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X-Men: X-Tinction Agenda

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X-Tinction Agenda, a 1990 crossover comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics that ran through Uncanny X-Men and its spin-off titles, X-Factor and New Mutants. "X-Tinction Agenda" not only reunited the X-Men after a prolonged period in which the team had been scattered around the globe (following the events of Uncanny X-Men #246-251), but featured the combined might X-Tinction Agenda, a 1990 crossover comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics that ran through Uncanny X-Men and its spin-off titles, X-Factor and New Mutants. "X-Tinction Agenda" not only reunited the X-Men after a prolonged period in which the team had been scattered around the globe (following the events of Uncanny X-Men #246-251), but featured the combined might of the three mutant teams for the first time, in their fight against the mutant-exploiting Genoshan government.


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X-Tinction Agenda, a 1990 crossover comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics that ran through Uncanny X-Men and its spin-off titles, X-Factor and New Mutants. "X-Tinction Agenda" not only reunited the X-Men after a prolonged period in which the team had been scattered around the globe (following the events of Uncanny X-Men #246-251), but featured the combined might X-Tinction Agenda, a 1990 crossover comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics that ran through Uncanny X-Men and its spin-off titles, X-Factor and New Mutants. "X-Tinction Agenda" not only reunited the X-Men after a prolonged period in which the team had been scattered around the globe (following the events of Uncanny X-Men #246-251), but featured the combined might of the three mutant teams for the first time, in their fight against the mutant-exploiting Genoshan government.

30 review for X-Men: X-Tinction Agenda

  1. 5 out of 5

    Frankh

    I'd be irresponsibly remiss if I don't read and review other notable storylines from the Chris Claremont era of the seventies, eighties and nineties before jumping on other works found in the recent MARVEL NOW! line-up. I have made a compact schedule I'm adamant to follow through for 2015 and I want to accomplish reading most of Claremont's memorable stuff first, even though I may have to do do it sporadically with no coherent sense of chronological rhythm at times. But I already posted a discla I'd be irresponsibly remiss if I don't read and review other notable storylines from the Chris Claremont era of the seventies, eighties and nineties before jumping on other works found in the recent MARVEL NOW! line-up. I have made a compact schedule I'm adamant to follow through for 2015 and I want to accomplish reading most of Claremont's memorable stuff first, even though I may have to do do it sporadically with no coherent sense of chronological rhythm at times. But I already posted a disclaimer in 'About XMCG" that my readings and reviews of the X-Men comics line will be mentally challenging not just for myself but for anyone who is just as new to the series. My goal mainly is to select the stories I know have been proven to be unanimously well-praised or at least well-liked by the majority of long-time fans and critics. To recap, I selected the classic, recognizable ones first (The Dark Phoenix, Days of Future Past and God Loves, Man Kills) and then skipped ahead to the later ones in 2009-2011 which were arguably Claremont's least impressive body of work (X-Men Forever, Excalibur III). And that's only when I decided to come back to the oldies, starting with the short-lived nineties run X-Men and then further back to The Uncanny X-Men with a standalone like issue #200, The Trial of Magneto and stories such as Legion Quest and this one called The X-Tinction Agenda. In between I touched upon House of M which is probably my very first taste of the work of current X-Men writer Brian Michael Bendis; Greg Pak's Magneto Testament and (for tomorrow's review) Fabian Nicieza's Fatal Attractions arc. For posterity, I also reviewed the very first Stan Lee debut issue X-Men #1 from the sixties and Len Wein's resurrection piece, Giant-Size X-Men #1. AND HERE WE ARE. "If the mutants aren't free, then maybe what you've built [in Genosha] isn't worth saving." The X-Tinction Agenda was brought to my attention by a brief 21-minute documentary from YouTube about key storylines from the Claremont era whose events were considered vital even to this day because whatever happened in them has continued to play an important role in the subsequent stories after. This collected volume I've acquired, however, was longer than the actual one posted in Goodreads. This one has 322 pages because it also included four additional issues (#235-238) which effectively contextualized what will come to pass by the time the X-Tinction Agenda story arc hits. This arc ran for nine issues and were divided equally among three titles: Claremont's The Uncanny X-Men, and Louise Simonson's X-Factor and New Mutants run. The volume also provided a recap of what has happened to the X-Men so far which really helped me understand and position myself in the stories herein. Before we read issues #235-238, we have to first read the summary of the previous events that led up to them: I apologize if I just copypasta-d the paragraphs instead of summarizing the summary itself because it would kind of defeat the purpose. Now, unlike with other reviews, I opted not to discuss in detail each issue's content here because, frankly, that would be an exhausting venture for me (and I've been in a tight time table lately with IRL work stuff so I'm trying to write reviews with a manageable length). I also might give away a lot of critical plot points that will irrevocably spoil you, and I think this is a collection that is worthy of a pick-up, so let me just give you some encouraging words of recommendation and commentary instead. The Uncanny X-Men #235-238 The thing that readers who are interested in this particular storyline need to understand first is the general treatment and care that Chris Claremont has provided in his years of writing The Uncanny X-Men since the mid-seventies. Anyone who knows the history of Stan Lee's "strangest heroes of all" is familiar with the fact that the X-Men are supposed to represent the civil rights movement at the time they were created which was during the African-American liberation and civil rights. It was Claremont who decisively sealed this allegory once he started to write for the X-Men, going as far as writing a rather straightforward story about that chilling comparison in God Loves, Man Kills which I reviewed nearly two months ago. That being said, as you read his earlier and inarguably most enduring works, you will notice a pattern in his story arcs. Everything that he has done in his Uncanny run has been building up to this socio-political atmosphere rife with anti-mutant sentiment and blatant racial hatred that often make me personally uncomfortable at times. Nevertheless, it's what makes Claremont's X-Men stories so exciting, dramatic and naturally sympathetic; by contextualizing real-life struggles that people have witnessed themselves or grew up with back in that time period, Claremont was both socially aware and smart enough to create stories from those experiences which require him to explore certain aspects about the X-Men as characters in the context of the fact that in the Marvelverse, mutants are considered a minority group, heavily discriminated against and are oppressed and exploited by human opportunists for both profit and propaganda. These four issues (#235-238) resonate with this message, primarily focusing on the 'exploitation' side of the coin. The story opens significantly in Genosha, a fictional city where a great number of the mutant population reside as citizens alongside the humans whom they supposedly harmoniously co-exist with, as the media coverage and public relations for that place would have you believed. In reality, every mutant there is hunted down, processed and assigned with different manual labor positions to the tune of a very modernized style of capitalist slavery. Treated more as cattle or machines than actual dignified people with indispensible rights, the mutants are reduced into the functionality and purpose of their powers or abilities. A bonafide brilliant genetic engineer (or 'genegineer') would tamper and manipulate their DNA for multiple purposes, most notably for breeding and modification where certain cluster of mutants are allowed to have children depending on the type of mutant Genoshans require for whatever field they want. It's a dystopic nightmare come to life as portrayed in a superhero genre story, and Claremont as a writer truly excels in rendering such haunting pieces that aim to expose human beings' capacity for cruelty, lunacy, and brutality all for the sake of their ridiculous sense of entitlement in the context of how they respond and treat the mutants as a separate species from them. I enjoyed these issues because this is the first time I encountered the horrors and crimes of Genosha towards its mutant citizens, and the spectrum of hatred and apathy that it's steeped in. This story also placed Wolverine and Rogue as the central characters we follow in this adventure as they learn of the terrible ways their fellow mutant brothers and sisters are being held captive and abused by the humans. Of course, racial hate crimes wouldn't be complete without having a designated discriminatory word for the race/species you wish to subjugate and make suffer. There has been an ongoing hate word for mutants which is "mutie", much like the N-word of their time. But Claremont surpassed that moniker with the grueling "genejoke". This term now attacks the genetic distinction of mutants, an inflammatory mockery of both their individual and racial identity as a "joke", deeming it an unnatural phenomenon. And here I thought that the Harry Potter series' "Mudblood" term for non-magic borned witches and wizards was the most offensive hate word I've ever come across in fiction. "Genejoke" is so much worse, especially when it's used by armed men and women who would shout it at your face as they either torture or murder you. In the other collected edition, these four issues were not included and I recommend that you buy the one that does have them instead because, although they are not a part of the actual X-Tinction Agenda arc, these ones give you a clearer and more vivid idea of how anti-mutant sentiments affect, destroy and advocate certain human beings' disgusting oppressive propaganda in Genosha--and why they must be stopped once and for all. RECOMMENDED: 8/10 The Uncanny X-Men #270-272, New Mutants #95-97, X-Factor issues #60-62 Personally, I enjoyed reading Claremont's contribution to this story arc the most, but Louise Simonson's issues from X-Factor and New Mutants are just as important but not as great as Claremont's. In addition, Jim Lee is once again illustrating Claremont's stories and I would maintain that he draws female X-Men characters the best of them all. The X-Tinction Agenda picks up many issues after #235-238, and here is the latest summary for that, once again industriously copypasta-d by me: This is, I believe, the height of all the criminal negligence and overall terrible assholery committed by the Genoshan humans that the X-Men, together with the X-Factor and New Mutants, will no longer put up with, and rightfully so--especially when this goddamn villain Cameron Hodge was discovered to be behind all of this, and then he also abducts and experiments on Ororo Munroe, my beloved Storm. Fuck that guy. There was nothing more satisfying than seeing him get obliterated into pieces once the last chapter closes. But before any of us would get to that heavenly readers, we had to endure the painful process of the continuing race war between the Genoshans and mutants as aided by the X-Men, and it's as depressing and enraging as one would expect. In spite of the shite our heroes are thrown head-first against, it also allowed for some of them to shine their brightest (like Cable, Beast, Angel, Havok, Wolfsbane and even Gambit). I also quite liked Storm's role in all of this even though it's rather insensitive to put an African superheroine in yet another degrading position where she is enslaved and brainwashed by a perceived powerful white man. It's...just gross, okay? But this does serve a purpose in the story and she does come out digfinied and stronger than ever in the end. Still, I was cringing in the scenes where she was programmed to attack her own friends and comrades while she is being pupetteered by Cameron Hodge WHO WILL NEVER STOP MAKING ME ANGRY. Ororo Munroe has always been a very important favorite; my love for her is only rivaled by Rogue and Jean Grey (my first and second faves respectively). I've always wanted to read more Storm-centric stories and I think the X-Tinction Agenda was about her in a manner of speaking. It explored her vulnerability but also invalidated that said vulnerability is a source of weakness. Villains and your average cunts and dickheads will take advantage of Storm, I suppose, but this self-fashioned weather goddess is a lot more powerful and deserving of our respect and fortitude than we actually give her. This story made a lot of use of her character--even if it's in the most unflattering way possible--but my love for Ororo Munroe has always been unfaltering anyway. Another commendable aspect of this story arc is the fact that we get to see the various X-teams work together and support one another in this brutal cavalry. Everyone feels important even if a select number of heroes do stand up more than others. As for the ending itself--well, the battle may have been won but a war is still imminent. The slavery and oppression in Genosha are just the tip of the iceberg in the ongoing fight among mutants and the humans who want them extinguished for good. We ended this story on that less than optimistic note, but as soon as the dust cleared, our heroes can at least claim their small, personal victories for themselves, knowing they have put the terrible crimes committed in Genosha in the spotlight so the rest of the world now knows what is truly going on there, and now everyone needs to make a decision of what they are fighting for or against. My only criticism for this story arc is that it does tend to get dull and redundant in some scenes and that some of the characterizations, and the flow of the narrative tend to contradict each other along the way but this can be overlooked and will not affect one's overall enjoyment of the story whatsoever as long as one is more emotionally invested on the characters themselves and their journey throughout all of this. RECOMMENDED: 7/10 With thirteen exciting issues collected, the X-Tinction Agenda is a memorable piece that belongs to the strongest run of the Chris Claremont era. You should pick this one up and see for yourself if this type is the of X-Men story that will appeal to your sensibilities. OVERALL RATING: 8/10 DO READ MY REVIEWS AT:

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    X-Tinction Agenda was the first big mutant crossover of the 1990s. Covering Uncanny X-Men #270-272, X-Factor #60-62, and New Mutants #95-97, this event makes many big changes in the status quo for all three X Books. The first thing that impresses me about this story is the cohesiveness...even near seamless interconnection...between the three titles. It reads like one long story. Previous mutant "crossover" events have had a two or maybe three issue sequence that brings characters and teams togeth X-Tinction Agenda was the first big mutant crossover of the 1990s. Covering Uncanny X-Men #270-272, X-Factor #60-62, and New Mutants #95-97, this event makes many big changes in the status quo for all three X Books. The first thing that impresses me about this story is the cohesiveness...even near seamless interconnection...between the three titles. It reads like one long story. Previous mutant "crossover" events have had a two or maybe three issue sequence that brings characters and teams together. This is the first time the characters of the different books were fully intertwined and the story flowed from book to book for 9 issues. For the X-Men, this is the first time that so many of the characters were back together and the first time Gambit and Jubilee were exposed to the "rest" of the team(s). Going forward after this, the questions of leadership and membership will be front and center. For the New Mutants, this is like a swan song. Death and change have decimated their ranks. The next few issues (the last 3 of the series) lead into the formation of X-Force. X-Factor is the only team that comes out intact, but emotionally they will never be the same. These events make them question everything about their hero status and their mission. Every X-Men fan should take a little time and read this crossover. It is key to understanding a lot of what happens in the 90s mutant titles. It also kicks off a new era in X-book history leading up to the launch of the second X-Men series and a complete changing of the guard in the writing department with the departures of Chris Claremont and Louise Simonson.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Omri

    The X-Men go to Genosha to fight against their rather obsessive megalomanic (and now semi-human) Hodge, who is enslaving mutants by turning them into mindless zombie-slaves. What will you get here? The Summers brothers reunited, the famous Jeanie/Wolvie kissy, the destruction of slave-time Genosha and a lot of unsatisfying loose ends. It's not one of Claremont's biggest sagas, but it is definitely of his rather good 90s era. So if you're into that kind of the X-Men (and I am) you will enjoy the The X-Men go to Genosha to fight against their rather obsessive megalomanic (and now semi-human) Hodge, who is enslaving mutants by turning them into mindless zombie-slaves. What will you get here? The Summers brothers reunited, the famous Jeanie/Wolvie kissy, the destruction of slave-time Genosha and a lot of unsatisfying loose ends. It's not one of Claremont's biggest sagas, but it is definitely of his rather good 90s era. So if you're into that kind of the X-Men (and I am) you will enjoy the nostalgic feel of reading a decent X-story, but if you're into the glamorous well designed stories - go read Whedon's Astonishing X-Men.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ανδρέας Μιχαηλίδης

    I have said before that I am not a fan of crossovers, especially major ones like this one, but X-tinction Agenda, as a product of the House of Ideas, was a monumentally bad idea. Most of it is basically one big boss battle against Cameron Hodge, while the plot is often devoid of cohesion: characters appear out of nowhere with no explanation, they change looks as plot elements are forgotten, there is senseless dialog which serves no purpose and action sequences which make no sense when you flip to I have said before that I am not a fan of crossovers, especially major ones like this one, but X-tinction Agenda, as a product of the House of Ideas, was a monumentally bad idea. Most of it is basically one big boss battle against Cameron Hodge, while the plot is often devoid of cohesion: characters appear out of nowhere with no explanation, they change looks as plot elements are forgotten, there is senseless dialog which serves no purpose and action sequences which make no sense when you flip to the previous page - sometimes when you look to the previous panel. Especially cringe-worthy are the flimsy efforts to draw parallels between Genosha and real-life history and politics, as well as make some political statements. As to the artwork, it is a royal mess, with the exception of some Jim Lee and Al Milgrom art. There are sloppy fillers, Rob Liefield not near his absolute worst but still pretty bad and again, a general lack of visual cohesion. As for Cameron Hodge, genuinely terrifying in the few places where the art is good, he mostly looks like a constipated cyborg-scorpion-thingie. I do not remember much from the first time I read it (which says something, since I remember all of the Age of Apocalypse, for instance), but this time, it was a genuinely bad read.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Crawford

    Overlong and overstuffed with characters. I understand the appeal of all of the x-teams working together, but there’s only one substantial antagonist so it feels like twenty people taking turns fighting the same guy for most of the book. Others have commented on how the inconsistency of the art throughout the story is distracting, so I won’t belabor that point. All in all you could tell this story with just Storm, Cyclops, Havok, Wolfsbane, and arguably Forge and Warlock. The pared down cast woul Overlong and overstuffed with characters. I understand the appeal of all of the x-teams working together, but there’s only one substantial antagonist so it feels like twenty people taking turns fighting the same guy for most of the book. Others have commented on how the inconsistency of the art throughout the story is distracting, so I won’t belabor that point. All in all you could tell this story with just Storm, Cyclops, Havok, Wolfsbane, and arguably Forge and Warlock. The pared down cast would also make the threat more believable.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    The first time I read this I had a gap of about 90 issues in Uncanny and hardly any bearing on X-Factor or New Mutants excepting some mostly common knowledge. And this story is very bound up in a lot of different pre-existing stories with a large mishmash of different characters from the three different titles. But rather than being an off-putting incident, I enjoyed all the different hints at backstory and characters I had no idea about. This of course stirs the continuity monster in me which c The first time I read this I had a gap of about 90 issues in Uncanny and hardly any bearing on X-Factor or New Mutants excepting some mostly common knowledge. And this story is very bound up in a lot of different pre-existing stories with a large mishmash of different characters from the three different titles. But rather than being an off-putting incident, I enjoyed all the different hints at backstory and characters I had no idea about. This of course stirs the continuity monster in me which causes such incidents as you are presently seeing through my little ongoing quest here. The other thing this does better than the crossover events prior is, although there are a few different stories feeding into the event, the different titles, characters, and plot threads all wrap together well. Inferno was a bit cracked between its different elements, and the writers didn't bother to bridge them fluidly. In this case I feel all the different ends are working together. The X-Men are still rebuilding themselves after the dissolution of the Australia branch and their ventures through the Siege Perilous. We also get to see the resolution of one of the better stories while the Australia branch was active. Also one of the more intuitive stories to the nature of the X-Men mythos: a country that uses mutants as slaves for the betterment of their nation. Though I recently saw Matt Fraction, the present Uncanny writer, say that Genosha just didn't work. And this is coming from the guy who appears to have resurrected Madelyne Prior... The New Mutants have had Cable take over and are beginning to get broken up. As with any crossover event, a New Mutant has to die (okay in one case it wasn't death, but it practically was). Another New Mutant gets cast off. Thankfully she gets picked up by a better writer than Liefield. And X-Factor is beginning their shift back into the X-Men fold. And they will confront their oldest enemy! (Wow, that was very cover teaser of me.) The art side unfortunately covers quite the spectrum. This crossover will make you think Jim Lee is the greatest artist ever. He isn't. But when he's up against a Rob Liefield who looks rushed and a Jon Bogdanove who has gone over the deep end he certainly looks it. In this recent continuity quest I saw some other Bogdanove art and it was actual kinda interesting. However he started to get so immersed in his style that he lost the ability to make it even remotely pleasing or interesting to the viewer. There was some other shmoe that drew a New Mutants issue as well. Mostly forgettable. Jim Lee has his faults, but I tend to enjoy his X-Men stuff. There's a reason it made him top dog in comic art in the early 90's. Everyone was copying him for a few years because of it. I personally begin to tire of all the characters looking exactly the same and later on he appears to both get lazy, and the little emotion his characters could muster seems to be mostly gone, excepting of course angry. And also his characters are impossibly muscular or curvaceous depending on gender. Obviously this is common in the superhero genre, but it doesn't mean I like it. And Jim Lee is an extreme of this.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Timothy McNeil

    I want to comment on a few things before I get to my main complaint. The artwork is somewhat consistent, but in X-Factor #60, the reader gets a Reagan-in-drag as the Genoshan President and a super-bulky Cyclops. Extra-muscled Cyclops actually comes and goes throughout the story, not just dependent on individual issues. Also, the artwork of the era was very much in line with the expectations of what the cheap paper could handle. It ain't great. In fact, it probably is my least favorite era of Mar I want to comment on a few things before I get to my main complaint. The artwork is somewhat consistent, but in X-Factor #60, the reader gets a Reagan-in-drag as the Genoshan President and a super-bulky Cyclops. Extra-muscled Cyclops actually comes and goes throughout the story, not just dependent on individual issues. Also, the artwork of the era was very much in line with the expectations of what the cheap paper could handle. It ain't great. In fact, it probably is my least favorite era of Marvel artwork (not that I'm an expert). But my main complaint is that Hodge -- the bad guy -- is so indestructible that it doesn't really matter what the X-Men/members of X-Factor/New Mutants (another reminder of how much I hate Cable) do. It doesn't matter if they have powers or not. Hodge is so amped up that nothing done to him matters (and, by the way, shouldn't his deal with the demon be the reason he gets to survive the supposedly lethal attacks rather than whatever means he used to borrow abilities for his suit?). Having said all of that, it is a connected story. There are not sidetracks or needless cutaways. In a graphic novel collection, it is awesome to see that. As a casual reader (as I was at the time), splitting the story over three titles (two of which I didn't read) is infuriating. Now, I do prefer more consistency to the artwork (and better quality, but the era was the era), but I understand that getting the story out in a short amount of time (as well as title contracts) required the workload be split up. The problem is that this is not the important excursion to Genosha. It isn't the second most important one, either. It really just ends up being part of that filler-era before the X-Men got back to being the X-Men.

  8. 4 out of 5

    C.

    I started reading the X-Men in middleschool at issue #275, right after the X-Tinction Agenda finished, so I spent my first few months as a comic-nerd hunting down these back issues and reading this "important" story-line. At the time, I was nieve enough to be taken in by the forced drama, new enough to comics to think that "earth-shattering" plots actually had some long term effect on the characters and the world. It was all new and strange, and I was instantly falling in love with Wolverine, Ar I started reading the X-Men in middleschool at issue #275, right after the X-Tinction Agenda finished, so I spent my first few months as a comic-nerd hunting down these back issues and reading this "important" story-line. At the time, I was nieve enough to be taken in by the forced drama, new enough to comics to think that "earth-shattering" plots actually had some long term effect on the characters and the world. It was all new and strange, and I was instantly falling in love with Wolverine, Archangel, Gambit, et al (and Psyloche! Jim Lee's run on the X-Men, in some ways, was the best time EVER to be a 12 year old nerd). This was really the last , forced hurrah before the X-Francise completely imploded into complete shlock, but all the signs were there - Claremont writing three interlocking titles, Lee's panel shattering art (which was mind-blowing to a young teen), Liefeld's utter disregart of anatomy or intelligent composition, Simonson's horrific art on X-Factor (even today its some of the worst penciling for a major title ever). But man, did I have a crush on Jubilee.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Oh how I yearn for the days of classic X-Men to return! This book made me remember everything I loved about the X-universe. The art is a little 90s, but for all that, it's still better than most of what is out there today. Of course, I would expect nothing less from Jim Lee, even back then. The teams were a little confusing and not long after this reset to the teams as I knew them. The storytelling is pretty good--I like less the story they told in some regards than the stories they were setting Oh how I yearn for the days of classic X-Men to return! This book made me remember everything I loved about the X-universe. The art is a little 90s, but for all that, it's still better than most of what is out there today. Of course, I would expect nothing less from Jim Lee, even back then. The teams were a little confusing and not long after this reset to the teams as I knew them. The storytelling is pretty good--I like less the story they told in some regards than the stories they were setting up. Doug and Warlock's deaths, not to mention Hodge's experiments, are critical to the Phalanx storyline that takes place over two years later. The tension between some people is likewise still crucial in setup. In any case, reading this was so nostalgic for me. I loved it. But I hated it for making me want to go back to the Marvel realm when I know how screwed up it is now.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Harris

    X-Tinction Agenda shook the X-Teams to their foundations, and paved the way for the early 90s period of X-comics that brought in a whole new generation of readers, and I think this crossover deserves some of the credit for making that possible. My favorite components of the book were the issues penciled by Jim Lee, but the characterization of the key players in the book was also strong, and Genosha's situation was a strong allegory to other country's issues, so seeing the X-Men strive to free th X-Tinction Agenda shook the X-Teams to their foundations, and paved the way for the early 90s period of X-comics that brought in a whole new generation of readers, and I think this crossover deserves some of the credit for making that possible. My favorite components of the book were the issues penciled by Jim Lee, but the characterization of the key players in the book was also strong, and Genosha's situation was a strong allegory to other country's issues, so seeing the X-Men strive to free the island nation and its enslaved mutate population from their despotic ruler, Cameron Hodge, made this a gripping read. The art on the New Mutants and X-Factor issues is not nearly as strong, but the plot remains powerful and logically sequential, with a lot of stumbling blocks thrown into the X-Men's path before the dramatic conclusion.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joel Gomes

    The best thing about Claremont's X-Men stories is the parallelism between fiction and reality. By using mutants and other fictional characters, Claremont is able to portray a picture of the worst aspects of mankind: ignorance and inability to deal with the unknown, to accept what's different. It's the Holocaust, it's the Ruanda genocides, it's Syria, it's everything that makes us want to change channels. This story may not have real pictures, but its images carry a message and meaning that easily The best thing about Claremont's X-Men stories is the parallelism between fiction and reality. By using mutants and other fictional characters, Claremont is able to portray a picture of the worst aspects of mankind: ignorance and inability to deal with the unknown, to accept what's different. It's the Holocaust, it's the Ruanda genocides, it's Syria, it's everything that makes us want to change channels. This story may not have real pictures, but its images carry a message and meaning that easily sustain the passage of time.

  12. 5 out of 5

    CoolNameGuy

    The story starts off slow with a totally uninteresting villian, yet an interesting overall concept. It's hot and miss for the first 1/4 or so. After that, it's non-stop action, drama, and twists, with Jim Lee, Rob Liefeld and the like supplying possible the best X art yet (which was especially nice after the preceding Excalibur issues) to amplify the intensity. There are some plot devices, but this arc has some of the best action and character moments in series history. The story starts off slow with a totally uninteresting villian, yet an interesting overall concept. It's hot and miss for the first 1/4 or so. After that, it's non-stop action, drama, and twists, with Jim Lee, Rob Liefeld and the like supplying possible the best X art yet (which was especially nice after the preceding Excalibur issues) to amplify the intensity. There are some plot devices, but this arc has some of the best action and character moments in series history.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    Haven't read comics since middle school. I loved the X-men then, especially with Jim Lee's art. This was a great thrift store find for a $1.00 in Munising, Michigan and mostly a nostalgic read, but a really fun one. Haven't read comics since middle school. I loved the X-men then, especially with Jim Lee's art. This was a great thrift store find for a $1.00 in Munising, Michigan and mostly a nostalgic read, but a really fun one.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    MOst of the art in this has not aged well. Writing was pretty crappy too. Basically various superhero characters keep fighting the same bad guy, Cameron Hodge over and over again. They lose many times and finally flex their butt muscles and win in the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    A fast moving read. the new mutants are kidnapped and taken to Genosha. Everybody associated with the Xmen decide to rescue them. Quite a few twists, and a good long read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Warren

    The art and style are super-dated, but I remember really enjoying this story back back in the day. It's definitely got the best version of Gambit, even if he was only in it for a few pages. The art and style are super-dated, but I remember really enjoying this story back back in the day. It's definitely got the best version of Gambit, even if he was only in it for a few pages.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Matt Brakensiek

    Epic storyline with tons of tie-ins with the various x-books, but a tough read. Hard to get through, but a worthwhile read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Hoo-boy. While the 90's X-Men are justifiably remembered as bad ass, enshrined forever in a warm glow of nostalgia and blue and yellow spandex, it turns out this awesomeness is best handled in small doses--a single wolverine splash page, for example, or a Jim Lee cover group shot. It turns out 200-odd pages of X-hijinks, dated quips and impossibly muscled bodies is A LOT. I'm sure this crossover worked better when digested as single issues, but a one-volume read through is tiring, repetitive, and Hoo-boy. While the 90's X-Men are justifiably remembered as bad ass, enshrined forever in a warm glow of nostalgia and blue and yellow spandex, it turns out this awesomeness is best handled in small doses--a single wolverine splash page, for example, or a Jim Lee cover group shot. It turns out 200-odd pages of X-hijinks, dated quips and impossibly muscled bodies is A LOT. I'm sure this crossover worked better when digested as single issues, but a one-volume read through is tiring, repetitive, and reveals all of this event's flaws. The action returns to the Genosha of Claremont's earlier "A Green and Pleasant Land" storyline: an island nation of advanced technology built on the backs of its enslaved mutant population, which naturally finds itself at odds with the X-men. As retribution for the X-men's interference, the Genoshan Press Gang (led by a surprising familiar face) attacks the X-teams, kidnapping members of both the X-Men and Cable's young X-Force. The remaining mutant heroes quickly plot a rescue, and the plot takes off... ...and then plods along slowly, treading water issue after issue. The "rescue" progresses agonizingly slowly, with the action quickly settling into a pattern of Escape-Fight-Recapture-Repeat. At its best moments, the story delves into the body horror elements of its main villain and the fates of a few key mutants. At its worst, the reader is stuck following Jubilee around while nothing happens, or listening to the repetitive monologues of the "mysterious" Big Bad. It also seems really weird that Magneto is absent from this storyline, as it seems tailor-made for his character. Eventually, the story does reach a climax of sorts, although it is reliant on a pretty big Deus ex machina to push things forward. Things turn into essentially an issues-long boss fight that moves from grueling to sublime to hilarious, complete with a beheading and a giant, cyborg scorpion. Everything is turned up to 11. It's the 90's. There are better and worse X-events, but this one is notable for changing up the group status quo and essentially ushering in what's fondly remembered as the "90's" X-Men. It's a key moment, important not so much for the content itself as for what comes after it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    James

    My appreciation for "X-Tinction Agenda" is hard to disentangle from the joy of first reading it when I was 10 years old. On a re-read, it still does a lot of things well. The plot centers on the X-Men (and their associated hangers-on) having a showdown with the mutant apartheid state of Genosha. The two sides are well-matched, leading to some solid subterfuge and action. The casts blend well, and the writers do a good job cross-cutting between different plot elements, following a strike force he My appreciation for "X-Tinction Agenda" is hard to disentangle from the joy of first reading it when I was 10 years old. On a re-read, it still does a lot of things well. The plot centers on the X-Men (and their associated hangers-on) having a showdown with the mutant apartheid state of Genosha. The two sides are well-matched, leading to some solid subterfuge and action. The casts blend well, and the writers do a good job cross-cutting between different plot elements, following a strike force heading into action, for instance, as well as escapees who have been stripped of their powers. That said, the storytelling is a bit flabby. Setpieces repeat, particularly when villain Cameron Hodge, a nightmarish cyborg, has the defeated heroes in his grasp only to wonder off to give them time to recover. The characters' motivations and backstories also shift slightly between issues, a sign that the editorial guidance for the crossover may not have been in total lockstep. The art is pretty divergent throughout the series. Jim Lee's work in the X-men issues is miles beyond anything X-Factor and New Mutants can offer up. It's almost a letdown to slip into one of the other art styles after seeing Lee's detailed lines. (Indeed, the cover for X-Factor 61 is one of the worst I've seen on a published comic.) The general arc for the series still succeeds. The teamwork--indeed, the sense of family--on display is strong. "X-Tinction Agenda" also shakes up the status quo for New Mutants and X-Factor series that were running stale. Even with the missteps and repetition, it remains an enjoyable example of late-classic X-Men.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Easy 5 stars. This is such a rewarding and exciting book. The art is through the roof!! Jim Lee, Rob Leifeld (yeah yeah yeah I like him, get over it) and John Bogdanove kill it!! It really elevates X-Factor, X-Men and New Mutants to the next level. Claremont and Simonson tell their best story since Dark Phoenix. What struck me is how all three titles tie into one coherent story. This was new for X book crossovers. Prior events like Inferno, Fall of the Mutants and Mutant Massacre seemed so disjo Easy 5 stars. This is such a rewarding and exciting book. The art is through the roof!! Jim Lee, Rob Leifeld (yeah yeah yeah I like him, get over it) and John Bogdanove kill it!! It really elevates X-Factor, X-Men and New Mutants to the next level. Claremont and Simonson tell their best story since Dark Phoenix. What struck me is how all three titles tie into one coherent story. This was new for X book crossovers. Prior events like Inferno, Fall of the Mutants and Mutant Massacre seemed so disjointed, with the various crossovers seeming sloppy and lacking in singular vision. Conversely, this reads like a novel. The drama and resolution here was a decade in the making. Cameron Hodge and Archangel go way back. There are some old, bitter hatreds here and they pay off. I fucking loved this story. So... here are some weird things that deserve mention. While all three individual artists are great, there didn’t seem to be much artist cooperation. The writers were all on the same page, but the artists had some issues keeping details consistence. Cable’s eye and Storm’s face tattoo immediately come to mind. In a New Mutants issue, Storm’s face is clear and Cable has a glowing eye... in the next X-Factor issue, his eye is normal, his scar is different, and Storm’s number is tatted on her face again. It’s weird. Not weird enough to justify giving this masterpiece anything less than five stars though. Enjoy!!!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Risebury-Crisp

    My X-history has a slight blind spot between Inferno and Deadly Attraction and beyond early New Mutants, I haven't read any of the Cable / X-Force era, so I thought I should read this. It's very reminiscent of it's time, lots of machismo, posturing, big guns and (at times) dodgy art (mainly from Liefield). Jae Lee's art is great though. And Cyclopd hairy chest is a nice treat too! The various X-teams have been dispersed for a few years, but after the kidnapping of Storm, Rictor, Boom-Boom and Wol My X-history has a slight blind spot between Inferno and Deadly Attraction and beyond early New Mutants, I haven't read any of the Cable / X-Force era, so I thought I should read this. It's very reminiscent of it's time, lots of machismo, posturing, big guns and (at times) dodgy art (mainly from Liefield). Jae Lee's art is great though. And Cyclopd hairy chest is a nice treat too! The various X-teams have been dispersed for a few years, but after the kidnapping of Storm, Rictor, Boom-Boom and Wolfsbane by Genosion forces, the 3 US based X-teams team up to rescue them (somehow Wolverine, new-formed ninja Psylocke and Jubilee turn up too). I think this collection could have benefited with a brief "Previously" box at the start to explain why Wolverine et al were in Genosia etc. Also, narrativly, seeing more of Genosia could have made the story grander (we mainly stay in the Citadel). If you're familar with the general premise of the X-universe and are looking for a slightly madcap, chaotic story, give this a go, it is entertaining in it's own way.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    I got into X-Men with the 90s cartoon. In comic terms, it was the end of the X-Cutioner's Song. I read earlier stories and issues that I could find in libraries or get cheap and I read a lot about earlier events. But I haven't read everything. I didn't realize how much I'd missed until I started listening to X-Plain the X-Men. After listening to the first episode about X-Tinction Agenda I remembered that my library has the trade and I got it. Ugh. I can see the X-Men I remember here but in early I got into X-Men with the 90s cartoon. In comic terms, it was the end of the X-Cutioner's Song. I read earlier stories and issues that I could find in libraries or get cheap and I read a lot about earlier events. But I haven't read everything. I didn't realize how much I'd missed until I started listening to X-Plain the X-Men. After listening to the first episode about X-Tinction Agenda I remembered that my library has the trade and I got it. Ugh. I can see the X-Men I remember here but in early forms. Mostly there's a lot of art that makes me cringe. I'm not as forgiving of the plot problems, continuity errors, or pacing as they are on X-Plain the X-Men but it's good to know the reasons for so much of the ugh stuff. This would have more weight if I'd been reading what came before but at least I know how important it is thanks to the podcast. Otherwise I'd wonder why this was collected and why I should keep it on my library's shelf. Had to make myself finish this one. I was kind of excited about reading X-Cutioner's Song but now I'm a little worried.

  23. 5 out of 5

    TK

    An uneven story line for sure. There were inconsistencies with the writing with lots of opportunities for readers to earn "No Prizes" for catching the obvious (minor) continuity issues. Ultimately it was still fun. Genosha is a strong setting, the villain in this is the most ludicrous 90's creation ever, and it's packed full of x-goodness. An uneven story line for sure. There were inconsistencies with the writing with lots of opportunities for readers to earn "No Prizes" for catching the obvious (minor) continuity issues. Ultimately it was still fun. Genosha is a strong setting, the villain in this is the most ludicrous 90's creation ever, and it's packed full of x-goodness.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Some of the politics in this one did not age well. "Yeah, the fascist, racist oppressors are bad but not as bad as (insert crazy bad guy) so let's work together with them at the end to bring down (insert crazy bad guy). Lost opportunity for a comic about Wolverine sneaking into an island full of anti-mutant Nazis and just executing every gd one of them. Some of the politics in this one did not age well. "Yeah, the fascist, racist oppressors are bad but not as bad as (insert crazy bad guy) so let's work together with them at the end to bring down (insert crazy bad guy). Lost opportunity for a comic about Wolverine sneaking into an island full of anti-mutant Nazis and just executing every gd one of them.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jesse Annoh

    Definitely a classic; a jewel from my youth. I recommend it to those who missed the Clermont era. Its lengthy, to qualify as more than a quick read and that yearning for an X-men story. Happy reading!

  26. 5 out of 5

    ProClaim Publishers

    Jim Lee's art in this book is some of the best, which makes up for some bits that are not so great. Rob Liefeld shows talent in his art, although at times very inconsistent. The book is good for it's time though. Jim Lee's art in this book is some of the best, which makes up for some bits that are not so great. Rob Liefeld shows talent in his art, although at times very inconsistent. The book is good for it's time though.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    An interesting story with real stakes but the 1990's art made reading this collection a painful experience. An interesting story with real stakes but the 1990's art made reading this collection a painful experience.

  28. 4 out of 5

    L

    So ugly it hurts (minus Jim Lee). The story is as bad as it gets and the writting is lazy as hell.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I'll be honest, I'm not the biggest fan of Chris Claremont. Yes, he is a genius. Yes, if not for him the X-Men would have died out before it even had a chance to flourish. But god damn, his work is some of the wordiest and out-dated I have ever read. So, although I was very excited to receive this graphic novel as a Christmas present this year, I found myself being a bit hesitant to start it for fear that the story wouldn't quite live up to more recent X work I have read, in particular All-New X I'll be honest, I'm not the biggest fan of Chris Claremont. Yes, he is a genius. Yes, if not for him the X-Men would have died out before it even had a chance to flourish. But god damn, his work is some of the wordiest and out-dated I have ever read. So, although I was very excited to receive this graphic novel as a Christmas present this year, I found myself being a bit hesitant to start it for fear that the story wouldn't quite live up to more recent X work I have read, in particular All-New X-Men, and in some ways it doesn't. For the first 200 pages or so the story plods on, is incredibly repetitive and nothing interesting seems to go down. (Some X-Men get captured by Genoshan forces. The other X-Men swoop in to the rescue. Everything is fine, and then some X-Men get captured by Genoshan forces again, and then it's up to the X-Men, X-Factor and the New Mutants to save the day.) I wasn't thrilled... I wasn't... x-cited (I had to, apologies). I base my rating on an X-Men graphic novel by asking myself the following question: did it make me want to become an X-Man? 200 pages into X-Tinction Agenda, the answer was no. Then came the last 116 pages and the graphic novel did a 360 - more on that later. This graphic novel can be split into 2 parts, which I refer to as The Genegineer Saga (Part 1) and The Hodge Saga (Part 2). In Part 1, after a rather boring romp in Genosha, the X-Men meet The Genegineer, an even more boring antagonist, brainwashed by his own anti-mutant views. They clash with him, threaten him, and get out in one piece. All is right with the world, or so we think. SPOILERS AHEAD In Part 2, some of the New Mutants and (a now teenage) Storm get captured by Genoshan forces and are put on trial to answer for their crimes in Part 1. This is when the story gets moderately interesting. We not only see the death of one of the characters (think a cybernetic version of Groot) but we come face to face with one of the most disturbing enemies of Claremont's run on the X-Men: Commander Hodge. He is hideous, a lovechild of Lovecraftian and Wachowski proportions dead set on wiping out all mutants at all costs. Although just thinking of this guy gives me nightmares, he saved X-Tinction Agenda from boring readers to tears. In this graphic novel, we see unlikely allies joining forces and some X-teammates putting aside their differences for the overall good - this is, I suppose, stating the obvious, as this is a cross-over after all. My favourite team-up had to have been Jubilee, Rictor and Boom-Boom, and the interaction between the two ladies was both sassy and priceless. I like to think that the two are actually lesbians who really dig one another but right now are confused. I'd totally ship that couple - Jubiloom - what a cute name! Speaking of lovers, the infamous love triangle of Cyclops, Jean Grey and Wolverine is revisited, which is also quite nice. Also, there's no hint of who Jean feels more strongly for, which I quite liked. The final act of the graphic novel was incredible, and definitely kept me in suspense. The final fight that takes place is awesome and intense. Hodge just won't die! It becomes quite comical, the only part I found humorous in this book to be honest. Overall, I would recommend this graphic novel for the patient comic reader, and of course every Claremont fan. Is it a must-read? Yes, perhaps. Does it make you want to be an X-Men? Yes, it eventually does. All in all: 4 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Colten Hibbs

    This is the second "old-school" X-Men graphic novel that I read. The first was The Dark Phoenix saga, and while it was very dated the storyline, characters, and art were such that I still found it very enjoyable. X-tinction however was a good story...not great, not brilliant, or masterfully told...merely good. The opening story involving Wolverine & Rogue was poorly illustrated. So much so that only a person intimately familiar with the characters could indicate who was speaking at least once per p This is the second "old-school" X-Men graphic novel that I read. The first was The Dark Phoenix saga, and while it was very dated the storyline, characters, and art were such that I still found it very enjoyable. X-tinction however was a good story...not great, not brilliant, or masterfully told...merely good. The opening story involving Wolverine & Rogue was poorly illustrated. So much so that only a person intimately familiar with the characters could indicate who was speaking at least once per page. The quality of the art and the story itself improved on page 99, and I understood the importance of the earlier storyline, but the fact that I fell asleep four times in reading the first 99 pages is telling. This is somewhat of an important story for someone who's interested in the history of the X-Men, but not one I would recommend for a novice-reader like myself. The plot is too convoluted, and a bit repetitive (capture, escape, capture, escape, etc). I found it too unevenly paced, and drawn out to be truly enjoyable. But all in all I'm glad I read it. In researching this arc and its aftermath I was led to other X stories that are more suited to my taste and level of fandom...it was also nice (however irritating) to read a piece of X history.

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