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Your Life Has Been Delayed

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Past and present, friends and crushes collide in a YA debut about a girl who takes off on a flight and lands 25 years later. Jenny Waters boards her flight in 1995, but when she lands, she and the other passengers are told they disappeared . . . 25 years ago. Everyone thought they were dead. Now contending with her family and friends fast-forwarding decades, Jenny must quick Past and present, friends and crushes collide in a YA debut about a girl who takes off on a flight and lands 25 years later. Jenny Waters boards her flight in 1995, but when she lands, she and the other passengers are told they disappeared . . . 25 years ago. Everyone thought they were dead. Now contending with her family and friends fast-forwarding decades, Jenny must quickly adjust to smartphones and social media while being the biggest story to hit the internet. She feels betrayed by her once-best friend and fights her attraction to a cute boy with an uncomfortable connection to her past. Meanwhile, there’s a growing group of conspiracy theorists determined to prove the whole situation is a hoax. Will Jenny figure out how to move forward, or will she always be stuck in the past?


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Past and present, friends and crushes collide in a YA debut about a girl who takes off on a flight and lands 25 years later. Jenny Waters boards her flight in 1995, but when she lands, she and the other passengers are told they disappeared . . . 25 years ago. Everyone thought they were dead. Now contending with her family and friends fast-forwarding decades, Jenny must quick Past and present, friends and crushes collide in a YA debut about a girl who takes off on a flight and lands 25 years later. Jenny Waters boards her flight in 1995, but when she lands, she and the other passengers are told they disappeared . . . 25 years ago. Everyone thought they were dead. Now contending with her family and friends fast-forwarding decades, Jenny must quickly adjust to smartphones and social media while being the biggest story to hit the internet. She feels betrayed by her once-best friend and fights her attraction to a cute boy with an uncomfortable connection to her past. Meanwhile, there’s a growing group of conspiracy theorists determined to prove the whole situation is a hoax. Will Jenny figure out how to move forward, or will she always be stuck in the past?

30 review for Your Life Has Been Delayed

  1. 4 out of 5

    emma

    So maybe I've never gotten on a flight and landed thirty years later, like this girl, but I have lost a year of my early twenties to a pandemic-related lockdown so it feels about the same. Just kidding. Also get vaccinated. This was just...whatever. It felt about one to two hundred pages too long. The romance icked me out so bad my shoulders were around my ears in a defensive cringe positioning for at least half of the aforementioned too-many pages. The characters were in a firm second place to th So maybe I've never gotten on a flight and landed thirty years later, like this girl, but I have lost a year of my early twenties to a pandemic-related lockdown so it feels about the same. Just kidding. Also get vaccinated. This was just...whatever. It felt about one to two hundred pages too long. The romance icked me out so bad my shoulders were around my ears in a defensive cringe positioning for at least half of the aforementioned too-many pages. The characters were in a firm second place to the plotline. I've only seen fifteen-second clips of the show Manifest, but here's what I got: Like the show Manifest, this is about a flight that goes missing in the air, with minutes passing for the passengers and years passing for everyone else. Also like the show Manifest, it was not my cup of tea. Bottom line: Too much pseudo science in my YA contemporary! --------------- tbr review uh, you're telling me, title! --------------- challenging myself to read as many review copies as possible this month because i'm addicted to projects! ARC 1: spaceman of bohemia ARC 2: in search of us ARC 3: aerialists ARC 4: the sound of drowning ARC 5: unleaving ARC 6: the other side of luck ARC 7: romanov ARC 8: the storm keeper's island ARC 9: gut check ARC 10: when force meets fate ARC 11: sisters in hate ARC 12: before i disappear ARC 13: big time ARC 14: stolen science ARC 15: have a little faith in me ARC 16: invitation to a bonfire ARC 17: the splendor ARC 18: how to be luminous ARC 19: the little women cookbook ARC 20: while we were dating ARC 21: the lost girls ARC 22: wait for it ARC 23: your life has been delayed

  2. 5 out of 5

    Namera [The Literary Invertebrate]

    ⤅ The way this fascinating premise has been DESTROYED and turned into an angsty, plot-less romantic soap opera is practically criminal. So, the heroine - 17-year-old Jenny Waters - goes missing in 1995, while flying on a plane between New York and St Louis. (Apparently that's in Missouri, which is one of those states that feels like it's been made up. The fact that the author gives zero place description doesn't help). When she touches down, she discovers that her three-hour flight been 25 ye ⤅ The way this fascinating premise has been DESTROYED and turned into an angsty, plot-less romantic soap opera is practically criminal. So, the heroine - 17-year-old Jenny Waters - goes missing in 1995, while flying on a plane between New York and St Louis. (Apparently that's in Missouri, which is one of those states that feels like it's been made up. The fact that the author gives zero place description doesn't help). When she touches down, she discovers that her three-hour flight been 25 years, and it's now 2020. Her parents are old, her 12-year-old brother Bradley is now in his 30s, and half her grandparents dead. Oh, and her best friend has married her boyfriend and birthed the worryingly attractive Dylan. Sounds amazing, right? But unfortunately, we get treated to a slew of issues, including: ❌ A really unlikeable heroine. Jenny is shallow AF, and we quickly discover that she develops prejudices against people based on what they look like. For instance, when she first meets her seatmate Art, his pockmarked face immediately puts her off him, and later she thinks that he could never be a romantic prospect for her because of the way he looks (especially compared to perfect blond Dylan). And when she sees her brother's wife Kelly for the first time, you know what Jenny's reflexive response is? 'You're black?!' Yes, that's literally her response. What the actual hell? She disappeared in 1995, not 1955! Black people being with white people surely doesn't warrant that level of shock? I mean, that was before I was born, so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. ❌ A 'romance' which is, again, shallow AF. I don't actually care that it's with the son of the man who was Jenny's boyfriend when she disappeared, because they never even kissed. But I do care that it feels like the only reason Jenny even likes Dylan is because he looks recognisable to her (i.e. like his dad Steve) and because he's vaguely nice to her. There's absolutely no stronger basis to it than that. And later on you discover that he knows some things about her which, frankly, makes the romance between them come across as a little bit creepy. ❌ At the end, a vague thriller-type plot has been stuffed in. It's boring, badly written, and appears so late in the book as to be irrelevant. The majority of the book deals with Jenny's dumb romance with Dylan, with small portions relating to patching things up with Angie. I'm going to stop there, because I'd much rather go and review a book I actually enjoyed now. But this only gets 2 stars because I managed to finish it, and I'm still impressed at how a fabulous-sounding premise was so badly botched.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    this title reminds me of the "you've been stopped" vine ******* sounds like An Absolutely Remarkable Thing but hopefully better | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram this title reminds me of the "you've been stopped" vine ******* sounds like An Absolutely Remarkable Thing but hopefully better | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Jenny Waters has just gone forward in time -- 25 years! She got on a plane in NYC in 1995 and landed in St. Louis in 2020. Talk about jet lag! This book has some sci-fi, some social media angst, a little romance, and a lot of heart. It was such a fun read. Cultural references abound for the 90's and up to the present. There are some apt comparisons to "Back In Time," one of my favorite movies, as well as plugs for the Hunger Games series. At one point in the midst of her learning curve with soci Jenny Waters has just gone forward in time -- 25 years! She got on a plane in NYC in 1995 and landed in St. Louis in 2020. Talk about jet lag! This book has some sci-fi, some social media angst, a little romance, and a lot of heart. It was such a fun read. Cultural references abound for the 90's and up to the present. There are some apt comparisons to "Back In Time," one of my favorite movies, as well as plugs for the Hunger Games series. At one point in the midst of her learning curve with social media, Jenny compares it to Telephone on steroids. Well said, Jenny, well said. Thank you to Bloomsbury YA and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish

    Being a 90s kid, I thought that this story of a girl who gets on a plane and steps off 25 years later would be a fun romp, but I was caught off guard by how emotionally raw the story is, as Jenny tries to come to terms with the death of her grandparents, and the potential to lose her own parents years earlier than she ever expected. Although this borders the sci-fi genre, this story feels more like a contemporary, with a side of romance. Jenny's fellow passengers offered her a safe space as they Being a 90s kid, I thought that this story of a girl who gets on a plane and steps off 25 years later would be a fun romp, but I was caught off guard by how emotionally raw the story is, as Jenny tries to come to terms with the death of her grandparents, and the potential to lose her own parents years earlier than she ever expected. Although this borders the sci-fi genre, this story feels more like a contemporary, with a side of romance. Jenny's fellow passengers offered her a safe space as they too, tried to deal with everything that had changed around them, losing family and partners to time. Jenny's heartbreak felt very real, but not over her boyfriend Steve but her best friend, Angie, who is now in her 40s with two children Jenny's age. They cannot be in the same place every again and it was brutal to see Jenny looking for those glimpses of her friend in this much changed woman. This was my most anticipated read this September and it did not let me down! I can't wait to see what Michelle does next, and this has got me really craving some books set fully in the 90s - this is all leading up to me digging out my many copies of Point Horror, I can feel it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I received an ARC from Bloomsbury in exchange for an honest review. Spoiler-free thoughts can be read here: https://twincitiesgeek.com/2021/09/yo... I was actually looking forward to this one, and I’m astounded at how disappointed I am at how the final product turned out. This is a mess of petty arguments, selfish reasoning, and sci-fi elements tacked on to try and detract from the meaningless drama. I know this is the author’s first book, but…wow. This could have done with more edits and more re I received an ARC from Bloomsbury in exchange for an honest review. Spoiler-free thoughts can be read here: https://twincitiesgeek.com/2021/09/yo... I was actually looking forward to this one, and I’m astounded at how disappointed I am at how the final product turned out. This is a mess of petty arguments, selfish reasoning, and sci-fi elements tacked on to try and detract from the meaningless drama. I know this is the author’s first book, but…wow. This could have done with more edits and more revisions. THINGS I LIKED •The support group scenes were easily the best and most well-written of the entire book. Everyone had different challenges to face, like getting married to their now-older fiancé or grieving for lost loved ones, and the group dynamic felt natural and a genuinely positive part of Jenny’s new life. I really wish the book had focused more on this, maybe even having Jenny connect more with other members outside of meetings, because it would have been far more interesting than Jenny’s relationship drama. •Jenny’s niece and nephew were cute…what little we saw of them. •The subplot about Walter wanting to go back to 1995 and thinking the plane would take him there was unintentionally hilarious. It was so melodramatic, I couldn’t not laugh at how outlandish it got. THINGS THAT MADE ME GO “HUH?” •Jenny’s family and friends keeping secrets from her got way out of hand. I understand wanting to ease her into things, but deliberately refusing to let her research or know Angie wrote a book about her was not okay. Angie asked for Jenny to be kept in the dark about it, so it really wasn’t about protecting Jenny at all, it was about Angie not being able to face the consequences of her actions and choosing to tiptoe around them until it blew up in her face. What kind of best friend does that? •Jenny’s heartbreak over Steve felt a little forced? I could understand if she’d dated him for longer and they’d actually been exclusive, but it sounds like they were at the very beginning stages of a relationship, and her outrage at Angie “stealing” her boyfriend didn’t make much sense to me. Maybe I’m unable to get into the mind of a teenager, but it’s not like they did it with the intention of hurting her, and I think that’s what bothered me the most: Jenny was convinced the world was out to get her (and to be fair, it was at times), so everything she finds out was done to deliberately ruin her life. •Jojo was way too salty about being named after Jenny. Her personality was made up of spite and her “turn around” at the end didn’t feel genuine after she was so bratty before. •The casual racism in this book was so misplaced. Jenny can be surprised that her brother married a Black woman, but to say out loud, “You’re Black?” Why would you do that? What was the point? And I’m not saying Ashling Chan had a vaguely racist name, but she kind of had a vaguely racist name, and it didn’t help that she was a bully. •Speaking of Ashling, why was she so hellbent on being awful to Jenny? She had no reason to dislike Jenny as much as she did and her sole purpose of being in the story was to be a huge bitch and screw with Jenny’s life. She was a literal Dhar Mann villain with no emotional depth and she made me rage every time I saw her name. •Jenny just wasn’t that likable or relatable. She was just kind of there and happened to like writing and being nosey. I didn’t feel invested in her personal growth at all, and I’m not sure she even made that much progress by the end of the novel. •Dylan was okay, but he and Jenny had no chemistry. At all. Their interactions felt more friendly than anything, and their romance felt underdeveloped and forced. •WALTER BELIEVING PATROL COULD SEND HIM BACK TO 1995. WHY WAS THIS SO SILLY? WHAT WAS THE POINT? This ties back into wanting to see more of the support group, because his shift into a conspiracy theorist and his pitiful desperation had hardly any build-up. I’m still torn about whether or not I enjoyed this part, because while it did make me laugh, it wasn’t intended to do so. NITPICK CORNER •I don’t ever want to hear about bird sex ever again. It doesn’t have the humorous impact you think it does, Michelle I. Mason. •There were so many needless descriptions and interruptions in the dialogue that propelled a lot of this into Telling, meaning Showing was pushed to the side in favor of overly explaining how someone was feeling (because I wouldn’t understand by body language, I needed my hand to be held the entire time). This needed at least one more round of edits for stuff like that, because as a result, the novel felt juvenile and messy. I just don’t even know what else to say. This could have been poignant and sweet, but it was unfocused and annoying and a huge letdown. If you want more Manifest, just rewatch it and pretend this doesn’t exist.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus High school junior Jenny Waters is visiting her grandparents in New York City in 1995. She hopes to convince her parents to let her go to journalism school there to get out of her Missouri suburb. When the plane is due to land, however, there are problems. The control tower has no information about the flight. When they are finally allowed to land, everyone on board discovers that it is now 2020, and their plane disappeared without a trace 25 years previously. Jen E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus High school junior Jenny Waters is visiting her grandparents in New York City in 1995. She hopes to convince her parents to let her go to journalism school there to get out of her Missouri suburb. When the plane is due to land, however, there are problems. The control tower has no information about the flight. When they are finally allowed to land, everyone on board discovers that it is now 2020, and their plane disappeared without a trace 25 years previously. Jenny's parents are missionaries and are out of the country, but her younger brother, Bradley, comes to pick her up... but he's now 43 years old, married, and has two children! He has thought for the whole time that she, like everyone else on the plane, was dead. Clearly, there are a lot of changes that have occurred during the missing time, and these are hard for Jenny to swallow. Her grandparents in New York are dead, and her grandmother is in a nursing facility. Her parents are retired. Worst of all, her best friend, Angie, has two children of her own, and her husband is quite a surprise! Not only that, but to deal with her grief, she wrote a book about Jenny after she graduated from college. This is just one of the many things that Jenny's family tries to keep from her. Despite being thrown 25 years into the future, Jenny wants to get back to her regularly scheduled life, and starts back to school to finish her senior year. She was going to be editor of the newspaper, and the newspaper advisor is still the same teacher Jenny had, so she makes her co-editor with Ashling, who is not happy about it and bristles at Jenny's notoriety. The only one who treats Jenny like a normal high school kid is Dylan, Angie's son, who calmly explains things like cell phones and social media to her. His twin sister, JoJo (named after Jenny), won't even talk to Jenny. With her parents trying to shield her from everything, and kids at school treating her differently, Jenny is glad when the passengers and crew put together a support group. There's a lot to talk about, from scientists trying to test their blood, to an organization called PATROL that is trying to claim that the reemergence of the flight is a hoax. The people in the group, from Art, a talkative college student to the 80 year old Mr. and Mrs. Spring, don't really care WHY they are not in 1995. They just all need to figure out how their lives will go forward, and don't have much patience with the media that is trying to destroy them. When PATROL claims to know a way for the group to return to 1995, will Jenny and the others think about returning, or will they embrace their new reality? Strengths: The most brilliant part of this was the general air of the 1990s that pervaded this book. It's like Ms. Mason read a chapter of The Face on the Milk Carton every morning before writing! The overprotective parents, the predominately white, middle class cast, the overwrought but sweet romance with Dylan, and the fact that Jenny is a junior in high school and won't drink at parties all would be right at home in a young adult novel from this era. The comments about the mall being "an institution", is school starting so early in August because "Did they move Labor Day?", and not wanting to "waste hours on the computer" when she could actually call her friends are also brilliant. It's okay that we never get a good explanation for what happened, and all I could think about after reading this was what if someone had flown in 1965 and returned in 1990? At least Jenny used computers to lay out the newspaper. What would it be like for a character to go from typewriters to primitive cell phones? Weaknesses: While I understand the subplot with PATROL, and the government intervention on a creepy level is completely in line with books from the 1990s, it somehow didn't grab my interest. What I really think: I love time travel books, and most of those travel back in time. This was a really fantastic trip into the "future", with a lot of interesting homages to the 1990s. And yes, I could have been one of the teachers that Jenny had in both time periods. Ouch! This will be hugely popular with some of my readers who love YA romances, even though it is speculative fiction.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamie (The Perpetual Page-Turner)

    This sounds exactly like the premise of the show Manifest -- which I loved for like 2 seasons and then it didn't appeal to me anymore because it got too convoluted. Regardless, I like the premise so excited for this one. This sounds exactly like the premise of the show Manifest -- which I loved for like 2 seasons and then it didn't appeal to me anymore because it got too convoluted. Regardless, I like the premise so excited for this one.

  9. 5 out of 5

    lily ✿

    [2.5 stars] when i read the inside cover of this book, it struck me that it was remarkably similar to the concept for the show manifest: a group of people get on a plane, but at the end of their trip, they find that they’ve haven’t reached quite the destination they thought they would…instead, they’ve accidentally time-traveled 25 years into the future. (in this case, landing in 2020. luckily without the pandemic, because that truly would’ve been a travesty.) in the author’s notes at the end, tho [2.5 stars] when i read the inside cover of this book, it struck me that it was remarkably similar to the concept for the show manifest: a group of people get on a plane, but at the end of their trip, they find that they’ve haven’t reached quite the destination they thought they would…instead, they’ve accidentally time-traveled 25 years into the future. (in this case, landing in 2020. luckily without the pandemic, because that truly would’ve been a travesty.) in the author’s notes at the end, though, i learned that she had the idea for this story before the announcement of the show, so i feel so sorry for her 😭 as for the book itself: we’ve got a fascinating concept explored. there are all sorts of repercussions to accidental time-travel. for one, the world has experienced countless events and upgraded in technology so as to become unrecognizable. not to mention every former family member and friend - they had to deal with the loss of their loved ones, and grieve over them after enough time had passed that they simply had to assume they were dead. some of their own loved ones died, others moved on in unexpected ways, and some coping mechanisms (i.e. publishing a book including all of their personal details) greatly affect the newcomers to the twenty-first century. jenny finds herself catapulted into fame, as the youngest and most-watched member of the flight. mostly, she wants to resume life as normal, and for the most part she does: moves back in with her (significantly older) parents, goes back to high school, etc. her dream is to be a reporter, but that being said, she isn’t all that perceptive. it’s startlingly easy to keep secrets from her, and she makes incorrect assumptions several times throughout the book. she also acts sort of childish for her age, falling into big emotional breakdowns every time those secrets are revealed. the worst part of the story - spoiler alert ahead - is that her love interest is, get this, the son of her best friend and ex-boyfriend (who she had been dating before she disappeared.) absolutely wild. that being said, i didn’t hate the book, and it was an interesting idea to explore. what would you do if you found that your little brother was now older than you (and a father??)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Linda Williams Jackson

    YOUR LIFE HAS BEEN DELAYED did not disappoint! It has a clever premise and a well-crafted plot. I LOVED it. I loved all the little surprises that Jenny had to face, and I loved hearing the stories of the people in the support group (a few others from the plane). So intriguing! I could totally put myself in their shoes and feel what it might be like to remember everything and everyone from just a week ago (or three hours, really) while they had all advanced by 25 years. Thanks to NetGalley for the YOUR LIFE HAS BEEN DELAYED did not disappoint! It has a clever premise and a well-crafted plot. I LOVED it. I loved all the little surprises that Jenny had to face, and I loved hearing the stories of the people in the support group (a few others from the plane). So intriguing! I could totally put myself in their shoes and feel what it might be like to remember everything and everyone from just a week ago (or three hours, really) while they had all advanced by 25 years. Thanks to NetGalley for the early read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Oyinda

    Book 212 of 2021 3.5/3.75 🌟 Many thanks to Bloomsbury YA for my review copy of this book via Netgalley! This was such a compulsive read, I couldn't put it down and I just had to keep reading for most of the book. I was scoping netgalley for books and came across the blurb and oh my! I knew I had to read it and gratefully, I don't regret my decision. I am a conspiracy theorist at heart, so a book about a plane that disappears only to land 25 years in the future is right up my alley. This started out Book 212 of 2021 3.5/3.75 🌟 Many thanks to Bloomsbury YA for my review copy of this book via Netgalley! This was such a compulsive read, I couldn't put it down and I just had to keep reading for most of the book. I was scoping netgalley for books and came across the blurb and oh my! I knew I had to read it and gratefully, I don't regret my decision. I am a conspiracy theorist at heart, so a book about a plane that disappears only to land 25 years in the future is right up my alley. This started out so well and on such a high. The premise was so intriguing too. Jenny Waters is the MC, a 17 year old girl who went to visit her grandparents in New York in the summer of 95. She gets on a plane back and when they land, she along with the rest of the plane discovers that they're in 2020. This is a YA book that's heavy on the YA. Against the backdrop of everything that's going on with the plane we still get to see Jenny be a teen, go to school, be petty and childish, and fall in love. There are so many culture shocks with Jenny experiences when she sees/discovers things like iPhones, flat screen TVs, social media, and the internet for the first time. This book was so so funny. I couldn't stop laughing at some parts. The writing was so witty especially at the beginning when Jenny was learning about new things in 2020. On the other hand as well, there's the serious aspect to the plane appearing 25 years later. The FBI is involved, the life everyone left isn't what they met, lots of their family and friends are dead, there are politicians and conspiracy theorists trying to find out what exactly happened. How is this possible? I, too, was invested in the science of it all - how did it happen? What's the explanation? I wish we had gotten more science during the course of the book. At a certain mark the book just delved into YA contemporary, with the high school, teen rivalry, and the romance. Jenny was very childish if I'm being honest. She kept getting mad and acting out over the tiniest things and things that aren't even justifiable to be mad at. I had a lot of questions at the end of this book. The main goal for picking up this book - the airplane disappearance -i wasn't satisfied by how the author closed that out. Lots of things were left in the air but we also got closure to a lot of the plot points so I'm thankful for that. This was such a fun read and I would definitely recommend it!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lea

    Your Life Has Been Delayed is a cute YA Contemporary novel with a time travel twist. That premise is super intriguing! The story pacing is a bit slow, but I found it picked up after a few certain plot points got ironed out and weren't consistently repeated, glazed over, or withheld because of protecting Jenny. There is just a hint of romance which was a nice touch, but not really necessary. With the amount of characters in the book, I found them all fairly well fleshed out (all the important detai Your Life Has Been Delayed is a cute YA Contemporary novel with a time travel twist. That premise is super intriguing! The story pacing is a bit slow, but I found it picked up after a few certain plot points got ironed out and weren't consistently repeated, glazed over, or withheld because of protecting Jenny. There is just a hint of romance which was a nice touch, but not really necessary. With the amount of characters in the book, I found them all fairly well fleshed out (all the important details touched on), but I really would've loved to have gotten more depth into the lives of Jenny's friends and family. An overall enjoyable read that's very heavy on the YA side as Jenny navigates her teenage life in a new time period with all the ups and downs. Thank you to Bloomsbury YA for the ARC to read and honestly review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paula Phillips

    This YA read's story had me intrigued as I love time travel novels. For those who have watched the TV show Manifest, then you will get the gist of this book as it was very similar in storylines without the characters getting weird powers like in the TV show and unlike the TV show which is 5 years gap - this book is 25 years. The book started with 17-year-old Jenny heading to New York to check out Columbia and then the next thing she knows, her plane is landing but it is now 2020 and when she lef This YA read's story had me intrigued as I love time travel novels. For those who have watched the TV show Manifest, then you will get the gist of this book as it was very similar in storylines without the characters getting weird powers like in the TV show and unlike the TV show which is 5 years gap - this book is 25 years. The book started with 17-year-old Jenny heading to New York to check out Columbia and then the next thing she knows, her plane is landing but it is now 2020 and when she left for her three hours ago it was the year 1995. Realistically she should be in her late 40's but of course, she is still her 17-year-old self, and she and the rest of the flight who haven't aged now have to find themselves and reintegrate into the present. Jenny's life has changed drastically as she has had her family die, her younger brother is now in his late 30's and married with two children and to make matters worse her best friend and her boyfriend at the time have both moved on with their lives and created new ones. Can Jenny find her way back into this world, especially when even technology has changed drastically and her whole career choice in newspapers is seen as dead since the world is all about online journalism? This book did make me think about what it would be like if we were suddenly catapulted into the future? Would we be able to pick it up? The only thing I wasn't keen on in this story was that the character of Jenny seemed younger than her 17-year-old self and her parents babied her quite a bit which made her a naive character. In parts, when we saw glimpses of her old self and present, it did make me wonder if Jenny had or was on the Autism/Aspergers spectrum. If she did, then the protectiveness and naivety would make sense for the story. If not, then JFC gives Jenny some space and let her grow up and make her own decisions people. Your Life has been delayed by Michelle I Mason is the perfect read for those who enjoyed Manifest and Jay Asher's The Future of Us.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Just in time for Manifest's 828 Day Resurrection, we have a lovely YA offering in the same vein. And it did not disappoint! Your Life Has Been Delayed follows mid-90s kid Jenny, who is on her way home from visiting her grandparents in New York. Only, whoopsie, her plane takes a little detour and winds up in 2020. You can imagine how jarring that would be, on many levels! Jenny has to try You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Just in time for Manifest's 828 Day Resurrection, we have a lovely YA offering in the same vein. And it did not disappoint! Your Life Has Been Delayed follows mid-90s kid Jenny, who is on her way home from visiting her grandparents in New York. Only, whoopsie, her plane takes a little detour and winds up in 2020. You can imagine how jarring that would be, on many levels! Jenny has to try to navigate a lot here. Not only is her personal life a mess, but she has to deal with authorities who flat out do not believe that her plane is from 1995. Add to it, the world has changed a lot since then, and Jenny's never even seen a cell phone, let alone used one. My point is, it's a lot. The initial changes she encounters are predictable, I suppose. Her baby brother is now decades older than her, with a wife and kids of his own. Her parents are now basically elderly, and all but one of her grandparents are dead. And that is just the tip of the iceberg! It's a really wholesome and heart warming story about Jenny finding her identity after hers has kind of been stripped away by time. She's forced to do all this while navigating a new world, and vastly different relationships with the loved ones she left behind. And for Jenny, she's seen these people only days ago, while for them it has been twenty-five years. I really loved watching Jenny take back control over her life, even as so many seem dead set on making it hard. Bottom Line: It's fascinating, thought-provoking, and just a genuinely uplifting story about finding the power to overcome even the most extreme circumstances.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stacey Kade

    Really liked this one!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Anna Kimbro

    I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review…and I’m going to be brutally honest - I wish I could get back the time I wasted on this book. Listen, the idea of time mysteriously jumping to the future on a plane to find everyone you loved either dead or 25 years older is wild and creates a lot of room for plot…the problem is it’s already been done before. If you’ve even seen the trailer for Manifest, you’ve basically read this book. Sure, Manifest is a 5 year difference vs. the 25 years here I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review…and I’m going to be brutally honest - I wish I could get back the time I wasted on this book. Listen, the idea of time mysteriously jumping to the future on a plane to find everyone you loved either dead or 25 years older is wild and creates a lot of room for plot…the problem is it’s already been done before. If you’ve even seen the trailer for Manifest, you’ve basically read this book. Sure, Manifest is a 5 year difference vs. the 25 years here, but that’s about the only difference. Now, with such a premise, you’d expect this book to be sci-fi…right? At least a little? Nope. But I don’t know what other genre it falls into because…welll…nothing really happens except for some regular teen romance scenarios and mild high school drama. It may be on me for having higher expectations based on the premise, but Jenny’s story was a whole lot of filler. I was also confused by the lingo of the high schoolers…it felt like they were all stuck in 1995, not just Jenny. Unfortunately, it pulled me even further out of the story hearing words that were out of date even when I was in high school in the early 2010s. Let’s just say this wasn’t for me for a lot of reasons…and as a whole, it felt like a series of missed opportunities and plot holes.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ruei (Ruei's Reading Corner)

    Full Review: https://rueisreadingcorner.blogspot.c... In 1995, Jenny Walters boards her plane but when she lands, she's 25 years in the future. This immediately sends an uproar throughout the media because everyone thought the passengers on that plane had died. When Jenny gets back to her family, she has to get used to everything that has happened since 1995: technology, the internet, phones. And it doesn't help that the media is watching her like she's some kind of alien. But there are other probl Full Review: https://rueisreadingcorner.blogspot.c... In 1995, Jenny Walters boards her plane but when she lands, she's 25 years in the future. This immediately sends an uproar throughout the media because everyone thought the passengers on that plane had died. When Jenny gets back to her family, she has to get used to everything that has happened since 1995: technology, the internet, phones. And it doesn't help that the media is watching her like she's some kind of alien. But there are other problems in her life. Her best friend Angie, her parents, the media, and a cute boy Jenny crosses paths with. Multiple times. Even though I haven't time-traveled by plane, the COVID-19 pandemic had a similar effect on many people that I think we can all kind of relate to how Jenny was feeling. The romance in this book I was not too big of a fan of. It seemed kind of shallow and it felt like the only reason Jenny liked the boy was because of his looks (you'll understand if you read the book). Overall, Your Life Has Been Delayed was a fun read. I liked the support group that Jenny and the other passengers attended. I felt that it gave them a sense of comfort, something we can all use if we had to go through their situation. Looking forward to her next book! **Thank you so much to NetGalley and Bloomsbury Publishing for sending me an Advanced Reader's Copy in exchange for an honest review!**

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Law

    The premise of this book was certainly interesting. It reminded me completely of the Netflix show, Manifest. It was so similar that I wondered throughout who copied who - it was so similar that I wouldn't be surprised if there was a lawsuit. Although it was advertised as YA, the main character, Jenny sounded and thought a lot like a middle schooler instead. Her thinking seemed very shallow and simple. This isn't a bad thing per se, but it's definitely not what I expected. I think what bothered me The premise of this book was certainly interesting. It reminded me completely of the Netflix show, Manifest. It was so similar that I wondered throughout who copied who - it was so similar that I wouldn't be surprised if there was a lawsuit. Although it was advertised as YA, the main character, Jenny sounded and thought a lot like a middle schooler instead. Her thinking seemed very shallow and simple. This isn't a bad thing per se, but it's definitely not what I expected. I think what bothered me the most was the way she reacted to the fact that she came back from the airplane to a world that had seemingly moved 25 years forward. If that happened to me, I think realistically it wouldn't be so easy to sneak out. Although the story mentioned many news headlines and shocked reactions from everyone, as the reader, I didn't necessarily feel these feelings through the storytelling of Jenny. The cover art is cute but isn't my favourite because of the cartoon-likeness of Jenny and doesn't portray her as what she is described as inside the book. The art makes it feel even more like a middle grade read. Overall, the premise was interesting and if you're not expecting a deep read, you'll probably still enjoy this!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    hmmm sounds like the tv show manifest...🤔

  20. 4 out of 5

    Liralen

    In 1995, Jenny gets on a routine three-hour flight. When the flight lands 25 years later, she faces a new world, with family and friends aged beyond recognition and in life stages that Jenny isn't ready for. I loved this conceptually, but the result focussed so much on the YA drama that pretty much every more interesting plot point got lost. Ultimately, the conflict in the book comes down to a couple of things: first, Jenny's best friend has grown up and married Jenny's boyfriend; second, they've In 1995, Jenny gets on a routine three-hour flight. When the flight lands 25 years later, she faces a new world, with family and friends aged beyond recognition and in life stages that Jenny isn't ready for. I loved this conceptually, but the result focussed so much on the YA drama that pretty much every more interesting plot point got lost. Ultimately, the conflict in the book comes down to a couple of things: first, Jenny's best friend has grown up and married Jenny's boyfriend; second, they've had a son, and Jenny thinks he's suuuuuuper cute. And third, her parents (and friends) are hell-bent on keeping the truth of the modern world from Jenny...or at least hell-bent on not telling her themselves. And I don't know. I didn't need the whole 'oh my god is it weird to date my ex's son???' plotline in particular (I don't think it's creepy, although contemporary news outlets would have a field day for sure, but Jenny's been in the new millennium for all of about...a day...when that romance starts), and I found it to distract and detract from the more important questions. Like...everyone seems to take it at face value that Jenny is still seventeen, and will be treated as such. There's never any discussion of 'are you legally 17, or are you legally 42?' (maturity level is definitely 17, but legally should be a question). Her poor parents have approximately three minutes of sobbing because the daughter who has been missing for twenty-five years is back, and then they slip right back into their parenting roles as though they haven't been doing other things since Jenny's brother grew up and moved out. Jenny meets her brother's wife, gasps, 'You're Black!' (44) and then basically (erm, unrelated to casual 1995 racism) never thinks about her brother and his family again. (After all, why try to figure out how you fit into your family 25 years later when you can go flirt with the son of your childhood best friend and ex-boyfriend?) Nobody wants to tell Jenny about things like social media or Google or online news or 9/11 or the book her best friend wrote about her or how much the entire world knows (or can find out) about her, so they just...bury their heads in the sand and hope that Jenny will too. (All this means is that she finds out in Dramatic Ways that further detract from the more interesting plotlines.) The FBI 'investigation' amounts to a couple of officers asking 'did you see anything weird?' then glaring suspiciously at Jenny and taking some blood for testing—nobody so much as suggests that she should be given a thorough check-up by a doctor (or that therapy might be useful as she adjusts to life in the future). Jenny wants to go back to school in person because she's scared that she won't get into her top-choice college if she finishes school online, and nobody thinks to point out that all she's going to have to do is write an admissions essay about being a very well publicised time traveller and she's likely to get in anywhere she wants. (She's also scared that someone will 'scoop' her and write about the flight before she can write about it for her school paper. Again, nobody thinks to explain to her that she will be able to write about the experience for much bigger outlets at pretty much any point in time...pun entirely intended.) And I just. Guys. I wanted to hear more about the woman whose fiancé has waited for her for twenty-five years, and who consequently still has a fiancé...but one who is suddenly (suddenly for her, anyway, if not for him) a quarter-century older than she is. I didn't need to know the why or how of the time-travelling, but when there's a group that decides that the way to send the passengers back to 1995 is to (view spoiler)[fly at a particular control tower, and the book was published days away from the 20th anniversary of 9/11 (granted, this seems like a publisher oversight, not an authorial oversight), I needed a great deal more than 'and they got in trouble for endangering lives!' (hide spoiler)] . I wanted some wrestling with the acknowledgement that Jenny's parents are suddenly 25 years older, and those are years that she won't have with them. I wanted Jenny's Big Cathartic Moment to be about something other than a teenage boy. So it's fine. I think I'm just too old for this—I wanted a much higher proportion of non-fluff than it wanted to give me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Okay, this book was seriously good. I really loved it! It’s kind of a YA contemporary/sci fi mashup, and it was really well done. Also, apparently this is the author’s first book?? I am very impressed by that. The writing was solid, the characters (both main and supporting) were likable, and the story was definitely unique. I really loved Jenny as a character. She was really likable and an all around “good kid” but didn’t come off as a goody-goody. I liked her drive to be a good, honest reporter Okay, this book was seriously good. I really loved it! It’s kind of a YA contemporary/sci fi mashup, and it was really well done. Also, apparently this is the author’s first book?? I am very impressed by that. The writing was solid, the characters (both main and supporting) were likable, and the story was definitely unique. I really loved Jenny as a character. She was really likable and an all around “good kid” but didn’t come off as a goody-goody. I liked her drive to be a good, honest reporter and her desire to find the truth. The author captured the 90s atmosphere perfectly. The way that Jenny discovers how much the world has changed including everything from cell phones to social media to The Hunger Games was really well done. I loved her observations about the world around her and her thoughts about the world she left behind. The romance was a bit odd at first, but once I got over the initial oddness, I really liked it. He was sweet and charming. It definitely wasn’t instalove, and I liked that he was always there for her and never made her feel “different” when she didn’t understand something about the world around her. This had some funny and amusing moments, but was also surprisingly introspective and philosophical as well. I definitely wasn’t expecting this to be as deep as it was. It had me thinking and I like books that make me think. Overall, I really enjoyed this one. I can’t wait to read Mason’s next book this fall.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Camille

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A huge thank you to Michelle I. Mason for this wonderful giveaway book. I love the story so much. This is the first time i’ve read about time travel and it was so good. I love this book, I can’t wait to read your next works. This book is about Jenny who travel back home to St. Louis in 1995 but disappeared for 25 years. Jenny and the other passengers are now in the present and all of them are confused especially Jenny. When they came back they all discovered what really happened to them. When she A huge thank you to Michelle I. Mason for this wonderful giveaway book. I love the story so much. This is the first time i’ve read about time travel and it was so good. I love this book, I can’t wait to read your next works. This book is about Jenny who travel back home to St. Louis in 1995 but disappeared for 25 years. Jenny and the other passengers are now in the present and all of them are confused especially Jenny. When they came back they all discovered what really happened to them. When she finally met her brother she can’t believe it, because when she left, her brother was only 12 years old but now, he’s married and has 2 children. After she discovered everything in the past 25 years it was too much for her. Then she met her best friend Angie, it was a disaster because Angie has a husband and children. And her husband was Jenny’s boyfriend. Jenny was so sad because she missed a lot of things. Going to school, going to prom and go to college with her best friend. She missed them all, that’s what makes her feel sad and hurt. After months, life was so hard for Jenny. The reporters didn’t leave her alone, posting about her life and love life. Everything is a mess now. Kira is so cute, she’s only 4 years old and daughter of Bradley. Kira always follows Jenny wherever she goes. Dylan is sweet and easy to talked to. He’s also Steve and Angie’s son. Dylan was so nice too, he helps Jenny learn about the modern life like how to use a phone, laptop, and social media. When Walter says they can go back to 1995 Jenny still choose to live in the present and not to go back because going back to 1995 she knows that she’s going to lose them again anyway. At the end of the book, even they didn’t discover anything that happened to them they still choose to live their lives in the present, even they lose a lot of people in their lives.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    Disclaimer: I received this arc from a local bookstore. Thanks @littleshopofstories! All opinions are my own. Book: Your Life Has Been Delayed Author: Michelle I. Mason Book Series: Standalone Diversity: 1 Black side character Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Young adult readers, contemporary, romance, sci-fi, time travel Genre: YA Contemporary Romance Publication Date: September 7, 2021 Publisher: Bloomsbury Pages: 367 Recommended Age: 14+ (Religion mentioned, 9/11 mention, Underage alcohol consumption, Ta Disclaimer: I received this arc from a local bookstore. Thanks @littleshopofstories! All opinions are my own. Book: Your Life Has Been Delayed Author: Michelle I. Mason Book Series: Standalone Diversity: 1 Black side character Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: Young adult readers, contemporary, romance, sci-fi, time travel Genre: YA Contemporary Romance Publication Date: September 7, 2021 Publisher: Bloomsbury Pages: 367 Recommended Age: 14+ (Religion mentioned, 9/11 mention, Underage alcohol consumption, Talks of airplane harm) Explanation of CWs: there is a lot of religion talk this book in the main character and her family are fairly devout Christians. There is one slight mention of 9/11 and there is other site mentions of harm done with airplanes or on airplanes such as bombs or using an airplane to hurt another building. Synopsis: Jenny Waters boards her flight in 1995, but when she lands, she and the other passengers are told they disappeared . . . 25 years ago. Everyone thought they were dead. Now contending with her family and friends fast-forwarding decades, Jenny must quickly adjust to smartphones and social media while being the biggest story to hit the internet. She feels betrayed by her once-best friend and fights her attraction to a cute boy with an uncomfortable connection to her past. Meanwhile, there’s a growing group of conspiracy theorists determined to prove the whole situation is a hoax. Will Jenny figure out how to move forward, or will she always be stuck in the past? Review: For the most part I really enjoyed this book. I felt like the book did really good to have that mystery of the time travel but didn't have to go that much into time travel. I also found the book very intriguing because I'm kind of a sucker for the "weird sci-fi random stuff happens" trope in contemporary novels. I also thought that the characters were all very well developed for the most part and that the world building was fairly well done. There were only a couple things that I really didn't like about the book. The first of them being that the book was kind of medium pace but also kind of fast-paced? It felt like there was a lot of stuff going on that was going by really fast but the pacing wasn't fast, you know? It's hard to explain. I also thought that the author could have done more to give a conclusive end to the book and that some of the other minor characters in the book got more "screen-time". Verdict: It was good!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Fall-Out-Book-Nerd

    Time jumping years without realising it is a plot I have loved in TV shows and movies, this is the first book I have read that includes this specific topic and I really enjoyed it. I thought the young adult theme kept it a slightly lighter read whilst still portraying how jarring that event would be, for everyone.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brittany Zimmerman

    Look, to be totally honest, I still wouldn't have wanted to be on this flight, but this book was an easy five stars for me. The character development, the plot line and development, the romance, the familial relationships, the growth- there is just so much good within in this book to even describe it all in detail one by one, so I'll do my best to summarize my favorite points. Jenny was such a complex, yet simplistic character and I think that's why I loved her so much. Her need and desire to kn Look, to be totally honest, I still wouldn't have wanted to be on this flight, but this book was an easy five stars for me. The character development, the plot line and development, the romance, the familial relationships, the growth- there is just so much good within in this book to even describe it all in detail one by one, so I'll do my best to summarize my favorite points. Jenny was such a complex, yet simplistic character and I think that's why I loved her so much. Her need and desire to know information and to want to write reminded me a lot of myself. Her curiosity, but need to want to stay in the simpler times of 1995 are very relatable. I think Michelle did such a great job with the structure and how she handled such difficult circumstances from Jenny's return. I think the conflict and conflict resolution was so well done, whether it was Jenny's conflict/differences with her family, her friends that were now grown, and the students when she went back to school. Her conflict within herself was flawlessly executed and I can't get over how good this was! What a phenomenal concept and done perfectly! Now, to the meat and bones. Everyone who's read my blog for any period of time knows that I don't do spoilers and that won't change. But, holy wow- the romance in this book is so sweet! It's also so accurate to how their actions (I personally think) would've happened, complete with the awkwardness, the anger and the apologies. I loved everything about it. Dylan was such a great guy! I couldn't get over his dynamic and his ability to see past what had happened to Jenny and just see her for who she was. This is one of my favorite contemporary couples I've read in a long while. The atmosphere was perfect, her research and knowledge of ATC/ boarding/ flying was on point and this was such a fun read! It was easy to give it five stars. I'd absolutely read this book again. Honestly, I can't wait to read it again just to see Jenny and Dylan!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Miesha (BookedAnBusy)

    Just having traveled myself weeks ago, I could not imagine getting off a plane and being told time has jumped 25 years. Jenny was a bit annoying, but I gave her a pass seeing as time stopped for her at 17. I laughed out loud a few times with Jenny’s confusion on current day things we have become accustomed to. From cell phones, social media, to key fobs to your car, it was funny as well as sad. Jenny was thrown into a world she missed, and having to navigate a world she was thrown into, is scary Just having traveled myself weeks ago, I could not imagine getting off a plane and being told time has jumped 25 years. Jenny was a bit annoying, but I gave her a pass seeing as time stopped for her at 17. I laughed out loud a few times with Jenny’s confusion on current day things we have become accustomed to. From cell phones, social media, to key fobs to your car, it was funny as well as sad. Jenny was thrown into a world she missed, and having to navigate a world she was thrown into, is scary. I couldn’t imagine one minute I think it’s 1995, then the next I’m told it’s 2020. The 90s references gave me so much nostalgia. Hello pay phones, Blockbuster and Beverly Hills 90210. All of it brought me back to my childhood. I could not put this one down until I saw how it all ended. Jenny had her flaws, and some foot in her mouth moments that made me cringe. I did enjoy this book, and found it to be thought provoking, and fascinating. I did like watching Jenny find her way, as well as forging new relationships with people who have aged while time stopped for her. Angie, her best friend, I was side eyeing her the whole book. I would definitely recommend this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    B

    There wasn’t really anything enjoyable about this except the plot. I didn’t expect to get an answer, so I’m okay with that, but Jenny was so annoying and self-righteous. I get it, it’s scary and confusing and a whole bunch of other shit, but her thoughts were just the worst and I couldn’t stand being in her head. Also, I don’t care if it was supposed to be sweet, her whole romance with Dylan was creepy AF and it never should have happened. There’s something extremely disturbing about dating your There wasn’t really anything enjoyable about this except the plot. I didn’t expect to get an answer, so I’m okay with that, but Jenny was so annoying and self-righteous. I get it, it’s scary and confusing and a whole bunch of other shit, but her thoughts were just the worst and I couldn’t stand being in her head. Also, I don’t care if it was supposed to be sweet, her whole romance with Dylan was creepy AF and it never should have happened. There’s something extremely disturbing about dating your former boyfriend’s son, no matter how many years have passed.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Your Life Has Been Delayed in exchange for an honest review. Your Life Has Been Delayed starts off with an interesting, unique premise so I was expecting it to be an interesting unique read and it just... wasn't. It's competently written and the plot is fine, but it quickly goes from "mysterious plane crash! What's going on?" to "here's a ton of high school drama" which was not the take I was really expecting. It could have been a "teen flees scand Thanks to the publisher for providing an eARC of Your Life Has Been Delayed in exchange for an honest review. Your Life Has Been Delayed starts off with an interesting, unique premise so I was expecting it to be an interesting unique read and it just... wasn't. It's competently written and the plot is fine, but it quickly goes from "mysterious plane crash! What's going on?" to "here's a ton of high school drama" which was not the take I was really expecting. It could have been a "teen flees scandal to new school, falls in love" book and been virtually the same which isn't necessarily bad, but I do think came off as disappointingly ordinary given the extraordinary premise.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Archisha Chinta

    I loved this book so much !😍❤️ 4.5 stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟 ✨ It was exactly like the way I hoped it would be. Emotional, adorable and relatable. I'm so glad I came across this book on bookstagram! I just couldn't put it down. I was hooked right from the start. The plot & the characters - amazing!! Jenny is one of my favourite main characters of all time now !! The relationship between Dylan and Jenny is to die for !! endearing , dreamy and lovable 😍❤️ *Swooning* In fact all the characters in the book are my favourit I loved this book so much !😍❤️ 4.5 stars 🌟🌟🌟🌟 ✨ It was exactly like the way I hoped it would be. Emotional, adorable and relatable. I'm so glad I came across this book on bookstagram! I just couldn't put it down. I was hooked right from the start. The plot & the characters - amazing!! Jenny is one of my favourite main characters of all time now !! The relationship between Dylan and Jenny is to die for !! endearing , dreamy and lovable 😍❤️ *Swooning* In fact all the characters in the book are my favourites ! Bradley & fam. Jenny's Dad , mom , Grandma, Angie , Art , Mr & Mrs Springs, Chloe, Madison & Mrs vega . A great YA debut by Michelle I. Mason. Absolutely looking forward to reading the next book " My second impression on you" 😊❤️. Can't wait !!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I love the concept of time travel and I initially loved the premise of this book: that a 90s teenager (I was one of those!) boards a plane, and debarks only to find 25 years have passed in what seemed like only three hours for her. Well, great concept, but the execution, for me, missed the mark. The book starts off fantastically. I really, really felt for the main character. I was in the lobby at a doctor's office for an appointment and crying over this book. I thought I was going to love it, add I love the concept of time travel and I initially loved the premise of this book: that a 90s teenager (I was one of those!) boards a plane, and debarks only to find 25 years have passed in what seemed like only three hours for her. Well, great concept, but the execution, for me, missed the mark. The book starts off fantastically. I really, really felt for the main character. I was in the lobby at a doctor's office for an appointment and crying over this book. I thought I was going to love it, add it to a list of favorites. Her pain and confusion of seeing her little brother is now a grown man, and finding out her grandparents have almost all passed away, was heart wrenching and real. But then. Then the reek of privilege hit. And it pretty much ruined this book for me. Main character Jenny goes to her older-little-brother's house and meets his wife, and the first thing that pops out of her mouth is, "You're black!" Come on. Even in 1995 that was not acceptable. She has the decency to at least be embarrassed by her outburst, but she never makes up for it, because the brother, his Black wife, and their kids are out of the story after that point. I guess I was hoping for some science fiction in this book, but it seems like it would be more appropriately shelved as "Christian fiction." Because instead of scientists even once asking to study the passengers on the time-traveling flight, instead of any real theories about how this could have happened, there's a lot of talk about "God works in mysterious ways" and "it was God's plan." And, okay. Fine. The main character is a Christian. Her parents are missionaries. I don't care. But the main character spends actual time in this book defending the rampant sexism found in her religion, including that her father measures the lengths of her skirts and that wearing white is a major no-no. There is a whole lot of slut-shaming in this book, though the main character has one kiss in totality. Look, I grew up in a very similar household to this character's, one in which men rule, women are subservient, and you go to church thrice a week to be told how awful you are, especially if you are female. And I was absolutely abused and traumatized by it. Scarred for life by a man (my father) not allowing me to wear white. (Because, if you haven't heard of this, a light colored fabric makes it possible for other people to detect that you're wearing a bra under your white shirt, or panties under your white skirt. Gasp. Because having genitals which you cover with underwear makes men think about your genitals, and that makes YOU the one in the wrong.) As if it is ANY man's business to tell a girl or woman what to wear. As if it's okay for a man, father or not, to make an innocent little girl feel like a whore when she hasn't done anything wrong. I recall very vividly finding out that being born a girl was a crime and that I was going to be demeaned and judged for it for the rest of my life, punished for things I had never done. Twenty-five years later I can still remember the first time I dared to attempt to wear a white skirt to church, how I was not allowed to leave the house until I changed my clothes. I was a child. This girl is a child. And yet she thinks this is all okay and normal, and defends it! There's a lot of other religious material in this book, but that point was the lowest. The rest is about maintaining "virginity" until marriage - lots more slut-shaming - and the main character presumes her former best friend is "mocking [her] faith" at one point. Christianity is a pervasive theme throughout the book that very seriously took away from my enjoyment of it. Most of this book is about Jenny learning about the world around her and the technology today. And it was not well-done. It was actually pretty fucking offensive. It starts off with the basics. Of course she learns about streaming services, flat screens, laptops, and cell phones. Which is fine for a few chapters, but after comprising most of the book, it becomes tedious. Also, a huge deal is made of her parents first hiding the "mysterious of the 21st century" from her, but then trying to help her cope with major world events by watching some documentaries dedicated to the decades, which cover world events and pop culture. Well, the author dodges the issue of school shootings by having the main character's mother say, yes, you have to go through a metal detector at school now, but we won't discuss why. (I'll refrain from making an assumption about the author's political affiliation, but...well. Hm. What reason could there be that we can't talk about guns in this book?) The only major world event that is discussed at all is 9/11. Which, yes, was a huge ordeal...but also 20 years ago. It happened shortly after the main character's disappearance. And, yes, her grandparents were New Yorkers. But you know what else has happened in the United States in the last 25 years? Marriage equality!!! A Black president!!! The book does not make a single mention of the amazing progress that's been made in the last two decades. No mention whatsoever that we had a Black president, though the main character reacted so strongly to the fact that her brother married a Black woman. He could have even married a man and given the author a chance to really show how the country has changed since 1995. I feel like a religious agenda was the real focus here. And I still might have read a piece of Christian fiction with the subject of time travel at its core, except for the repeated slut-shaming of a girl for wearing white, wearing a skirt that was too short, and kissing her boyfriend in public. Once. She kissed him once. And it was world news, with literally news organizations all over the world slut-shaming her. In addition to the boys and girls at school slut-shaming her. In addition to her slut-shaming herself. I really loved the concept behind this book, but it just did not live up to my expectations. Worse than that, it offended me. There was a lot of teen drama that I half-enjoyed, half-felt was too far-fetched to believe. I thought the ending was pretty clever, how at long last the subject of time travel came up in the last three chapters of the book. I liked some of the characters and I liked the dynamics between them, how their relationships were so very complicated because of what happened to Jenny on that plane. But the entire storyline was overshadowed by bigotry. Every time I started really enjoying the book, somebody would slut-shame the main character again. The entire time I was bouncing around between 2 stars and 4 in my mind. It was (other than the bigoted bits) well-written and I liked the plot and characters and thought the ending was pretty perfect. However, I am also horrified by some of the content. I forgot to mention that the villainess, the "mean girl" at school, is Asian. The only other non-white character besides Jenny's sister-in-law, and she's the one clear "bad guy." Not okay. I feel like the author just really, really, REALLY needs to get out of her bubble and get educated. For the story alone, without all the (hopefully unintended) bigotry, I'm going to settle on giving this 3 stars. I am disappointed.

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