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Inca Empire: A History from Beginning to End

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In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups and somewhere around fourteen million people were ruled by a much smaller number of Incas. Inca engineers designed and built an extensive and sophisticated system of roads and created buildings and walls from massive blocks of worked stone. Inca temples were opulent and featured the abundant use of gold, silver, and precious stones. Massive Inca armies won victory after victory as they steamrollered potential competitors. The Inca government controlled every aspect of the lives of its subjects, from the food that they ate to the clothes that they wore. By around 1500 CE, the Inca Empire had reached its greatest extent and looked set to persist for a very long time indeed. Instead, within little more than thirty years, it had been reduced to a small rump state, and within seventy years, it had vanished entirely. This is the story of the rapid rise and sudden fall of the mighty Inca Empire.


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In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups and somewhere around fourteen million people were ruled by a much smaller number of Incas. Inca engineers designed and built an extensive and sophisticated system of roads and created buildings and walls from massive blocks of worked stone. Inca temples were opulent and featured the abundant use of gold, silver, and precious stones. Massive Inca armies won victory after victory as they steamrollered potential competitors. The Inca government controlled every aspect of the lives of its subjects, from the food that they ate to the clothes that they wore. By around 1500 CE, the Inca Empire had reached its greatest extent and looked set to persist for a very long time indeed. Instead, within little more than thirty years, it had been reduced to a small rump state, and within seventy years, it had vanished entirely. This is the story of the rapid rise and sudden fall of the mighty Inca Empire.

30 review for Inca Empire: A History from Beginning to End

  1. 4 out of 5

    AC

    A good and very, *very* short primer for the ignoscenti (like me)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Leona

    Inca Empire: A History from Beginning to End by Hourly History In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups and somewhere around fourteen mil Inca Empire: A History from Beginning to End by Hourly History In the space of less than one hundred years, the Inca people expanded from being a small kingdom in the highlands of Peru to becoming one of the largest and most powerful empires in the Americas. At the height of its power, the Inca Empire stretched for more than one thousand miles down the Andes Mountains and the west coast of South America. It incorporated more than two hundred distinct ethnic groups and somewhere around fourteen million people were ruled by a much smaller number of Incas. Inca engineers designed and built an extensive and sophisticated system of roads and created buildings and walls from massive blocks of worked stone. Inca temples were opulent and featured the abundant use of gold, silver, and precious stones. Massive Inca armies won victory after victory as they steamrollered potential competitors. The Inca government controlled every aspect of the lives of its subjects, from the food that they ate to the clothes that they wore. By around 1500 CE, the Inca Empire had reached its greatest extent and looked set to persist for a very long time indeed. Instead, within little more than thirty years, it had been reduced to a small rump state, and within seventy years, it had vanished entirely. This is the story of the rapid rise and sudden fall of the mighty Inca Empire. Leona's Review: The books from Hourly History are always short but there is a lot of information. This book gives the names of the rulers, their accomplishments, and about their empires until the Spaniards came. The time of the Incas was about 100 years and "in less than 40 years after the Spaniards arrived the Inca Empire had gone from being the most powerful in South America to complete and utter destruction." The Inca people did not write so there is little knowledge about them or their building of the stone structures. It would have been intersting to have known more about these people. Hourly History has free downloads of books about people and places. I always give their books a 5 star rating. Table of Contents: introduction The Andean Civilazations Origin of the Incas The Kingdom of Cuzco The Rise of the Empire The Spanish Conquest The Fall of the Inca Empifre Conclusion

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Harwood

    A taste of this Mesoamerican civilization, the good and the bad, which gets to the point and gives an overview of life, a snapshot of how, before Europe arrived and decimated the indigenous people with Smallpox, War and slavery, this part of the world was likely one of the world most advanced empires. How much of their genetic makeup is still extant is still a matter of conjecture, & studies of genetics I've seen elsewhere show a lack of evidence of their continued life, thus showing a possible A taste of this Mesoamerican civilization, the good and the bad, which gets to the point and gives an overview of life, a snapshot of how, before Europe arrived and decimated the indigenous people with Smallpox, War and slavery, this part of the world was likely one of the world most advanced empires. How much of their genetic makeup is still extant is still a matter of conjecture, & studies of genetics I've seen elsewhere show a lack of evidence of their continued life, thus showing a possible genocide on the European part... but I'm sure further scrutiny may show a mixture of truth and lies in this. I've also seen recent documentaries blowing up the myth that they had no written language, so it's possible there's contradictions in some works written before this. Still, this book is short and shows much knowledge that's backed up with evidence, so the reader does learn something about this fascinating civilization of which we learn more and more by the day as archeology carries on apace. A well-written and informative piece of work x

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jean Hall

    I didn't know much about the Inca Empire other than the name. It was amazing how quickly they rose to prominence and later how quickly they were destroyed by man and disease. Unfortunate that they had no written alphabet to give us insight into them. Their human sacrifices appalled me, but then the Spanish were good at killing too. So sad that so much of colonization was basically for power and greed. I didn't know much about the Inca Empire other than the name. It was amazing how quickly they rose to prominence and later how quickly they were destroyed by man and disease. Unfortunate that they had no written alphabet to give us insight into them. Their human sacrifices appalled me, but then the Spanish were good at killing too. So sad that so much of colonization was basically for power and greed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    John Jackse

    Wonderful and Tragic history of a dynasty I knew very little about the Incas. Found out more than I ever thought I would know. The mystery about their lives and history will tragically never be known. Because it can’t be deceivers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mark Baller

    Avery short History of the Incas The book is well done it's pretty short it's a quickest tree And that's it But it's well done I liked it Avery short History of the Incas The book is well done it's pretty short it's a quickest tree And that's it But it's well done I liked it

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Luinstra

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  9. 4 out of 5

    Donald E. Brabham

  10. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karol Johnson

  12. 5 out of 5

    mr p r henden

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ron Gerughty

  14. 5 out of 5

    Buzz

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luis Gonzalez Orozco

  16. 4 out of 5

    James Spagnoli

  17. 5 out of 5

    josette ringuette

  18. 4 out of 5

    Armin Keller

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ann Baker

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sergio Gaubert

  22. 5 out of 5

    Paul Marriott

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep Palakkal

  24. 4 out of 5

    Francis H. Kinney

  25. 4 out of 5

    Hallie Gannon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shauna Summers

  27. 5 out of 5

    Martin Cormack

  28. 4 out of 5

    Starfighter

  29. 4 out of 5

    Geraldine Armbruster

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate Swartz

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