Hot Best Seller

The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food: A Cookbook

Availability: Ready to download

In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor of dozens of top chefs, writers, and activists—with stories exploring their creativity and influence.   Black cooking has always been more than “soul food,” with flavors tracing to the African continent, to the Caribbean, all over the United States, and beyond.


Compare

In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor In The Rise, chef, author, and television star Marcus Samuelsson gathers together an unforgettable feast of food, culture, and history to highlight the diverse deliciousness of Black cooking today. Driven by a desire to fight against bias, reclaim Black culinary traditions, and energize a new generation of cooks, Marcus shares his own journey alongside 150 recipes in honor of dozens of top chefs, writers, and activists—with stories exploring their creativity and influence.   Black cooking has always been more than “soul food,” with flavors tracing to the African continent, to the Caribbean, all over the United States, and beyond.

30 review for The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food: A Cookbook

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine from How Useful It Is

    The Rise cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks I have been recently exploring. It's a compilation of different recipes from different Black chefs across America. This book celebrates Black foods and recognizes Black cooks. I enjoyed reading the author's note and learning about Black foods. The Rise "stands on 3 pillars: authorship, memory, and aspiration." Definitely interesting to read mini biographies of different chefs and to have the chance to cook their specialties. 
Not all recipes in this The Rise cookbook is unlike any other cookbooks I have been recently exploring. It's a compilation of different recipes from different Black chefs across America. This book celebrates Black foods and recognizes Black cooks. I enjoyed reading the author's note and learning about Black foods. The Rise "stands on 3 pillars: authorship, memory, and aspiration." Definitely interesting to read mini biographies of different chefs and to have the chance to cook their specialties. 
Not all recipes in this cookbook have pictures unfortunately because pictures played a big role in determining what I want to eat. I like pictures of arts in places where the chefs reside like the murals on the walls of buildings in Detroit downtown and the Harriet Tubman Memorial statue in Harlem. 
I loved learning about different foods at the end of this cookbook! Interesting to know the origin of plantains and okra, among others. I have eaten plantains but not the same way as shown in this cookbook's recipes. My mom utilized banana leaves to wrap some desserts before baking so it's definitely on point in its description of the usage.
 There are many dishes to try and so far, I have learned how to cook two dishes from two different chefs: Fish Cakes and Hand Pies. Do visit my blog for pictures! xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details Many thanks to Little Brown for the opportunity to cook and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lorna

    The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food by beloved and renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson was a beautiful exploration and compilation of the diverse foods, culture, and history throughout America. He interviewed top chefs, food producers, authors and activists to give us a remarkable compendium of recipes and their origins including those from Africa, the Caribbean, and other locales, together creating the soul and diversity of black cooking. What I found so compelling about this book w The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food by beloved and renowned chef Marcus Samuelsson was a beautiful exploration and compilation of the diverse foods, culture, and history throughout America. He interviewed top chefs, food producers, authors and activists to give us a remarkable compendium of recipes and their origins including those from Africa, the Caribbean, and other locales, together creating the soul and diversity of black cooking. What I found so compelling about this book were the personal stories of each of those highlighted in this lovely book that goes to the history of not only black culture but to the history of America. And I found quite a few recipes to keep and savor. One of my favorites was the Gumbo recipe by Leah Chase. She opened Dooky Chase's, the Creole restaurant and New Orleans institution in 1940. It should be no surprise that many in the Civil Rights Movement held meetings in her restaurant. Marcus Samuelsson states that no one has inspired him more than Leah Chase stating that she has been a driving force for him, and thus, this book was dedicated to her among many other black women important to him. "Recipes are rituals. They're more than an ingredient list and a series of steps. They're personal meditations, small celebrations. They connect us to loved ones we remember well and those we wish we had known. Recipes introduce us to cultures that are new to us, and they reflect our own histories in the lives of others." "This mass movement--this migration--continues to shape our food. That's why I've come to think of the American South as not only a geographical region, but a state of mind."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Denver Public Library

    This is a fantastic compendium of food culture, lore, recipes and culinary history, all focused on contributions made by Black chefs, food producers, writers and more on what is considered "American food." Samuelsson's voice and passion comes through in each and every chapter, and recipes are well-written and easy to follow. Substitutions are suggested for hard to source items, such as tigernuts. I especially appreciated the spotlight bios of up and coming chefs and influencers, in particular De This is a fantastic compendium of food culture, lore, recipes and culinary history, all focused on contributions made by Black chefs, food producers, writers and more on what is considered "American food." Samuelsson's voice and passion comes through in each and every chapter, and recipes are well-written and easy to follow. Substitutions are suggested for hard to source items, such as tigernuts. I especially appreciated the spotlight bios of up and coming chefs and influencers, in particular Denver's own Adrian Miller, aka The Soul Food Scholar! Design and photography is outstanding. A few recipe highlights—Pork Griot with Roasted Pineapple and Pikliz, Steak Afrique with Sauce Yassa, and Spicy Grilled Garden Egg Salad (that egg being an eggplant!). Back matter includes an ingredient resource list, social media info for Featured Chefs and Experts, Upcoming Chefs to Watch, Source list, and full index.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sandra The Old Woman in a Van

    I have extremely mixed opinions about this book. Let me try and list them. - This book highlights black cooks, and that’s part of the title. In that regard it’s vast and detailed and I now have a long list of restaurants across the country I want to try. Well done. - As a cook book (which it is)it’s pretty inaccessible to most cooks, even experienced ones. I consider myself adventurous and willing to hunt out ingredients for a special dish. But even so, there are so many ingredients (almost one i I have extremely mixed opinions about this book. Let me try and list them. - This book highlights black cooks, and that’s part of the title. In that regard it’s vast and detailed and I now have a long list of restaurants across the country I want to try. Well done. - As a cook book (which it is)it’s pretty inaccessible to most cooks, even experienced ones. I consider myself adventurous and willing to hunt out ingredients for a special dish. But even so, there are so many ingredients (almost one in every recipe) that are either not accessible without a long look (in a big city) or through mail order. I looked up prices, and many of these recipes would cost an arm and a leg and leave you with unused ingredients you would likely through out. - I tagged about half a dozen recipes I thought I might try. Thats not a lot from a pricy book like this. - Many of the recipes look tasty, but the time, effort and ingredients made me wave bye-bye. If you want to learn about some of the history of black cooking in America, and are interested in established and up and coming chefs, or if you are a serious foodie then this book may be worth the purchase. While I read it from cover to cover and may make a small number of the recipes, I rather wish I had my money back. I’m glad I bought the kindle version otherwise I’d be donating the hard cover. Sorry Marcus. I love your passion, but this book is for a very small niche audience.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kasa Cotugno

    When picking up a book by Marcus Samuelsson, the reader should prepare themselves for a treat on so many levels. More than a cookbook (although that is the section of the store where you'll find it), this is a history, set of biographies, social study, and yes, mouthwatering recipe collection, lavishly illustrated not only with the dishes whose inspiration and history he provides, but of Samuelsson himself and his endless array of colorful garments and scarves. Up to the minute, the book opens w When picking up a book by Marcus Samuelsson, the reader should prepare themselves for a treat on so many levels. More than a cookbook (although that is the section of the store where you'll find it), this is a history, set of biographies, social study, and yes, mouthwatering recipe collection, lavishly illustrated not only with the dishes whose inspiration and history he provides, but of Samuelsson himself and his endless array of colorful garments and scarves. Up to the minute, the book opens with a chapter on current life under the pandemic and its devastating effect on the restaurant community and his transformation of his Harlem institution, Red Rooster.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Cintron

    As a book about the diversity and richness of the food coming from black chefs in America- this book was fantastic. I loved reading the background stories of the widely diverse group of chefs that were highlighted. However, I found that the recipes themselves were largely inaccessible to your average home chef. Many of these ingredients are hard to hunt down even in a metropolitan area. I did, however, feel that the vegetable recipes were doable and I look forward to trying a few out!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne

    I don't usually mark cookbooks on Goodreads, but this is a mix between narrative and recipes so I say it counts in my completely made-up system. Rise was/is inspiring for my pandemic-and-parenting-weary cooking brain. We've cooked three recipes from it and while they don't look quite like the photos in the book and we had to substitute some ingredients, they've been delicious. I need to figure out how to use my broiler without filling the house with smoke, but hey, goals are good right? I don't usually mark cookbooks on Goodreads, but this is a mix between narrative and recipes so I say it counts in my completely made-up system. Rise was/is inspiring for my pandemic-and-parenting-weary cooking brain. We've cooked three recipes from it and while they don't look quite like the photos in the book and we had to substitute some ingredients, they've been delicious. I need to figure out how to use my broiler without filling the house with smoke, but hey, goals are good right?

  8. 4 out of 5

    William Schram

    "The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food" is a cookbook with interviews. On the one hand, it contains recipes and directions to cook food items. On the other hand, it has interviews about the Soul Food Movement. Author/ chef Marcus Samuelsson does a great job in writing the book. I believe I took this book from the library for two reasons. The first reason, I thought the title sounded interesting. Secondly, the current events that are happening in the United States. Now I don't know i "The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food" is a cookbook with interviews. On the one hand, it contains recipes and directions to cook food items. On the other hand, it has interviews about the Soul Food Movement. Author/ chef Marcus Samuelsson does a great job in writing the book. I believe I took this book from the library for two reasons. The first reason, I thought the title sounded interesting. Secondly, the current events that are happening in the United States. Now I don't know if #BLM is still active, I don't have a Twitter account, and I hate watching or reading the news. Most of my news I obtain through osmosis. Anyway, this book was great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leigh Kramer

    A celebration of Black cooking over the years, accompanied by beautiful photography and profiles of Black chefs and food experts. The recipes are inspired by the various people profiled, which is such a neat touch. Many of the recipes are aspirational for me—either more complicated than I want to try at home or with ingredients that will be trickier to track down. But I still thoroughly enjoyed reading through them and seeing what Samuelsson loves about each one. And there are quite a few recipe A celebration of Black cooking over the years, accompanied by beautiful photography and profiles of Black chefs and food experts. The recipes are inspired by the various people profiled, which is such a neat touch. Many of the recipes are aspirational for me—either more complicated than I want to try at home or with ingredients that will be trickier to track down. But I still thoroughly enjoyed reading through them and seeing what Samuelsson loves about each one. And there are quite a few recipes I do plan on trying! I’ve grown very tired of cooking for myself this past year but I feel renewed after reading this and getting new ideas.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    After reading The Rise in full, I have mixed feelings about the content. Though I applaud Samuelson's efforts to bring attention to the diversity of Black food and its vast influence in America, as well as showcase a number of Black chefs and food professionals in this country, in the end I felt that it didn't quite come together in execution. Before elaborating, I wanted to dispel a misconception about this book that I've seen put forth in a few of the reviews I read - namely the idea that this After reading The Rise in full, I have mixed feelings about the content. Though I applaud Samuelson's efforts to bring attention to the diversity of Black food and its vast influence in America, as well as showcase a number of Black chefs and food professionals in this country, in the end I felt that it didn't quite come together in execution. Before elaborating, I wanted to dispel a misconception about this book that I've seen put forth in a few of the reviews I read - namely the idea that this volume compiles recipes from the numerous chefs featured in the book. This is not the case. The recipes are all Samuelson's (with Yewande Komolafe and Tamie Cook) inspired by the featured chefs. While there's nothing wrong with this - in fact I find it to be an incredibly cool way to conceptualize a cookbook - many people seem to be under the impression that this book is something that it isn't and never claimed to be. Now that that's out of he way, I want to cover a few of my gripes about the book, most of which concern the editing. I'm aware that my practice of reading cookbooks in their entirety, as if they were a novel or a memoir, is not the way most approach a cookbook. That being said, I can't be the only one, and I'm always disappointed when I come away from a cookbook with the feeling that it could have been so good, if only it had been a bit more consistent, if only the essay portions and the recipe portions had been a bit better integrated, if only it hadn't repeated itself as much. In short, if only it had had a bit more editing. Unfortunately, that's how I felt whilst reading this book. The Rise contains parts written by (at least) four different people - Marcus Samuelson writes the introductions to all the chapters and recipes; he, along with Yewande Komolafe and Tamie Cook are credited with recipe development; and the essays are penned by Osayi Endolyn - and it feels that way. On one page an essay will introduce a particular chef and provide many details about their life, influences, and food history; the next page contains an introduction to a recipe which often repeats a number of the exact same facts. Though this won't be apparent to the majority of readers who are merely dipping in and out of the book, to me it became a bit frustrating. It often felt as though Samuelson and Endolyn wrote their parts separately and then just stuck them in the same book without bothering to read them in conjunction with each other. Additionally, the essays themselves were a bit clunky. I often found myself rereading sentences trying to figure out to what or whom the essayist was referring. Another concern I had was that the contents of chapters felt a bit arbitrary. The first four chapters, which contain the main recipes and profiles of chefs, are titled "Next," "Remix," "Migration," and "Legacy," and are ostensibly divided up as such. However, there is so much overlap between the intended content of each chapter that it felt as if most of the chefs/recipes could have been included in any of the chapters without feeling out of place. The final chapter, "Origin" was more of a reference component and was split into five sections - "Spices, Spice Blends, and Powders," "Wet Pantry," "Flours, Grains, and Staples," "Nuts, Nut Variations, and Seeds," and "More." Within these sections, I really couldn't figure out what the organizational system was, and would have preferred if everything had been separated into just two sections - "Glossary" and "Basic Recipes" for instance - with the contents of each in alphabetical order. My only minor complaint unrelated to editing choices is in regards to the accessibility of the recipes and it almost seems unavoidable. As other reviewers have mentioned, the average home-cook could run into some issues with the recipes; a few seem overly complicated, but primarily the difficulties stem from the unfortunate fact that many West African/Caribbean/traditionally Black ingredients simply aren't carried in most supermarkets. While this is a symptom of exactly what it is that this book is trying to combat - the erasure and disregard of Black chefs and food in America - the fact remains that unless you live in a large metropolitan area, there's a good chance you will need to order ingredients online to complete a large portion of the recipes in this book. Samuelson frequently mentions that you can find an ingredient at "your local West African market" which, while a nice idea, just isn't realistic for a lot of people - a quick google search informed me that I would have to drive at least an hour to find any sort of African Market. That said, if you have the time and access to ingredients, I would definitely recommend trying some of the recipes included in this book - they all look and sound delicious. All in all there were a lot of things I liked about the book - the pictures were beautiful, the food sounded lovely, there were a number of new ingredients and processes to learn about, and I came away with knowledge about quite a few chefs I'd not heard of before - but the editing really let the content down, and left me a little underwhelmed.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Talea

    I learned so much in this cookbook! There were ingredients I’d never heard of before and a culinary history that has been by and large ignored in the US. It was an eye opening read and the recipes all look amazing. As someone who has strong southern roots I recognized many ingredients but not nearly as many as I believed I would when I borrowed this book from the library. This is one I will have to get for my personal collection also.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sonia

    I may try a few of these dishes. I wish I lived closer to where these chefs are! This book is a visual feast recognizing Black cooking tracing flavors from around the world.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Silverberg

    A Learning Experience. Where to begin....I enjoyed reading the short bios of each chef. They all had a rich background and won multiple awards for their cooking. The historical and cultural significance of food is not something that I have given much thought. I see now that so many people of color from all over the world have contributed massively, and have largely been dismissed and marginalized.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This is a beautiful and provocative book, though I don't know that I will try the recipes. Samuelsson examine the contributions Black chefs and cooks have made to what we think of as American cuisine. As in so many other fields, these contributions have been ignored, overlooked, erased or diminished. A timely and powerful look at food as culture. Worth a read even if you won't use the recipes. This is a beautiful and provocative book, though I don't know that I will try the recipes. Samuelsson examine the contributions Black chefs and cooks have made to what we think of as American cuisine. As in so many other fields, these contributions have been ignored, overlooked, erased or diminished. A timely and powerful look at food as culture. Worth a read even if you won't use the recipes.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I jumped at the chance to get this book from my library. I've been interested in books by Marcus Samuelsson since I read his memoir, Yes, Chef. (If you aren't familiar with his story, he was born in Kenya and adopted by a Swedish family. He became a chef and now lives in the United States.) This is more than just a cookbook. It is the story of many Black chefs. Each person has their story told over a few pages with wonderful photographs and then lists 2 or 3 recipes of theirs. This makes the I jumped at the chance to get this book from my library. I've been interested in books by Marcus Samuelsson since I read his memoir, Yes, Chef. (If you aren't familiar with his story, he was born in Kenya and adopted by a Swedish family. He became a chef and now lives in the United States.) This is more than just a cookbook. It is the story of many Black chefs. Each person has their story told over a few pages with wonderful photographs and then lists 2 or 3 recipes of theirs. This makes the format of this book a bit different than other cookbooks. The recipes aren't arranged by topics. There is a recipe guide that lists the dishes by main ingredient or course so you can find what you are looking for. These aren't recipes that I think will be made routinely by home cooks. Many of them have preparation and cook times of several hours or the recipe refers you to other recipes that need to be made before you can assemble the dish you picked. These chefs do introduce some ingredients that I wasn't familiar with. It would require ordering in these ingredients if I wanted to make these recipes because they aren't available at my local stores. Sea moss smoothies, anyone? I found myself doing more googling of ingredients than I usually have to do. It like the innovation but probably won't be making those dishes. The recipes here are overwhelmingly meat-based. Even the recipes in the guide under Grains or Vegetables are heavily into meat. I did find one recipe that I wanted to try. It is a Couscous Salad with Roasted Figs. https://flic.kr/p/2kgAVVV Even this recipe has three sub-recipes as written. It is recommended to make a fresh Ethiopian cheese, a spiced butter, and a carmelized honey vinaigrette. I skipped the cheese. The butter recipe added an additional spice to another spiced butter recipe that already had 11 ingredients. It makes a pound. I needed a tablespoon. I did some melted butter with dashes of whatever of the listed spices I had close. I'm sure the original recipe is amazing but it added a whole other layer of complicated on top of this "simple" salad. I'm not even sure that the extra steps helped a lot. Maybe I just have really simple tastes but I think this would have been just as good with fresh figs and nuts instead. The people whose stories are told in this book are fascinating. I would pick up this book in order to learn about them and to learn about some ingredients that you may not be familiar with but I don't think this will be a cookbook that many people will use regularly. This review was originally posted on Based On A True Story

  16. 5 out of 5

    Coriander

    I picked this up from my local library's "peak picks" section thinking, oh, an interesting looking cookbook, that won't take long to read and I'll get it back well within the 3 week period (no extensions) allowed for this type of book. It is a credit to the book and a discredit to me that this did not in any way occur. This is a much, much denser book than I thought it was and I love it. It's packed with history, threads to pick up and follow to other authors and podcast-makers and historians an I picked this up from my local library's "peak picks" section thinking, oh, an interesting looking cookbook, that won't take long to read and I'll get it back well within the 3 week period (no extensions) allowed for this type of book. It is a credit to the book and a discredit to me that this did not in any way occur. This is a much, much denser book than I thought it was and I love it. It's packed with history, threads to pick up and follow to other authors and podcast-makers and historians and chefs, and with (for me as a pacific northwest white kid) completely unfamiliar ingredients and concepts. And right alongside those unfamiliar recipes, sometimes even within them, that spark of recognition of "oh, that's where that comes from" or "oh, just like [insert similar food from my own lexicon]". It truly highlights the diversity of food, the oft-ignored and forgotten roots of African and Black cuisine in the mainstream American food world, and the universality of food all at the same time. This is truly a masterwork of shining a light on black cooks, beverage-people (...not being much into alcohol I really don't remember the official terms but I respect their ingenuity!) and parts of the culinary world we might not immediately associate with a cookbook: Food historians, photographers, activists, entrepreneurs of various stripes. There are so many people doing so many fascinating things with food and culture detailed in this book, it opened my eyes not just to a massive cast of people I had never heard of but also to a host of ways to engage with food professionally that I didn't know existed. I cannot recommend this enough. As a cookbook to those looking for something new to try, as a historical work for those looking for a first, light taste of food history (and a handful of recommendations for where to look for more) and as a way of showcasing and amplifying the work and ethos of both activists and rising leaders whose work is under-appreciated. There are so many recipes in here: some I can't wait to try for myself, and many I know, for one reason or another, that I will probably never make. I'm glad I read those "probably-not-for-me" recipes too. This is a 'read cover to cover' cookbook, not a 'look up the recipe you're wanting and put it back on the shelf' type of situation. Do yourself a favor, check it out. And maybe check out a copy where your loan can be renewed. Sorry Seattle Public Libraries! I'll be better next time I swear!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kawaii

    It was an interesting read. Did I learn anything new about black cuisine in America? Yes. I think it would be important to note that it wasn't all completely traditional recipes. And that's ok. Not for one minute would I discount this recipe book. It highlights how African and African origin chefs have been overlooked even though we have been here the WHOLE time. Not only cooking for our European masters, but for American as a whole, from the beginning - yet we are all too often overlooked or un It was an interesting read. Did I learn anything new about black cuisine in America? Yes. I think it would be important to note that it wasn't all completely traditional recipes. And that's ok. Not for one minute would I discount this recipe book. It highlights how African and African origin chefs have been overlooked even though we have been here the WHOLE time. Not only cooking for our European masters, but for American as a whole, from the beginning - yet we are all too often overlooked or underestimate or diminished as not "elevated" or refined. There are many old restaurants and hotels which had recipes that made them famous and where cooked by Black chefs, without acknowledgement. This book showcases some old dishes, cooked in a traditional manner, as well as old dishes with modern twists. These are new chefs that bring the Black voice into the 21st century and incorporate the African diaspora of cuisine. This isn't by far, an African cookbook but there are details as to the origin of some of the dishes and ingredients. It's time to stop overlooking and not including the diaspora as well as recognizing that the whole planet has influenced each other thru conquering, exploration and colonization/imperialisms. Otherwise, American would never have the variety of vegetation, animals or spices like we do. Thank god for it! I still saw old familiar dishes; a black-eyed pea dish similar to Hopping John, Gumbo, and Jollof. One chef that I found interesting is Michael W. Twitty. He studies the history of African cuisine and the Black cuisine identity here in America. Just having him the book was worth it for me. It inspired me to seek out more chefs like him. I think it's a book worth having on the shelf for those who want to see Black cooking to stop being defined as "Southern", (considering most of Black America originated there, it's just ignorant and mischaracterized) and shows there are roots in African, Spanish, French and Portuguese cuisines.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Meagan

    This book ended up being a fantastic accompaniment to Samuelsson’s Audible book “Our Harlem.” (Or vice versa. Either way, they complement each other for sure.) I saw several familiar names from “Our Harlem,” and felt this book really allowed Samuelsson to doin book form what “Our Harlem” did for audio—bring people together, share about the Black experience (make that experiences, plural, because there are plenty and they are diverse!), and expand horizons. Now, having explored both books made me This book ended up being a fantastic accompaniment to Samuelsson’s Audible book “Our Harlem.” (Or vice versa. Either way, they complement each other for sure.) I saw several familiar names from “Our Harlem,” and felt this book really allowed Samuelsson to doin book form what “Our Harlem” did for audio—bring people together, share about the Black experience (make that experiences, plural, because there are plenty and they are diverse!), and expand horizons. Now, having explored both books made me appreciate each all the more. I will say, very few of these recipes are “quick,” and they do have A. Lot. of ingredients. I’d be curious to see just how easy ingredient procurement would be, as the book notes “how easy” it is, while lower-star reviews put that claim to the test. Covid has really expanded my food horizons thanks to a workout app I’ve been using (shoutout to Chris Hemsworth’s Centr), and frankly, that app has made me try and enjoy way more than I ever would have prior to March 2020 (ironically, around when Samuelsson wrote the foreword for “The Rise”). All that to say, pending ingredient procurement (and a few free hours, but hey, covid life, right?), I’d happily give many of these recipes a go. I also appreciated all the extra resources included, from restaurants to try to book and podcast recommendations.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lee Ann

    My mom was a great cook. She had a wall of cookbooks, watched cooking shows on PBS and Food Network, and, when she died, near every TV was a stack of recipes she had jotted down while watching cooking shows. She was 100 percent Norwegian but cooked a variety of cuisines. When my oldest niece brought back spices from Africa, mom researched recipes using those spices with Moroccan carrots being a favorite that made it into the family cookbook. My mom and Marcus Samuelsson have a similar philosophy: My mom was a great cook. She had a wall of cookbooks, watched cooking shows on PBS and Food Network, and, when she died, near every TV was a stack of recipes she had jotted down while watching cooking shows. She was 100 percent Norwegian but cooked a variety of cuisines. When my oldest niece brought back spices from Africa, mom researched recipes using those spices with Moroccan carrots being a favorite that made it into the family cookbook. My mom and Marcus Samuelsson have a similar philosophy: Get to know people over food. I love Samuelsson's PBS show, No Passport Required, where he celebrates the immigrant cultures and flavors throughout the US. This book celebrates the rich Black American cuisine with all of its influences (Africa, Caribbean, French, and more) and foods and spices typical of the cuisine (I am going to look for berbere and can't wait to try fufu.). The chefs profiled and recipes shared are new takes on traditional dishes as well as family recipes. I am not the cook mom was so won't be trying any of these recipes, but I will be looking for this at area restaurants and visiting some of the restaurants profiled when we are able to travel again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I enjoyed learning about the featured chefs and the rich histories included, but this is not a cookbook I could take many notes from. The dishes are just too inaccessible for me (and I feel like they would be inaccessible to the average person tbh). And this is more of a personal issue rather than an issue with the book: I felt disconnected from this particular Black culture, despite being Black, because most (if not all) of the stories and recipes had a sense of knowing in regards to the histor I enjoyed learning about the featured chefs and the rich histories included, but this is not a cookbook I could take many notes from. The dishes are just too inaccessible for me (and I feel like they would be inaccessible to the average person tbh). And this is more of a personal issue rather than an issue with the book: I felt disconnected from this particular Black culture, despite being Black, because most (if not all) of the stories and recipes had a sense of knowing in regards to the history and connection to specific cultures. I grew up with some of these foods (with much less ingredients used, so very likely it tasted wildly different) so it's not completely foreign to me. But it definitely felt like I was missing important context via life experience, which I undoubtedly am. I still enjoyed reading through it, but almost none of these recipes would be something brought to (or eaten at) my grandmother's house when everyone decides to get together. Everything just sounds too intricate and like it belongs on the menu of a Michelin star rated restaurant.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    This book highlights excellence in Black cooking in (mostly) America, highlighting its traditional roots and its creativity rather than focusing on stereotypical images of traditional black food. The organization of this cookbook was unusual; rather than organizing around food or meal types, it focuses on important moments/movements in black history that brought about changes, both culturally and with cuisine. Then, each section highlights a particular black chef/food activist/restauranteur/food This book highlights excellence in Black cooking in (mostly) America, highlighting its traditional roots and its creativity rather than focusing on stereotypical images of traditional black food. The organization of this cookbook was unusual; rather than organizing around food or meal types, it focuses on important moments/movements in black history that brought about changes, both culturally and with cuisine. Then, each section highlights a particular black chef/food activist/restauranteur/food historian/cookbook author with an extensive essay and recipes inspired by this person. Each recipe has a little pre-write up to clarify the importance of the recipe, and the end of the book describes some of the more unusual ingredients and explains their cultural and culinary importance. The unusual organization adds to the book’s purpose in highlighting black culinary excellence, but it does make it harder to pull off the shelf for everyday cooking. Some outstanding looking recipes that I’m looking forward to making for a special occasion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate (Looking Glass Reads)

    This cookbook is more than just a list of recipes. Author and chef Marcus Samuelsson brings us a book dedicated to Black foods, culture and chefs. Black chefs are highlighted throughout the book, and readers get information on them and their backgrounds not just as chefs but personally and culturally as well. Foods are spoken about in-depth as well, including their histories and usages. Recipies are detailed and easy to follow. Many sauces, spice blends, and the like also have their own recipes This cookbook is more than just a list of recipes. Author and chef Marcus Samuelsson brings us a book dedicated to Black foods, culture and chefs. Black chefs are highlighted throughout the book, and readers get information on them and their backgrounds not just as chefs but personally and culturally as well. Foods are spoken about in-depth as well, including their histories and usages. Recipies are detailed and easy to follow. Many sauces, spice blends, and the like also have their own recipes within the book, making cooking certain dishes much easier than they may initially appear. However, those who aren't close to urban areas may need to order certain ingredients online, as certain ingredients (fermented bean pastes, for example) may be more difficult to find in areas devoid of specialty, culture-based, or extremely large grocery stores. Overall, I'd definitely give this cookbook a look. Not only have I learned a lot about fantastic modern chefs but I also have a slew of fantastic-looking recipes to try!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    This isn't really a cookbook, it's a food history book. It is a really wonderful book in terms of the history of black cooks and the cuisine that has resulted from so many different cultures coming together over generations. It offers up a plethora of restaurants to try, the photography is beautiful. And I do like that Samuelsson has always profiled and elevated so many cooks and chefs that you might otherwise never hear of. But as a home cookbook, it's just not. The dishes themselves, while fas This isn't really a cookbook, it's a food history book. It is a really wonderful book in terms of the history of black cooks and the cuisine that has resulted from so many different cultures coming together over generations. It offers up a plethora of restaurants to try, the photography is beautiful. And I do like that Samuelsson has always profiled and elevated so many cooks and chefs that you might otherwise never hear of. But as a home cookbook, it's just not. The dishes themselves, while fascinating, all require very unusual ingredients that could be largely inaccessible for most home cooks. And where I live, even in a country with a strong history of South American and Caribbean dishes, I cannot find a single one. So by all means, do check it out from the library and read through it, it's got some amazing information, but don't expect to be able to cook anything from it unless you're fortunate enough to have access to some of the ingredients.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mia

    This is such as interesting book to read. It is time for more diversity in restaurants. When I was young, we had one kind of rice, two kinds of potatoes and Italian food was becoming popular. Now there are Thai restaurants, Moroccan restaurants and many kinds of Chinese restaurants. Now I have spices like harissa, six types of dried beans and three types of rice in my pantry. We see all kind of tomatoes and potatoes in the Farmer’s Market. Soon, it may be possible to find canned callaloo greens, This is such as interesting book to read. It is time for more diversity in restaurants. When I was young, we had one kind of rice, two kinds of potatoes and Italian food was becoming popular. Now there are Thai restaurants, Moroccan restaurants and many kinds of Chinese restaurants. Now I have spices like harissa, six types of dried beans and three types of rice in my pantry. We see all kind of tomatoes and potatoes in the Farmer’s Market. Soon, it may be possible to find canned callaloo greens, fermented shrimp paste, cow peas, locust bean powder, baobab powder, fonio, and other ingredients which are now unfamiliar. I plan to try some of the recipes as many spices and ingredients from the Northern regions of Africa can be found nearby without resorting to mail order. It was great to see how Marcus Samuelson has brought together cooks from so many different countries and cultures to make such an interesting and mouth watering collection of recipes.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cindy DavisClark

    This book features a number of people of color that are important in the food world today. They are either chefs , historians of food ways or growing and preserving food. The recipes are in honor of the food ways of the people featured. Due to my inability to eat spicy foods I could not prepare many of the recipes. We did enjoy the recipes I tried. I did so enjoy reading about the various people and their work. I enjoy the work of Marcus Samuelsson as he appears on his program No Passport Requi This book features a number of people of color that are important in the food world today. They are either chefs , historians of food ways or growing and preserving food. The recipes are in honor of the food ways of the people featured. Due to my inability to eat spicy foods I could not prepare many of the recipes. We did enjoy the recipes I tried. I did so enjoy reading about the various people and their work. I enjoy the work of Marcus Samuelsson as he appears on his program No Passport Required and other programs. I borrowed this book from the public library. It led me to another book The Jemima Code by Toni Tipton-Martin which I also checked out from the public library. I would suggest to one reviewer who wanted their money back that they check out cook books at the public library before purchase if you are unsure they will be useful in your collection. I enjoyed the information and pictures but can't make enough of the recipes to go ahead and purchase this book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tracy Middlebrook

    Sat down and read a cookbook over a few days and it was a delight. The approach and design is wonderful, offering fantastic biographies/interviews with all kinds of wonderful people involved in creating, researching, and celebrating Black and Black chefs. The thought and care that went into this book are not a surprise for anyone who has followed Chef Samuelsson. Lots of great information and discussions, wonderful profiles of people we'll all want to follow/know more about, as well as so many d Sat down and read a cookbook over a few days and it was a delight. The approach and design is wonderful, offering fantastic biographies/interviews with all kinds of wonderful people involved in creating, researching, and celebrating Black and Black chefs. The thought and care that went into this book are not a surprise for anyone who has followed Chef Samuelsson. Lots of great information and discussions, wonderful profiles of people we'll all want to follow/know more about, as well as so many delicious recipes. There's such a necessary (and belated) recognition happening in the industry. This book is about a real moment in time, and it'll totally broaden and excite your home kitchen, too. Cultures, histories, personalities recipes. I also loved the thematic approach to layout/recipes. It's not something I've seen before in a cookbook, but it makes a lot of sense. Plus, this is also a physically gorgeous book; the design is clever and engaging.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tory

    A beautifully illustrated book with great descriptions of the contributions of Black cooks and soul food to American cuisine. The organization is unusual for cookbooks (the chapters are: Rise - Where Black Food is Headed; Remix - Black Food Integrates Many Cultures; Migration - The Influence of the American South; Legacy - Old and New Journeys from Africa to the Americas; and Origins - a Pantry of Ingredients, Techniques, and Recipes), rather than the usual organization by ingredient. There is a A beautifully illustrated book with great descriptions of the contributions of Black cooks and soul food to American cuisine. The organization is unusual for cookbooks (the chapters are: Rise - Where Black Food is Headed; Remix - Black Food Integrates Many Cultures; Migration - The Influence of the American South; Legacy - Old and New Journeys from Africa to the Americas; and Origins - a Pantry of Ingredients, Techniques, and Recipes), rather than the usual organization by ingredient. There is a "Recipe Guide" that can help the reader find recipes for specific ingredients. Though most of the recipes look delicious, and I would love to try them in a restaurant, many call for hard to find ingredients or complicated cooking methods, which is why I took away one star in my rating. Worth a look for the historical/future aspects and for the recipes that are less complicated.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a great resource for the history of Black food in America, and how different African cooking styles have influenced American food. There are bios of some incredible chefs, and I now have a long list of restaurants to try and know what some dishes are that I've always wondered about. As a cookbook, it's not incredibly useful to me because most of the recipes are pretty involved and some require ingredients that aren't that easy to find (though the author does give resources at the end of t This is a great resource for the history of Black food in America, and how different African cooking styles have influenced American food. There are bios of some incredible chefs, and I now have a long list of restaurants to try and know what some dishes are that I've always wondered about. As a cookbook, it's not incredibly useful to me because most of the recipes are pretty involved and some require ingredients that aren't that easy to find (though the author does give resources at the end of the book). There are some promising seafood and veggie recipes (and one very good smoothie) that I could see fitting into our routine. And for a book like this, there really should be a picture for every recipe. There were a few dishes that I really wanted to see and had to google. This is a really interesting book and a good read if you like to learn about food and influential chefs.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Favorite quote from the book- Breakfast was a humble biscuit with jelly, a cup of cocoa or coffee. "We better bring back that 90 or 100 on that report card because daddy wasn't going to tolerate anything else. And you had to do that on a biscuit and coffee." Her mother typically cooked one-pot meals: string beans and rice, greens and rice, beans and rice. The family couldn't afford meat, so they didn't eat it, unless it was hog-killing time. Hortensia stretched every meal. She'd take bones and ma Favorite quote from the book- Breakfast was a humble biscuit with jelly, a cup of cocoa or coffee. "We better bring back that 90 or 100 on that report card because daddy wasn't going to tolerate anything else. And you had to do that on a biscuit and coffee." Her mother typically cooked one-pot meals: string beans and rice, greens and rice, beans and rice. The family couldn't afford meat, so they didn't eat it, unless it was hog-killing time. Hortensia stretched every meal. She'd take bones and make a rich broth, then steep garden vegetables inside. The first course at dinner was the strained broth, course two was the reserved vegetables. A taste of sweet always closed the family meal. Hortensia, averse to unnecessary dishes, would instruct the family "Turn your plate over," and serve slices of pie.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I loved the stories of Black chefs who, after being trained in classic European cooking at school, turned back to their roots and used their professional life to showcase the ingredients and techniques they grew up with. It seems like the book wants to prove that Black cooking is worthy of fine dining, and I’d say it succeeds. I would love to order any of these dishes in a restaurant. I was disappointed that these are mostly not, however, recipes I could easily cook after work due to the prepara I loved the stories of Black chefs who, after being trained in classic European cooking at school, turned back to their roots and used their professional life to showcase the ingredients and techniques they grew up with. It seems like the book wants to prove that Black cooking is worthy of fine dining, and I’d say it succeeds. I would love to order any of these dishes in a restaurant. I was disappointed that these are mostly not, however, recipes I could easily cook after work due to the preparation time or the ingredients. Still, it’s a beautifully done tome with written with a generosity of spirit that refuses to pigeonhole Black cooks—or anyone else—with invented rules about what Black food should or should not be.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...