Hot Best Seller

If You, Then Me

Availability: Ready to download

What would you ask your future self? First question: What does it feel like to kiss someone? Xia is stuck in a lonely, boring loop. Her only escapes are Wiser, an artificial intelligence app she designed to answer questions like her future self, and a mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. And then one day Xia enrolls at the Foundry, an app incubator for What would you ask your future self? First question: What does it feel like to kiss someone? Xia is stuck in a lonely, boring loop. Her only escapes are Wiser, an artificial intelligence app she designed to answer questions like her future self, and a mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. And then one day Xia enrolls at the Foundry, an app incubator for tech prodigies in Silicon Valley. Suddenly, anything is possible. Flirting with Mast, a classmate also working on AI, leads to a date. Speaking up generates a vindictive nemesis intent on publicly humiliating her. And running into Mitzy Erst, Foundry alumna and Xia’s idol, could give Xia all the answers. And then Xia receives a shocking message from ObjectPermanence: He is at the Foundry, too. Xia is torn between Mast and ObjectPermanence—just as Mitzy pushes her towards a shiny new future. Xia doesn’t have to ask Wiser to know: The right choice could transform her into the future self of her dreams, but the wrong one could destroy her.


Compare

What would you ask your future self? First question: What does it feel like to kiss someone? Xia is stuck in a lonely, boring loop. Her only escapes are Wiser, an artificial intelligence app she designed to answer questions like her future self, and a mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. And then one day Xia enrolls at the Foundry, an app incubator for What would you ask your future self? First question: What does it feel like to kiss someone? Xia is stuck in a lonely, boring loop. Her only escapes are Wiser, an artificial intelligence app she designed to answer questions like her future self, and a mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. And then one day Xia enrolls at the Foundry, an app incubator for tech prodigies in Silicon Valley. Suddenly, anything is possible. Flirting with Mast, a classmate also working on AI, leads to a date. Speaking up generates a vindictive nemesis intent on publicly humiliating her. And running into Mitzy Erst, Foundry alumna and Xia’s idol, could give Xia all the answers. And then Xia receives a shocking message from ObjectPermanence: He is at the Foundry, too. Xia is torn between Mast and ObjectPermanence—just as Mitzy pushes her towards a shiny new future. Xia doesn’t have to ask Wiser to know: The right choice could transform her into the future self of her dreams, but the wrong one could destroy her.

30 review for If You, Then Me

  1. 4 out of 5

    Simone

    Having a programming husband, I know way more than I need to about coding and the tech world. However, this book presented me with a completely different aspect; the business side. It was interesting to see how tech looks at these young folks and their apps. There was a bit of snobbery with some of the ideas the kids had while other kids were trying to save the world with their apps. I also thought it was interesting to see who got bought and who got funding. I don't know much about those parts, Having a programming husband, I know way more than I need to about coding and the tech world. However, this book presented me with a completely different aspect; the business side. It was interesting to see how tech looks at these young folks and their apps. There was a bit of snobbery with some of the ideas the kids had while other kids were trying to save the world with their apps. I also thought it was interesting to see who got bought and who got funding. I don't know much about those parts, but it was fun to read about. Xia was the definition of naive young person. The story followed her more than had a plot that moved forward. Her actions leading her character development felt spot on and her blown up ego at the end made so much sense to me. Although, it did surprise me when the book finally got to the final showcase and everyone was already prepared. I also really liked her removal from both the tech world (growing up outside of Boston) and from the kinds of privilege and luxury the other kids. She got herself into a lot of messes. At one point, I kind of felt bad for her. A lot of the situations she found herself in were very adult for someone just sixteen to be in. I don't think it was wild that she went off to California on her own (as someone who's traveled across the world at 15, I know that that level of responsibility is possible for someone that age), but the situations she found herself in were so much more than even I want to find myself in. Because as an adult, you can read her situations and can determine right off the bat that something feels scammy or someone's out to get you behind your back, but as a kid, you don't know better. This is all new to you and with that newness comes a level of naivety that you don't develop until you've experienced it. The situations Xia found herself were rough and with each new experience, it felt like it got worse and worse for her. At one point, I just wanted to give her a big old hug and pull her away from everything. I wanted to save her from what she was going through, but at the same time I understand how important it is to experience these things first hand. That's how you grow and learn. The characters were great. I thought it was an interesting mix including folks who were super rich and privileged and other folks who didn't have all the luxuries in the world. There was a lot of backstabbing, envy and jealousy, and petty arguments as well given that they're teenagers who were living in boarding school together. It made for some interesting dynamics that played so well throughout the story. I loved Amina, Xia's best friend. She was so confident in knowing who she was, which was just a nerdy tech girl feeling a bit lost in the whole game of things. She provided such good advice and insight that Xia desperately needed (and desperately avoided). The only issue I had was that there were a few storylines that were dropped towards the end. I wanted to know what happened to Mitzy and I wondered what the kids were doing after they finished their year at the foundry. Also, it felt like Mast dropped off right in the middle of the story and aside from a few glances his way, he didn't have a big part in the story. It made the ending feel a bit weird. It's not a big deal, but something I noticed while I was finishing up the book. I also loved the whole You've Got Mail vibe going with Xia and her mysterious online friend, ObjectPermanence. I tried to guess who it was (and came out wrong), but pleasantly surprised to find out who it was in the end. Overall, this was a great story that followed a young person through some heavy trials and tribulations. I really loved getting to know Xia throughout. I received a copy of this book from the author. My opinion hasn't been influenced by the publisher or the author.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ayushi

    Thank you so much to HarperCollins Children's Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review! I loved this YA contemporary! This book did a great job of describing the enticing yet cutthroat nature of Silicon Valley and following Xia on her journey of self determination and standing up for herself in a precarious environment. Please keep in mind that although this is a YA novel, the book does feature content that may be triggering for readers, including assault, racism, and s Thank you so much to HarperCollins Children's Books for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review! I loved this YA contemporary! This book did a great job of describing the enticing yet cutthroat nature of Silicon Valley and following Xia on her journey of self determination and standing up for herself in a precarious environment. Please keep in mind that although this is a YA novel, the book does feature content that may be triggering for readers, including assault, racism, and substance abuse. I’d give this book 4 stars total! If You, Then Me follows Xia Chan, a 16-year-old programmer desperate to escape her slow Massachusetts town to glittering Silicon Valley with Wiser, her self-designed artificial intelligence app and her mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. One day Xia finds the opportunity to travel to California, through the Foundry, an app incubator for tech prodigies in Silicon Valley. Once in Silicon Valley, Xia finds herself thrust into a world of cutthroat competition, dangerous influences, and new love. I loved the influence of Silicon Valley and computer science mixed in this story (the opening chapter was so cool!). Although I am not as knowledgeable in programming languages, I still found the lingo and references easy to comprehend. Yvonne Woon does an excellent job of highlighting important social issues within Silicon Valley culture, such as women in STEM having to fight their way to be seen among their male counterparts, classism, harassment in the workplace, and the exploitation of minors. I loved rooting for Xia in this story, even when she made the wrong decisions, and was so glad to see her find her way in the end of the novel. The romance aspect of this novel is not a super prominent storyline compared to Xia’s own personal journey and therefore I didn’t find myself too invested in the love triangle. However, it was interesting to try to guess ObjectPermanence’s identity throughout the novel (although the answer became a little obvious towards the end). I love books that feature two characters meeting anonymously online without realizing each other’s identity, and this book lived up to the trope! Overall, if you’re a computer science & YA contemporary lover, I’d definitely recommend this book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    This book surprised me by how good it was. It was such a page turner! The mystery aspect of the love story kept me reading until the end and was so cute. It was also pretty funny. Some parts had me laughing out loud. I also loved how it explored so many of the issues girls face when they enter spaces dominated by men. I didn’t think a tech book would appeal to me but you really don’t have to know anything about coding to love this book! The characters were so real and believable that it felt lik This book surprised me by how good it was. It was such a page turner! The mystery aspect of the love story kept me reading until the end and was so cute. It was also pretty funny. Some parts had me laughing out loud. I also loved how it explored so many of the issues girls face when they enter spaces dominated by men. I didn’t think a tech book would appeal to me but you really don’t have to know anything about coding to love this book! The characters were so real and believable that it felt like they were my friends. Xia was super relatable and such a sweet narrator. I did wish the ending was a little longer but that’s mainly because didn’t want the book to end.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chandra Claypool (WhereTheReaderGrows)

    I absolutely LOVED this story! Cue up an Asian girl named Xia who makes it into a very elite school called the Foundry. She has an on-line boyfriend she can tell anything to, an app she made called Wiser whom she speaks to on the reg and always feels a bit out of place.... So yes, in her naivety, she starts to make some questionable decisions. I was happy to see that while the synopsis suggests some weird love triangle between Xia, an IRL boy and her online love... that it also was a whole lot mo I absolutely LOVED this story! Cue up an Asian girl named Xia who makes it into a very elite school called the Foundry. She has an on-line boyfriend she can tell anything to, an app she made called Wiser whom she speaks to on the reg and always feels a bit out of place.... So yes, in her naivety, she starts to make some questionable decisions. I was happy to see that while the synopsis suggests some weird love triangle between Xia, an IRL boy and her online love... that it also was a whole lot more! It's Xia coming to terms with herself. This comes not only in gaining some confidence but also in succeeding within herself. There were so many times I wanted to shake some sense into her but I feel the experiences she went through were very realistic and very, very human. Now... the only thing I side eyed a bit was the excessive use of alcohol and slight drug usage ... especially in instances of adults providing or taking advantage because of it. Don't get me wrong, I remember what it's like to be 16 and certainly wasn't an angel but some parts of this didn't fell 100% authentic. BUT, I wouldn't be surprised in this day and age either. Ok, now I'm rambling. I truly came to love and admire Xia throughout this read. A few things I definitely saw coming but one particular little thing I was surprised by and I love it. Was a little too neatly wrapped up? Possibly... but it absolutely worked for me. Wiser, how do I get people to read this book? 😉 Seriously, readers and friends, this is an adorable story and would highly recommend.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Incredible book! Definitely her best yet 😜

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Children's Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review If You, Then Me was such an original novel. You don’t need to have any particular interest in coding or start-ups to fall in love with this book. It’s about people and relationships and what happens when sixteen-year-olds are thrust into a high powered, high stakes adult world without much guidance or a real safety net. It was funny, heartbreaking, and entertaining from Thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Children's Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review If You, Then Me was such an original novel. You don’t need to have any particular interest in coding or start-ups to fall in love with this book. It’s about people and relationships and what happens when sixteen-year-olds are thrust into a high powered, high stakes adult world without much guidance or a real safety net. It was funny, heartbreaking, and entertaining from beginning to end. Xia is a very relatable protagonist feeling at times lost, lonely, completely in control, and absolutely taken advantage of. The setting of the book, Silicon Valley in the cutthroat world of tech start-ups, was detailed and immersive. The parties, the people, and the meetings where everything is on the line felt real and easily overwhelming. Similarly, the complexity of all of Xia’s relationships kept them feeling realistic and interesting. If You, Then Me was full of insight and surprises and absolutely worth the read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    ellie garrett

    ~ 1.5 stars there are just over a hundred ratings for this book as of now. there is only ONE 1 star rating other than mine. so i feel as though i need to justify this. xia chan is a lower middle class girl, living in massachusetts with a dream of silicon valley. miraculously, her program Wiser gets her into an elite school where she will compete with 20 other top coding kids to become the year's newest Founder. also, as you can tell from the cover, this book was sold to me as a romance. xia chan ~ 1.5 stars there are just over a hundred ratings for this book as of now. there is only ONE 1 star rating other than mine. so i feel as though i need to justify this. xia chan is a lower middle class girl, living in massachusetts with a dream of silicon valley. miraculously, her program Wiser gets her into an elite school where she will compete with 20 other top coding kids to become the year's newest Founder. also, as you can tell from the cover, this book was sold to me as a romance. xia chan was, in my opinion, an utterly dislikable and obnoxious protagonist. she was ridiculously naïve, superficial, and careless with her time and decisions. even for a teen, i was baffled by her stupidity. she also spent half of the book going to parties and drinking and once doing acid, and at the end when the truth came out about someone who had been taking advantage of her, she was told she had done nothing wrong. this confused me more than anything, because while the person arrested definately used xia, i found this a.) spectacularly obvious and b.) partially xia's own fault. moving on to the plot itself- the school xia attends, the Foundry, has potential to be very interesting. instead, xia spends the entire book ditching, going to parties, and blowing off classes. so i never actually got to see what was interesting about the school, and i never got to hear about any coding stuff. especially since xia never worked on her AI, which she talked about the flaws of but never fixed cause she was too busy partying. i am aware that in the last few pages, teachers and such point out to her that this was a bad move. the author wasn't trying to glorify getting drunk instead of going to class. but when that's all i’m reading about for 350 pages, it makes for an awful plot and protagonist. finally, the DREADFUL romance. what the heck. since xia spent her whole life out with her mentor, at lunch, at parties, she was never even WITH the boy she "fell in love with"! plus the lOvE tRiAnGle was revealed so freaking late that she never really even had a debate- she just instantly chose the boy she'd barely even talked to. and he said he was in love with her too? for an ENTIRE school year she blew you off to go get drunk and have a good time. THATS what you're in love with? plus, i knew the identity of her online friend the whole time. it was painfully obvious. gah. at least we are done. onward

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    From the Militant Recommender Book Review Blog: http://militantrecommender.blogspot.com/ 16 year old Xia Chang is something of a computer prodigy. She has created an AI program called "Wiser" that replies to your questions with the advice you might give yourself when you're older. She lives in Massachusetts with her Mom, a political science professor, who is hardly home, as she works at 4 different colleges. Except for her neighbor, Gina, Xia is pretty lonely and created Wiser to keep her company. From the Militant Recommender Book Review Blog: http://militantrecommender.blogspot.com/ 16 year old Xia Chang is something of a computer prodigy. She has created an AI program called "Wiser" that replies to your questions with the advice you might give yourself when you're older. She lives in Massachusetts with her Mom, a political science professor, who is hardly home, as she works at 4 different colleges. Except for her neighbor, Gina, Xia is pretty lonely and created Wiser to keep her company. Knowing Wiser is a unique creation, Xia has applied to a school for tech prodigies called "The Foundry". The unthinkable happens and Xia gets a call from the Foundry's director inviting her to join them in California's Silicon Valley at the institute, where all her expenses will be paid as she works on further developing Wiser. While she waits to break the news to her mother who is going to be a tough sell, she has someone else to share her good news with. ObjectPermanence, her online soulmate, someone whom she's shared her secrets and hopes with, well, while using her own online persona U/ARRAYofLIGHT. Once her mother finally agrees and Xia is off to the Foundry, we'll share her adventures as she joins the other 19 teens from around the country as they work to build their creations in hopes of startup money and becoming coding rockstars. I loved this book! You felt you were part of the new world Xia has entered, and were cheering her on from the sidelines. Xia experiences so much in her new school, and is stronger than she thinks, as she faces the sexism of the largely male tech world and works at trying to fit in and make friends with classmates who are also competitors. There's also the verbal bullying from a couple of entitled white boys who delight in humiliating her right from the start. And there may be a boy, who seems to be someone who "gets" her. Could there be more to him than he seems? Does he like her... or is he just trying to find out the secrets behind her AI? Then, something happens that takes her in an unexpected direction, at a party, Xia has a casual meeting with a young woman, famous for the apps she created, and whom Xia had idolized. What happens next and throughout the rest of Xia's whirlwind trajectory from nonentity to notoriety in this unputdownable story is something you've got to find out yourself! I haven't read Ms. Woon's previous books, but she has created one of my favorite characters ever in Xia, a young woman so smart and resilient and quick and funny that you'll find yourself wondering about her and her future long after you've turned that last page. This is highly recommended, and one I'll be Militantly Recommending! Thanks to NetGalley and Harper Collins for the DRC!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Samantha (WLABB)

    Rating: 3.5 Stars Bored and lonely, Xia hoped her artificial intelligence application would be her ticket to bigger and better things. When she earned a spot at the Foundry, Xia found herself among the Silicone Valley elite. Struggling to navigate this world, she began to lose focus and must get back on track or risk losing it all. THE GOOD * I love seeing females winning in a male-dominated world. Xia was so passionate about her craft, and I wanted her to take full advantage of this opportunity. Rating: 3.5 Stars Bored and lonely, Xia hoped her artificial intelligence application would be her ticket to bigger and better things. When she earned a spot at the Foundry, Xia found herself among the Silicone Valley elite. Struggling to navigate this world, she began to lose focus and must get back on track or risk losing it all. THE GOOD * I love seeing females winning in a male-dominated world. Xia was so passionate about her craft, and I wanted her to take full advantage of this opportunity. * There were some quality friendships in this story. Xia had her bestie back home, her neighbor in the program, and her online crush. I was a fan of all these relationships and wanted more of this. * The IRL romance was super cute too. This was a great pairing, and again, I wanted more of this. * Talk nerdy to me! The book opens with Xia talking about her life in code. My former-programmer self absolutely loved it! * When world collide. I enjoyed trying to figure out who Xia’s online crush was IRL. I loved that the Foundry brought them together off-line. * Wiser was great. Wiser had great personality for an application. * I appreciate the hard lessons Xia had to learn. All the terrible situations she found herself in contributed to her personal growth. WHERE I STRUGGLED When I read the synopsis for this book, an expectation was set. I was anticipating a cute and fluffy YA romance. There was a some romance in this story, however, a big chunk of it was Xia losing her way, hitting rock bottom, and discovering the ugly side of the tech world. It was much darker than I anticipated. I appreciate the exploration of the dark side of tech, but it wasn’t what I really wanted from this book. It was not bad, but rather a case of my expectations being incorrectly set. Overall: This wasn't quite what I was expecting from the synopsis, but it was an interesting look at the challenges women in tech face. I loved that Xia had a dream, and though I was screaming at her as she lost her way, I was happy to see her grow and learn from the experience. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Sproul

    Yvonne Woon's If You, Then Me is unquestionably one of the very best YA books I've ever read. Xia is a protagonist with a full, realistic, heartbreaking arc, and I loved her and rooted for her every step of the way, even when (and perhaps especially when) she made mistakes. This book gives readers a peek into the fascinating, often impenetrable social landscape of Silicon Valley, and delivers a delicious villain, hilarious dialogue, and a realistic look into why women tear each other down in a w Yvonne Woon's If You, Then Me is unquestionably one of the very best YA books I've ever read. Xia is a protagonist with a full, realistic, heartbreaking arc, and I loved her and rooted for her every step of the way, even when (and perhaps especially when) she made mistakes. This book gives readers a peek into the fascinating, often impenetrable social landscape of Silicon Valley, and delivers a delicious villain, hilarious dialogue, and a realistic look into why women tear each other down in a white, male-dominated industry. As Xia questions her own ability, self worth and inner strength, the disconnect between what she feels inside verses how others perceive her is mirrored in her ultimate decision: will she choose to lose herself in the traps of an online relationship and a world in which appearances are more valued than honesty, or to be a present and active force in her own life, to let herself love someone she can see and touch, to create what she feels is missing in the world? I wanted this book to go on forever, so I could follow Xia and Wiser on their next adventure.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Lucero

    Wow! I LOVED this book! Even though our main character, Xia, is a million times smarter than I’ll ever be she was also a very relatable one. We’ve all experienced many of the same insecurities that she has and made for a lovable protagonist. Throughout the entire book, I rooted her on. When she laughed I laughed, when she felt embarrassed I cringed for her, and when she swooned I swooned. In those moments where she made bad or questionable decisions, I constantly wanted to reach through the book Wow! I LOVED this book! Even though our main character, Xia, is a million times smarter than I’ll ever be she was also a very relatable one. We’ve all experienced many of the same insecurities that she has and made for a lovable protagonist. Throughout the entire book, I rooted her on. When she laughed I laughed, when she felt embarrassed I cringed for her, and when she swooned I swooned. In those moments where she made bad or questionable decisions, I constantly wanted to reach through the book and shake some sense into her but never once did that make me dislike her as a character. I truly wanted to see her succeed which was exactly why this was a book I didn’t want to put down. I also loved the important discussions that were had in this book about the treatment of women in the workplace and how they have to work that much harder to be recognized and taken seriously. This truly was a great book and one I would recommend to everyone! A special thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Children’s Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and Katherine Tegen Books for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I'll post that review upon publication. In the meantime, I thoroughly enjoyed this read. It's a great romance, but it's much more than that, too. If you're looking for a combo romance with a heavy dose of coming-of-age and how tough that can be for young women-identifying folks in particular, this may just be one of your favorite YA novels of the year. Updated 7/6/21 .4.5 stars This book Thanks to NetGalley and Katherine Tegen Books for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I'll post that review upon publication. In the meantime, I thoroughly enjoyed this read. It's a great romance, but it's much more than that, too. If you're looking for a combo romance with a heavy dose of coming-of-age and how tough that can be for young women-identifying folks in particular, this may just be one of your favorite YA novels of the year. Updated 7/6/21 .4.5 stars This book should be getting so much more buzz than it is currently, and if it isn't on your to-read list yet, I highly recommend adding it ASAP. Xia, the m.c., is living with her mom in Massachusetts and dreaming of getting into the Foundry, which is an elite boarding school for young folks with big ideas in tech. Readers and Xia learn RIGHT at the start of the novel that this dream is coming true, and it is exciting to see Xia leave the isolated, lonely life she knows for a totally different experience in Northern California. Like all slightly more experienced readers know, Xia's change in environment won't result in an automatic change in HER... There is so much fantastic material to love here. First, Xia is just the right balance of naive and smart. She makes mistakes appropriate for her age and experience, but unlike so many characters - teens and adults alike - she's no fool. It's empowering to watch her learn from those mistakes and do better next time. This theme is expressed expertly not only through Xia's thoughts and actions but through her main project, Wiser, which is designed to be a more experienced advice giving version of the user. I LOVE the way both Xia's work product and her own life evolve to highlight her personal growth. Much of Xia's growth happens as she navigates being a teen and a student, but two standout areas include what it means to grow up as a young woman and how to manage the romantic trials of one's young life. Xia has some extremely challenging experiences professionally, and there are some heartbreaking moments that are definitely mentioned but not necessarily delved into throughout the narrative: TW sexual assault and sexual harassment. I appreciate the realistic treatment of these areas, though I do think a bit more attention could have been paid to their aftermath. Additionally, there is some important commentary about who is to be trusted and that a person's outside should not be the deciding factor on this. The romance is so well devised because it is an important part of the novel but not the CENTRAL part; that's Xia as a human not as a romantic partner. From the start, readers know that Xia is in an online-only relationship with a person she has never met and whose identity she does not know. The evolution of this relationship - and the mystery surrounding this person's identity - also highlight Xia's growth and add complexity to the narrative overall. I came into this novel expecting a light YA summer romance, but there is much more substance here. Woon is now on my must-request/must-read list and should be on yours, too. Recommended!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caitie

    This started off really great in my opinion, but then I think it kind of went off the rails. Xia is a great main character, she seems like a real teenager, with real insecurities about fitting in at the Foundry (the fancy tech wizard school Xia ends up going to). However, I found her decision making skills to be severely lacking, and majorly stupid even for a sixteen year old kid. Missing classes that could truly help your future and I don't know, asking for help, but instead she jumps at the ch This started off really great in my opinion, but then I think it kind of went off the rails. Xia is a great main character, she seems like a real teenager, with real insecurities about fitting in at the Foundry (the fancy tech wizard school Xia ends up going to). However, I found her decision making skills to be severely lacking, and majorly stupid even for a sixteen year old kid. Missing classes that could truly help your future and I don't know, asking for help, but instead she jumps at the chance to be noticed by her idol. Basically the plot revolves around Xia, who lives with her mother outside Boston, gets the chance to go to the Foundry--a school that basically takes teens who have begun (or have fully) developed some kind of app to study and learn how to make it better. Xia finds herself struggling with the course load, classes like finance and advanced coding. When she meets her idol, Mitzy, who had essentially "won," her her year at Foundry by having her app developed Xia basically dropped everything to be Mitzy's sidekick....I mean she drags her parties and everything, so she seems like a puppet. The writing was good and everything, but I think I wanted more from Xia's time at the Foundry. I wanted her to ask for help, because character growth also means asking for help when you need it. That would've been growth that I wanted to see, I found Xia's blasé attitude towards missing classes (i.e. "what does it matter if I miss more class?") made me cringe. She's obviously a smart girl, but she kept making worse and worse decisions throughout the book. I think that she got caught up wanting to please other people, like Mitzy, instead of making things better for yourself.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Trigger Warning Database

    Trigger & Content Warnings Racism Sexism

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Lucero

    Wow! I LOVED this book! Even though our main character, Xia, is a million times smarter than I’ll ever be she was also a very relatable one. We’ve all experienced many of the same insecurities that she has and made for a lovable protagonist. Throughout the entire book, I rooted her on. When she laughed I laughed, when she felt embarrassed I cringed for her, and when she swooned I swooned. In those moments where she made bad or questionable decisions, I constantly wanted to reach through the book Wow! I LOVED this book! Even though our main character, Xia, is a million times smarter than I’ll ever be she was also a very relatable one. We’ve all experienced many of the same insecurities that she has and made for a lovable protagonist. Throughout the entire book, I rooted her on. When she laughed I laughed, when she felt embarrassed I cringed for her, and when she swooned I swooned. In those moments where she made bad or questionable decisions, I constantly wanted to reach through the book and shake some sense into her but never once did that make me dislike her as a character. I truly wanted to see her succeed which was exactly why this was a book I didn’t want to put down. I also loved the important discussions that were had in this book about the treatment of women in the workplace and how they have to work that much harder to be recognized and taken seriously. This truly was a great book and one I would recommend to everyone! A special thank you to NetGalley and HarperCollins Children’s Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    USOM

    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: sexism, racism What immediately drew me to Xia was her vulnerability and heart. The ways she has poured herself into her work and the ways her fears resonated with me. Woon combines a heroine who makes mistakes, gets caught up, but also is trying so desperately to find herself, with a great premise and set up. In some ways, this felt a bit like "You've Got Mail" with teenagers and (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) TW: sexism, racism What immediately drew me to Xia was her vulnerability and heart. The ways she has poured herself into her work and the ways her fears resonated with me. Woon combines a heroine who makes mistakes, gets caught up, but also is trying so desperately to find herself, with a great premise and set up. In some ways, this felt a bit like "You've Got Mail" with teenagers and coding. I finished If You, Then Me in a few days because I was just so swept away with the plot and action. The ways Xia has to figure out if we let people's opinions and efforts to humiliate us effect us. How it becomes so hard to filter out their voices of doubt in our head. The sounds of laughter and mockery which chips away at our armor. What is more relatable than that? At the same time, If You, Then Me examines the differences between the people we imagine in our head and reality. full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book was an original, fascinating exploration of a world/mindset totally unfamiliar to me. It was unbelievable at times, which could be due to my ignorance, but I was mostly willing to suspend my disbelief because I was invested in the characters and the storyline.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Seaman

    Gahhhh! I adored this book so much! Such powerful relationships depicted, so much heart! Highly recommend!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Yvonne Woon, author of the Dead Beautiful trilogy, again takes us to a boarding school for exceptional young people, but the only supernatural forces at work this time around are wealth and greed. Set in present-day Silicon Valley, If You Then Me follows the story of Xia Chan as she navigates the hyper-competitive world of internet startup culture, while also coming to terms with her own identity as a creator and as an adult. Identity is a key theme of the book, with Woon skillfully, and sometime Yvonne Woon, author of the Dead Beautiful trilogy, again takes us to a boarding school for exceptional young people, but the only supernatural forces at work this time around are wealth and greed. Set in present-day Silicon Valley, If You Then Me follows the story of Xia Chan as she navigates the hyper-competitive world of internet startup culture, while also coming to terms with her own identity as a creator and as an adult. Identity is a key theme of the book, with Woon skillfully, and sometimes brutally, portraying the layered hostilities of racism, sexism and classism that exponentially complicate the professional and personal lives of Asian-American women working in the tech industry. It is telling that this is not a book about racism or sexism. It is a novel about values, priorities, hard work, and integrity. But when the protagonist is the daughter of a single mother who emigrated from China, the story must also address how racist aggressions (both micro and overt), sexism, sexual assault, and the tidal forces of privilege and wealth all exhaust someone like Xia, long before she even has the chance to start putting in the necessary work to succeed. The nature of “success” is also a key theme of If You, Then Me. Woon vividly portrays the emptiness and superficiality of a world in which poorly-socialized geniuses receive too much wealth and power too quickly. The novel asks important questions about what is real, what has value, and what sacrifices are too great. Those questions are not subtle. Xia and her friends are a group of hyper-intelligent outsiders who are both keenly introspective and wryly articulate, a hallmark of Yoon’s young-adult writing. Despite some obviously dangerous blindspots, Xia and her peers are often thoughtful observers of their circumstances and their responsibility for them, an indication of Yoon’s respect for her audience and of the reality that older teenagers are often much more cognizant of the exigencies of their lives than adults give them credit for. Bright teenagers butting heads against unnecessary obstacles will find much to relate to in If You, Then Me. Likewise adults who want to step fully into a vital and authentic depiction of the world of one such teenager will find much to enjoy, and even learn from, here. There are important ideas here for adults as well, as most of the non-teens in the novel have a parasitic relationship of one kind or another with Xia. The novel asks: When faced with the brilliance and creative vitality of youth, how many of us see at as a resource to exploit rather than as a wonder to nurture and support? The book moves smoothly and briskly through these themes, driven primarily by sharp dialogue interspersed with sparse exposition. My one real complaint is that I wanted there to be more – more of the daily life at the Foundry, more backstory on the lives and works of the supporting characters, more time to fully digest the relatively predictable but nonetheless satisfying conclusion. My only other quibble is that the nerdspeak sometimes feels forced or contrived. Those of us who grew up on Usenet or Reddit recognize when an outsider is speaking our native tongue, even when they do so fluently. Woon clearly researched Silicon Valley thoroughly, but this is still a book written about tech nerds, not by a tech nerd. It is also a book that is well worth your time. Xia Chan is a complex, honest, compelling character whose journey kept me completely fixated for a cover-to-cover read in a single session. Yvonne Woon may not be a tech nerd, but she clearly knows what it’s like to be a smart, young, Asian woman fighting to define herself and her creative voice in a milieu dominated by powerful, white men. We need to hear more stories like Xia’s, and Woon has the skill and artistry to make those stories come alive.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma Reid

    I thought I was going to wholly adore this book, I mean look at the premise! - Girl goes to California to work on her AI app at a school full of fellow nerds. But there were SO many signs that Xia was overlooking when it came to ObjectPermanence and her company. She gets caught up in the glitz and glamour of the Silicon Valley and I can't blame her for that, she's 16. But god did I just want her to open her eyes to what was happening! But I was still so invested in the story, so I gotta give cre I thought I was going to wholly adore this book, I mean look at the premise! - Girl goes to California to work on her AI app at a school full of fellow nerds. But there were SO many signs that Xia was overlooking when it came to ObjectPermanence and her company. She gets caught up in the glitz and glamour of the Silicon Valley and I can't blame her for that, she's 16. But god did I just want her to open her eyes to what was happening! But I was still so invested in the story, so I gotta give credit where credit is due. *Thank you to Penguin Random House Audio for the ALC in exchange for an honest review*

  21. 5 out of 5

    Margrethe

    Usually, I love this kind of story, but I didn't think this was very well done. There was just too much focus on how everybody looked. So it was kind of shallow, even though it tried to be deep. Also, I found a lot of the plot points with the MCs mentor unbelievable. It simply didn't meet my expectations and was something else than I thought it would be. It had its moments, but in the end, it fell through for me. This scored 4.57 on CAWPILE. That makes it on the higher two-star mark. Usually, I love this kind of story, but I didn't think this was very well done. There was just too much focus on how everybody looked. So it was kind of shallow, even though it tried to be deep. Also, I found a lot of the plot points with the MCs mentor unbelievable. It simply didn't meet my expectations and was something else than I thought it would be. It had its moments, but in the end, it fell through for me. This scored 4.57 on CAWPILE. That makes it on the higher two-star mark.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus A bit too Young Adult (slower paced, more interpersonal drama than "things happening", a little language) for my library, but I would LOVE to see more middle grade books with girls involved in technology or science. Would definitely buy this for high school. E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus A bit too Young Adult (slower paced, more interpersonal drama than "things happening", a little language) for my library, but I would LOVE to see more middle grade books with girls involved in technology or science. Would definitely buy this for high school.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Johanna

    IG: @JohsJournal YA contemporary romcom about Massachusetts-based teen Xia Chan, who gets into her dream program at a tech high school program for exceptionally inventive students in California’s Silicon Valley. Will Xia’s A.I. program, Wiser, be enough to win the competition? This book took me on a rollercoaster ride. An entertaining read despite that some of the aspects were a bit far-fetched for me, this is one of those books that I couldn’t stop reading because I was enjoying the ongoing train IG: @JohsJournal YA contemporary romcom about Massachusetts-based teen Xia Chan, who gets into her dream program at a tech high school program for exceptionally inventive students in California’s Silicon Valley. Will Xia’s A.I. program, Wiser, be enough to win the competition? This book took me on a rollercoaster ride. An entertaining read despite that some of the aspects were a bit far-fetched for me, this is one of those books that I couldn’t stop reading because I was enjoying the ongoing train wreck! Xia’s naivety was a little hard to swallow but that may be because her innocence was personally relatable: the realism of being taken advantage of and withstanding some racist BS struck a chord. There were so many recognizable characters from Xia’s strict & tough-loving mom to a friend who reminds how much harder people of color need to work to be taken seriously to that d-bag racist white kid in high school who seems hell-bent on making life miserable. Speaking of which, I did appreciate the realistic otherness nuances & anti-Asian racism that were portrayed. There were so many moments I shook my head, especially at Xia, but I had to remind myself she’s a young and vulnerable teenager away from home. When in trouble, it was annoying to see her push away her mom and the one friend she gets close to. I think YA romance readers will enjoy the predicament Xia finds herself in. (I can see why the marketing chose to mention Emergency Contact by Mary H.K. Choi — which I enjoyed a lot.) Who is the mysterious alias behind the online forum? Is he also at The Foundry? The romance part was fun even though the ending was a little bit predictable (and too rushed, if you ask me). Fun YA romcom that I read in one sitting. (I think YA romcoms are growing on me! 😂) [Thanks to @EpicReads for the gifted finished copy.]

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    There were some predictabilities and some surprises, and though I was right about the *who,* I was still surprised by how it all played out. So that was nice. The protagonist made lots of frustrating mistakes, and sometimes I wanted to shake her, but her vulnerabilities were relatable, and I cared about her journey.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the author and publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: If You, Then Me Author: Yvonne Woon Book Series: Standalone Diversity: Asian American lead and side character, Nigerian side character Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: young adults, contemporary, coding, romance, fail and rise again trope Genre: YA Contemporary Publication Date: July 6, 2021 Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books Pages: 416 Recommended Age: (Racism, Slight sex content, Slight Language, Bullyin Disclaimer: I received this e-arc from the author and publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: If You, Then Me Author: Yvonne Woon Book Series: Standalone Diversity: Asian American lead and side character, Nigerian side character Rating: 5/5 Recommended For...: young adults, contemporary, coding, romance, fail and rise again trope Genre: YA Contemporary Publication Date: July 6, 2021 Publisher: Katherine Tegen Books Pages: 416 Recommended Age: (Racism, Slight sex content, Slight Language, Bullying, Alcohol consumption by minors, Drug use, Being drugged, TW Sexual assault, Victim blaming) Explanation of CWs: There are mentions of racism against the MCs ethnicity by the bully character. There are some small instances of some curse words. Alcohol is consumed frequently throughout the novel by underaged characters. There is 1 mention of drug use by the main character and a few small scenes and mentions of seeing other characters use drugs. The main character is drugged in that same scene. It is not a roofie, but she was slightly unintentionally drugged by the villain character. There is one scene where the main character is forcibly touched and groped. She is also blamed for the day incident later in the text. Synopsis: What would you ask your future self? First question: What does it feel like to kiss someone? Xia is stuck in a lonely, boring loop. Her only escapes are Wiser, an artificial intelligence app she designed to answer questions like her future self, and a mysterious online crush she knows only as ObjectPermanence. And then one day Xia enrolls at the Foundry, an app incubator for tech prodigies in Silicon Valley. Suddenly, anything is possible. Flirting with Mast, a classmate also working on AI, leads to a date. Speaking up generates a vindictive nemesis intent on publicly humiliating her. And running into Mitzy Erst, Foundry alumna and Xia’s idol, could give Xia all the answers. And then Xia receives a shocking message from ObjectPermanence: He is at the Foundry, too. Xia is torn between Mast and ObjectPermanence—just as Mitzy pushes her towards a shiny new future. Xia doesn’t have to ask Wiser to know: The right choice could transform her into the future self of her dreams, but the wrong one could destroy her. Review: I really liked this book! When I first started it I was concerned because the book features a lot of coding lingo and computer knowledge and if you've ever been to a hang out with my friends (who are all into the coding/computer/IT world) and I then you might be concerned too lol. I've spent many a hang out session with them disassociating because computer talk is it's own language (insert Java/Ruby/HTML joke here). But I understood the book and what I didn't understand I was able to by the context. I loved the world the author built and I love the character development. The writing was amazing and it made for easy understanding of the computer lingo and world of Silicon Valley. I guess you could call this my first dedicated post to my friends and my husband. I never realized how much there is in programming/coding/IT and now I do and I'm tagging one particular friend in here if you'd love to check her out to learn/see more into the programming world too. I also loved the plot of the book and I thought that the characters struggles were very much in tune with what modern teens might see today. The only issue I had with the book is that I felt like it ended too soon, I wanted to see more of Xia and make sure she was ok. I also had a slight issue with what happened to a certain villain character at the end of the book. It felt too swift of an end for that villain and not enough justice. Verdict: I absolutely adored the book and I'm definitely buying it today! I'd also love for the author to come out with a sequel because I want to see bosslady Xia at work.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Kay

    I received an ARC of this fantastic book in a giveaway, so my heart and humble thanks go out to the author and HarperCollins for giving me the opportunity to read this novel and fall in love with Xia and Wiser. If You, Then Me is a wonderful contemporary YA novel that follows a teenage girl, Xia, on her ambitious dream of becoming a future CEO of her own tech company! During her time alone at home, Xia programmed her application, Wiser, an AI that was meant to listen to people, give advice, and I received an ARC of this fantastic book in a giveaway, so my heart and humble thanks go out to the author and HarperCollins for giving me the opportunity to read this novel and fall in love with Xia and Wiser. If You, Then Me is a wonderful contemporary YA novel that follows a teenage girl, Xia, on her ambitious dream of becoming a future CEO of her own tech company! During her time alone at home, Xia programmed her application, Wiser, an AI that was meant to listen to people, give advice, and all around be a friend to all who downloaded it. One of the cooler aspects of Wiser was that she manipulated the user's voice and used an older version of the user's voice to communicate with them. It was meant to make it seem like the user's future self was talking to them and giving them advice. (I won't even go into the details about how Wiser made me laugh and cry at the most random of times. I legitimately started sobbing in an Uber while reading this novel!) Xia's dream was to join the school of the Foundry, a high school for gifted students who the current visionaries of the world believed would run the future of the world. Along the way, Xia met friends, enemies, her idols, and more. More importantly though, Xia's online friend, ObjectPermanence might be attending her elite school alongside her! She couldn't outright ask him for fear of driving him away. She also thought the odds were too slim. I mean, what were the chances that her secret online crush was also super smart and in classes alongside her? Besides, her feelings were being swayed by another dreamy guy at her school. Was he dreamy? She couldn't get him out of her head, and she genuinely enjoyed his company! It wasn't love at first sight, and they were supposed to be rivals, but the heart wants what it wants. In addition to her complicated love life-- love triangle?-- Xia was also swept in the world of powerful girl bosses who were giving her attention. Xia's friends didn't like Mitzy Erst, but she was Xia's idol. Xia would do anything to stay on her good side, and besides, Mitzy was nice to Xia. She believed in her, and wanted to see her succeed. What ulterior motives could a successful woman possibly have? Find out all that and more in: If You, Then Me! As I mentioned earlier, this book brought so many emotions forward. I was laughing and crying, and I definitely had some second-hand embarrassment from some of the things that happened to Xia. I fell in love with Wiser, and now I'm jealous I don't live in a reality where she's real. All of the characters were so well-written. Even the AI. Also, as a person who SUCKS at coding and scientific languages, I had no real trouble following along in this book, so don't let that factor stop you from picking up a copy of this for yourself. All in all, I give this book 5 stars. It's definitely a great summer read for anyone who love contemporary YA. (and bonus! It's OWN VOICE!) Thank you again to the author and publishing house for making this ARC available.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ✨ Meg reads and dim sum ✨

    Xia is a programmer genius that get's into this super exclusive (all-expenses paid) program in California. She gets to spend one year learning more about programming and business in an attempt to build up her revolutionary idea--an AI that provides you advice from the POV of your future self--to a real company. She has an online connection with a ~mysterious but insightful mans and also a flirtationship with a cute boy in her program. Xia learns to navigate the glitzy and cutthroat world of Sili Xia is a programmer genius that get's into this super exclusive (all-expenses paid) program in California. She gets to spend one year learning more about programming and business in an attempt to build up her revolutionary idea--an AI that provides you advice from the POV of your future self--to a real company. She has an online connection with a ~mysterious but insightful mans and also a flirtationship with a cute boy in her program. Xia learns to navigate the glitzy and cutthroat world of Silicon Valley while trying to find who she is as a person. This is such a beautiful book told from such a unique viewpoint I rarely see in books. As an Asian student studying business and CS, this book was sooo relatable I was so shook. I was crying two chapters in with Xia's discussion with her mother about her future and duty. Idk why but Asian immigrant stories and family duty vs. passion stories always get me 😫😫😫. All the characters are written in a really refreshing way, and I just LOVED the programming puns and references, I was laughing so much. I would describe this book as a crossover between Loveboat, Taipei and lowkey You've Got Mail. I think Yvonne is able to weave in all the classic romance / YA tropes in really well. Even though you know exactly what's going to happen, it's enjoyable to read through the journey. While it's superrrr obvious who her online ~friend is, I still enjoyed reading Xia work through it. The only thing I was kinda miffed about is I wanted a more girls help girls book, because I think it's sooo important to show the supportive environment of women supporting other women. Without getting into too much detail, a few scenes in you can already tell how backstabbing and toxic some of these relationships can get, and while there still is mentorship / support to some degree, I just wished it could be more prominent. (view spoiler)[Girl, Mitzy is C R A Z Y, and while I was getting annoyed a bit about how much Xia was letting her walk all over her, I can totally understand it and see how the passiveness and conformity engrained in many Asian cultures works itself into this dynamic. ALTHOUGH, now that I'm taking a law class, I can 100% say you can get out of a contract if you were highly intoxicated/unable to comprehend what you're signing, so hopefully Xia got a good lawyer LOLLL. Additionally, self-destruction storylines aren't really my thing so I was hardcore cringing in the later parts of the book, but I think there's a decent enough redemption arc to overcome it. (hide spoiler)] But for a fun and inspiring read about a young girl working to break barriers in such a male-dominated industry with a cute dose of romance on the side, If You, Then Me is a great read!!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This provided great insight into how it is or can be like for a woman in the male dominated tech industry. As a reader, you find yourself sympathetic to the protagonist Xia right away, and the common themes of loneliness and parental discord are sure to resound in many teens. It's a bit painful reading of her struggles in school, and the downwards spiral she eventually gets into, but her search for her online love while coming to terms with her feelings for another boy provides some distraction. This provided great insight into how it is or can be like for a woman in the male dominated tech industry. As a reader, you find yourself sympathetic to the protagonist Xia right away, and the common themes of loneliness and parental discord are sure to resound in many teens. It's a bit painful reading of her struggles in school, and the downwards spiral she eventually gets into, but her search for her online love while coming to terms with her feelings for another boy provides some distraction. A solid story.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erica Garcia

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I bought this book on vacation just to have something to read. I immediately loved it from the beginning. It has a really good plot and it’s an easy read. I love everything about this book, although I wish it would’ve been a little longer at the end( I don’t wanna spoil anything but you’ll understand if you’ve read it or plan on it) As in I wish the other love interest had gotten more time. I read the last 12 chapters in one night, I just couldn’t stop reading until I knew what was going to happ I bought this book on vacation just to have something to read. I immediately loved it from the beginning. It has a really good plot and it’s an easy read. I love everything about this book, although I wish it would’ve been a little longer at the end( I don’t wanna spoil anything but you’ll understand if you’ve read it or plan on it) As in I wish the other love interest had gotten more time. I read the last 12 chapters in one night, I just couldn’t stop reading until I knew what was going to happen at the end. Ultimately I really recommend this book to those who love books with a love story!

  30. 5 out of 5

    ✨ Meg reads and dim sum ✨

    Xia is a programmer genius that get's into this super exclusive (all-expenses paid) program in California. She gets to spend one year learning more about programming and business in an attempt to build up her revolutionary idea--an AI that provides you advice from the POV of your future self--to a real company. She has an online connection with a ~mysterious but insightful mans and also a flirtationship with a cute boy in her program. Xia learns to navigate the glitzy and cutthroat world of Sili Xia is a programmer genius that get's into this super exclusive (all-expenses paid) program in California. She gets to spend one year learning more about programming and business in an attempt to build up her revolutionary idea--an AI that provides you advice from the POV of your future self--to a real company. She has an online connection with a ~mysterious but insightful mans and also a flirtationship with a cute boy in her program. Xia learns to navigate the glitzy and cutthroat world of Silicon Valley while trying to find who she is as a person. This is such a beautiful book told from such a unique viewpoint I rarely see in books. As an Asian student studying business and CS, this book was sooo relatable I was so shook. I was crying two chapters in with Xia's discussion with her mother about her future and duty. Idk why but Asian immigrant stories and family duty vs. passion stories always get me 😫😫😫. All the characters are written in a really refreshing way, and I just LOVED the programming puns and references, I was laughing so much. I would describe this book as a crossover between Loveboat, Taipei and lowkey You've Got Mail. I think Yvonne is able to weave in all the classic romance / YA tropes in really well. Even though you know exactly what's going to happen, it's enjoyable to read through the journey. While it's superrrr obvious who her online ~friend is, I still enjoyed reading Xia work through it. The only thing I was kinda miffed about is I wanted a more girls help girls book, because I think it's sooo important to show the supportive environment of women supporting other women. Without getting into too much detail, a few scenes in you can already tell how backstabbing and toxic some of these relationships can get, and while there still is mentorship / support to some degree, I just wished it could be more prominent. Additionally, self-destruction storylines aren't really my thing so I was hardcore cringing in the later parts of the book, but I think there's a decent enough redemption arc to overcome it. But for a fun and inspiring read about a young girl working to break barriers in such a male-dominated industry with a cute dose of romance on the side, If You, Then Me is a great read!!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...