city. The author reinforces his theories and observations with ex This is a well-written book but half of it is a fairly boring neuroanatomy lecture about rat neurons. The whole book reads like a 225-page New Yorker article - something Malcolm Gladwell might write. The chapters that focus on the psychology of people when they are lost and the things that cause them to make an already bad situation even worse are fascinating, as are the chapters comparing getting lost in the wilderness versus the city. The author reinforces his theories and observations with exhaustive footnotes and citations, as any good investigative journalist should do; the reader is confident that everything in the book is accurate. I learned a lot from this book and I'd recommend it for anyone with an interest in the outdoors, hiking or wilderness adventure.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Fahima

    A must read for wanders, hikers, runnier, nature lover and .. basically everyone! It’s a scientific book about navigation, wayfinder and human ability of finding their path - AND IT is made readable for everyone. It covers topic from how we find our way as children, the affects of different method of freedom, how human is unlearning the skills of way finding, thanks to technology, and how lost does a Alzheimer patient feel and behave. Beside stating the scientific research on the area or topic th A must read for wanders, hikers, runnier, nature lover and .. basically everyone! It’s a scientific book about navigation, wayfinder and human ability of finding their path - AND IT is made readable for everyone. It covers topic from how we find our way as children, the affects of different method of freedom, how human is unlearning the skills of way finding, thanks to technology, and how lost does a Alzheimer patient feel and behave. Beside stating the scientific research on the area or topic the author wrote about the affects and practical guidance for you to follow. I want to give it 4,5 ⭐️- half down due to some chapters where he writes about rat neurones, where he lost me. SPOILER - when you lost - STAND STILL! 💃🏼

  13. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Great book, well-written and blends general and scientific knowledge nicely! I would have liked to see more Indigenous authors and leaders referenced, but I appreciated that the topics of navigation weren't solely from Western/North American perspectives. Does a great job of distinguishing hypotheses from evidence-based conclusions, which I also enjoyed. I also would have liked some more examples of how we can use GPS to improve our navigation, rather than just turning them off and trying to nav Great book, well-written and blends general and scientific knowledge nicely! I would have liked to see more Indigenous authors and leaders referenced, but I appreciated that the topics of navigation weren't solely from Western/North American perspectives. Does a great job of distinguishing hypotheses from evidence-based conclusions, which I also enjoyed. I also would have liked some more examples of how we can use GPS to improve our navigation, rather than just turning them off and trying to navigate without. I also would have liked to do more tests to see how my own navigation skills compare in the studies!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Todd

    Thoroughly enjoyable mix of history, neuroscience, and psychology on the human need for a sense of place and direction. The neuroscience can be a bit dry, but Bond’s ability to relate these details to things like the more relatable fear of being lost allows “From Here to There” to work on many levels. His recounting of navigational successes and failures throughout history creates an effective narrative arc that helps readers realize all that may be lost in our current age of pocketable GPS devi Thoroughly enjoyable mix of history, neuroscience, and psychology on the human need for a sense of place and direction. The neuroscience can be a bit dry, but Bond’s ability to relate these details to things like the more relatable fear of being lost allows “From Here to There” to work on many levels. His recounting of navigational successes and failures throughout history creates an effective narrative arc that helps readers realize all that may be lost in our current age of pocketable GPS devices. Highly recommended and a sure fire entry for my shortlist of best books of 2020.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Saurabh

    It was while I started to write this review and tag it, I realized that the ideas in this book spanned across multiple fields. It is a good book - one that makes you think about things that you wouldn't otherwise. For e.g. disadvantages of a kids playground (kids being natural explorers, are confined to a 'safe space'), eskimos tracking various geographical features amid an icy terrain (which would seem all same to me) and many more. The sad tale of a lost hiker's demise and the author's visit to It was while I started to write this review and tag it, I realized that the ideas in this book spanned across multiple fields. It is a good book - one that makes you think about things that you wouldn't otherwise. For e.g. disadvantages of a kids playground (kids being natural explorers, are confined to a 'safe space'), eskimos tracking various geographical features amid an icy terrain (which would seem all same to me) and many more. The sad tale of a lost hiker's demise and the author's visit to that place later was chilly.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Ireland

    This book excellently describes the science behind the art of navigation but still weaves together elements of story that keep you turning the pages. I thoroughly enjoyed learning more about how our brains navigate us through the world and how navigation can break down as we age, rely on technology, and when we are scared. This is a great read for all, especially those interested in “getting lost”. May this book serve as a reminder to all that we need to explore our surroundings and wander aimle This book excellently describes the science behind the art of navigation but still weaves together elements of story that keep you turning the pages. I thoroughly enjoyed learning more about how our brains navigate us through the world and how navigation can break down as we age, rely on technology, and when we are scared. This is a great read for all, especially those interested in “getting lost”. May this book serve as a reminder to all that we need to explore our surroundings and wander aimlessly if we are truly to believe we are here.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kris

    So interesting! Randomly picked up from the new books at the library, i was attracted to it because of my directional challenges... i never know what direction I am going or facing. 🤷‍♀️ This book addresses that and so many other things...how children no longer go outside and explore their worlds, neurology, the impact of GPS, historical and cultural needs for wayfinding, getting lost, dementia. Well written and understandable.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yycdaisy

    This book seemed to have two main thrusts; the brain science part and the stories about people getting lost. The brain science might be too detailed for a lot of people, and some of the stories were a bit too long. Takeaways are we tend to walk in circles when lost, don't use GPS exclusively as the parts of the brain needed for location will atrophy, and do what you can to keep your brain in good shape as getting dementia will hasten loosing those location cells. The chapter on cities was one of This book seemed to have two main thrusts; the brain science part and the stories about people getting lost. The brain science might be too detailed for a lot of people, and some of the stories were a bit too long. Takeaways are we tend to walk in circles when lost, don't use GPS exclusively as the parts of the brain needed for location will atrophy, and do what you can to keep your brain in good shape as getting dementia will hasten loosing those location cells. The chapter on cities was one of the more interesting ones, especially the discussion of the difficulties of mapping London.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Antonietta tesfaye

    A lot of information packed in a very can dice, well executed book. He covered a wide range of information without putting the lame person to sleep. Well done! I especially was impressed with the chapter dealing with blind people, Considering I am one of them. We are always forgotten and I found this well researched. We can go on and on regarding visual cues and then you take into consideration blind people and how they navigate throughout the city etc. so it shows a fine example.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Some fascinating science here, from research to identify grid patterns in cells that light up when laboratory rats (yes,I know 🤔) find their way through mazes ,to findings that confirm human behaviour when lost - dementia patients ,for example, nearly always walk in a straight line. And more evidence,that we rely on GPS instead of a map and compass,when actually using our hippocampus is good for us.(must try and remember this!).

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty Darbyshire

    I loved this exploration of how we navigate, there are all kinds of interesting details about place names and cultures and how our brains work. It's science and history and all kinds of other things. I'll give you a warning that I found the section about dementia at first uplifting but ultimately depressing, which left me with a rather sad feeling at the end of the book. But on the whole I really enjoyed the rest of it! I loved this exploration of how we navigate, there are all kinds of interesting details about place names and cultures and how our brains work. It's science and history and all kinds of other things. I'll give you a warning that I found the section about dementia at first uplifting but ultimately depressing, which left me with a rather sad feeling at the end of the book. But on the whole I really enjoyed the rest of it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Christine Segalas

    I found this book to be fascinating. I learned a lot of new things and had other things I thought I knew confirmed. Even though is can be technical, it was presented in a way that it was helpful and easily understandable. The human brain and how we navigate through our physical world is a fascinating topic which Michael Bond does good job is presenting to his audience.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tiel Markeman

    "Fascinating" The chapters on neuroscience became a bit of a bit bore, but I understood that they were essential to set up the field for later chapters which were mostly fascinating and very well writen. This is a book - when you've finsihed it - makes you look differently at the world around you. One of the best things that a book can offer you, so I higly recommend the read! "Fascinating" The chapters on neuroscience became a bit of a bit bore, but I understood that they were essential to set up the field for later chapters which were mostly fascinating and very well writen. This is a book - when you've finsihed it - makes you look differently at the world around you. One of the best things that a book can offer you, so I higly recommend the read!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Interesting trip through the science and psychology of the way we navigate and at times fail to navigate the world around us. Particularly interesting piece in chapter 10 on maps of cities with the neighbourhoods of London being mapped out in a whole new way.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    A brilliantly research and written book. Bond takes us a cognitive map of our brains in relationship the way finding. He draws parallels between depression, anxiety, and Alziemer's found in the shrinking of the hippocampus. Learning to make mental maps may offset dementia A brilliantly research and written book. Bond takes us a cognitive map of our brains in relationship the way finding. He draws parallels between depression, anxiety, and Alziemer's found in the shrinking of the hippocampus. Learning to make mental maps may offset dementia

  26. 5 out of 5

    pea.

    i thought it would possibly be interesting but it was so much more... was absolutely fascinated.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Interesting. The first bit was about how the brain tracks location, followed by stories of people getting lost. I think the moral is to safely get lost more often?

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abhay

    This was an amazing read. I would definitely recommend this

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ajla

    Nonfiction about the human brain is apparently the newest addition to my wheelhouse.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Turn off the GPS; it shrinks your hippocampus.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...