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Face to Face: The Art of Human Connection

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New York Times bestselling author and iconic Hollywood producer Brian Grazer reveals a new secret to forge a happier and more successful life. Through his own personal stories, discover how eye contact—a power available to nearly everyone—can change your life too. In his bestseller A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, Academy Award-winning producer Brian Grazer New York Times bestselling author and iconic Hollywood producer Brian Grazer reveals a new secret to forge a happier and more successful life. Through his own personal stories, discover how eye contact—a power available to nearly everyone—can change your life too. In his bestseller A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, Academy Award-winning producer Brian Grazer helped everyone from parents to CEOs to artists to young graduates develop their curiosity into a superpower that would expand their world. Now, he reveals a new secret. Whether you’re looking to develop a relationship, build your confidence or win a negotiation: the answer is in the eyes. Grazer delves into the power of eye contact, as he shares personal, life-changing stories and insightful advice that will help you immediately discover the secret to a more meaningful life. While it might seem like second nature, Grazer proves that eye contact—really looking someone in the eyes—is one of the most transformative habits you can develop in your daily life. Eye contact has the power to offer validation, show generosity, create intimacy, and—most importantly—establish genuine human connection. Even as technology takes on a bigger and bigger role in our lives, from self-driving cars to the smartphones in our pockets, no machine will ever be able to replace the unique and powerful benefits of eye contact. As one of the most acclaimed Hollywood producers in the world, Grazer transports you into the moments from his life where eye contact proves to be the key to unlocking power, emotion, and insight. These are moments like a high-powered CEO conference with Bill Gates; a surprise date with supermodel Kate Moss; a tough conversation with Eminem when creating the movie 8 Mile; a tête-à-tête with George W. Bush; and encounters with personalities like Taraji Henson, Airbnb Founder Brian Chesky, and Chance The Rapper. With his flair for telling intriguing stories, Grazer’s highly readable book will give you a powerful advantage across every aspect of your life. Read this book now, and learn how a happier and more meaningful life is just a blink away.


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New York Times bestselling author and iconic Hollywood producer Brian Grazer reveals a new secret to forge a happier and more successful life. Through his own personal stories, discover how eye contact—a power available to nearly everyone—can change your life too. In his bestseller A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, Academy Award-winning producer Brian Grazer New York Times bestselling author and iconic Hollywood producer Brian Grazer reveals a new secret to forge a happier and more successful life. Through his own personal stories, discover how eye contact—a power available to nearly everyone—can change your life too. In his bestseller A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life, Academy Award-winning producer Brian Grazer helped everyone from parents to CEOs to artists to young graduates develop their curiosity into a superpower that would expand their world. Now, he reveals a new secret. Whether you’re looking to develop a relationship, build your confidence or win a negotiation: the answer is in the eyes. Grazer delves into the power of eye contact, as he shares personal, life-changing stories and insightful advice that will help you immediately discover the secret to a more meaningful life. While it might seem like second nature, Grazer proves that eye contact—really looking someone in the eyes—is one of the most transformative habits you can develop in your daily life. Eye contact has the power to offer validation, show generosity, create intimacy, and—most importantly—establish genuine human connection. Even as technology takes on a bigger and bigger role in our lives, from self-driving cars to the smartphones in our pockets, no machine will ever be able to replace the unique and powerful benefits of eye contact. As one of the most acclaimed Hollywood producers in the world, Grazer transports you into the moments from his life where eye contact proves to be the key to unlocking power, emotion, and insight. These are moments like a high-powered CEO conference with Bill Gates; a surprise date with supermodel Kate Moss; a tough conversation with Eminem when creating the movie 8 Mile; a tête-à-tête with George W. Bush; and encounters with personalities like Taraji Henson, Airbnb Founder Brian Chesky, and Chance The Rapper. With his flair for telling intriguing stories, Grazer’s highly readable book will give you a powerful advantage across every aspect of your life. Read this book now, and learn how a happier and more meaningful life is just a blink away.

30 review for Face to Face: The Art of Human Connection

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    I found the stories a bit self-congratulatory. Not everyone has the luxury to fly off and meet people and to have these kinds of opportunities. As far as books go it does not have much depth.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cory Reese

    I just couldn't get into this one. I kept waiting for some insight or a point to the stories, but eventually realized that this book is essentially a collection of stories from the author meeting with famous people who made good eye contact. I just couldn't get into this one. I kept waiting for some insight or a point to the stories, but eventually realized that this book is essentially a collection of stories from the author meeting with famous people who made good eye contact.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I give this book between 3.5 and 4 stars. Brian Grazer's first book "A Curious Mind" is about "what" could be learned from having conversations with people and being open minded. This book is about "how" to have engaging conversations -- look people in the eye, really listen, and give a good story or useful information in return. Again, not earth-shattering and some of the same stories from his first book are repeated in this book. But it's an easy read and if you didn't mind the first book, thi I give this book between 3.5 and 4 stars. Brian Grazer's first book "A Curious Mind" is about "what" could be learned from having conversations with people and being open minded. This book is about "how" to have engaging conversations -- look people in the eye, really listen, and give a good story or useful information in return. Again, not earth-shattering and some of the same stories from his first book are repeated in this book. But it's an easy read and if you didn't mind the first book, this one is okay too.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Rivas

    I loved this author's book "A Curious Mind" and was fascinated by how he conceived a philosophy and stuck to it. This book touches on an important aspect of his philosophy of having "a curious mind," which is connecting with the human your curious about. He retells a lot of the stories from "A Curious Mind" but with a more concentration on the connection, he created with that person he was curious about. To but labels on what he was practicing, I would say the author has high "emotional intellig I loved this author's book "A Curious Mind" and was fascinated by how he conceived a philosophy and stuck to it. This book touches on an important aspect of his philosophy of having "a curious mind," which is connecting with the human your curious about. He retells a lot of the stories from "A Curious Mind" but with a more concentration on the connection, he created with that person he was curious about. To but labels on what he was practicing, I would say the author has high "emotional intelligence" and like Dales Carnegie's advice says to "talk in terms in other people's interests." The book has a focus on communicating face to face, which in Brain's era seems like a must. I understand at times we tend to romanticize how things were done, especially if it brought great success but it seems like this digital era of communication is getting demonized. I am not saying that is what the author is trying to express or convince the reader of. I feel that having the awareness and capacity to implement different forms of communication is a skill that brings value to a person. There are times when face to face communication will be the most beneficial way to communicate and sometimes it won't. After reading Susan Cain's book "Quiet" I know there are individuals who do not like face to face encounters and prefer email, video chats, phone chats, or other forms of communication that are not considered face to face. What I'm trying to say is that knowledge is power and after reading this book I am aware of how powerful face to face communication can be.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Akash Agrawall

    Brian Grazer spills out the importance of F2F conversations and how this has made a pivotal role in his life. This is a light read in self-help category. Rather than suggesting tons of lessons on how to get the art of human connection right, Brian shares his life experiences and how they led to his big hits. Good for a night time read. Once read the concept really gets imprinted on your mind and you understand the importance of F2F conversations. Reason for 3 stars: + Not a great book in terms of Brian Grazer spills out the importance of F2F conversations and how this has made a pivotal role in his life. This is a light read in self-help category. Rather than suggesting tons of lessons on how to get the art of human connection right, Brian shares his life experiences and how they led to his big hits. Good for a night time read. Once read the concept really gets imprinted on your mind and you understand the importance of F2F conversations. Reason for 3 stars: + Not a great book in terms of read to learn Gain. + Better to read the book summary rather. Main Points touched in book + Importance of eye contact + Be curious always. + Intentional listening rather than thinking what to speak next. + Step out of comfort zone to talk to people.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara floerke

    Meh. Endearing character, but it seemed like a list of name dropping and hollywood stardom. Great point about eye contact again and again, but the 1 hour interview with Dan Harris was more insightful than wading through this book

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tom Cross

    Dreadful book. Just a collection of personal stories focused on how well certain people make eye contact. There is no content on many topics about relating to people on a personal level.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    1.5? I expected it to explore and give an overview on human connection and face-to-face interactions in general with some personal stories and going into the book with such expectations (also due to the author and not by having just misled myself) was a serious let down. I'd like to assume that this book would be of more interest to the fans of the author who'd like to hear more about how many famous people he's connected with in an ~authentic~ way and how he's great friends with those famous pe 1.5? I expected it to explore and give an overview on human connection and face-to-face interactions in general with some personal stories and going into the book with such expectations (also due to the author and not by having just misled myself) was a serious let down. I'd like to assume that this book would be of more interest to the fans of the author who'd like to hear more about how many famous people he's connected with in an ~authentic~ way and how he's great friends with those famous people because they looked each other in the eye or something, but I think even as a memoir/autobiography this book is lacking. As it is, I didn't find what had been advertised in this book, the author came off annoying and full of himself and I just really really did not enjoy this book. I honestly do not even understand the point of it besides telling stories of how great and famous and entitled he is and how many famous people he knows. Good for him, I guess? And good for me for actually getting through this audiobook and being able to move on to hopefully something better.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Barnes Deeg

    More a memoir than a book about connection, I found the essays astonishing. However, my hope was to learn about how to better connect with others; this is where Grazer falls short other than to offer platitudes - eye contact, be present, be curious. Not a fan in that sense, but his stories were entertaining.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mark Matheson

    Surface-level and self-congratulatory insights keep this from being little more than a Hollywood producer’s vanity project.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Matherly

    I may not share the same opinion as others in regard to how they view the book, but I thoroughly enjoyed it from front to back as I read it all in one sitting without stopping and didn't find myself becoming disengaged or distracted from it at all. It was a delightful experience and a chance as Brian Grazer says in his book to widen my perspective of the world and how different cultures interact differently with one another. This was my first book I have read from him, so I cant speak on how rep I may not share the same opinion as others in regard to how they view the book, but I thoroughly enjoyed it from front to back as I read it all in one sitting without stopping and didn't find myself becoming disengaged or distracted from it at all. It was a delightful experience and a chance as Brian Grazer says in his book to widen my perspective of the world and how different cultures interact differently with one another. This was my first book I have read from him, so I cant speak on how repetitive it is in comparison to his other book, but I did read a few reviews to gather a little bit of perception before posting my own and do agree it has a lot of names dropped throughout the stories. Whether this is bragging or just to further emphasize his stories, I am not sure. I do think it helps us understand that they are all people and humans just like us though and we can connect with others all the same in our own way. While this may not be a book everyone will enjoy or have a positive impression of, it is that difference of opinions and perspectives that make the world such a beautiful place and I think we can all learn something from this book if we choose to look close enough.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I had the great opportunity to meet Brian Grazer and receive a copy of this book. He is a super nice guy, especially given how accomplished and well known he is. The book is interesting and well told and gives good insight into his life and how he achieved his success. For me, much of the lessons he is trying to impart are pretty obvious and basically the traits of someone who is a good conversationalist. Bottom line: for those people with a high emotional quotient, there is not much to learn here I had the great opportunity to meet Brian Grazer and receive a copy of this book. He is a super nice guy, especially given how accomplished and well known he is. The book is interesting and well told and gives good insight into his life and how he achieved his success. For me, much of the lessons he is trying to impart are pretty obvious and basically the traits of someone who is a good conversationalist. Bottom line: for those people with a high emotional quotient, there is not much to learn here. But for those who may be a bit more socially awkward, then you might pick up a few good tips.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    The entire premise of this book was efficiently and effectively presented in the introduction. The rest of the book is a mere collection of personal experiences relayed in short story format by the author. Many of the stories, to me, sounded a lot like bragging and famous name dropping and rather turned me off the book. I did finish reading it though, just to make certain there weren't any other little nuggets of good advice tucked in between the stories. There wasn't. Everything to be learned c The entire premise of this book was efficiently and effectively presented in the introduction. The rest of the book is a mere collection of personal experiences relayed in short story format by the author. Many of the stories, to me, sounded a lot like bragging and famous name dropping and rather turned me off the book. I did finish reading it though, just to make certain there weren't any other little nuggets of good advice tucked in between the stories. There wasn't. Everything to be learned can be learned in the introduction!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    More of a 2 1/2. It wasn't terrible and had a few good points at the beginning. Beyond that, it was interesting if you like insider Hollywood tidbits and want to know about the stars and famous people that Brian's met. More of a 2 1/2. It wasn't terrible and had a few good points at the beginning. Beyond that, it was interesting if you like insider Hollywood tidbits and want to know about the stars and famous people that Brian's met.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mehmet Fatih

    Well-intended but contains a little bit too much name tagging.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nilyufar Rajabova

    Actually I was skeptical at the beginning while decided to read it due to the same concept was offered in this book as it was in other books- “Assisting to improve interpersonal or communication skills”, but as I dived deeper into it I enjoyed about the writing style of the author. Sure, he had an opportunity to meet with the famous people and the reason for it as he tried to attract the investors and actors to his movies, and not everyone might have that opportunity. However, I think one can be Actually I was skeptical at the beginning while decided to read it due to the same concept was offered in this book as it was in other books- “Assisting to improve interpersonal or communication skills”, but as I dived deeper into it I enjoyed about the writing style of the author. Sure, he had an opportunity to meet with the famous people and the reason for it as he tried to attract the investors and actors to his movies, and not everyone might have that opportunity. However, I think one can benefit from the ideas and suggestions were provided in the book such as looking into the eyes while talking to someone, carefully listening, asking some questions to show your curiosity, and etc. From my point of view, it doesn’t provide ground breaking or revolutionary suggestions as those advices are general that most of the people aware of, but it is an easy to read book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Somewhere between 3-3.5 stars. A self-help book by Brian Grazer, who is the co-founder of Imagine Entertainment, with Ron Howard. Together Grazer and Howard have made many memorable and blockbuster movies including A Beautiful Mind, and The Da Vinci Code. This is a really a book about face-to-face communication by a master negotiator. The book has many strengths, by is slowed bu some uneven parts, and an obtuse introduction. there is some great advice. Nut the best parts of the book are the insi Somewhere between 3-3.5 stars. A self-help book by Brian Grazer, who is the co-founder of Imagine Entertainment, with Ron Howard. Together Grazer and Howard have made many memorable and blockbuster movies including A Beautiful Mind, and The Da Vinci Code. This is a really a book about face-to-face communication by a master negotiator. The book has many strengths, by is slowed bu some uneven parts, and an obtuse introduction. there is some great advice. Nut the best parts of the book are the inside look into the buying and selling of motion pictures... and obviously, communication and human interaction plays an important part of that contact.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dawn

    I had hoped this book might actually be about how to make better human connections, but the takeaways are pretty succinct. I thought the introduction was the most insightful part (I listened to audiobook and the author reads the intro). It states things I had already suspected, that people who can't/don't make eye contact with you are unlikely to ever be good friends/people you can trust. As others have pointed out, it becomes very self-congratulatory and self-aggrandizing. The part about how me I had hoped this book might actually be about how to make better human connections, but the takeaways are pretty succinct. I thought the introduction was the most insightful part (I listened to audiobook and the author reads the intro). It states things I had already suspected, that people who can't/don't make eye contact with you are unlikely to ever be good friends/people you can trust. As others have pointed out, it becomes very self-congratulatory and self-aggrandizing. The part about how me met his gorgeous wife and fell in love with her at first sight when she wandered into an exclusive Malibu restaurant looking smoking hot in a red dress? Gag.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kalle Wescott

    I read /Face to Face: The Art of Human Connection/, by Brian Grazer: https://www.wsj.com/articles/face-to-... Grazer's previous book, /A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life/, is one of the most enjoyable and illuminative books I've ever read, and /Face to Face/ benefited from the afterglow from /A Curious Mind/, and some overlapping subject matter. Read /A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life/ if you haven't, as the foundation, and then /Face to Face/. I read /Face to Face: The Art of Human Connection/, by Brian Grazer: https://www.wsj.com/articles/face-to-... Grazer's previous book, /A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life/, is one of the most enjoyable and illuminative books I've ever read, and /Face to Face/ benefited from the afterglow from /A Curious Mind/, and some overlapping subject matter. Read /A Curious Mind: The Secret to a Bigger Life/ if you haven't, as the foundation, and then /Face to Face/.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Samiyah

    Always insightful. I just love Brian Grazer's view on life and connection. It's a quick read with stories that will stick with you for years to come. And they stick because the writing is accessible. What I mean by that is, though his occupation and the people he interacts with are not what the general public is privy, his storytelling and the core message of his book is. And what is that message? Human Beings are social creatures we are meant to connect. So do just that, unplug and connect. Always insightful. I just love Brian Grazer's view on life and connection. It's a quick read with stories that will stick with you for years to come. And they stick because the writing is accessible. What I mean by that is, though his occupation and the people he interacts with are not what the general public is privy, his storytelling and the core message of his book is. And what is that message? Human Beings are social creatures we are meant to connect. So do just that, unplug and connect.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    Recommend this book. I really enjoyed it. Problem is it’s my children who need this info. My husband also talks to everyone and loves to hear their stories. Great to know that there is someone in Hollywood who seems so down to earth and interested in the human race. I would love to meet brain Grazer too .

  22. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Janis IV

    Amidst some needless and overtly self-promotional anecdotes related to the author’s illustrious social circle—including the likes of Oprah, Prince, Bono and Mark Wahlberg—there can be found moments of sincere insight regarding the need for sustained eye contact and the lost art of human-to-human connection in the 21st century.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy

    It’s ok. I mean it’s really just summed up in the introduction. It’s a simple read and when entering the subject of human connections maybe a good first read, however it’s not very good. It’s a series of stories that make Grazer look good. A few good things that strike my interest. Women’s rights, and political science, but not inspiring or a fun read, just an easy one.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alex J Lindsay

    Given the current lockdown situation, the practical learning from this book is very hard to implement. Some pieces are interesting, others are just another wealthy person telling others to "take more risks". Given the current lockdown situation, the practical learning from this book is very hard to implement. Some pieces are interesting, others are just another wealthy person telling others to "take more risks".

  25. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Some good tips on how to make better connections with people, and I enjoyed the behind-the-scenes tidbits about the movie making process -- but too many anecdotes .... and worse personal anecdotes to make the argument thoroughly compelling.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Natala

    There is so much from this book that resonates with me. It really is a good example of why we should put down our phones and be interested in the people around us. By learning from others we can learn about ourselves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paiman Chen

    We are made for connection. It is the source of growth, discovery, joy and meaning in our short, sweet time here on Earth.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kara of BookishBytes

    Seemed more of a vehicle for the author to share his personal stories than an attempt to help others.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    To phrase Brian Grazer's word, this book is only 'Good Enough'. To phrase Brian Grazer's word, this book is only 'Good Enough'.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    Lots of anecdotes and name dropping. It quickly got boring as nothing new was brought to light in subsequent anecdotes.

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