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She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices

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Looking at the greatest speeches of all time, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Elizabeth I and Boudica were about the only women to have dipped a toe into the pool of public oratory. But the truth is very different - countless brave and bold women have used their voices to inspire change, transform lives and radically alter history. In this timely and personal anthology, Looking at the greatest speeches of all time, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Elizabeth I and Boudica were about the only women to have dipped a toe into the pool of public oratory. But the truth is very different - countless brave and bold women have used their voices to inspire change, transform lives and radically alter history. In this timely and personal anthology, Yvette Cooper MP tells the story of 30 inspirational speeches given by women. From Boudica to Margaret Thatcher and from Malala to gun-control activist Emma Gonzalez, each speech will be reproduced in full and introduced by Yvette. This is not only a much-needed celebration of women's speeches throughout history, but also proof that powerful and persuasive oratory can be decidedly female.


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Looking at the greatest speeches of all time, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Elizabeth I and Boudica were about the only women to have dipped a toe into the pool of public oratory. But the truth is very different - countless brave and bold women have used their voices to inspire change, transform lives and radically alter history. In this timely and personal anthology, Looking at the greatest speeches of all time, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Elizabeth I and Boudica were about the only women to have dipped a toe into the pool of public oratory. But the truth is very different - countless brave and bold women have used their voices to inspire change, transform lives and radically alter history. In this timely and personal anthology, Yvette Cooper MP tells the story of 30 inspirational speeches given by women. From Boudica to Margaret Thatcher and from Malala to gun-control activist Emma Gonzalez, each speech will be reproduced in full and introduced by Yvette. This is not only a much-needed celebration of women's speeches throughout history, but also proof that powerful and persuasive oratory can be decidedly female.

30 review for She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth (Prolific Reader Alice)

    A collection of speeches by women throughout History made for very interesting reading. I liked how well-documented and edited this edition was made and Yvette's own personal views towards every speech that was included. My personal favourites were from Queen Elizabeth the First, Greta Thunberg and Michelle Obama, however, every single one was worth the time to read! A collection of speeches by women throughout History made for very interesting reading. I liked how well-documented and edited this edition was made and Yvette's own personal views towards every speech that was included. My personal favourites were from Queen Elizabeth the First, Greta Thunberg and Michelle Obama, however, every single one was worth the time to read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sheree | Keeping Up With The Penguins

    I was really pleasantly surprised by the bipartisan and diverse selection of speeches in this collection. Personal favourites for me included speeches by Sojourner Truth, Marie Colvin, Julia Gillard, Kavita Krishnan, Michelle Obama, and Jacinda Ardern. She Speaks is a quick but powerful read, and hopefully a sign of more such collections to come. My full review is up now on Keeping Up With The Penguins. I was really pleasantly surprised by the bipartisan and diverse selection of speeches in this collection. Personal favourites for me included speeches by Sojourner Truth, Marie Colvin, Julia Gillard, Kavita Krishnan, Michelle Obama, and Jacinda Ardern. She Speaks is a quick but powerful read, and hopefully a sign of more such collections to come. My full review is up now on Keeping Up With The Penguins.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tilly

    3.5 stars A really good collection of powerful speeches by women. Itncovered a good ground of topics although I wish less had been by politicians but I guess that is because Yvette Cooper compiled this book. It was good but I think it could have been even better. It may have been nice to have some powerful quotes as well as full speeches. Please note that I was gifted this book in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    This anthology of speeches from women covers various eras and cultures from Boudicca in the Iron Age to Greta Thunberg in recent times. The fact that many of the speeches date from the last few decades shows how often women were silenced in the past. Definitely worth checking out whether you agree with what these women have said or not.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michelle (Fluttering Butterflies)

    Really interesting collection of speeches from women who have used their voices to inspire change across a range of topics.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    A great collection of powerful and inspiring words by a diverse range of women. Obviously I enjoyed some more than others and it was refreshing to be introduced to both new and familiar voices. I still can’t believe the irony of me reading this without realising the author was MP for my hometown!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Clifton

    “There are so many silences to be broken.” – Audre Lourde.  I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of speeches from women of all walks of life, dating back to Boudicca through to Greta Thunberg. The speeches were compiled by Yvette Cooper, who introduces each amazing women. I could post about each individual speech, they were so compelling.  Several were familiar, such as Emma Watson’s diligent oratory ‘HeForShe’ and Malala Yousafzai’s famous UN address: “One pen can change the world.” I was also de “There are so many silences to be broken.” – Audre Lourde.  I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of speeches from women of all walks of life, dating back to Boudicca through to Greta Thunberg. The speeches were compiled by Yvette Cooper, who introduces each amazing women. I could post about each individual speech, they were so compelling.  Several were familiar, such as Emma Watson’s diligent oratory ‘HeForShe’ and Malala Yousafzai’s famous UN address: “One pen can change the world.” I was also delighted to be introduced to women I did not know, like Donna Strickland, who was only the third woman to win the Nobel Prize for Physics.  Two of my favourites were by female Prime Ministers. Australia’s Julia Gillard spoke powerfully in Parliament about her battle against misogyny within the opposition: “if he wants to know what misogyny looks like… he needs a mirror”; New Zealand’s Jacinda Ardern spoke with compassion and empathy in response to terrorist attacks against the Muslim community.  It is difficult to pick an overall favourite, but I was moved by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s delivery about why we should all be feminists. The answer has always been obvious to me, but for some this is not the case, and Adichie explains it perfectly.  The topics are as diverse as the speakers. The Windrush Scandal to the fight for equal pay, education rights to feminism to the environment – each speech delivered a strong message and each orator ignited strong passion. The speeches are presented chronologically, and what struck me was how often the same topics kept coming up, the same message of the long fight for equality. With ongoing battles it is essential we do not let down our guard. This is a book for everyone and, as Cooper explains, “They are all women of whom I have thought – she speaks, I must listen.”  Compelling, important, empowering – a must read. – E.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Luisa Pellegrino

    I really like this one! Already on its first pages, I was already feeling inspired and empowered to speak up. I found it sweet to see how Yvette Cooper could express her passion for speeches and, of course, words and the power within, in such a way that makes me feel closer to her and I caught myself admiring and loving words and speeches as well. Moving on, the book is full of great and powerful speeches that empowers you to speak up and not to be silenced. One thing in particular that I loved I really like this one! Already on its first pages, I was already feeling inspired and empowered to speak up. I found it sweet to see how Yvette Cooper could express her passion for speeches and, of course, words and the power within, in such a way that makes me feel closer to her and I caught myself admiring and loving words and speeches as well. Moving on, the book is full of great and powerful speeches that empowers you to speak up and not to be silenced. One thing in particular that I loved was when Cooper and other authors shared their fear and anxiety when delivering a speech. She doesn't treat it as a natural skill (the public speaking skill I mean). Even though she's a politician and public speaking is almost an everyday task for her, she still feels nervous every time she has to stand and give voice to her words. And fear is not out-of-office as well - there is the fear of censure, of others judgments, of the challenge of itself, and of course, the vulnerability to which we are exposed. Nonetheless, the book shows you how important it is to overcome all of those fears (and she recognizes is not that easy) and to find the courage and braveness to speak up and stand for what you believe for "silence does not protect you". Although great, I felt there were a lot of politicians speeches to which I couldn't feel much connected. Also, most of them were made by Britains and I think it would be even greater if they were more diversified. There was one speech from a trans which at the end I like it 'cuz I was starting to think there will be none... Still, it's really powerful and I totally recommend it!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Katie Smith

    This is one of the most inspirational books I’ve read in a while. I am a huge huge fan of any feminist book but this is unique. It’s an anthology of speeches by 36 women, advocating for a range of causes from equality, to asylum seekers, to peace, climate change and more. Yvette does a fantastic job at including modern day feminist figures that we all love, like Michelle Obama and Greta Thunberg. She also includes speeches from women who have faced incredible injustices like Malala Yousafazi and This is one of the most inspirational books I’ve read in a while. I am a huge huge fan of any feminist book but this is unique. It’s an anthology of speeches by 36 women, advocating for a range of causes from equality, to asylum seekers, to peace, climate change and more. Yvette does a fantastic job at including modern day feminist figures that we all love, like Michelle Obama and Greta Thunberg. She also includes speeches from women who have faced incredible injustices like Malala Yousafazi and Jo Cox. But importantly, she also includes speeches from those less well known (to me anyway) such as Benazir Bhutto and Audre Lorde. Yvette’s introductions to each speech were well written and paid tribute to some of the strongest women in history. Every single speech in this anthology represents passion. The thoughtful collection truly paints a picture of the power of women’s voices, and indeed all voices. It addresses so many of the worlds burning injustices and documents so many key movements towards equality. I’ve certainly come away with a fresh outtake on life and a renewed desire to change the world. It’s definitely one of those I’ll reread regularly, especially when I’m feeling down. I’d recommend to any feminist, campaigner, liberal and indeed to all.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Hart

    In an ideal world, She Speaks: The Power of Women’s Voices would not need to be written. However, while the first result of a Google search presents a list of “The 35 Greatest Speeches in History”, all of which were given by men, the sad reality is that such books are a necessity. They are a necessity to open our eyes to the fact that powerful words do not just come from one gender; to create awareness of the threats of violence received by women who speak out to make a difference in this world; In an ideal world, She Speaks: The Power of Women’s Voices would not need to be written. However, while the first result of a Google search presents a list of “The 35 Greatest Speeches in History”, all of which were given by men, the sad reality is that such books are a necessity. They are a necessity to open our eyes to the fact that powerful words do not just come from one gender; to create awareness of the threats of violence received by women who speak out to make a difference in this world; to “tear down the walls of ignorance and narrow-mindedness.” (Angela Merkel, speech to Harvard graduates) Yvette Cooper has put together a powerful anthology of humdinger speeches from brave women who have sought to make a difference, sharing the story of each speech maker as an introduction. While this reader may not agree with every word written, there can be no doubt that there is power in the voices of these and many other women.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    So empowering reading all of these women's powerful words! Would highly recommend! A lot of the speeches were from politicians, which was expected given Cooper is a politician herself, but differing opinions were represented which I liked. There was also decent LGBT+ rep, although I would've like more trans inclusion and disability rep (though there was at least one speech for both) So empowering reading all of these women's powerful words! Would highly recommend! A lot of the speeches were from politicians, which was expected given Cooper is a politician herself, but differing opinions were represented which I liked. There was also decent LGBT+ rep, although I would've like more trans inclusion and disability rep (though there was at least one speech for both)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Iqra Choudhry

    I'm not sure that including a speech by Thatcher in between Maya Angelou and Audre Lorde sat right with me. All the speeches by women of colour in this book are worth a read. The rest is hit and miss. I'm not sure that including a speech by Thatcher in between Maya Angelou and Audre Lorde sat right with me. All the speeches by women of colour in this book are worth a read. The rest is hit and miss.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emma Charlotte

    I read this book in one go, and did enjoy it, but I think it might be better read bit-by-bit.  Some of the speeches were great, others were less so but overall just having a whole collection of notable women's speeches in front of me was inspiring in itself. A few of the speeches have been bookmarked for further research at some point, to learn more about the women and the circumstances that led to their speeches being made. I read this book in one go, and did enjoy it, but I think it might be better read bit-by-bit.  Some of the speeches were great, others were less so but overall just having a whole collection of notable women's speeches in front of me was inspiring in itself. A few of the speeches have been bookmarked for further research at some point, to learn more about the women and the circumstances that led to their speeches being made.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hâf

    A brilliant collection of speeches by a diverse cast of women from all kinds of backgrounds and careers. Speeches from women in sports, politics, social justice, science and more. If the author expanses the series further I would have appreciated more speeches by LGBTQ+ women from varying countries and backgrounds.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Gayle

    Them feckin' women. Them feckin' women.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sîana

    ★★★½☆ - 3.5 stars Women are class, I am a self proclaimed lover of all things woman; but not all women that have held any form of political power should be put in a book like this. I say not all women; I am specifically referring to Teresa May and Margaret Tatcher, who despite being the only two female British Prime Ministers, have about as much right to be in this book as Richard Branson. So -1.5☆ for their inclusion in this otherwise impeccable list of inspirational women and their greatest spe ★★★½☆ - 3.5 stars Women are class, I am a self proclaimed lover of all things woman; but not all women that have held any form of political power should be put in a book like this. I say not all women; I am specifically referring to Teresa May and Margaret Tatcher, who despite being the only two female British Prime Ministers, have about as much right to be in this book as Richard Branson. So -1.5☆ for their inclusion in this otherwise impeccable list of inspirational women and their greatest speeches.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emma Forrest

    this book was okay. it had some amazing speeches but i don’t have many feelings on the book. it didn’t leave me feeling empowered or full of hope, it just left me feeling nothing. maybe that’s because i read it all together and didn’t dip into it; judging by how i read it, i wasn’t overly impressed

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elvina Zafril

    3.5 stars She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices The compilation of women from different eras. It was an inspiring book to read. Touches on various topics such as politics, LGBT even gun-control activists. The collection of women speeches from different was what made me kept reading this book until the end. Not so fond of reading about politics and there's a lot about it and this book somehow made kept me stuck with it because of the histories the author wrote. It was really amazing to know the h 3.5 stars She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices The compilation of women from different eras. It was an inspiring book to read. Touches on various topics such as politics, LGBT even gun-control activists. The collection of women speeches from different was what made me kept reading this book until the end. Not so fond of reading about politics and there's a lot about it and this book somehow made kept me stuck with it because of the histories the author wrote. It was really amazing to know the histories and it was indeed an inspiring read for me. Overall, this book opened my eyes to realized that women are so powerful and women have right to speak up and everyone should listen to women's voices not just men. Equality is important. Thank you #Pansing @definitelybooks for sending me a copy of She Speaks in return for an honest review. This book is available at all good bookstores.

  19. 4 out of 5

    peppersocks

    Reflections and lessons learned: “To hold an audience’s attention, you have to be confident in your authority but also feel something in common with those who are listening – all things which are harder if you are talking to an all-male audience” Im not necessarily a fan of Cooper from a political standpoint, and it took me a few attempts to get into this, but it turned out to be a fascinating and very moving collection of words from a wide range of people. These are sadly words that have to be sp Reflections and lessons learned: “To hold an audience’s attention, you have to be confident in your authority but also feel something in common with those who are listening – all things which are harder if you are talking to an all-male audience” Im not necessarily a fan of Cooper from a political standpoint, and it took me a few attempts to get into this, but it turned out to be a fascinating and very moving collection of words from a wide range of people. These are sadly words that have to be spoken out loud to shout into the face of adversity and threats but all bear repeating. A clever use of typographic layout, which may not have even been planned, is that the speeches presented in smaller text, meaning that the reader has to physically lean in to make the effort, almost joining in conspiratorially. The least the reader can do considering the experience of some of the orators... “I am here as a soldier who has temporarily left the field of battle in order to explain” For me as a fan of positive mottos and soundbites, this was incredibly quote worthy as well as educational, with some great analogies and descriptors: Emmeline Pankhurst and kicking baby vs patient baby progress; Impossible to I’m possible from Joanne O’Riordan; Lorde the librarian speaking in the year of my birth on the tyranny of silence; good morning hope from Angelou; Bhutto learning and the classic quote from Dante (‘The hottest place in Hell is reserved for those who remain neutral in times of moral crisis’); Kor having lived through the horrors of Auschwitz and Mengele; May as a balanced conservative trying to fight for change within; Harman if you are not having arguments not making a difference quote - so much to take in - almost like a short, choice political and history lesson with nods to potential ideals for the future “If you throw your words out into the world, someone will disagree, someone will knock them down. But those words will also lift others up. Our words help us build precious personal relationships and create powerful public ones”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Filipa

    Historically, positions of power and public speaking have been reserved for men with few women disrupting the assumption that only men were made to be leaders or should be allowed to speak for the masses. I understand that women have been the underdogs for as long as our species exists, because when survival hinged on physical prowess, men were superior to women in that regard and, hence, men were needed to ensure the survival of families. But now, survival doesn't hinge on physical prowess and Historically, positions of power and public speaking have been reserved for men with few women disrupting the assumption that only men were made to be leaders or should be allowed to speak for the masses. I understand that women have been the underdogs for as long as our species exists, because when survival hinged on physical prowess, men were superior to women in that regard and, hence, men were needed to ensure the survival of families. But now, survival doesn't hinge on physical prowess and therefore it's equally important to understand that men shouldn't fear women, shouldn't fear women in positions of power and definitely shouldn't limit women's voices. It's very sad to live in a world where violence, abuse and vitriolic attacks are hurled at women just because we are women. Misogyny is still in practice in our days and that saddens and enrages me more than I can convey in this review. That's why I fiercely defend Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's arguments in the We Should All be Feminists speech and, ultimately, this is why I think books like this are important. Yvette Cooper has, in this anthology, assembled speeches of different women from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century. The speeches are about many different things - politics, climate change, human rights, gender equality... each one of the speeches here presented have something special to impart and they all are strangely emotional; I could easily imagine myself in the audience when the speeches were being delivered. That was how easily I connected with the words on the page and how much sense they made to me. I am only sad that these words need uttering, I am only sad that human beings had to die, had to suffer violence defending basic human rights that should be inalienable.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hanna Kusumawaty Jaya

    This book was given by some close friends for my 25th birthday and I couldn't thank them enough for how grateful I am to read this amazing book of compiled speeches from all women across the world. Yvette Cooper had chosen several speeches that I believe is only a small number of speeches when there are numerous great speeches yet recorded. First time reading I was a bit skeptical because of Cooper's background that I thought this book would only bring up the speeches made by the UK MP's or UK's This book was given by some close friends for my 25th birthday and I couldn't thank them enough for how grateful I am to read this amazing book of compiled speeches from all women across the world. Yvette Cooper had chosen several speeches that I believe is only a small number of speeches when there are numerous great speeches yet recorded. First time reading I was a bit skeptical because of Cooper's background that I thought this book would only bring up the speeches made by the UK MP's or UK's politician that I won't observe anything diverse, but the more I got into the middle of the book, I read speeches about race in the Hollywood, LGBT case in the mainstream tv, terrorist attack in Christchurch (that was obviously spoken by Jacinda Ardern), speeches about women in Islam (and I am desperately in love with Benazir Bhutto's way of thinking), girls and education, and not to forget the popular speech made by Greta Thunberg in the UN. This book had let me observe various problems that woman has been affected with for years that I am privileged enough not to be in under any circumstance of adversity. Even in the year that we might feel modern enough to have lousy problems, there are still these tragedies that we thought have no longer exist, it might not happen here but somewhere in the world, it still is happening. These speeches help me to open my mind about how the world is actually rotating, that of course, it doesn't solely rotate around me, but there are hells and heavens for different countries around the world, and if there are any obstacles that might occur to any of the female friends that I have because of some lack in diversity or any masochism, I should be the person who realizes the wrong and stands up for them, cause quoted from Emma Watson "If not me, who? If not now, when?"

  22. 5 out of 5

    elly

    #bookreview #bookfeature ‘She Speaks’ The Power of Women's Voices, a compilation of speeches by Yvette Cooper. This book is a gem. A timely and exceptional collection of speeches by women across generations. From Boudica to Greta Thunberg, and Malala to Jacinda Arden, this collection underscores the power that lies in spoken word and shared empowerment. I loved that it is fairly diverse, shedding light to the intersectionality that comes with our shared struggles, reinforcing the importance of a #bookreview #bookfeature ‘She Speaks’ The Power of Women's Voices, a compilation of speeches by Yvette Cooper. This book is a gem. A timely and exceptional collection of speeches by women across generations. From Boudica to Greta Thunberg, and Malala to Jacinda Arden, this collection underscores the power that lies in spoken word and shared empowerment. I loved that it is fairly diverse, shedding light to the intersectionality that comes with our shared struggles, reinforcing the importance of a common humanity. With personalised introductions for each speech, this book is an inspiration for anyone, and everyone today. Reading the speeches was inspiring and it reminded that each one of us has a voice - even in face of oppression, and especially, as witnesses of oppression in the world we live in. There is a part for each one of us to play in centralising and spotlighting the marginalised voices, and not being complicit in silencing those voices. During this global pandemic crisis, there is a lot of unlearning to be done and I urge us all to remain humble and listen with understanding. A lot of times I am witnessing so much defensive and toxic behaviour, as I’ve reflected in my earlier posts and writings. I would like to take this opportunity to spotlight a webinar by @haymarketbooks on ‘System in Crisis’ featuring Stacey Davis Gates and Sara Nelson - an hour of learning and unlearning assured, with an emphasis on how we can all recover collectively. Link is up in my IG bio (@pagesofelly).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pip

    I really reccomend this book to every single family. "she speaks, I must listen"- Yvette Cooper. This book has a variety of topics discusses in it and makes a big change from the usual 'greatest speeches of all time' that are usually all men. It has open my eyes to some amazing speeches as well as people who I will be doing more research into. At several moments, where the idea could be applied to many different problems, eg. "Your silence will not protect you"-Audre Lorde or "If not now, when?" I really reccomend this book to every single family. "she speaks, I must listen"- Yvette Cooper. This book has a variety of topics discusses in it and makes a big change from the usual 'greatest speeches of all time' that are usually all men. It has open my eyes to some amazing speeches as well as people who I will be doing more research into. At several moments, where the idea could be applied to many different problems, eg. "Your silence will not protect you"-Audre Lorde or "If not now, when?" -Emma Watson I will say this took me a while to read, but that was because I couldn't just read speech after speech. I read one or two every night. This could be a perfect way for you to read to your children and get them thinking about others. I will finish this review with one of my favourite parts out of all the speeches. There has been a lot of debate over 'free speech' and what should be allowed and I think Angela Merkel's speech in November 2009 to the US Congress is a must listen to for everyone. One of my favourite parts of it is "But let there be no misunderstanding: tolerance does not mean 'anything goes'. There must be zero tolerance to all those who show no respect for the inalienable rights of the individual and who violate human rights" - Angela Merkel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Aaliyahsbookshelf

    Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (4/5 stars) This book is amazing! If you think this book is purely for women, is aimed at women or speaks only of issues related to women, oh how wrong you are. Topics such as climate change, race, the gender pay gap, LGBTQA+, education and war are merely some of the topics breached in this book. To hear the words of women that have been overlooked in their own words is truly remarkable. Some women are no longer here, such as the MP Jo Cox or Holocaust survivor Eva Kor, and their w Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (4/5 stars) This book is amazing! If you think this book is purely for women, is aimed at women or speaks only of issues related to women, oh how wrong you are. Topics such as climate change, race, the gender pay gap, LGBTQA+, education and war are merely some of the topics breached in this book. To hear the words of women that have been overlooked in their own words is truly remarkable. Some women are no longer here, such as the MP Jo Cox or Holocaust survivor Eva Kor, and their words resonate in today’s climate just as much as when they spoke them. My only critique of Cooper’s compilation is that I found it very politically heavy and would have liked maybe slightly more variety. Please read this book and take in the words of women throughout history who have been overlooked, ignored and threatened. This book shows how these women, and all women, won’t be ignored anymore👏🏼

  25. 4 out of 5

    Aisy A.

    The book is a little out of my expectation so I felt kind of underwhelmed when I first started reading it. She Speaks contains speeches from empowering women around the world, each speech begins with an introduction from the author. Honestly, I thought the book would cover more diverse women from around the world, but I think half of it are politician and British. Given the background of the author, it is (perhaps) not that surprising. However, if you're familiar with AOC, Emma Watson, Ellen DeG The book is a little out of my expectation so I felt kind of underwhelmed when I first started reading it. She Speaks contains speeches from empowering women around the world, each speech begins with an introduction from the author. Honestly, I thought the book would cover more diverse women from around the world, but I think half of it are politician and British. Given the background of the author, it is (perhaps) not that surprising. However, if you're familiar with AOC, Emma Watson, Ellen DeGeneres, Gretha Thunberg, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and have follows their movement and watch their speech, I would say you will find the exact same on in this book. Only instead of hearing and watching it, you will be reading it, with some introduction given by Yvette Cooper. That's another down point from me, because I thought I would read something different. Overall, it is an okay book, could have been better.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Miriam James

    This was a great collection of speeches from some great women. I loved the diversity of the speakers - they weren’t all from the UK and there was a speech from a trans person in there - and the diversity of the topics. Rosie Duffield’s speech made me very emotional, alongside some of the other absolutely fantastic speeches. I like that each speaker was introduced before the speech, giving it more context and making it easier to understand. Some of the speeches dragged a little, but it’s probably This was a great collection of speeches from some great women. I loved the diversity of the speakers - they weren’t all from the UK and there was a speech from a trans person in there - and the diversity of the topics. Rosie Duffield’s speech made me very emotional, alongside some of the other absolutely fantastic speeches. I like that each speaker was introduced before the speech, giving it more context and making it easier to understand. Some of the speeches dragged a little, but it’s probably because the medium of book isn’t quite right for speeches, and hearing them aloud may have been better.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Cornfield

    Really enjoyed this book. Yvette Cooper makes the timely point that in so many of the books of speeches published, very few print the speeches made by women. There are some fabulous speeches in this book. I especially liked Audre Lourdes. Lourde was a poet, writer and civil rights activist. "Where the words of women are crying to be heard, we must each of us recognise our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them." Audre Lourde A book that I will share with my daughter Really enjoyed this book. Yvette Cooper makes the timely point that in so many of the books of speeches published, very few print the speeches made by women. There are some fabulous speeches in this book. I especially liked Audre Lourdes. Lourde was a poet, writer and civil rights activist. "Where the words of women are crying to be heard, we must each of us recognise our responsibility to seek those words out, to read them and share them." Audre Lourde A book that I will share with my daughter and my sons...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Lochhead

    A collection of women’s speeches over the ages, this book is an attempt to redress the balance in the voices we get to hear. Definitely one I’m glad to have on my bookshelves: I particularly enjoyed the contribution from Yvette Cooper herself, who set out to build some consensus about the response needed to desperate people migrating across the oceans. I’d have liked to hear more from less well-known voices: Michelle Obama and Emma Watson’s speeches are wonderful, but I already knew them. I’d we A collection of women’s speeches over the ages, this book is an attempt to redress the balance in the voices we get to hear. Definitely one I’m glad to have on my bookshelves: I particularly enjoyed the contribution from Yvette Cooper herself, who set out to build some consensus about the response needed to desperate people migrating across the oceans. I’d have liked to hear more from less well-known voices: Michelle Obama and Emma Watson’s speeches are wonderful, but I already knew them. I’d welcome a second volume that unearths truly forgotten words that deserve to be remembered.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alba

    'She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices' is a great book, which consists of a number of speeches from important figures, such as Maya Angelou, Malala Yousafzai, Michelle Obama and many others. It starts with the words of Boudica, the warrior queen, and ends with those of Greta Thunberg. I enjoyed reading this book, because it not only included wise words said by women of different backgrounds, but it also introduced me to a lot of powerful women that school failed to even mention. I would highly 'She Speaks: The Power of Women's Voices' is a great book, which consists of a number of speeches from important figures, such as Maya Angelou, Malala Yousafzai, Michelle Obama and many others. It starts with the words of Boudica, the warrior queen, and ends with those of Greta Thunberg. I enjoyed reading this book, because it not only included wise words said by women of different backgrounds, but it also introduced me to a lot of powerful women that school failed to even mention. I would highly recommend it. It is a great read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria Salmon

    I love this collection of speeches and have read it through multiple times now. It features a range of speeches from different time periods, as well as both famous and lesser known speeches. I have used it with my students when discussing representations of women/language features and I love how up to date and relevant it is to the 21st century. The information before each speech is interesting and provides relevant contextual information.

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