Hot Best Seller

Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch

Availability: Ready to download

A brilliantly modern take on Jewish culinary traditions for a new generation of readers, from a bright new star in the culinary world. When you think of Jewish food, a few classics come to mind: chicken soup with matzo balls, challah, maybe a babka if you’re feeling adventurous. But as food writer and nice Jewish boy Jake Cohen demonstrates in this stunning debut cookbook, A brilliantly modern take on Jewish culinary traditions for a new generation of readers, from a bright new star in the culinary world. When you think of Jewish food, a few classics come to mind: chicken soup with matzo balls, challah, maybe a babka if you’re feeling adventurous. But as food writer and nice Jewish boy Jake Cohen demonstrates in this stunning debut cookbook, Jewish food can be so much more.   In Jew-ish, he reinvents the food of his Ashkenazi heritage and draws inspiration from his husband’s Persian-Iraqi traditions to offer recipes that are modern, fresh, and enticing for a whole new generation of readers. Imagine the components of an everything bagel wrapped into a flaky galette latkes dyed vibrant yellow with saffron for a Persian spin on the potato pancake, best-ever hybrid desserts like Macaroon Brownies and Pumpkin Spice Babka! Jew-ish features elevated, yet approachable classics along with innovative creations, such as:  Jake’s Perfect Challah  Roasted Tomato Brisket  Short Rib Cholent  Iraqi Beet Kubbeh Soup  Cacio e Pepe Rugelach  Sabich Bagel Sandwiches, and Matzo Tiramisu.  Jew-ish is a brilliant collection of delicious recipes, but it’s much more than that. As Jake reconciles ancient traditions with our modern times, his recipes become a celebration of a rich and vibrant history, a love story of blending cultures, and an invitation to gather around the table and create new memories with family, friends, and loved ones. 


Compare

A brilliantly modern take on Jewish culinary traditions for a new generation of readers, from a bright new star in the culinary world. When you think of Jewish food, a few classics come to mind: chicken soup with matzo balls, challah, maybe a babka if you’re feeling adventurous. But as food writer and nice Jewish boy Jake Cohen demonstrates in this stunning debut cookbook, A brilliantly modern take on Jewish culinary traditions for a new generation of readers, from a bright new star in the culinary world. When you think of Jewish food, a few classics come to mind: chicken soup with matzo balls, challah, maybe a babka if you’re feeling adventurous. But as food writer and nice Jewish boy Jake Cohen demonstrates in this stunning debut cookbook, Jewish food can be so much more.   In Jew-ish, he reinvents the food of his Ashkenazi heritage and draws inspiration from his husband’s Persian-Iraqi traditions to offer recipes that are modern, fresh, and enticing for a whole new generation of readers. Imagine the components of an everything bagel wrapped into a flaky galette latkes dyed vibrant yellow with saffron for a Persian spin on the potato pancake, best-ever hybrid desserts like Macaroon Brownies and Pumpkin Spice Babka! Jew-ish features elevated, yet approachable classics along with innovative creations, such as:  Jake’s Perfect Challah  Roasted Tomato Brisket  Short Rib Cholent  Iraqi Beet Kubbeh Soup  Cacio e Pepe Rugelach  Sabich Bagel Sandwiches, and Matzo Tiramisu.  Jew-ish is a brilliant collection of delicious recipes, but it’s much more than that. As Jake reconciles ancient traditions with our modern times, his recipes become a celebration of a rich and vibrant history, a love story of blending cultures, and an invitation to gather around the table and create new memories with family, friends, and loved ones. 

30 review for Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch

  1. 4 out of 5

    Taylor Reid

    I love the recipes Jake Cohen shares on his Instagram so I was very excited when his cookbook came out earlier this year. He’s taken traditional Jewish dishes and modernized them, simplified them, perfected them, or added another dimension. This month I think I’m going to finally try my hand at a babka.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Krystelle Fitzpatrick

    Please note this is a 3.5. This book is an absolutely gorgeous collection of recipes that are marvellously modern and have absolutely gorgeous illustrations. A lot of the recipes, however, find themselves a little complex at times and have a lot of ingredients- which is why it is a little hard to institute them into a weekly routine. There’s a lot here if you’re really into meat recipes, however, and some of them might be really practical. I enjoyed a lot of the cultural discussions in here, and Please note this is a 3.5. This book is an absolutely gorgeous collection of recipes that are marvellously modern and have absolutely gorgeous illustrations. A lot of the recipes, however, find themselves a little complex at times and have a lot of ingredients- which is why it is a little hard to institute them into a weekly routine. There’s a lot here if you’re really into meat recipes, however, and some of them might be really practical. I enjoyed a lot of the cultural discussions in here, and the exploration of culture through autobiographical sections as well. The book melds anecdotes and food really beautifully, and there’s a lot to be found in here as well- especially for the carnivores out there!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Morris

    In my recent quest to learn how to make more than 2-3 dishes, I’ve been reading a lot of cookbooks. This one has become my instant favorite. There are recipes for every level of cook accompanied by gorgeous photos. What I like most, however, is the instant feel of love and belonging I used to have when my family gathered. It was always a mix of Jews, Christians, agnostics, orthodox, non-practicing, etc. Cancer ravaged us in a few short years, and I’ve been missing that sense of comfort and commu In my recent quest to learn how to make more than 2-3 dishes, I’ve been reading a lot of cookbooks. This one has become my instant favorite. There are recipes for every level of cook accompanied by gorgeous photos. What I like most, however, is the instant feel of love and belonging I used to have when my family gathered. It was always a mix of Jews, Christians, agnostics, orthodox, non-practicing, etc. Cancer ravaged us in a few short years, and I’ve been missing that sense of comfort and community as the rest of us have drifted apart. This book gave me hope to have that again, even if it’s in a slightly different form. Highly recommended! This unbiased review is based on a complimentary copy provided by the publisher.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Stein

    I read this as a novel, as I knew most of the recipes wouldn't work for my eating "style". I LOVED THIS! I had already purchased this as a gift for a friend and just had to borrow it from the library when it was available. The recipes look amazing, and the things I have made from his instagram account have always been delicious. LOVE this. I read this as a novel, as I knew most of the recipes wouldn't work for my eating "style". I LOVED THIS! I had already purchased this as a gift for a friend and just had to borrow it from the library when it was available. The recipes look amazing, and the things I have made from his instagram account have always been delicious. LOVE this.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    In Jew-ish, the author recreates the food of his heritage and offers fresh and modern recipes that will appeal to a new generation of readers. The book opens with an introduction to the Shabbat tradition and shows you how to throw a Shabbat dinner. The author guides you on what to expect when you’re expecting guests including working with the space you have, delegating tasks to your guests (they could bring wine or challah); setting up your mise en place. This means assembling your ingredients, t In Jew-ish, the author recreates the food of his heritage and offers fresh and modern recipes that will appeal to a new generation of readers. The book opens with an introduction to the Shabbat tradition and shows you how to throw a Shabbat dinner. The author guides you on what to expect when you’re expecting guests including working with the space you have, delegating tasks to your guests (they could bring wine or challah); setting up your mise en place. This means assembling your ingredients, tools, and any equipment you need to prepare a meal🥘 The author also suggests how to incorporate candles, wine, and bread along with specific prayers that accompany these rituals. He also shows the reader what he has in the pantry: Matzo meal, Egg Noodles, Sour scream, and Cream Cheese, Pickles, Basmati Rice, Saffron, Tahini and offers his recipes using these ingredients. Some recipes include Compound Schmaltz, Spiced Bourbon Applesauce, Horseradish Mayo, and so on. Subsequent chapters are dedicated to breakfast recipes as well as apps + snacks, salads, vegetables, soups & stews, mains, desserts, amen drinks. Breakfast 🧇 🥞recipes include Charred Scallion Cream Cheese. In this chapter, the author presents the anatomy of the perfect bagel 🥯 and shows you how to place the toppings accordingly. Some bagel recipes include Sabich Bagel Sandwiches 🥪 and Everything Bagel Galette 🥯 A notable recipe is Shakshuka alla Vodka—but here the author introduces a fresh twist using vodka sauce. Then there’s Cardamom Fresh Toast, Citrus and Poppy Seed Pancakes 🥞, Persian-ish Granola. In apps + snacks, the author presents the art of the cheeseboard and offers pairing options combing different food items and various cheeses 🧀. For example, berries, grapes 🍇 + Brie. Recipes in this chapter include Roasted Garlic Hummus, Persian Cucumber Yoghurt Sauce ( Most-o-Khiar ), Smokey Deviled Eggs 🍳, Russian Nachos, and so on. Salads include Little Gem Salad with Pickled Celery 🥗 and Tahini Dressing; Soy-Glazed Chicken 🍗 Salad, and Kale Tabbouleh Salad🥬 🥗 In the Vegetables section, you’ll find some roasted delights such as Date-Roasted Brussel Sprouts, Roasted Cauliflower with Pistachios and Golden Raisins, *Baharat* Smashed Potatoes 🥔 If you feel like taking the carb route, there are dishes such as Kugel and Cheese; and Crispy Persian Rice. Recipes in the soups and stews; and the mains include Saffron Chicken Noodle Soup, Roasted Tomato Brisket🍅; French Onion Brisket🧅; Herb-Roasted Spatchcocked Chicken, and Crispy Chicken Thighs with Tzimmes to name a few. Desserts include Macaroon Brownies, Sour Cherry Rice Pudding. For Drinks: Fresh Mint Tea and Sumac Hot Chocolate 🍫 The book is interspersed with suggestions for recipes for specific occasions such as Hanukkah 🕎 and offers a menu suggestion for a Passover. Some recipes start with a brief overview and are accompanied by beautiful photos. There are also step-by-step instructions (with photos) for some pastries🥮 Suitable for vegetarians, meat lovers, and anyone with a sweet tooth. Highly recommend. Thank you to Jake Cohen, NetGalley, and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC of this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    I really enjoyed this book! The recipes look amazing, the design was so much fun, and I loved the author's voice. I am delighted that it included not just Ashkenazi specific recipes but Persian ones as well. Great cookbook! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this review copy, I really like this one! I really enjoyed this book! The recipes look amazing, the design was so much fun, and I loved the author's voice. I am delighted that it included not just Ashkenazi specific recipes but Persian ones as well. Great cookbook! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for this review copy, I really like this one!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

    The recipes are fantastic in this book. I love the new seasonings and modernization of recipes. The photography is great with some helpful photographs on how to braid challah and make rugelach cookies. I loved learning about he origins of the crockpot so many interesting snippets of information include in the cookbook in addition to the recipes.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debby Hammer

    Shana tova. I read this for a fresh , new twist for the new year and loved it. You may incorporate as much or as little in your recipes. In Israel,. We love our spices and love to try different mixtures.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mskychick

    Lots of fun variations, but either I already have my own recipes that I love for the things he's got listed, or I am not interested in the fusion recipes he has Mostly checked this out for my spouse to read I did save the roasted mushroom recipe to try: that sounds delish! Lots of fun variations, but either I already have my own recipes that I love for the things he's got listed, or I am not interested in the fusion recipes he has Mostly checked this out for my spouse to read I did save the roasted mushroom recipe to try: that sounds delish!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Lovitt

    Earlier this month, Jake Cohen’s brand new cookbook Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch came out and it is a must-have addition for anyone’s kitchen. Not only does Cohen reinvent recipes tied to his Ashkenazi heritage, but he infuses his creations with traditions from his husband’s Persian-Iraqi traditions to create a fresh twist on familiar recipes.  Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a 5-Star Collection of Recipes (READ MORE AND SEE THE COOKING PICS!: https://yourmoneygeek.com/jew- Earlier this month, Jake Cohen’s brand new cookbook Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch came out and it is a must-have addition for anyone’s kitchen. Not only does Cohen reinvent recipes tied to his Ashkenazi heritage, but he infuses his creations with traditions from his husband’s Persian-Iraqi traditions to create a fresh twist on familiar recipes.  Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a 5-Star Collection of Recipes (READ MORE AND SEE THE COOKING PICS!: https://yourmoneygeek.com/jew-ish-a-c...) I was initially overwhelmed as I flipped through Jew-ish because I wanted to eat everything I saw. Cohen has created a visual masterpiece, brightly colored designs paired with vibrant delicacies artfully plated up. Throughout the book, he offers autobiographical insights into his life as it relates to food and thoroughly explains customs and meanings behind food for the goy who might pick-up Jew-ish.  As you flip through the book, you might come across ingredients you aren’t familiar with or elements of dishes you’ve never seen for sale in the grocery store. Cohen smartly begins the cookbook with a lexicon of sorts called “my pantry” that goes through all of the ingredients he purchases and all of the ingredients he makes for himself. Don’t let unfamiliar ingredients keep you from trying out the dishes in Jew-ish.  The book is split into nine categories: breakfast, apps + snacks, salads, vegetables, carbs, soups + stews, mains, desserts, and drinks. The recipes include fresh twists on challah, brisket, rugelach, and even matzo soup, but Cohen has included unexpected dishes like Iraqi Beet Kubbeh Soup, Za’atar Pesto Risotto, and Kale Tabbouleh Salad.  I have been dying to try my hand at making kugel ever since my local grocery store stopped carrying it, and Cohen’s Spinach-Artichoke Kugel recipe did not disappoint. The step-by-step instructions were easy to follow. Since I had no need to make a dish big enough for 10-12 servings, I cut the recipe in half and had more than enough for dinner and lunch leftovers.  It was rich and delicious and I cannot wait to try the Cardamom-Spiced Pear Noodle Kugel next.  On another day, I followed Cohen’s advice for making the perfect bagel and he didn’t lead me wrong. An everything bagel paired with cream cheese, red onions, tomatoes, and of course smoked salmon. It makes for a delicious breakfast and an even more delicious lunch. The next thing I’m keen to make is Cohen’s very different twist on bagel and lox — an Everything Bagel Galette.  While my plated-up Roasted Garlic Hummus tray pales in comparison to the artful creation featured in Jew-ish, you won’t want to miss out on trying your hand at making homemade hummus.  Overall Jew-ish is a cookbook that is clearly aimed at the millennial kitchen and it succeeds at every turn of the page. The recipes are easy to follow and they turn out as-pictured, the ingredients are easy enough to find, and nothing you’ll need for the recipes is going to break the bank. The only crime committed by the book is the fact that Cohen failed to include the recipe for the delicious marbled hamentashen he shared on TikTok. 

  11. 5 out of 5

    Channon Coats

    Great-ish Okay, really 4.8 stars. There are only two flaws hereto that get under my skin, and funnily enough both involve alcohol. I made stuff from this cookbook the very first day I kindled it, complicated stuff, i.e., when beans marry meat and potatoes marry parsnips, you are going to get a more interesting family of flavors than when meat marries potatoes and carrots say "I do!" to the parsnip soufflē. Not dull, or pedestrian, just not as nuanced or fun and frankly, Jake Cohen is that rara av Great-ish Okay, really 4.8 stars. There are only two flaws hereto that get under my skin, and funnily enough both involve alcohol. I made stuff from this cookbook the very first day I kindled it, complicated stuff, i.e., when beans marry meat and potatoes marry parsnips, you are going to get a more interesting family of flavors than when meat marries potatoes and carrots say "I do!" to the parsnip soufflē. Not dull, or pedestrian, just not as nuanced or fun and frankly, Jake Cohen is that rara avis in the kitchen: a bright buoyant fun chef. Yay!! Just love your feathers and how you fly. However. Don't get between me and my Mani nor me and my Jack. Two recipes need just a little snip, and a third doesn't need anything, I just couldn't help myself. 1. Salmon roe as a more economic topping for your hors d'oeuvres. Don't. If you're not going to cowboy up and use caviar, much more available now with US farming production (they can catch wild surgeon right here in the Sacramento River, who knew?) and the pricing is cheaper in dollars than rubles, keep the salmon roe for bait fishing. If you want to save a little, keep it pretty with snippets of smoked salmon . Same color, bougētary, I mean budgetary, still crackerable. 2. Latkes are ambrosial. When you start messin' with alcohol, Mani is or can be made to be appropriate. Therefore do not send apples to do your pectin job, use pectin. It has no flavor and will not require sharp blast of lemon to keep from turning brown. Lemon ALWAYS adds flavor and fragrance. If you don't smell or taste it, it's because you smoke in the kitchen. That's bad for you and your food, period. Just don't. 3. Appropriate nectar is NEVER bourbon, so keep your whisky (finest Tennessee sippin') where it belongs and use rum. Based on the spices you added, rum is completely flavor-profilely speaking, in its own house. Jack and I will thank you. Kentucky and its bourbon can speak for themselves. 4. I know this is nit-picky, but this chef and his recipes are so fine, that frog hairs ARE impediments. Now when you pick on Manichevitz by throwing an apple for pectin in the lovely Concord grape, it IS frog hair. Yes, almost invisible, yes fine, but food that comes out this good and serveable with pride at Shabbat, should be perfect when it can be perfect. You, Jake Cohen, have shown it can be. 5. Completely and totally too picky for words, but like one's secret recipe for latke ambrosia, chicken livers deserve the same when it's possible. A dash of nutmeg makes it possible, probable, in fact, down right unpreventable. If you have bought or are buying the book, this critique will make perfect sense. If you didn't and don, shame on you. You are really missing a genius new concept in the fresh new previously unknown or unacknowledged marriage of two very old cuisines. What is particularly beautiful is they married for love and brought something wonderful to the table that perhaps should have always been there: the novel idea that the entire family is welcome in their offerings for dinner, and that dinner and Jewish-ness is only for the better for it. Try to think of my nitpickings as my miniscule contribution to that perfect table and let's all celebrate together: l'chaim!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    =^.^= Janet

    Date reviewed: August 20, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. And it is way too hot to go outside, so why not sit in from of the blasting a/c and read and review books?? BTW - stay home and save lives!!!!!!!! No tan is wort Date reviewed: August 20, 2020 When life for the entire universe and planet turns on its end and like everyone else you "have nothing to do" while your place of work is closed and you are continuing to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. And it is way too hot to go outside, so why not sit in from of the blasting a/c and read and review books?? BTW - stay home and save lives!!!!!!!! No tan is worth dying for. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. 100 updated classic and all-new Jewish-style recipes from a bright new star in the food community These are not your Jewish grandmother's recipes! Jake Cohen, editorial director of the wildly popular FeedFeed and nice Jewish boy, has been hosting Friday night Shabbat dinners for the past few years and reinventing beloved (but sometimes outdated) recipes from his culture along the way. The result is Jew-ish, an innovative take on classic Jewish recipes that were created with the modern millennial in mind, both experienced and novice home cooks looking for elevated versions of old-school favourites. Imagine kugel turned savoury with the flavours of spinach-artichoke dip and latkes dyed vibrant yellow with saffron for a Persian spin on the potato pancake, plus best-ever hybrid desserts like Macaroon Brownies and Pumpkin Spice Babka! Cooks and hosts will find helpful tips and tricks throughout, gleaned from personal stories told in a fresh voice that is uniquely Jake Cohen’s. I am once again "pregnant" with a book I adore - that is the problem with reviewing books that don't come out for seven months! The recipes are fresh and innovative and applicable to cooks of all levels: I cannot wait to make the macaroon brownies and the spinach-artichoke kugel...in fact, I plan on taking both to our "welcome autumn" book club pot luck come September. Afraid of Jewish food like my husband is? This will allay those fears as there is no "need" for gefilte fish or stewed prunes if you don't want them (LOL) as these recipes will appeal to all. Great job, Jake Cohen .. please write more books! As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🥘🥘🥘🥘🥘

  13. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Publishing on my blog at release: Nonstop Reader. Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a tutorial guide with recipes collected and developed/updated by Jake Cohen. Due out 9th March 2021 from Houghton Mifflin HarcourtHoughton Mifflin Harcourt, it's 272 pages and will be available in hardcover and ebook formats. It's well laid out with a trendy appealing vibe (definitely not my grandma's cookbook for sure). The introduction includes some salient observations from the author about ethnicity, food, love, and Publishing on my blog at release: Nonstop Reader. Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a tutorial guide with recipes collected and developed/updated by Jake Cohen. Due out 9th March 2021 from Houghton Mifflin HarcourtHoughton Mifflin Harcourt, it's 272 pages and will be available in hardcover and ebook formats. It's well laid out with a trendy appealing vibe (definitely not my grandma's cookbook for sure). The introduction includes some salient observations from the author about ethnicity, food, love, and comfort in old traditions (and making new traditions). The introduction covers the basics of Jew(ish) cooking, pantry essentials to buy and make, and essential accessories as well as an intro to the whole idea of pausing at the end of a work week and sharing food with people in our circles. The following chapters include the recipes arranged roughly by category: breakfasts, appetizers & snacks, salads, vegetables, carbs, soups & stews, mains, desserts, and drinks. Ingredient measurements are supplied (mostly) in American standard measurements only - there are some recipes which include metric measures. Nutritional information is not included. Each recipe has a header with a short description of the recipe, yields, and approximate prep-times. Ingredients are listed bullet style in a sidebar followed by step by step directions. Extra tips or recipe alternatives are listed in text boxes in the recipes. The recipes themselves are fairly straightforward and are made for the most part with easily sourced ingredients. Not many of these are very simple, some of them are quite complex (but worth the effort). There are also four sample menus provided for high holiday entertaining and gatherings. The author has a fun and upbeat style of writing. He's by turns whimsical and entertaining and his love and appreciation for his family, husband, and culture shine through in the text. It's also a beautuful book in its own right: lavishly photographed, the serving suggestions and food styling often include colorful serving accessories and well appointed tables as well as visually appealing well made food. Five stars. This would make a superlative gift for an enthusiastic cook. Beautifully made babka and rugelach are sublime soul-satisfying blessings (I'm alllll about baked goods) and he includes good expanded recipes for both. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Harold Citron

    An interesting cookbook with some fusion takes on a variety of Jewish recipes including a mix of both Ashkenazic and Sephardic-Persian recipes. Starting off with the good points, I appreciated both the pantry section and the "what I make" section, which provides people who may not be familiar with many of the staples used in the various recipes, and gives everyone a jump start to the recipes ahead. Interesting fusion starts from the get-go with the Sabich bagel sandwich, a new take on the tradit An interesting cookbook with some fusion takes on a variety of Jewish recipes including a mix of both Ashkenazic and Sephardic-Persian recipes. Starting off with the good points, I appreciated both the pantry section and the "what I make" section, which provides people who may not be familiar with many of the staples used in the various recipes, and gives everyone a jump start to the recipes ahead. Interesting fusion starts from the get-go with the Sabich bagel sandwich, a new take on the traditional pita sandwich. However, most of the breakfast through snack recipes didn't do much for me. About the only one that was intriguing was the Pomegranate-BBQ chicken wings. The others didn't jump out with any 'Jewish-y" to me. Recipes became more interesting in the vegetable category, including the Roasted Cauliflower with Pistachios and Golden Raisins, Za'atar-roasted Eggplant with Tahini, and especially the Pickle-juice Braised Cabbage. The discussion on Tahdig was insightful, especially for those who may not be familiar with the Persian rice dish. Same goes for the Khoresh-e Ghormeh Sabzi take. In the protein section, the Iraqi Roasted Salmon with Tomato and Lemon shows potential as does the Lemony Sheet Pan chicken with Crispy Chickpeas and Kale. A strong finish too, with a number of desserts that look promising and worth making, two that stand out include the flourless cake with chocolate buttercream frosting, and the sour-cherry rice pudding. Unfortunately, the "ish" part was a tremendous draw-back for me. Creating a cookbook that mixes meat and milk, a huge roadblock for many Jews, is something that could have easily been worked around with some decent editing. If one is going to highlight a cookbook as Jewish, then there should be enough Jew in it beyond family anecdotes. With that in mind, the deliberate inclusion of pork in recipes was a tremendous turnoff. The Prohibition against eating pork is central to Judaism. Regardless of whether anyone follows the practice or not, to highlight such recipes in a cookbook touting Jewish recipes makes a mockery of the culture and religion. If you are going to tout love and community, this is not the way to do it. So too, was the inclusion of several prayers at the beginning. The blessings themselves are not the issue, but if you are going to publish them, then there are ways to write them without including G-d's name. That should have been an easy editorial catch.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    Jew-ish. Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch is Jake Cohen first cookbook, published early this month. A collection of various recipes - some from his Askenazi family home, some adapted, some inspired by the Persian-Iraqi heritage of his husband. Not all of them for the strictly kosher-kitchen, but they can be easily adapted easily. Addressed to a millenial audience, the book is based on recipes mostly tested during the various Shabbat evenings the couple hosted. As in the case of many mille Jew-ish. Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch is Jake Cohen first cookbook, published early this month. A collection of various recipes - some from his Askenazi family home, some adapted, some inspired by the Persian-Iraqi heritage of his husband. Not all of them for the strictly kosher-kitchen, but they can be easily adapted easily. Addressed to a millenial audience, the book is based on recipes mostly tested during the various Shabbat evenings the couple hosted. As in the case of many millenials, they explore their identity through food and various culinary practices. ´This book has helped me define the pride I have for the rich culture of traditions and dishes I´ve inherited. It´s a love story. It´s a family tree. It´s me at my core. It´s Jewish´. Not all the recipes are traditionally Jewish, but can be easily integrated into Jewish menus tasted on different occasions. For instance, the Baharat smashed potatoes sound so delicious that it´s a pity not to have it on a Shabbat meal, eventually in the company of some heimische schnitzel. Shaksuka alla vodka may taste better than the penne alla vodka. The savory Babka and rugelach are already classical pastries offered in the hip bakeries of Brooklyn of Williamsburg in NYC. I am a very courageous person, but I have to really think four times before writing ´cardamom-spiced pear noodle kugel´...Can you repeat after me? The recipes are well writen, with a lot of details that may help even the less experimented cook - me included - to prepare it right and understand the directions. As someone with a big heart for spices, I can only appreciate the diversity used for various recipes, including the less-known - and a real Kabbalistic challenge for the Askenazim - such as Baharat, Amba or Urfa Biber. I may have some observations regarding some of the recipes introduced in the book, but only if I completely take them out of the author´s identity story. Therefore, more than a general food story, Jew-ish is relevant for the generational and unique identity-in-the making Jewish story, one of the many built out of the classical framework but still relevant for its strive for identity. Rating: 3.5 Disclaimer: Book offered by the publisher in exchange for an honest review

  16. 4 out of 5

    Candy

    Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch by Jake Cohen (5 Stars) Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in return for an honest review. The author and his husband have been hosting Friday night Shabbat dinners for the past few years and reinventing classic recipes for today. While there is an emphasis on Shabbat dinner, the author makes clear that his version of Shabbat is not religious. His Shabbat celebration is more of a pause and reflectio Jew-ish: A Cookbook: Reinvented Recipes from a Modern Mensch by Jake Cohen (5 Stars) Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for an advance copy of this book in return for an honest review. The author and his husband have been hosting Friday night Shabbat dinners for the past few years and reinventing classic recipes for today. While there is an emphasis on Shabbat dinner, the author makes clear that his version of Shabbat is not religious. His Shabbat celebration is more of a pause and reflection at the end of a work week and a celebration with family and friends, sharing good food and drink a means to deepen existing relationships. You’ll find that some of the recipes are complex, or at least time-consuming, for a weeknight. Recipes for some classics have been modernized, and a diverse selection of recipes result from this couple blending their Ashkenazi and Sephardic roots and culture into their food celebrations. Overall, the book is billed as being created for the modern millennial but I think anyone looking for a healthier version (okay, pass up the ones with schmaltz if you’re looking for healthier!) or more flavorful twist to some classic comfort foods will appreciate this cookbook. There are 100 recipes with clear directions, and full-page, stunning photos of each dish. The classics are represented--Latkes, Short Ribs, Roasted Chicken Matzo Ball Soup, Brisket, Babka, Rugelach--but these really piqued my interest: Shakshuka alla Vodka Rose Water and Cardamom French Toast Pastrami Biscuits and Gravy Challah Croque Monsieurs Eggplant and Tomato Dip Pomegranate-BBQ Chicken Wings Russian Nachos Apples and Honey Baked Brie Baharat Smashed Potatoes Fancy Mushroom Kasha Varnishkes Kugel (various ingredients) Saffron Chicken Noodle Soup Tiramatzu, yes, Matzo Tiramisu This is a beautiful book, and would make a great hostess gift. https://candysplanet.wordpress.com/

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nasty Lady MJ

    Everything I have done in here has been great so far. The chicken with chickpeas and the chicken with prunes were both fantastic. Also the macaroon brownies were easy to put together, and I really do appreciate that the dessert was already gluten free and I didn't have to make any substitutions . Am planning on having the tomato brisket and potato pancakes this evening-did step one of the brisket yesterday and it made the house smell mouthwatering good. Also, going to probably do the almond cook Everything I have done in here has been great so far. The chicken with chickpeas and the chicken with prunes were both fantastic. Also the macaroon brownies were easy to put together, and I really do appreciate that the dessert was already gluten free and I didn't have to make any substitutions . Am planning on having the tomato brisket and potato pancakes this evening-did step one of the brisket yesterday and it made the house smell mouthwatering good. Also, going to probably do the almond cookies in the book next week-finally something to use that rose water I bought on. Overall, I really do like this book. I got it because I missed one of my favorite restaurants in Houston that shared similar food, though this book was missing a cabbage roll recipe which was what I was hoping it would have . Still though, I have been very happy with all the recipes that I have made and likely will be buying this book for other people to use as well which is a huge plus from me. Nothing is too over convoluted and for the most part I have been able to located most of the items I need at the super market-though for the potato pancakes I had to special order gluten free matzo and I ordered U-bet syrup to make the egg creams.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Zee Monodee

    Absolutely beautiful book, not just in the gorgeous, fresh, and crisp images on every other page, but also for the scope of recipes themselves, and their origins and history and culture, especially as it pertains to the author and his family (including his husband's side). Some of the recipes require one to be a real fearless cook to attempt them, none less for the spices and other specifically Jewish ingredients which might be completely foreign for some people (like it was the case for me!). B Absolutely beautiful book, not just in the gorgeous, fresh, and crisp images on every other page, but also for the scope of recipes themselves, and their origins and history and culture, especially as it pertains to the author and his family (including his husband's side). Some of the recipes require one to be a real fearless cook to attempt them, none less for the spices and other specifically Jewish ingredients which might be completely foreign for some people (like it was the case for me!). But you gotta love the heart Jake Cohen puts into his recipes, especially in all the words he chooses for them, the little something special, the nifty trick, like he really wants to be there for you, especially you inexperienced in Jewish cuisine cook, to help you out. He can't be there physically, but he uses his heartfelt words and instructions to figuratively hold your hand and guide you over your shoulder as you're making his dishes. My only peeve - and this is just me - is that I wished the recipes were a bit more vegetarian-friendly, but let's not forget this was not the scope of this book, so can't fault Jake Cohen that

  19. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Jew-ish by Nate Cohen is a bright, fun, mouth-watering cookbook that is exactly what it claims to be in the subtitle: "reinvented recipes from a modern mensch". During a dark time in our culture, with the emboldening of violent antisemitism in so much of the world, it was really a pleasure to read a light happy cookbook that so completely reveled in what it can mean to be Jewish, and the many ways that identity can be expressed. That embraces dishes and culinary traditions from all over the Jewi Jew-ish by Nate Cohen is a bright, fun, mouth-watering cookbook that is exactly what it claims to be in the subtitle: "reinvented recipes from a modern mensch". During a dark time in our culture, with the emboldening of violent antisemitism in so much of the world, it was really a pleasure to read a light happy cookbook that so completely reveled in what it can mean to be Jewish, and the many ways that identity can be expressed. That embraces dishes and culinary traditions from all over the Jewish diaspora, while reimagining them in ways that work for a smart, trendy gay New Yorker and his probably impossibly stylish circle. when I read about his Sabbath dinners, I drool with envy, knowing that I would not be remotely cool enough, but would be so happy stuffing my face with all the decadent dishes he describes that I wouldn't care too much about being awkward. The dishes really do sound delicious. That is at least partially due to how incredibly rich they are. Schmaltz, rendered chicken fat with onions, is a delicious traditional ingredient in European Jewish cuisine, and figures heavily in Nate's recipes, along with eggs and dairy, sugar and meat. Many of the recipes are completely unsuitable for my dietary needs, as well as often above my level of culinary skill (or interest in learning), and featuring sometimes obscure and/ or expensive ingredients (pomegranate molasses. sumac. SAFFRON!$), so I won't be buying a copy of the book for myself. But it was so much fun reading the recipes and anecdotes, learning more about Jewish diaspora food and culture and community and drooling over the brilliant food photography throughout. Some themes, ingredients, and flavors recurred throughout many of the recipes, especially everything bagel with or without lox, as well as ingredients like tahini. But they all sounded delicious, so I didn't mind the repetition. I also appreciated how some dishes were offered with a base recipe, and then 2-4 variations on the theme, often two sweet and two savory, as with rugelach (pastry) or kugel (noodle side dish), and there were several two page spreads demonstrating the anatomy of a "perfect bagel" or cheese board or menus for specific holiday events, like Yom Kippur breakfast or Passover or Hanukkah festivities. Because of the decadence of the recipes, they aren't particularly appropriate for restricted diets. Heavy in saturated fats and sugars and starches, they are meant for maximum flavor for young and healthy guests. And due to Nate's expression of Judaism, a surprising number of the recipes aren't even necessarily kosher. However, I was pleasantly surprised how many of the dessert recipes were gluten free or adaptable, due to being Passover friendly recipes. Like the majority of these recipes they are rich and decadent. But they can be gluten free as well as delicious. Perhaps I will try a few of those recipes, as well as a few of the very few recipes in here that suit my dietary restrictions, like spicy herb roasted mushrooms, za'atar-roasted eggplant with tahini, pickle juice-braised cabbage, date roasted brussels sprouts, roasted eggplant and tomato dip, or tomato cucumber salad. I am sure that I won't be disappointed. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for lending me a temporary digital advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    roxi Net

    Despite it being a cookbook, my attention was caught by the amazing laser background photo of the author holding challah -- nostalgia hit as I remembered my school days. I knew immediately I liked his sense of humor and not knowing much about Jewish recipes, I was glad to have received this book for review. I loved the step-by-step photos, the inclusion of the Hebrew prayers and how personal the book is (things I buy, things I make). 'The anatomy of the perfect bagel' cracked me up and was so in Despite it being a cookbook, my attention was caught by the amazing laser background photo of the author holding challah -- nostalgia hit as I remembered my school days. I knew immediately I liked his sense of humor and not knowing much about Jewish recipes, I was glad to have received this book for review. I loved the step-by-step photos, the inclusion of the Hebrew prayers and how personal the book is (things I buy, things I make). 'The anatomy of the perfect bagel' cracked me up and was so informative. The Bagel Galette is on my list of recipes to try and while I have (and love) rose water and cardamom, how did I not think of putting it in a french toast? (thank you Jake Cohen). I learned quite a bit about Jewish cooking and traditions through this book, and it's one of the few cookbooks that I'd like to attempt every recipe (but I do have a few to begin with - Russian Nachos, Babka, Tadhig, Rugelach, and basically all of the desserts). #JewishACookbook #NetGalley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    JEW-ISH: A COOKBOOK is such a delightful take on recipes and entertaining that it was truly a joy to read. Author Jake Cohen writes the way a good host would entertain and I felt as though I was embraced as I worked my way through his recipes and stories. I especially enjoyed his explanations on how to incorporate age-old traditions into modern lifestyles. So, why then have I not rated this cookbook a 5-star treasure? It is too short. There just isn’t enough here for the kind of cookbook that fo JEW-ISH: A COOKBOOK is such a delightful take on recipes and entertaining that it was truly a joy to read. Author Jake Cohen writes the way a good host would entertain and I felt as though I was embraced as I worked my way through his recipes and stories. I especially enjoyed his explanations on how to incorporate age-old traditions into modern lifestyles. So, why then have I not rated this cookbook a 5-star treasure? It is too short. There just isn’t enough here for the kind of cookbook that forms the backbone of a working cook’s repertoire. The recipes that are here are a marvel and well-worth trying and using regularly. I especially like the way the author suggests multiple approaches for basic recipes, such as babkes and rugelaches. But he could have included more recipes and this would be a cookbook bible rather than a specialty title. I hope he writes more. In fact, I can’t wait. I received my copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I absolutely love the idea for this cookbook. Jake Cohen is someone who never saw himself as super religious but who has found a lot of joy in his culture. He now feels more tied to Judaism because of the dishes he's prepared and the people in his life who he's gathered for Shabbat dinners. This book had absolutely gorgeous photographs and recipes that made my mouth water. They're accompanied by Cohen's fun anecdotes and tips on how to successfully make each dish. My only complaint is that a lot I absolutely love the idea for this cookbook. Jake Cohen is someone who never saw himself as super religious but who has found a lot of joy in his culture. He now feels more tied to Judaism because of the dishes he's prepared and the people in his life who he's gathered for Shabbat dinners. This book had absolutely gorgeous photographs and recipes that made my mouth water. They're accompanied by Cohen's fun anecdotes and tips on how to successfully make each dish. My only complaint is that a lot of the recipes sounded difficult (and were made with ingredients I don't typically have at home). I'm just not strong enough of a cook to be able to tackle a lot of the dishes. However, I can think of several people in my family that I would gift this book to so that they could make me some of these delicious and unique Jewish foods. *Free ARC provided by Netgalley and publisher in exchange for an honest review*

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara Hill

    What a FABULOUS cookbook and one I will be adding to my small collection of cookbooks. Everything I have tried in this book has been amazing. I want to try just about everything in it. Part of that is due to the amazing pictures with each of the recipes. About a year ago I took a trip to Israel and I fell in love with the food. There are several of those recipes included in this book, and I was so excited to find them! Most of the recipes are pretty straight forward, but there are a few that look What a FABULOUS cookbook and one I will be adding to my small collection of cookbooks. Everything I have tried in this book has been amazing. I want to try just about everything in it. Part of that is due to the amazing pictures with each of the recipes. About a year ago I took a trip to Israel and I fell in love with the food. There are several of those recipes included in this book, and I was so excited to find them! Most of the recipes are pretty straight forward, but there are a few that look rather intimidating. I loved the layout. I appreciated the lists of what he buys and what he makes. I also loved that he included the prayers and menus for the different holidays. I cannot wait for this book to come out so I can snag a copy! This book is great for just about anyone. You do not have to be Jewish or Jew-ish to enjoy it. I received an eARC from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt through NetGalley. All opinions are 100% my own.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I really liked this book. I read a lot of cookbooks, both for recipes and entertainment. I really enjoyed the author's fun conversational tone and sense of humor. (Challah back!) I felt like I was part of his family as he discussed his family, traditions and culture. There were so many great pictures, which I really appreciate in a cookbook. Especially helpful were the step by step photos in the challah and rugala recipes. I'm really looking forward to trying the different varieties of babka and I really liked this book. I read a lot of cookbooks, both for recipes and entertainment. I really enjoyed the author's fun conversational tone and sense of humor. (Challah back!) I felt like I was part of his family as he discussed his family, traditions and culture. There were so many great pictures, which I really appreciate in a cookbook. Especially helpful were the step by step photos in the challah and rugala recipes. I'm really looking forward to trying the different varieties of babka and rugala, and the eggplant dolmeh. My only complaint is that it maybe slightly challenging to find some ingredients but the author offers some suggestions to help track them down. Thank you to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for providing me with an eARC for review. I'm looking forward to getting a physical copy of this one.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    **I received and voluntarily read an e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.** I've had an obsession with potato latkes and matzo ball soup for years (always my go-to recipes when I'm feeling sick), so I was excited to get the opportunity to read and review this cookbook. The food looks amazing, and I can't wait to try my hand at most of these recipes. There are some great photos that make the food look delicious! Overall, I definitely see this b **I received and voluntarily read an e-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.** I've had an obsession with potato latkes and matzo ball soup for years (always my go-to recipes when I'm feeling sick), so I was excited to get the opportunity to read and review this cookbook. The food looks amazing, and I can't wait to try my hand at most of these recipes. There are some great photos that make the food look delicious! Overall, I definitely see this book being added to my collection and several of the recipes being added into my culinary rotation.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Thank you to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for this ARC copy. I love this cookbook by Jake Cohen! It contains so many wonderful recipes, and most important to me, photos that accompany them. I grew up in a jewish household and my mother was a great cook. Sadly, she didn't have a recipe book, it was all in her head, as was the case for that generation! This book brings those recipes to life, but with a modern twist. I have so many recipes bookmarked, it will take me months to get throug Thank you to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for this ARC copy. I love this cookbook by Jake Cohen! It contains so many wonderful recipes, and most important to me, photos that accompany them. I grew up in a jewish household and my mother was a great cook. Sadly, she didn't have a recipe book, it was all in her head, as was the case for that generation! This book brings those recipes to life, but with a modern twist. I have so many recipes bookmarked, it will take me months to get through them, but it will be so much fun! I highly recommend this book if you've ever loved going to a jewish deli!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eli Sab

    The whole vibe of this book feels like you're chatting with the author in a warm, comfy place. I love the vibrant pictures, the friendly, down to earth style and tone. I know little to nothing about Jewish cuisine, so the recipes are fairly new to me and very much to die for, especially the desserts! Also easy enough to follow that a not so accomplished cook could try their hand at this. The short history nugget about every recipe lends a very heartfelt personal touch that further adds to the wh The whole vibe of this book feels like you're chatting with the author in a warm, comfy place. I love the vibrant pictures, the friendly, down to earth style and tone. I know little to nothing about Jewish cuisine, so the recipes are fairly new to me and very much to die for, especially the desserts! Also easy enough to follow that a not so accomplished cook could try their hand at this. The short history nugget about every recipe lends a very heartfelt personal touch that further adds to the whole charm of this cookbook. Many thanks to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing me with this ARC in exchange for an unbiased review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Beth SHULAM

    Thank you to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC to read and review. Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a gorgeous book that reinvents many traditional Jewish dishes of both Askenazi and Sephardic traditions. There are several holiday menus spread through out the book as well. Jake Cohen provides very detailed but uncomplicated instructions for preparing meat, vegetable, salad, soup, and dessert recipes. But, I think the highlight of this book are the gorgeous photographs by Matt Taylor-Gross Thank you to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the ARC to read and review. Jew-ish: A Cookbook is a gorgeous book that reinvents many traditional Jewish dishes of both Askenazi and Sephardic traditions. There are several holiday menus spread through out the book as well. Jake Cohen provides very detailed but uncomplicated instructions for preparing meat, vegetable, salad, soup, and dessert recipes. But, I think the highlight of this book are the gorgeous photographs by Matt Taylor-Gross. This is a cookbook I will be purchasing for myself when it releases in March 2021.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Basicsadie

    My Recommendation I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is beautifully photographed and fulfills the purpose for which it was written. This is not your Grandmother's recipes (I'm certainly not knocking grandma!) but the recipes have been up dated for today's flavors, tastes and hosting. (If you still enjoy grandmas recipes and don't wish to update, that too is okay. But the book is refreshing and the pages convey a work of love that the author I think strives for. I believe he has hit his mark! All My Recommendation I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is beautifully photographed and fulfills the purpose for which it was written. This is not your Grandmother's recipes (I'm certainly not knocking grandma!) but the recipes have been up dated for today's flavors, tastes and hosting. (If you still enjoy grandmas recipes and don't wish to update, that too is okay. But the book is refreshing and the pages convey a work of love that the author I think strives for. I believe he has hit his mark! All the classics are still there, just reinvented or better word, updated! Helpful tips, details and mouthwatering photography and recipes await you!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This is a beautifully illustrated well written cookbook that updates so many of the traditional recipes I’ve been making forever. Accompanying the recipes are “conversations” about them, their meaning and history. I’ve made quite a few of the recipes and they were wonderful. I really enjoyed that this wasn’t just recipes, but more like a story of the authors experience of them. I highly recommend this cookbook, not only for anyone who is Jewish, but for anyone who likes good love filled food for This is a beautifully illustrated well written cookbook that updates so many of the traditional recipes I’ve been making forever. Accompanying the recipes are “conversations” about them, their meaning and history. I’ve made quite a few of the recipes and they were wonderful. I really enjoyed that this wasn’t just recipes, but more like a story of the authors experience of them. I highly recommend this cookbook, not only for anyone who is Jewish, but for anyone who likes good love filled food for food truly is love. I received an advanced readers copy of this book from Netgalley.com, Jake Cohen and Houghton, Mifflin Harcourt for the opportunity to review this book.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...