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Brag Better: Master the Art of Fearless Self-Promotion

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This effortless and unapologetic approach to self-promotion will manage your anxiety and allow you to champion yourself. Does talking about your accomplishments feel scary or icky because you're worried people will think you're "obnoxious"? Does it feel more natural to "put your head down and do the work"? Are you tired of watching the loudest people in your industry get This effortless and unapologetic approach to self-promotion will manage your anxiety and allow you to champion yourself. Does talking about your accomplishments feel scary or icky because you're worried people will think you're "obnoxious"? Does it feel more natural to "put your head down and do the work"? Are you tired of watching the loudest people in your industry get disproportionate praise and rewards? If you answered "yes" to any of the above, you might be self-sabotaging. You need to learn to Brag Better. Meredith Fineman has built a career working with "The Qualified Quiet": smart people who struggle to talk about themselves and thus go underestimated or unrecognized. Now, she shares the surefire and anxiety-proof strategies that have helped her clients effectively communicate their achievements and skillsets to others. Bragging Better doesn't require false bravado, talking over people, or pretending to be more qualified than you are. Instead, Fineman advocates finding quiet confidence in your opinions, abilities, and background, and then turning up the volume. In this book, you will learn the career-changing tools she's developed over the past decade that make bragging feel easy, including: - Get remembered by focusing your personal brand and voice on key adjectives (like "effective, subtle, and edgy") - Practice explaining what you do in simple, sticky terms to earn respect and recognition from the public and people at work. - Eliminate words that undermine your work and find better ones--like your bio saying you're "trying" or "attempting" to do something instead that you ARE doing it. If you're ready to begin Bragging Better--to telling the truth about your accomplishments with grace and confidence--this book is for you.


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This effortless and unapologetic approach to self-promotion will manage your anxiety and allow you to champion yourself. Does talking about your accomplishments feel scary or icky because you're worried people will think you're "obnoxious"? Does it feel more natural to "put your head down and do the work"? Are you tired of watching the loudest people in your industry get This effortless and unapologetic approach to self-promotion will manage your anxiety and allow you to champion yourself. Does talking about your accomplishments feel scary or icky because you're worried people will think you're "obnoxious"? Does it feel more natural to "put your head down and do the work"? Are you tired of watching the loudest people in your industry get disproportionate praise and rewards? If you answered "yes" to any of the above, you might be self-sabotaging. You need to learn to Brag Better. Meredith Fineman has built a career working with "The Qualified Quiet": smart people who struggle to talk about themselves and thus go underestimated or unrecognized. Now, she shares the surefire and anxiety-proof strategies that have helped her clients effectively communicate their achievements and skillsets to others. Bragging Better doesn't require false bravado, talking over people, or pretending to be more qualified than you are. Instead, Fineman advocates finding quiet confidence in your opinions, abilities, and background, and then turning up the volume. In this book, you will learn the career-changing tools she's developed over the past decade that make bragging feel easy, including: - Get remembered by focusing your personal brand and voice on key adjectives (like "effective, subtle, and edgy") - Practice explaining what you do in simple, sticky terms to earn respect and recognition from the public and people at work. - Eliminate words that undermine your work and find better ones--like your bio saying you're "trying" or "attempting" to do something instead that you ARE doing it. If you're ready to begin Bragging Better--to telling the truth about your accomplishments with grace and confidence--this book is for you.

30 review for Brag Better: Master the Art of Fearless Self-Promotion

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Actually a very good and practical book. It has impacted my career quite a bit! I'm definitely one of the "Quiet Qualified" who do their work quietly, effectively, and efficiently - but what's the purpose if no one knows I'm doing it? Sure if I'm just cruising by no one needs to ear about that, but if I'm going above and beyond the call of duty I need to let it be known to my superiors of the value and impact my work is influencing. It's not bragging by stating facts of your accomplishments, it' Actually a very good and practical book. It has impacted my career quite a bit! I'm definitely one of the "Quiet Qualified" who do their work quietly, effectively, and efficiently - but what's the purpose if no one knows I'm doing it? Sure if I'm just cruising by no one needs to ear about that, but if I'm going above and beyond the call of duty I need to let it be known to my superiors of the value and impact my work is influencing. It's not bragging by stating facts of your accomplishments, it's when you say it and how you say it that matters. As women, most of us are humble and it's usually loud boastful men that comfortably take on the spot light and enjoy a nice ego boost (I'm generalizing). So we as women need to make a conscious effort (at least I do) to let it be known what you are doing. It's also good to brag about teammates but be careful of when and how you do it. In order to get a raise, or get a promotion we need to be masters at self promotion. We shouldn't feel embarrassed to self promote it's a part of life, it's how we get ahead. How can you ever get a promotion or a job interview wants to hire you if you can't iterate what you've accomplished. Own it, be proud of your accomplishments, be prepared to discuss them in advance. If others have a problem with you self promoting yourself it's most likely that they have issues with themselves. They don't believe that they can self promote or they don't want others self promoting because they feel too embarrassed to do it themselves so they don't want others to do it either.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ritu

    Insightful! Highly recommend. I stumbled across this book through nonfiction author Anne Janzer's site. Anne always recommends solid books, and so I picked this up. It sounded interesting. Like many women, I am a member of what Meredith calls the Qualified Quiet. I am also an introvert. As I have taken my creative work into the world, I have felt that tussle of learning how to manage feelings of discomfort and wishing to stay hidden to keep safe. But as I have gotten better at it, I have realize Insightful! Highly recommend. I stumbled across this book through nonfiction author Anne Janzer's site. Anne always recommends solid books, and so I picked this up. It sounded interesting. Like many women, I am a member of what Meredith calls the Qualified Quiet. I am also an introvert. As I have taken my creative work into the world, I have felt that tussle of learning how to manage feelings of discomfort and wishing to stay hidden to keep safe. But as I have gotten better at it, I have realized that real safety is in taking up space. This book will help you take up more space. I found it insightful, compassionate and conscientious. It's not one of those books that tell you how to " dominate the world." It's for those people who want to make a real impact, a real difference through their work. Bragging better is about claiming the space that is yours to claim instead of shrinking as a lot of quiet people and especially women often do. This book has actionable, ethical and thoughtful advice. I found it nuanced and I really liked the case that Meredith makes for bragging better -- If we don't want different aspects of the world to be taken over by the loud but unqualified, the Qualified Quiet does need to take up more space. I also really liked that this book had examples from all sorts of people and actually demonstrated the diversity in its examples --from people of color, LGBTQIA -- that most people and organizations just pay lip service to. Highly recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Colleen Nakanishi

    I think this book is fantastic for people who have their own business, personal brand, or want to be a public figure or influencer (though she cringes at the word). I pretty much gave this book a 3-star rating because I do not have or really want any of those things. I listened to the audiobook, which was wonderfully read by Meredith Fineman herself, but I pretty much tuned out (or even outright skipped) whenever she started talking about self-branding, public appearances/being on TV, or giving I think this book is fantastic for people who have their own business, personal brand, or want to be a public figure or influencer (though she cringes at the word). I pretty much gave this book a 3-star rating because I do not have or really want any of those things. I listened to the audiobook, which was wonderfully read by Meredith Fineman herself, but I pretty much tuned out (or even outright skipped) whenever she started talking about self-branding, public appearances/being on TV, or giving speeches. I did think that the parts that were applicable to me were well-written: bolstering your self-confidence, making a list of your accomplishments, asking for a raise, or dealing with people who don't appreciate your bragging. She did repeat herself A LOT, but maybe that was a strategy (she kinda talked about it at the end). Last, I appreciated that she addressed that she is a white, cis woman and made it a point to try to understand and help minorities.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsey

    Brag Better is a helpful book for the "qualified quiet." People who are very talented at their work but they don't effectively market themselves (via brags) to get recognition and increase their opportunities. Fineman advises how to brag by providing many easy actions and approaches. This book is focused on industry and entrepreneur scenarios but still lends useful advice for academics and scholars. Fineman often references Susan Cain's book "Quiet" (another book I loved) on introversion. Brag Better is a helpful book for the "qualified quiet." People who are very talented at their work but they don't effectively market themselves (via brags) to get recognition and increase their opportunities. Fineman advises how to brag by providing many easy actions and approaches. This book is focused on industry and entrepreneur scenarios but still lends useful advice for academics and scholars. Fineman often references Susan Cain's book "Quiet" (another book I loved) on introversion.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cara Moran

    There was a lot of fluff and filler in this book. It also felt more like a how-to on building a personal brand than a guide on communicating accomplishments effectively and fearlessly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    My wife (that's right Goodreads, I'm married now, get used to it) threw this book at me after we met up with a college friend of hers and I answered the question "what do you do?" with one of the biggest dud bombs of my life. 31 years of life has not made me any better at answering the question. If I never consciously work at deciding how I want to answer that question then it's very easy to imagine dying without ever having the right response. I do not blame her for passing this one to me that e My wife (that's right Goodreads, I'm married now, get used to it) threw this book at me after we met up with a college friend of hers and I answered the question "what do you do?" with one of the biggest dud bombs of my life. 31 years of life has not made me any better at answering the question. If I never consciously work at deciding how I want to answer that question then it's very easy to imagine dying without ever having the right response. I do not blame her for passing this one to me that evening, haha. The book is definitely directed toward a female audience, which doesn't mean anybody can't read it, but it made me feel a little sheepish digging through for tips as a straight white cis-male. Ah well, I still appreciate Fineman for sharing the knowledge with me and it's important to be reminded of the discrimination and disadvantages others faces so you can be more aware of personal bias and work as a professional ally. There's a ton of practical advice on how to present yourself professionally. Most of it comes down to practice and work on things that people expect are tics of one's nature, like being extroverted, confident, and well-spoken. My context for reading through is that I'm on a job-search for a new industry, specifically something writing focused like Technical Writing or UX Content Design. I feel like I have the tools and the capability sometimes, and sometimes I feel like a dolt. It's pretty normal to have those thoughts fighting for brain space. You just gotta work out the part that makes you feel good about yourself. Fineman took on a difficult subject for a book, which is trying to prep everybody up to achieve whatever goal they may have, which can be a million different things. I saw some other reviewers bring this up, but apparently she helps a lot of people get on TV and spends several paragraphs throughout most chapters describing how to best get and perform on TV. I...do not need to be on TV. I don't know what percentage of readers are picking this up to get a slot on the Today show, but hell if that's what you want, you'll find some pointers. Most books like this feel like they're done by absolutely wonderful columnists or presenters who decided a book wouldn't be a bad way to tick off another accolade or expand the brand. Nothing wrong with that, I wouldn't have been exposed to the Brag Better brand if there wasn't a print copy of a book out there, but these books often seem to run out of things to say after a few chapters. I felt like I might've actually been better served by an hour long presentation with a downloadable PDF at the end of it. It felt a tad front-loaded, so I skimmed through the later chapters. I do want to shout-out the three part structure that was used to divvy up the chapters, which at least seemed structurally clever to avoid seeming like it a front-loaded presentation with some afterthoughts at the end (although...still kind of felt that way!). The book made me want to work on my resume. Made me want to apply for some stuff and get rejected for kicks, like ask for a NASA internship or audition to be the next Captain America for the haha-factor and practice.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather Aaron

    I found this book to be written more with the corporate worker in mind. However, I still came away with actionable ideas that I can use to change the way I promote my own work and business. I'd recommend it to anyone who has trouble speaking about their accomplishments and who tend to shrink into the background when they're around loud people in a business setting. I found this book to be written more with the corporate worker in mind. However, I still came away with actionable ideas that I can use to change the way I promote my own work and business. I'd recommend it to anyone who has trouble speaking about their accomplishments and who tend to shrink into the background when they're around loud people in a business setting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    A badly written and outdated 'Lean In' wannabe. I really wanted to like this book. Unfortunately it really was a huge disappointment. I wouldn't even call it a book but rather a collection of essays loosely connected by excerpts of other people's work - all in quotation marks as if the author doesn't know how to paraphrase while giving credit. It seems to be intended for people who are insecure, anxious and jealous of others and the recognition they might get. It's also quite hard to relate to i A badly written and outdated 'Lean In' wannabe. I really wanted to like this book. Unfortunately it really was a huge disappointment. I wouldn't even call it a book but rather a collection of essays loosely connected by excerpts of other people's work - all in quotation marks as if the author doesn't know how to paraphrase while giving credit. It seems to be intended for people who are insecure, anxious and jealous of others and the recognition they might get. It's also quite hard to relate to if you don't work in a corporate environment. I selected two stars instead of one because the author shared several personal stories, making herself vulnerable, which can only be commended despite her poor writing style.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aude Hofleitner

    While I find the title still off-putting and the author argue that it shouldn't, the main message that I took out of this book is the importance of communicating facts about your achievements and aspirations in a succinct manner and to make sure that the communication reaches the relevant people. This is important in a world of information overload in which you can't expect people to know all the things that you have done if you don't tell them, you can't expect them to know your desires or goal While I find the title still off-putting and the author argue that it shouldn't, the main message that I took out of this book is the importance of communicating facts about your achievements and aspirations in a succinct manner and to make sure that the communication reaches the relevant people. This is important in a world of information overload in which you can't expect people to know all the things that you have done if you don't tell them, you can't expect them to know your desires or goals or know how they can best help. Parts of the book are very focused on people in communication, Public Relations and I found these sections less relevant (not everyone wants a gig on TV!) though a lot of the principles remain fairly general.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Orenstein

    Meredith Fineman makes self-promotion, personal branding, and networking feel utterly approachable and easy. I walked away from this book with an actionable list of tasks to take my public presence to the next level. Thank you, Meredith!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    It is hard to give a star review to a book like this, so I won’t. Either it will work for you, or it won’t. There are definitely pieces of this I will take with me, but a lot of it I found a little tricky to apply to my career.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erica W

    The ideas in this book could’ve been explained in one blog post. It was too corporate leaning for me, so it was hard to relate.

  13. 5 out of 5

    MariWabiSabi

    Skimmable in a couple of hours. Generally some good takeaways and common sense. I appreciate that this was written to help elevate women in general. Seems geared towards those in their early careers.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I’m not sure I want to or will ever master the art of self promotion, but the advice here was helpful. I also appreciated the ways she framed the advice as a feminist project.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Masatoshi Nishimura

    The book seems to target female audience. But I enjoyed it nevertheless. We need to keep track of what we are good at, and focus on the facts when talking about accomplishment. That's the gist of bragging better. The later chapter sounded more like social media personal branding strategy. I do notice many of the influencers on Twitter (or any other) are also amazing braggers. Those chapters gave me the language to describe what they were doing. Overall, it may be too much for some. For others, i The book seems to target female audience. But I enjoyed it nevertheless. We need to keep track of what we are good at, and focus on the facts when talking about accomplishment. That's the gist of bragging better. The later chapter sounded more like social media personal branding strategy. I do notice many of the influencers on Twitter (or any other) are also amazing braggers. Those chapters gave me the language to describe what they were doing. Overall, it may be too much for some. For others, it is a handy book from resume building to promotion negotiation.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Josephine Katlyn

    Packed with great info. Read, and now going back to each chapter to get to work!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Ann

    I first heard Meredith on Natch Beaut and really enjoyed her rapport with Jackie. This book lived up to & even exceeded my expectations. Meredith is likable & knowledgable and I would definitely recommend this book to any of my friends struggling to advocate for themselves professionally.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Wendi

    Some nuggets of good information that the author repeats, using different words, until the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

    Poor. What could have been written in an article is needlessly expanded into a full book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Searway

    The first part of the book was very helpful and insightful. The other two parts are probably best for people who want to be writers, speakers, etc.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Seemed repetitive and shallow to me so not a great example of effective self-promotion.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    It took me ages to read this book. So bussinessy… some cool tricks are hidden in between those ceo-admiring pages though.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jim Tincher

    Did not finish. It's general stuff, and is more about those who have a severe challenge with talking about themselves. Did not finish. It's general stuff, and is more about those who have a severe challenge with talking about themselves.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Gregp

    3 out of 10

  25. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Wallace

    I added this book on Audible for 3 reasons: 1. I’m terrible at bragging. Either I don’t say anything at all about my accomplishments or in an exasperated attempt for authority, I brag obnoxiously, through sarcasm. 2. I had Audible credits. 3. I’m starting a business where I help people brag better about themselves, I may as well get some tips on doing it for myself. First of all, I don’t like the word “brag.” To me, it has a negative connotation. Cringe, roll my eyes, and mutter something like “here I added this book on Audible for 3 reasons: 1. I’m terrible at bragging. Either I don’t say anything at all about my accomplishments or in an exasperated attempt for authority, I brag obnoxiously, through sarcasm. 2. I had Audible credits. 3. I’m starting a business where I help people brag better about themselves, I may as well get some tips on doing it for myself. First of all, I don’t like the word “brag.” To me, it has a negative connotation. Cringe, roll my eyes, and mutter something like “here we go.” So to me, that was a HUGE sign that I needed to completely change my mindset around bragging. There is no second of all. This book is not only a guide toward punch-kicking that mental demon that says “Who do you think you are?” when you try to brag about something. She also offers VERY practical tips on HOW to brag appropriately, at the right time, and effectively. (HINT: It’s not starting your sentences with “I hate to brag but…” or “Shameless self promotion…”) Here are the 5 top things I’ve learned in this book: 1. Tips to develop my personal brand. 2. How to pitch potential clients 3. How to succinctly introduce myself to people in different roles in different businesses in a way that’s not either completely confusing, too over the top, or wayyyy too humble. 4. I still cringe at the word “brag” but I’m working on that. 5. Reframing failures as learning opportunities and celebrating negative comments as “hey! I was noticed and they took the time to actually read, listen to, or watch my content. Yay!) The biggest thing I’m afraid of as I start this business, is rejection. So I really liked her take on it. I may have gotten the Audible book for the low, low price of “included with my Audible membership” but I bought the printed book as well. This book is way too good of a reference guide to not have a copy on my shelf. If you’re struggling with promoting your achievements or even celebrating your wins, this book is for you. Also, you could come talk to me, I’m the best at celebrating other people. :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    I hated this book for several reasons. First, it combines the rhetoric of several of my least favorite discourses, airhead business writing and social justice warriors. In a first, Fineman manages to take the worst writing and speaking of country club Republicans and a left wing Democrats and combine them into a single, hotmess. In one sentence, Fineman is writing with all the finesse of a third-rate management theorist, and in another she is using virtue-signalling words like "empowerment" and I hated this book for several reasons. First, it combines the rhetoric of several of my least favorite discourses, airhead business writing and social justice warriors. In a first, Fineman manages to take the worst writing and speaking of country club Republicans and a left wing Democrats and combine them into a single, hotmess. In one sentence, Fineman is writing with all the finesse of a third-rate management theorist, and in another she is using virtue-signalling words like "empowerment" and "justice." Those left and right wing rhetorics are mixed in with this...I don't know how to describe it...raraism...cheerleaderism. You are great, you are amazing and everything you do is wonderful...come on, I am sometimes an idiot, stop giving me this half-baked millennial helicopter parent routine. Admit that not everything that I do is amazing. Second, so much of this book felt like hotair, information that was as useful to my mind as cotton candy is to nutrition. Fineman hardly makes any helpful points. Third, she is frequently quoting other people. This is a sign that she is not secure in what she is saying. It is the kind of thing that second-rate journalists do. Fourth, there is some false advertising in this book. She claims that she is going to teach you to "brag better." In fact, much of this book (and her consulting work, apparently) is just focused on getting women to brag at all, not to improve their bragging. That is fine, but, at least, be honest and open about what you are doing. No where in the Publisher's Summary does it say anything about this being specifically for women. But this is a book for women who want someone to enable them to brag. People (i.e. men/assholes) who are not afraid to brag but want to do it better have no need to touch this book. Made it 13% of the way through the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Britney

    This was an interesting read. I was drawn to this book because I tend to have a difficult time talking about my accomplishments, making myself sound good in cover letters/interviews, and being my own best advocate. This was a quick read, and overall I found it encouraging. There were a few practical examples, but if anything, I would have liked to see even more examples, especially from various industries/jobs. Fineman definitely has lots of experience in her field and I appreciated her expertis This was an interesting read. I was drawn to this book because I tend to have a difficult time talking about my accomplishments, making myself sound good in cover letters/interviews, and being my own best advocate. This was a quick read, and overall I found it encouraging. There were a few practical examples, but if anything, I would have liked to see even more examples, especially from various industries/jobs. Fineman definitely has lots of experience in her field and I appreciated her expertise in marketing/PR. But I would have also liked to see examples from people with retail jobs, who own small businesses, work as school teachers, etc. There seemed to be more of a focus on corporate publicity. I still found the info useful, but it's a little outside of my usual experiences. I appreciated how this book made me think. I think a major element of this book was encouraging a change of perception and mindset. This book acts as a type of pep talk and, while it probably could have gone a little deeper in areas, I think this book is a great motivator.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    I added this book to my Audible queue awhile ago, hesitating to start it because I thought I might be judged for reading something with “Brag” in the title. Therein lay my problem. This book was a much-needed pep talk for someone like me, who author Meredith Fineman refers to as “The Qualified Quiet.” Through her encouragement, examples, and instructions, this book empowered me to see my voice in a new light. I imagine that I’ll return to Brag Better to implement its methodology, but I’ve already I added this book to my Audible queue awhile ago, hesitating to start it because I thought I might be judged for reading something with “Brag” in the title. Therein lay my problem. This book was a much-needed pep talk for someone like me, who author Meredith Fineman refers to as “The Qualified Quiet.” Through her encouragement, examples, and instructions, this book empowered me to see my voice in a new light. I imagine that I’ll return to Brag Better to implement its methodology, but I’ve already experienced instant results, including securing a speaking engagement, purely from being inspired by Fineman’s message. Creating positive change in our world hinges on our ability to communicate effectively. And you don’t need to be a brand or a personality to make an impact. If you are open to growing and are willing to answer your personal calling, this book is for you.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne Janzer

    As someone who has spent most of her life as a card-carrying member of the Qualified Quiet, I find the advice in Brag Better invaluable. Fineman gets to the heart of a problem that many people face, particularly women: not knowing how to talk about their own accomplishments in a way that others need to hear. The book includes plenty of stories as well as practical advice. If the idea of “bragging” gives you the heebie-jeebies, take her advice about bragging on behalf of others, and finding a bud As someone who has spent most of her life as a card-carrying member of the Qualified Quiet, I find the advice in Brag Better invaluable. Fineman gets to the heart of a problem that many people face, particularly women: not knowing how to talk about their own accomplishments in a way that others need to hear. The book includes plenty of stories as well as practical advice. If the idea of “bragging” gives you the heebie-jeebies, take her advice about bragging on behalf of others, and finding a buddy. And then pay attention to what she says at the end: “Raise your voice because others cannot. Raise your voice because it is your duty to others whose voices can’t be heard or aren’t allowed to be used.” (I read a pre-released version of the book courtesy of NetGalley.)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lily Nussbaum

    I wouldn't say I stepped away from this book being fully ready to promote myself in every way, shape or form, but I surely stepped away being able to write about my accomplishments, recognize my talents, and boost myself and others in ways I hadn't considered. I truly love Fineman's assertions that there is a place for everyone to self promote (and no need for competition!) and that we aren't all good at the same things. Growing up in a society that wants us to be well-rounded, I think it can al I wouldn't say I stepped away from this book being fully ready to promote myself in every way, shape or form, but I surely stepped away being able to write about my accomplishments, recognize my talents, and boost myself and others in ways I hadn't considered. I truly love Fineman's assertions that there is a place for everyone to self promote (and no need for competition!) and that we aren't all good at the same things. Growing up in a society that wants us to be well-rounded, I think it can always help to have a reminder that sometimes it is more helpful to focus on what we are best at and rely on others to help in areas we aren't as great at. This is a fantastic testament not only to self-promotion, but to boosting others. I would recommend this to all women starting in their careers or farther along. It is a must-read.

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