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The Collector's Daughter

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A Novel of the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb Bestselling author Gill Paul returns with a brilliant novel about Lady Evelyn Herbert, the woman who took the very first step into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, and who lived in the real Downton Abbey, Highclere Castle, and the long after-effects of the Curse of Pharaohs.  Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of C A Novel of the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb Bestselling author Gill Paul returns with a brilliant novel about Lady Evelyn Herbert, the woman who took the very first step into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, and who lived in the real Downton Abbey, Highclere Castle, and the long after-effects of the Curse of Pharaohs.  Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb. In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the burial place of Tutankhamun, packed full of gold and unimaginable riches, and she was the first person to crawl inside for three thousand years. She called it the “greatest moment” of her life—but soon afterwards everything changed, with a string of tragedies that left her world a darker, sadder place. Newspapers claimed it was “the curse of Tutankhamun,” but Howard Carter said no rational person would entertain such nonsense. Yet fifty years later, when an Egyptian academic came asking questions about what really happened in the tomb, it unleashed a new chain of events that seemed to threaten the happiness Eve had finally found.


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A Novel of the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb Bestselling author Gill Paul returns with a brilliant novel about Lady Evelyn Herbert, the woman who took the very first step into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, and who lived in the real Downton Abbey, Highclere Castle, and the long after-effects of the Curse of Pharaohs.  Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of C A Novel of the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb Bestselling author Gill Paul returns with a brilliant novel about Lady Evelyn Herbert, the woman who took the very first step into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun, and who lived in the real Downton Abbey, Highclere Castle, and the long after-effects of the Curse of Pharaohs.  Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb. In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the burial place of Tutankhamun, packed full of gold and unimaginable riches, and she was the first person to crawl inside for three thousand years. She called it the “greatest moment” of her life—but soon afterwards everything changed, with a string of tragedies that left her world a darker, sadder place. Newspapers claimed it was “the curse of Tutankhamun,” but Howard Carter said no rational person would entertain such nonsense. Yet fifty years later, when an Egyptian academic came asking questions about what really happened in the tomb, it unleashed a new chain of events that seemed to threaten the happiness Eve had finally found.

30 review for The Collector's Daughter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    The Collector's Daughter brings a fascinating story of Lady Evelyn Herbert, who took the very first steps into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. London, 1972. Eve is in her early seventies, and after another stroke she is working to regain her speech at a rehabilitation center. It’s here that she receives a visitor from Egypt - Dr. Ana Mansor. Mansor has been engaged in a research project and has found some anomalies in archives around the finds of the Tutankhamun’s tomb. The memory of the discove The Collector's Daughter brings a fascinating story of Lady Evelyn Herbert, who took the very first steps into the tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. London, 1972. Eve is in her early seventies, and after another stroke she is working to regain her speech at a rehabilitation center. It’s here that she receives a visitor from Egypt - Dr. Ana Mansor. Mansor has been engaged in a research project and has found some anomalies in archives around the finds of the Tutankhamun’s tomb. The memory of the discovery gives Eve a spark and motivation for improving her speech, but there is something she doesn’t want to reveal. Luxor, 1919. Eve comes from a privileged family, a daughter of Lord Carnarvon, who funds the exploration of the Tutankhamun’s tomb. While her mother plans to marry her well, meaning to a man of certain social standing, Eve dreams of an equal partnership, a man who will share a passion for travel and who will accept her being a lady archeologist. She has been coming to Egypt with her family since she was six year old, but never had a chance to visit Luxor and the Valley of the Kings. At eighteen, she is here at last and Howard Carter, who with her father indulged her curiosity from a young age, shows her how to dig during her first winter in the Valley. It is the beginning of an extraordinary journey, which also has some questionable events afterwards. After the discovery of the Tutankhamun’s tomb, there is a chain of illnesses experienced by different people. Some claim it’s due to the disturbance of the spirits in the tomb. Is it? Egypt becomes an independent state shortly before the discovery of the Tutankhamun’s tomb. Thus, the rules regarding the finds in any tomb are changing constantly. It is fairly normal for archeologists to keep some mementos. It’s a wonderful experience to be right there when the discovery happens and how it all leads to it and what happens afterwards; and to get to know all those who were involved in this discovery. It is a lifetime experience that we’re granted through this story. Nevertheless, keep in mind that most of the story is set in England. The story is revealed in flashbacks switching between two timelines. It beautifully gains depth, both in character development and in keeping readers in suspense around the discovery of the tomb. The flashbacks are woven artfully having a smooth flow and carrying enjoyable storyline. This is an engaging story written with depth and suspense. Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Review originally posted at mysteryandsuspense.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

    Lady Evelyn Herbert’s the only daughter of the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon, she and her brother Porchy were born at Highclere Castle. Evelyn wants to be an archaeologist, she’s traveled to Egypt numerous times with her father Pups, they work with famous archaeologist Howard Carter and they search for the elusive tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. In November 1922, they found it, crammed full of gold and priceless artifacts for the boy King to take with him on his journey to the afterlife, it’s an a Lady Evelyn Herbert’s the only daughter of the Earl and Countess of Carnarvon, she and her brother Porchy were born at Highclere Castle. Evelyn wants to be an archaeologist, she’s traveled to Egypt numerous times with her father Pups, they work with famous archaeologist Howard Carter and they search for the elusive tomb of Pharaoh Tutankhamun. In November 1922, they found it, crammed full of gold and priceless artifacts for the boy King to take with him on his journey to the afterlife, it’s an amazing discovery and receives a lot of attention. The newspapers later went on about “the curse of Tutankhamun” and anyone who visited his sacred burial place or had entered the tomb would be forever cursed. Evelyn marries the love of her life, Sir Brograve Beauchamp, they have a daughter Patricia, and an elderly Evelyn has a number of stokes over the years. Her most recent stoke has affected her speech, she can’t walk and her memory is rather fuzzy. When an Egyptian academic, Ana Mansour starts asking Evelyn questions about what was in Tutankhamun’s tomb, it causes her a lot of distress and Brograve becomes very concerned for her health. Evelyn tries to remember exactly what happened fifty years ago, should she keep the secret or finally reveal the truth and can she trust Ana Mansour? A fascinating dual timeline story, set in the 1920’s and the 1970’s and it takes you from Egypt to England. I enjoyed reading about Evelyn traveling to Egypt with her father, the adventures they had together and it was exciting when they found King Tutankhamun’s tomb with Howard. A story full of intrigue, superstitions, history, and the relationship between Evelyn and Brograve is wonderful and so is the book. Thanks to NetGalley and Gill Paul for my copy of The Collector's Daughter, I loved every page and five stars from me. https://karrenreadsbooks.blogspot.com/

  3. 5 out of 5

    RoshReviews

    In a Nutshell: If you are looking for a historical fiction novel woven mostly around facts and with something other than WWII for a change, this is an interesting one. Story: The book is based on the life of Lady Evelyn Herbert, who is known for being one of the first people in modern times to enter the tomb of the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun in November 1922 along with her father Lord Carnarvon and archaeologist Howard Carter. The story begins in 1972, fifty years after the above event. Eve, now In a Nutshell: If you are looking for a historical fiction novel woven mostly around facts and with something other than WWII for a change, this is an interesting one. Story: The book is based on the life of Lady Evelyn Herbert, who is known for being one of the first people in modern times to enter the tomb of the Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun in November 1922 along with her father Lord Carnarvon and archaeologist Howard Carter. The story begins in 1972, fifty years after the above event. Eve, now in her 70s, has suffered yet another stroke and after some touch-and-go days in the hospital, is recovering at home with her beloved husband of almost 5 decades, Lord Brograve Beauchamp. When an Egyptian academic named Anna comes to visit her to enquire about something anomalous in the documentation of the discovery, Eve’s guards go up. But how can she save the reputation of Howard Carter, her father, and herself, when her stroke has left her memory in tatters? The blurb makes it sound like the book is entirely about the discovery of the Tutankhamun tomb. But while this is a significant event in the book, the actual discovery itself is just a few pages long. The focus is more on the life of Eve, especially after the discovery when a series of unfortunate events (Sorry, Lemony Snicket!) creates rumours of an ancient malevolent curse on those who breached the tomb. There is also a lot of detail on Eve’s parents and brother and their personal problems, and on Eve’s life with Brograve, and of course on Anna’s interactions with Eve. Not that all this takes away anything from the narrative, but if you are looking for a dominant Egyptian theme in the plot, you might be disappointed. Egypt has an important role to play in the plot, but the book isn’t about Egypt per se. The plot includes a lot of flashbacks set in the 1920s, which enable us to know what actually happened. The dual timeline isn’t written in the typical format of alternating past and present chapters. I don’t know how to describe it exactly. But imagine you are watching a movie set in the 1970s. The characters are talking or lost in some thought, and during the course of their conversation/musing comes a reference to something that happened in the past. The screen then fades into that specific historical point and you get to see what they were talking/thinking about. That’s exactly how the past events are interspersed in the 1970s timeline of the book. After a while, I could easily guess when the narrative would shift to the past: all that was needed was a trigger that mentioned a past event. It was an unusual method of writing dual timelines, and I’m still not sure if I enjoyed it or not. The characters are a typical representation of the British upper class of the 1920s but with an atypical heroine. As most of the British characters are actual persons, I looked up some information on them and was happy to see a great level of accuracy in their portrayals. In the book, they come across exactly as they might have been in real life, based on the information available online. However, I wasn’t happy with the portrayal of the fictional Anna. She was the only Egyptian character in the plot, yet her depiction was somewhat demeaning. There seemed to be an undertone of praising British techniques while looking down on everything Egyptian except the artefacts. While this must be an accurate depiction of upper-class Britishers’ thoughts at that time, it felt awkward to read. (view spoiler)[ I hated how there was no guilty feeling in Eve at their having "taken" precious artefacts from the cave. I suppose this feeling of dissatisfaction is worse in me because I’m not a Brit but am “from the colonies”. I know how it feels to have your country’s treasures taken away from you under fake pretensions and then displayed in the so-called superior museums. It’s nothing but stealing. (I’ll not hold this against the book; it is accurate in its depictions of old-time archaeological pursuits and the mentality of the colonial rulers. This is just my frustration coming out.) For this very reason, I loved the ending. It provided a small compensation. (hide spoiler)] Overall, the book flows fairly smoothly once you get used to the writing structure. The characters are interesting, the writing is neat, and the pace is quick. The secondary arcs are also taken care of neatly and they maintain faithfulness to facts. The ending made me push up my otherwise 3.75 rating to 4. It was a fitting finale. I heard the 11 hrs 32 min audiobook narrated by Imogen Clark and she was fantastic. I really enjoyed her performance as she was lively and emotional as required by the narrative. Full marks to her reading. Recommended for all lovers of historical fiction who are looking for a great story on an atypical topic. Thank you, HarperCollins UK Audio and NetGalley, for the audio ARC of the book in exchange for an honest review. *********************** Join me on the Facebook group, Readers Forever! , for more reviews, book-related discussions and fun.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Joan Happel

    What happens when you combine an ancient Egyptian tomb, the real Downton Abbey (Highclere Castle), and the notorious Curse of the Pharaohs? An enthralling, dual time-line novel full of history, intrigue, and suspense. In 1972 Lady Evelyn Herbert, the daughter of the Early of Carnarvon known as Pups to his children, is recovering from a series of strokes that have left her struggling to regain her speech. She is visited by an Egyptian academic, Ana Mansour, who has discovered discrepancies in the What happens when you combine an ancient Egyptian tomb, the real Downton Abbey (Highclere Castle), and the notorious Curse of the Pharaohs? An enthralling, dual time-line novel full of history, intrigue, and suspense. In 1972 Lady Evelyn Herbert, the daughter of the Early of Carnarvon known as Pups to his children, is recovering from a series of strokes that have left her struggling to regain her speech. She is visited by an Egyptian academic, Ana Mansour, who has discovered discrepancies in the records of the treasures of King Tutankhamun’s tomb. Eve, along with her father, and the famous archaeologist, Howard Carter discovered the tomb in November 1922, and Eve was the first to enter the untouched burial place full of the riches and priceless artifacts. Revealed in flashbacks, the story of Eve’s desire to become an archaeologist, her marriage to Sir Brograve Beauchamp, the discovery of King Tut’s tomb and the curse that seemed to haunt those who entered, is a fascinating fictionalized account of this intriguing time. Can Eve trust Ana Mansour with her secrets or will they be buried with her? This was a wonderful work of biographical fiction which will appeal to fans of that genre as well as fans of Egyptology. I highly recommend this novel! Thank you to William Morrow and Custom House, as well as NetGalley for the e-ARC.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Thebooktrail

    Meet Gill and her characters in Luxor and Tutankhamun's Tomb Visit the locations in the novel Transports the reader to Tutankhamun’s tomb via Downton Abbey! Gill Paul is a genius in my eyes. She has only gone and taken one of the most fascinating stories in history and brought it to life. Not only that, she has taken an overshadowed character and made her centre stage. What other author could breathe fresh air into a well-known story but make it unique, compelling and quite unlike anything else yo Meet Gill and her characters in Luxor and Tutankhamun's Tomb Visit the locations in the novel Transports the reader to Tutankhamun’s tomb via Downton Abbey! Gill Paul is a genius in my eyes. She has only gone and taken one of the most fascinating stories in history and brought it to life. Not only that, she has taken an overshadowed character and made her centre stage. What other author could breathe fresh air into a well-known story but make it unique, compelling and quite unlike anything else you have read before! I’d read a fair bit about Tutankhamun like everyone else and thought I knew the story quite well. Nope. This story really shines the light on the whole affair and I was fascinated to read the detail and history surrounding it. You can tell Gill has taken a great deal of care and attention to get this right as the novel shines with authenticity and an immersive quality that you will really feel as if you’ve travelled back in time. The leading lady of this story is Lady Evelyn Herbert who lived at Highclere Castle ie Downtown Abbey. She wanted to be an archaeologist and has traveled to Egypt numerous times with her father. They both work with famous archaeologist Howard Carter who is desperate to search for the most elusive of treasures – the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun. To bear witness to such a historic event must have been indescribable. I honestly felt I was there thanks to the author and her careful crafting of the characters and their stories. Just wait until the day comes in November 1922 when the party find the tomb. The moment when they open it and the second they see the treasures before them. Breathtaking in more ways than one. The events itself must have been quite something and Gill Paul gifts you this moment across the pages for the reader. Stunningly brilliant. That’s just the start of this amazing novel as we are then transported several years after that grand event. An event that was celebrated and much discussed in the media of the time. It got so much coverage but so too did its dark side – the fact that there was supposed to be a “curse of Tutankhamun” and anyone who visited his sacred burial place or had entered the tomb would be forever tainted by having entered the tomb. Gill takes this story further by introducing an Egyptian academic who starts asking Evelyn about what was in Tutankhamun’s tomb. Having suffered illness and strokes since, history has faded and certain memories might be coloured. However, could it be that there are just some things that Evelyn never wants to reveal? A fascinating story. Immersive and so well crafted. I enjoyed reading about Evelyn and her husband traveling to Egypt and the build up to the moment when they all enter King Tutankhamun’s tomb with Howard Carter. This is a cinematic read and gives a fresh take on a infamous story. This is by far the most interesting angle on this historical event that I have ever read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was an expertly written, poignant story about the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt during the 1920s. Paul is a thorough writer and I immensely enjoyed unravelling the mystery of Eve’s memories. It does make for a difficult read, particularly if you have witnessed a relative or close friend who has suffered from a stroke. This is how the novel opens and we watch Eve’s confusion at trying to recollect memories that are prompted by her husband, Brograve. Paul vividly describes the rehab This was an expertly written, poignant story about the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt during the 1920s. Paul is a thorough writer and I immensely enjoyed unravelling the mystery of Eve’s memories. It does make for a difficult read, particularly if you have witnessed a relative or close friend who has suffered from a stroke. This is how the novel opens and we watch Eve’s confusion at trying to recollect memories that are prompted by her husband, Brograve. Paul vividly describes the rehabilitation process and it feels like the author has done a lot of research to demonstrate Eve’s difficulties – both emotional and physical – as she struggles to regain the person she was before being ill. The hurdle of trying to remember is a theme throughout the novel and I was heart-broken over how much Brograve struggled by Eve’s side; he is the faithful, loyal and loving husband to the very end. However, let’s forget the key part of this story. With a love of history, I knew I would enjoy Paul’s exploration of Egyptian discoveries. The novel moves from the 1970s (present day for Eve) back to the 1920s where, post-war, Eve is experiencing the innocence of a young woman with privileges you expect from a family of money. Eve’s father is a known collector and, friends with Howard Carter, Eve soon develops a hunger for archaeological discoveries. Being present at the uncovering of Tutankhamun’s tomb, I could really grasp a sense of anticipation, mystery and even the supernatural. This continues throughout the story as, in present day, Eve attempts to remember what happened to some key artefacts. What I loved most about this story was how thorough the writer is in their portrayal of such an interesting period of history. Not only do readers see the influence of class and wealth with Eve’s mother trying to make a tactical marriage for her daughter, but also the impact of colonisation in Egypt. We learn about the Egyptian government’s move to ensure archaeological finds remain in the country. Yet, often this was conflicting with the person who found it in the first place. The secrecy surrounding these findings was particularly fascinating and, even though museums were able to locate most items, I loved the mystery around Eve’s experiences. Paul is a fantastic writer and I was immediately immersed in Eve’s story. A lot of research has been undertaken and, whilst it is based on historical fact, this was not a dense read. Eve is such a lovable character and, whilst it was difficult to read of her deteriorating memories, the love that comes through with her relationships is particularly endearing. The curse of Tutankhamun’s tomb remains a mystery and one that delights fans of the supernatural. Paul lets the reader decide for themselves about this tale and I think this adds an extra layer to the story. I really enjoyed my first read from Paul and this latest release did not disappoint either. I think this is a very talented author who can bring modern history alive in such an engaging way. For fans of historical fiction, I think Paul is an author you simply must consider. With thanks to Avon books and NetGalley for providing me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter pf the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in the stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a Lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undiscovered tomb. The story has a dual timeline: 1772 where Evelyn is in the hospital r Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter pf the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in the stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a Lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undiscovered tomb. The story has a dual timeline: 1772 where Evelyn is in the hospital recovering from a stroke, she's now 71. And 1922: when Eve and her father discover the tomb of Tutankhamun. The two timelines are woven seamlessly together. The story is descriptively written. Eve is trying to remember everything she can about the dig and soon realises that some secrets should remain hidden. Throughout the book the curse of King Tut is frequently mentioned. There is just enough history told behind this enjoyable story. The chapters alternate between the two timelines. I would like to thank #NetGalley #AvonBooksUK and the author #GillPaul for ny ARC of #TheCollectorsDaughter in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Elegantly written in a british-sorta way, it had a full cast of likable characters. Told in a dual POV of the past and present, Lady Evelyn Herbert tells of her struggles and adventures. It was her love story of ancient Egypt and Brograve. There were secrets about Tutankhamun tomb she had only shared with a few close people and a mystery to solve. I thought it done quite well and recommend for those you love historical fiction. I chose to listen to this book on audio and the narrator was excelle Elegantly written in a british-sorta way, it had a full cast of likable characters. Told in a dual POV of the past and present, Lady Evelyn Herbert tells of her struggles and adventures. It was her love story of ancient Egypt and Brograve. There were secrets about Tutankhamun tomb she had only shared with a few close people and a mystery to solve. I thought it done quite well and recommend for those you love historical fiction. I chose to listen to this book on audio and the narrator was excellent. It was 11 hours and 23 minutes of easy listening. Thanks to Harper Collins Audio via Netgalley.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Javier

    Review published in: https://diagnosisbookaholic.blogspot.... If there’s a time period that absolutely fascinates me is Ancient Egypt, so I love reading stories about archaeology and egyptology and the discovery of the pharaoh’s tombs and so on. If you add some real life characters I can google and that they lived in Highclere Castle (the real Downton Abbey), you have a novel that has my name written all over it. Lady Evelyn Herbert, daughter of the Earl of Carnavon, always wanted to be an archaeo Review published in: https://diagnosisbookaholic.blogspot.... If there’s a time period that absolutely fascinates me is Ancient Egypt, so I love reading stories about archaeology and egyptology and the discovery of the pharaoh’s tombs and so on. If you add some real life characters I can google and that they lived in Highclere Castle (the real Downton Abbey), you have a novel that has my name written all over it. Lady Evelyn Herbert, daughter of the Earl of Carnavon, always wanted to be an archaeologist. Her father worked along and financed Howard Carter’s excavations so, when he discovered Tutankhamun’s tomb in the Valley of the Kings, Eve was one of the first people to enter. Fifty years later she has suffered a stroke that has affected her memory when an Egyptian academic visits her asking questions about Tutankhamun’s tomb and her role in its discovery. Can she reveal the truth of what happened then? Was “the curse of Tutankhamun” real? I found this story fascinating. The dual timelines worked seamlessly and the back and forth between Egypt and England made for some gorgeous scenarios. I had the pleasure of visiting Egypt a few years back so it was nice reading about places I could picture in my mind. I would hace loved the tomb discovery part to be longer cause I found it truly engaging. The 70s timeline was equally interesting. Eve’s sequels after her stroke were really well portrayed and it was such a delight reading about her relationship with her husband Brograve. You could feel how much they loved each other. There was also a bit of mystery in the figure of the Egyptian academic that added a nice touch to this historical fiction. A story of intrigue, the past, curses and superstitions that will appeal to Egyptology fans and will discover you some fascinating characters. Thanks to NetGalley and Avon Books UK for providing an eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Christina (Confessions of a Book Addict)

    Eve Herbert lives a lavish life as part of the British aristocracy. Her father is the Earl of Carnarvon and they live at beautiful Highclere Castle. The Earl of Carnarvon has always been interested in archeology and is the financial backer of archeologist Howard Carter. Eve longs to be an archeologist, which is a much different life that is expected of her. Nonetheless, Eve travels to Egypt and accompanies her father and Howard Carter on their latest dig. This one will be life changing though. S Eve Herbert lives a lavish life as part of the British aristocracy. Her father is the Earl of Carnarvon and they live at beautiful Highclere Castle. The Earl of Carnarvon has always been interested in archeology and is the financial backer of archeologist Howard Carter. Eve longs to be an archeologist, which is a much different life that is expected of her. Nonetheless, Eve travels to Egypt and accompanies her father and Howard Carter on their latest dig. This one will be life changing though. Spoiler: They find King Tutankhamun's tomb. The novel also takes place during the 1970s when an archeologist, Ana, is on the hunt for Eve in the hopes that she can answer some questions about what exactly happened when they found King Tutankhamun's tomb as well as the location of some missed artifacts. However, when Ana encounters Eve as a much older woman, her memory isn't what it used to be. Plus, there's always the age-old question hovering in the periphery of this story: is the tomb really cursed? Gill Paul's The Collector's Daughter has a great combination of everything readers enjoy about a historical fiction novel as well an adventurous mystery. Read the rest of the review here: http://www.confessionsofabookaddict.c...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Addie Yoder

    I love a book that sends me to google. About mid way through this story of Eve and her role in the discovery of King Tut's tomb, I was looking up names and pictures to get a better view of what really went down when the tomb was uncovered. I love when the bones of a story is real, but the details are fiction. It is such a good gateway to learning more about a time in history. I read a lot of HF, but this setting just drew me in and kept me reading. The intrigue behind the curse rumors, the idea I love a book that sends me to google. About mid way through this story of Eve and her role in the discovery of King Tut's tomb, I was looking up names and pictures to get a better view of what really went down when the tomb was uncovered. I love when the bones of a story is real, but the details are fiction. It is such a good gateway to learning more about a time in history. I read a lot of HF, but this setting just drew me in and kept me reading. The intrigue behind the curse rumors, the idea of the relationships between the people at the site and the dual time line were compelling and exciting to read about. Thank you for the opportunity to read and review!

  12. 5 out of 5

    ❀ Sarah ❀

    A historical fiction with a mystery and love story spanning generations. Eve is a young woman and aspiring archeologist drawn to Egypt. Having grown up in a sheltered privileged life, Egypt is like a new world. Her father and friend Howard are determined to find Tutankhamun's tomb. During one of their planned digs Eve stumbles on the entrance to a tomb. That moment changes their lives. This is my second Gill Paul novel and I wasn't disappointed. The historical aspect was interesting but the love s A historical fiction with a mystery and love story spanning generations. Eve is a young woman and aspiring archeologist drawn to Egypt. Having grown up in a sheltered privileged life, Egypt is like a new world. Her father and friend Howard are determined to find Tutankhamun's tomb. During one of their planned digs Eve stumbles on the entrance to a tomb. That moment changes their lives. This is my second Gill Paul novel and I wasn't disappointed. The historical aspect was interesting but the love story of Eve and her husband Brograve made the story extra special. Eve suffers from multiple strokes throughout her life and the way Paul explores the deterioration of her access to memories was terrifyingly brilliant.

  13. 5 out of 5

    The Lit Bitch

    Like so many people, ancient Egypt is a source of endless fascination for me. When I saw this one was coming out, it was a no brainer—I had to read this one. I actually listened to the audio version on my commutes in Arizona. The narrator had a pleasant voice and made the book interesting while I was stuck in the desert traffic. Not to mention the story was equally interesting. A few years ago I read a non fiction novel on the Countess of Carnarvon and I had a deep affection for Lady Almina when Like so many people, ancient Egypt is a source of endless fascination for me. When I saw this one was coming out, it was a no brainer—I had to read this one. I actually listened to the audio version on my commutes in Arizona. The narrator had a pleasant voice and made the book interesting while I was stuck in the desert traffic. Not to mention the story was equally interesting. A few years ago I read a non fiction novel on the Countess of Carnarvon and I had a deep affection for Lady Almina when I finished it. This book does not portray the Countess in a favorable light though, at times that rankled but considering the era, the way she was portrayed in this novel would probably be a bit more accurate. In actuality, this book made me want to know more about the Countess of Carnarvon so maybe I will look for more books on her not just about her castle and charitable works. This book alternates between Lady Evelyn Herbert’s accounting of her life as a young girl and as an older woman. If you love ancient Egypt and your historical fiction with some glamour and a hint of the occult then this is a wonderful novel to pick up and spend some time with. While I enjoyed the audio version, I think I might have been happier if I had read the book rather than listened to it. I like the narrator and found her soothing but I also wanted to devour the book faster than she could read to me. That was my only regret in choosing the audiobook over the hard copy. I can’t decide if I like the romance part of this book or not. Eve and Brograve meet in Egypt and it is practically love at first sight for Eve and Brograve but they have a long way to go before they make it to the alter. I liked their romance and at times found it tender and sweet but I was so intrigued by the larger story about Howard Carter and Egypt that I didn’t really feel as invested in their romance as I normally would have been. It was ok but for me it wasn’t the highlight of the story. The star of the show is really King Tuts tomb and finding out if Howard Carter did in fact ‘loot’ the tomb before the Egyptian authorities arrived to secure it—oh and if it was truly cursed or not. I have read quite a bit on King Tut’s tomb and life and of course the suspected murder of the boy king, but I haven’t read much about Howard Carter. Now I certainly want to read more about him. I really liked how the author examined his character and made readers wonder if he was maybe a tab bit of a villain. The author also did a really great job explaining some of the difficulties that the British encountered with the Egyptian government as well as some of the logistical issues. For example, it wasn’t as if anyone could just barge into the tomb and start excavating the second it was discovered. I think it was like 6 months before anyone could actually get into the tomb. It also took Eve and her father 2 weeks to arrive once they received word from Carter of a discovery. I mean think about that……you invest your entire life and money into discovering a tomb and when you do you have to wait 2 weeks to get there and another 6 months before you can even see what’s inside. The author did a great job with his historical research and presentation in this book. If you love historical fiction and Egypt you will devour this book! While I enjoyed the narrator and her performance, I also struggled with her rendition of Eve’s character. The narrator did a great job making Eve come alive, but when she was reading the parts with Eve post stroke, she even added in the stutter. It was sometimes hard to listen to but I did think it added a lot to the performance. If I had been reading it physically I would have probably skipped over the stutter parts but listening to is made the story come alive even if I felt frustrated and wanted it to move long. Overall this was a fascinating story and a wonderful piece of historical fiction! I really enjoyed it and the audio version. I have read many books by Gill Paul and have loved many of them but few in the way that I loved this one. Great read!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    I was not familiar with the connection between Highclere Castle (known to many as Downton Abbey) and the discovery of King Tut's Tomb, so it was really fun to read this and then browse Wikipedia about the real connections between Howard Carter and the Earl of Carnarvon (of Highclere Castle). I especially liked this that story focused on Carnarvon's daughter, Eve, who played an interesting role in the historic find, and really should have had a career in Egyptology. I really enjoyed taking my tim I was not familiar with the connection between Highclere Castle (known to many as Downton Abbey) and the discovery of King Tut's Tomb, so it was really fun to read this and then browse Wikipedia about the real connections between Howard Carter and the Earl of Carnarvon (of Highclere Castle). I especially liked this that story focused on Carnarvon's daughter, Eve, who played an interesting role in the historic find, and really should have had a career in Egyptology. I really enjoyed taking my time reading this story.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality Once upon a time, there was a crocodile on a sandbank. While that particular crocodile doesn’t make an appearance in this book (although there is A crocodile), it’s still the reason I picked this book up. I’m referring to the first Amelia Peabody book by Elizabeth Peters, Crocodile on the Sandbank, published only three years after the more modern parts of The Collector’s Daughter take place. I still miss Amelia, and I still look for books that remind me of Originally published at Reading Reality Once upon a time, there was a crocodile on a sandbank. While that particular crocodile doesn’t make an appearance in this book (although there is A crocodile), it’s still the reason I picked this book up. I’m referring to the first Amelia Peabody book by Elizabeth Peters, Crocodile on the Sandbank, published only three years after the more modern parts of The Collector’s Daughter take place. I still miss Amelia, and I still look for books that remind me of her. I hoped that this book, wrapped around famous ( or infamous) events in Egyptology featuring people that Amelia would have known and had firm opinions about – as she always did – would scratch my itch to hear Amelia’s rather forthright voice in my head one more time. Lord Carnarvon, Lady Evelyn Herbert and Howard Carter at the top of the steps leading to the newly discovered tomb of Tutankhamun, November 1922. The lovely thing about this particular story, however, is that at least the bare bones of it are true. Lady Evelyn Leonora Almina Beauchamp (née Herbert) was the daughter of Lord Carnarvon. THE Lord Carnarvon who sponsored Howard Carter’s discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. Evelyn, along with her father and Howard Carter, was truly one of the first people to see the inside of the famous tomb in modern times. Even if those modern times were nearly a century ago. Howsomever, the way that the story split its timelines between the 1920s and the 1970s meant that it wasn’t exactly the book that the blurb would lead one to expect. Because that blurb, along with the book’s subtitle, gives every impression that the more significant part of the story revolves around the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb. And unfortunately it doesn’t. Instead, the larger part of the story takes place in the 1970s, just after the latest in a series of strokes that Eve suffered throughout her real life, after a severe automobile accident in 1935. Whether this particular stroke mirrors reality or not, it is true that the threat of another stroke hung over her life very much like the curse of Tutankhamun – even if that curse was entirely a creation of the press looking for sensationalism. So most of the book takes place in the 1970s, and much of its time, its mystery and its pathos are wrapped around Eve’s months of recovery, her flashbacks of memory during that recovery, her husband’s love for her and his fears about the future as they are both in their 70s, and the attempts by an unscrupulous archaeologist to get a compromised Eve to reveal secrets that she has been keeping for 50 long and tumultuous years. Escape Rating B+: The issue with this book is that it is a much quieter and gentler book than the reader has been led to expect from the blurb and the subtitle. I was expecting, honestly, a bit of Amelia. A woman perhaps a bit ahead of her time who overcame obstacles and had adventures. Because, let’s face it, being one of the very first people to see the inside of Tutankhamun’s tomb in thousands of years should have been a great adventure. The adventure of a lifetime. I was expecting to read a story about that adventure. But that’s not what this story is about. Partially that’s because it is wrapped around Eve’s real life, and Eve is, as her Wikipedia entry puts it, “known for (being) present at the opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb. She didn’t discover it. She didn’t work on the team that made the discovery. She was not an archeologist – and neither was her father Lord Carnarvon. Eve was present because her father provided the funding for Howard Carter’s expedition, and she was the first in the tomb because she was able to fit through a much smaller hole than either her father or Carter. Then her father died, the lurid story of the curse was born, and Eve left Egypt for home, never to return, although she and Howard Carter remained friends for the rest of Carter’s life. This story isn’t really about the discovery. It’s really about the way that the discovery has haunted her life and the way that the secrets she kept hidden loomed in the background. The secrets really existed, as revealed in her uncle’s diary many years after she returned to England. There had always been rumors that she, her father and Howard Carter had made a surreptitious visit to the inside of the tomb before the officials came down from Cairo to certify the find. And that while they were inside the tomb, a few small items made their way into all of their pockets. In a way, this is a story about the way that the thing that Eve stuck in her pocket has hung over her life rather like a bad smell. Still it seems to have been a good life, a comfortable life, and even if it was visited by tragedy, it seems like no more than any other – curses notwithstanding. But readers expecting something like the 1999 film The Mummy, where Rachel Weisz plays a character named Evelyn Carnahan who is based on Eve Herbert, are going to be a bit disappointed. As I was in Eve’s lack of resemblance to the redoubtable Amelia Peabody. Or even to amateur detective Jane Wunderly in Murder at the Mena House. But if you’re looking for a quiet, lovely book about a woman who did not transcend her time but lived in the shadow of her one great adventure, there’s plenty of charm and a great deal to enjoy in The Collector’s Daughter. It just wasn’t quite the book I was looking for.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was a fascinating story about the daughter of Lord Carnarvon, the financial backer of Howard Carter’s search for King Tut’s tomb. Evelyn was in her early 20’s when she, her father and Howard snuck into the tomb before the formal opening with the Egyptian officials. While there, they “stole” several artifacts that were not catalogued by Howard and were later sold to various museums. It was also a story of the enduring love she had for her husband, Brograve, and his care for her after multipl This was a fascinating story about the daughter of Lord Carnarvon, the financial backer of Howard Carter’s search for King Tut’s tomb. Evelyn was in her early 20’s when she, her father and Howard snuck into the tomb before the formal opening with the Egyptian officials. While there, they “stole” several artifacts that were not catalogued by Howard and were later sold to various museums. It was also a story of the enduring love she had for her husband, Brograve, and his care for her after multiple strokes robbed her of many of her memories, but never of those of her beloved King Tut. There is also discussion of the curse since her father died soon after the tomb’s opening followed by several other untimely deaths of those connected with the excavation. The story was told in a dual timeline. While I have tired of that method, it works in this case as Evelyn is the main character in both timelines, alternating between the 1920’s and the discovery of the tomb and the 1970’s when the 50th anniversary of the tomb’s discovery was celebrated. I was also surprised to learn that her family home is the setting for Downton Abby. So many fascinating connections to the Carnarvon family. The story captured me from the start and I highly recommend.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    I've long had a love/hate relationship with fictional biographies, my biggest complaint being that the stories usually lack dramatic tension, and as such, can cause me to lose interest. Not in this case. Gill Paul solves the tension issue by giving us a modern mystery to accompany Lady Evelyn Herbert''s story. The mystery surrounding a missing artifact and an overzealous researcher kept my interest even when the biographical portion lagged a bit. It helps that I knew nothing about Lady Beauchamp o I've long had a love/hate relationship with fictional biographies, my biggest complaint being that the stories usually lack dramatic tension, and as such, can cause me to lose interest. Not in this case. Gill Paul solves the tension issue by giving us a modern mystery to accompany Lady Evelyn Herbert''s story. The mystery surrounding a missing artifact and an overzealous researcher kept my interest even when the biographical portion lagged a bit. It helps that I knew nothing about Lady Beauchamp or that she was the first modern person to enter King Tut's tomb. Paul portrays her as a woman curiosity and energy well ahead of her time. I loved learning about her relationship with her father, Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter, and about her 50 year romance with Brograve Beauchamp. I'm not embarrassed to admit I shed a few tears at the end of the book. I didn't want to say goodbye. I listened to the book on audio. The narrator was fabulous. She made the characters come to life! I would highly recommend enjoying this book in audio form as it added to the experience.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Selene

    I became a fan of Gill Paul after reading Jackie and Maria. I was thrilled to be able to read this title! The book centers around Lady Evelyn Herbert, the first woman to step inside the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, alongside her father and renowned archaeologist Howard Carter. The story smoothly moves back and forth between the early 1970s, when Eve is in her 70s, to the early 1920s, when the tomb was discovered. I did not know much about this historical event, but I was prompted to do my ow I became a fan of Gill Paul after reading Jackie and Maria. I was thrilled to be able to read this title! The book centers around Lady Evelyn Herbert, the first woman to step inside the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamun, alongside her father and renowned archaeologist Howard Carter. The story smoothly moves back and forth between the early 1970s, when Eve is in her 70s, to the early 1920s, when the tomb was discovered. I did not know much about this historical event, but I was prompted to do my own research after reading this novel. It is evident that the author's research was extensive. While reading, I was transported to the events of the story, and I grew to adore and appreciate most of the characters. Along the way, I was eager to learn the truth of the secrets held and how the story would resolve. I don't like giving away too much of the story, but I will say that this has been a recent favorite of mine and I highly recommend it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Monson

    As a huge fan of The Secret Wife, I was very excited for Paul’s newest book. While I’m less captivated by the curse of Tuktankhamun than I am by the Romanovs, the idea of it interested me enough to read (not to mention that Eve lived at Highclere, the real Downton Abbey!). While it was certainly an interesting story, I felt unfulfilled anticipation, like the story was building and building to a big reveal or climax that never came. Ultimately, it’s the story of a fascinating life that didn’t tra As a huge fan of The Secret Wife, I was very excited for Paul’s newest book. While I’m less captivated by the curse of Tuktankhamun than I am by the Romanovs, the idea of it interested me enough to read (not to mention that Eve lived at Highclere, the real Downton Abbey!). While it was certainly an interesting story, I felt unfulfilled anticipation, like the story was building and building to a big reveal or climax that never came. Ultimately, it’s the story of a fascinating life that didn’t translate into an epic story in a way that really captivated me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Annelies - In Another Era

    Lady Evelyn Herbert is the daughter of the earl of Carnarvon who finances Howard Carter’s expedition to find the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt. Eve who wants to become a lady archeologist herself can’t believe her eyes when she’s one of the first people to enter the burial chamber. But after the unique discovery, things start to go wrong with the people she loves and there’s talk of an ancient curse. Decades later, Eve is struggling with the aftermath of another stroke when Ana Mansour starts ask Lady Evelyn Herbert is the daughter of the earl of Carnarvon who finances Howard Carter’s expedition to find the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt. Eve who wants to become a lady archeologist herself can’t believe her eyes when she’s one of the first people to enter the burial chamber. But after the unique discovery, things start to go wrong with the people she loves and there’s talk of an ancient curse. Decades later, Eve is struggling with the aftermath of another stroke when Ana Mansour starts asking questions about missing artefacts from the tomb. Only Eve can still tell the tale, or will she take her secrets with her to the grave? Gill Paul is an author I’ve meant to read a long time ago. She often writes a two perspective novel with one the characters being from royal blood. Her newest novel ‘The collector’s daughter‘ is different in that regard. There’s only one female perspective, although we meet her at two certain points in her life, and she has noble but no royal ancestors. The discovery of Tutankhamun has always fascinated me so I did know who Evelyn Herbert was. The book opens with Eve waking up in the hospital after a stroke with her loyal husband Brograve Beauchamp besides her. We learn that Eve has had a car accident some time ago since when she suffers from strokes that sometimes take away her speech, but also parts of her memories. This time she does recall the distant past as if it was yesterday and her mind takes her back to the 1920’s in Egypt and the balls in Engeland where she met Brograve after WOI. Highclere castle, the real Downton Abbey, also features in the story. We meet Eve’s complex family from the earl who dotes on his daughter, her lively but spendthrift mother Almina and her brother Porchy, the future earl of Carnarvon. I did enjoy this novel, but it’s a light read. There’s a heavy focus on Eve’s health and her revalidation, leaving not enough space in my opinion for the historical perspective. I loved traveling back to Egypt, but the storyline became a bit shallow at times. I didn’t like Eve referring to her father as ‘Pups’ all the time. I also didn’t think the character of Ana really contributed to the story. We never get to know her or her motives. The focus is on Eve and her relationship with Brograve. And there’s talk of a curse to spice things up. Paul has written an extensive historical note. A lot of research has gone into this book with utter respect for the real people behind the characters. As it’s a book about 20th century people with living descendants, I can really appreciate that. I’ll certainly pick up one of Paul’s earlier books now, and I want to read more historicals novels about Egypt (any recommendations?). But I don’t know if this will be a story I still remember in, let’s say, two years from now. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a copy of this book in return for my honest opinion. Dutch review: Eve Herbert is de dochter van Lord Carnarvon die Howard Carter financeert in zijn zoektocht naar de tombe van Tutankhamun. Eve wil zelf archeologe worden en kan haar ogen niet geloven als ze bij de eersten de tombe mag binnen gaan. Maar na de ontdekking beginnen geruchten over een vloek de ronde te gaan. Wanneer Eve op latere leeftijd last heeft van geheugenverlies door enkele beroertes na een verkeersongeluk probeert een Egyptische archeologe via Eve te weten te komen wat er met bepaalde artefacten is gebeurd. Ik wou al langer iets lezen van Gill Paul. Waar ze normaal een koninklijk onderwerp kiest, gaat ze deze keer voor het verhaal van een ontluikende liefde begin 20ste eeuw. En met maar één perspectief maar wel met twee tijdslijnen. Lady Evelyn Herbert is in de 70 en ontwaakt in het ziekenhuis na alweer een beroerte. Ze herinnert zich niks van de recente jaren, maar wel nog alles van de jaren 20 toen ze in Egypte de tombe van Tutankhamun mee ontdekte en haar man Brograve Beauchamp ontmoette op een bal. Wanneer Ana Mansour haar vervelende vragen begint te stellen over verdwenen stukken uit de tombe probeert Eve alle puzzelstukjes bij elkaar te leggen. Ik vond dit op zich wel een mooi boek, maar het deed me niet zo veel. Ik was geïnteresseerd in de jaren 20 die met veel fitnesse werden beschreven, zowel in Egypte als in Highclere Castle in Engeland. Maar er ligt een grote focus op Eve als oudere dame en haar slechte gezondheid en revalidatie. Dat vond ik wat jammer. Ook het personage van Ana Mansour bracht niet super veel bij vond ik. Ik vond het ook vervelend hoe Eve altijd aan haar vader refereerde als 'pups'. Al bij al zitten hier veel interessante elementen in waar ik wel van genoten heb en wil ik graag nog eens een ander boek van Paul proberen. Zeker door haar gedetailleerde historische noot waaruit heel wat zorg en aandacht voor de echte mensen achter de personages schuilt. Maar of dit verhaal me nu echt gaat bijblijven? Daar twijfel ik aan. Bedankt aan de uitgever en Netgalley voor een exemplaar van dit boek in ruil voor mijn eerlijke mening.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    This is sweeping and evocative story that begins in London in the early 1970s and takes the reader back to hot, sultry Egypt during the discovery of the Tutankhamun tomb. I have to admit that unlike most people, I've never been overly interested in the Egyptian tombs, of course I had heard about the so-called 'curse' that followed those who entered the Tutankhamum resting place, but I honestly had no idea that Lady Evelyn Herbert, a young gentlewoman from rural England had been part of the discov This is sweeping and evocative story that begins in London in the early 1970s and takes the reader back to hot, sultry Egypt during the discovery of the Tutankhamun tomb. I have to admit that unlike most people, I've never been overly interested in the Egyptian tombs, of course I had heard about the so-called 'curse' that followed those who entered the Tutankhamum resting place, but I honestly had no idea that Lady Evelyn Herbert, a young gentlewoman from rural England had been part of the discovery. I have learned so much and it's been an absolutely fascinating ride. Gill Paul specialises in creating fictional stories, based on the truth. In The Collector's Daughter, she has taken Evelyn, or Eve as she is known to those closest to her and given her centre stage in the story. All too often, women in history have been disregarded, given a fleeting mention, or used as a photo opportunity. Within this wonderful novel, she is the star. Her love for her father, and their shared passion for Egypt shines through. Eve grows into a determined, passionate and loyal woman, extraordinarily knowledgeable and an expert in her field. The reader meets Eve in 1972, she's just suffered a stroke. This is not the first stroke that she's had, she has suffered ill-health since the 1930s when she was involved in an accident. I have to give my personal thanks to the author for the sensitive way that she dealt with the effects of the stroke. Just before I began to read the book, my own Mum had a stroke. The author did warn me about the content, but I chose to continue to read, and I'm glad that I did. Whilst it tugged at my heart, it was also a comfort to me and I know that the author has her own personal family experiences to draw upon too. She'd did it so very well. We go back and forth, from the 1920s, right through until the 1980s and follow Eve's life journey. Along with the wonderful experience of being involved in the Tutankhamun find, she also married Brograve, raised a daughter and became an active fundraiser and organiser when Brograve became a Member of Parliament. We learn how the car accident affected her life, and of course, the rumours of the 'curse' linger throughout the story. Eve is never quite convinced, yet questions why so many terrible things happen to so many of her closest friends and acquantainces. It is the appearance of a young Egyptian woman, towards the end of the story that really explains just what did happen during that incredible discovery, and as Eve's stroke creates more confusion for her and her memories become blurred, the reader really feels her struggles. This is a truly wonderful story. The historical settings, both in London and in Egypt are so beautifully created and Eve and her supporting cast of characters are lifelike and believable. I was entranced throughout, it's an absolute joy to read, and so educational too. Highly recommended by me,

  22. 4 out of 5

    C.P. Lesley

    The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings almost a century ago revolutionized the study of ancient Egypt and its pharaohs. The splendors that surrounded the burial of this relatively minor ruler, interred in a hastily arranged tomb, sparked a furor of speculation, scholarship, and outright chicanery and draw crowds even today. For a long time, though, no one knew that the first modern person to enter the tomb was not Howard Carter, the famed archaeologist who located it, The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings almost a century ago revolutionized the study of ancient Egypt and its pharaohs. The splendors that surrounded the burial of this relatively minor ruler, interred in a hastily arranged tomb, sparked a furor of speculation, scholarship, and outright chicanery and draw crowds even today. For a long time, though, no one knew that the first modern person to enter the tomb was not Howard Carter, the famed archaeologist who located it, but Lady Evelyn (Eve) Herbert, the twenty-one-year-old daughter of Lord Carnarvon, who funded Carter’s expedition. In The Collector’s Daughter, Gill Paul approaches the story of Carter’s discovery from the perspective of its long-term effects on those involved in the find. We meet Eve first in 1972, fifty years after these life-changing events, when she has just awoken in a hospital after suffering the latest in a series of strokes that sap her physical and mental strength. She barely recognizes the man sitting next to her, although she soon concludes (correctly) that he is her husband, Brograve. As Eve fights her way back to health, Brograve attempts to jog her memory with photographs and tales, each of which sets off a trip into the past where we see what actually occurred and contrast it with Eve’s foggy recollections. Meanwhile, Brograve is doing his best to shield his wife from the demands of an Egyptian archaeologist determined to track down missing artifacts from the tomb—on behalf of her government, her university, or herself? We’re not quite sure of the archaeologist’s motives, only that she has secrets of her own. The tale of Tutankhamun’s tomb, the accidents that followed its discovery, and how Eve came to be the first person to enter its suffocating atmosphere three thousand years after the ancient Egyptian priests sealed the sarcophagus is beautifully told. But what really sets The Collector’s Daughter apart is its haunting exploration of memory loss and its impact on Eve and Brograve’s long and loving marriage. This is definitely a book that you don’t want to miss. Interview with the author at New Books in Historical Fiction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    My Review Of THE COLLECTOR’S DAUGHTER By Author, @GillPaul Published & Gifted by @WilliamMorrowBooks On Sale: 9/7/21 - Purchase Link in my Bio ****** Well if this novel wasn’t so expressive, I wouldn’t be thinking about getting my 100 year old self off my couch to quit reading and instead start digging to begin my own archaeological dig to discover untampered with tombs of my own in the Egyptian Desert. Thankfully it was so fascinating and the Author has such an uncanny ability to describe the world My Review Of THE COLLECTOR’S DAUGHTER By Author, @GillPaul Published & Gifted by @WilliamMorrowBooks On Sale: 9/7/21 - Purchase Link in my Bio ****** Well if this novel wasn’t so expressive, I wouldn’t be thinking about getting my 100 year old self off my couch to quit reading and instead start digging to begin my own archaeological dig to discover untampered with tombs of my own in the Egyptian Desert. Thankfully it was so fascinating and the Author has such an uncanny ability to describe the world surroundings, that I was able to travel as a daughter of an Earl from the Castle in which I lived to accompany him to do exactly what I just described. The magnificence of being there via Gill Paul’s words at the discovery & unearthing of a 3000 year old tomb was enchanting. And to be able to feel as if I lived to see the insides of a tomb, as Lady Evelyn Herbert (Eve) did, was an experience one will never forget. Eve would rather be doing exactly such things with her father but her Mother was focused on her being dolled up, in gowns & attending societal balls to attract a wealthy suitor to lead to a prestigious marriage. But when her father gets a call from a dear friend in 1922, Howard, who worked to uncover the tomb of Pharaoh Turankhamun, Eve and he leave immediately to join him. When they get there it’s more than they ever could dream of but keeping a few secrets of their own and taking a few with them will unleash something that will curse whoever trespasses the tomb. Not knowing, they live life as the ordinarily would and it isn’t until it is perhaps a bit late that what secrets they promised each other that day, weren’t just secrets. This story is astonishingly told with intriguing and undying interest; going back and forth between two time periods….the past and the present. If you love historical fiction and love to feel as if you’re living what you read, then this book is a must read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Just when I think I have already found the best historical fiction authors, Gill Paul comes into my life! Gill was recommended to me by a fellow historical fiction lover on Twitter so I jumped at the chance to read her latest novel. Even if this is not your usual go to genre it is about the finding and opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb! Who wouldn’t be interested? We hear the story from the point of view of Lady Evelyn Herbert (Eve), the daughter of Lord Carnarvon who sponsored Howard Carter’s mission Just when I think I have already found the best historical fiction authors, Gill Paul comes into my life! Gill was recommended to me by a fellow historical fiction lover on Twitter so I jumped at the chance to read her latest novel. Even if this is not your usual go to genre it is about the finding and opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb! Who wouldn’t be interested? We hear the story from the point of view of Lady Evelyn Herbert (Eve), the daughter of Lord Carnarvon who sponsored Howard Carter’s mission which successfully located the tomb. Eve had been interested in archeology from a very young age, inspired by her visits to Egypt and her father’s friend Howard Carter. It is now fairly common knowledge that Eve, her father and Howard Carter broke into the tomb before it was officially opened and Eve may have been the first person to enter since the tomb was sealed. As the story is written, Eve is now an elderly lady who has been plagued with TIA’s, or mini strokes, since a car accident. Each one takes away a little of her memory although she can remember her knowledge of the Valley of the Kings and Tutankhamun as though it were yesterday. I really enjoyed the way the past was written as Eve remembered it so we have a dual timeline which is my very favourite! Gill Paul’s researched shines through as she has written as much as possible true to the known facts but has added some plausible fiction to fill the gaps. I’m so happy she gave Eve a voice! I was always very interested in the story of Tutankhamun’s tomb and the curse but this book has given me so much more knowledge and I shall be recommending it highly.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sharlene

    "Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb." "In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the bu "Lady Evelyn Herbert was the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvon, brought up in stunning Highclere Castle. Popular and pretty, she seemed destined for a prestigious marriage, but she had other ideas. Instead, she left behind the world of society balls and chaperones to travel to the Egyptian desert, where she hoped to become a lady archaeologist, working alongside her father and Howard Carter in the hunt for an undisturbed tomb." "In November 1922, their dreams came true when they discovered the burial place of Tutankhamun, packed full of gold and unimaginable riches, and she was the first person to crawl inside for three thousand years. She called it the “greatest moment” of her life—but soon afterwards everything changed, with a string of tragedies that left her world a darker, sadder place." "Newspapers claimed it was “the curse of Tutankhamun,” but Howard Carter said no rational person would entertain such nonsense. Yet fifty years later, when an Egyptian academic came asking questions about what really happened in the tomb, it unleashed a new chain of events that seemed to threaten the happiness Eve had finally found." A very interesting look at the lives of those connected with the discovery of King Tutankhamun's Tomb. Exciting location, well researched. Recommend to anyone that enjoys historical fiction, interesting characters and a unique setting.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Rivera

    This was an interesting read and I love Egyptian mythology and reading about excavating the tombs and the early nineteenth/twentiethThis was an interesting read and I love Egyptian mythology and reading about excavating the tombs and the early nineteenth/twentieth century in Egypt. I really love that this is about a real person the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvan who was funding the excavation of the tomb of King Tut and the owner of Highclere castle where they film Downtown abbey. So it start This was an interesting read and I love Egyptian mythology and reading about excavating the tombs and the early nineteenth/twentiethThis was an interesting read and I love Egyptian mythology and reading about excavating the tombs and the early nineteenth/twentieth century in Egypt. I really love that this is about a real person the daughter of the Earl of Carnarvan who was funding the excavation of the tomb of King Tut and the owner of Highclere castle where they film Downtown abbey. So it starts in 1970 after Evelyn is in the hospital after having another stroke and while she is recovering she is questioned about artifacts that might be missing from the opening of King Tuts tomb which causes her to relieve the moments when she was there in Egypt. So the narrative went from Evelyn in 1970 not really remembering the present very well but remembering the past really well and to her in 1922 util the day of the excavation but back and forth depending on what is being asked of her to remember. I expected more mysticism relating to the so called King Tuts curse but there really wasn’t anything overt. Thanks to William Morrow and Custom House and Netgalley for the complimentary copy of this book in e-book form. All opinions in this review are my own. century in Egypt.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer N

    Gill Paul has become one of my favourite historical fiction authors. This one is about Lady Evelyn Herbert who was there when King Tut's tomb was discovered. She may have been the first one inside his burial chamber. This novel flashes back to the 1920s during the discovery of the tomb and also focuses on the 1970s when she is recovering from a stroke. It is a fascinating look at an overlooked figure in history. Gill Paul has become one of my favourite historical fiction authors. This one is about Lady Evelyn Herbert who was there when King Tut's tomb was discovered. She may have been the first one inside his burial chamber. This novel flashes back to the 1920s during the discovery of the tomb and also focuses on the 1970s when she is recovering from a stroke. It is a fascinating look at an overlooked figure in history.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Young

    Excellent. Just when you think you are getting a simple Egyptian curse story, you suddenly get much more. A story of a man, a woman, their love for each other, a lifetime. I loved the ending.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Mussell

    An historical novel that goes between the 1920s and the 1970s. A loving couple, a stranger, a history that goes to Egypt. What more do I need to say. This was a sweet and mysterious read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    ⓐⓥⓡⓔⓔ ☞ The Bookish Blonde

    Thank you NetGalley for the ARC of this well-crafted and well-researched story about such an exhilarating event. I felt like I got to be a fly on the wall in the discovery of King Tut's tomb and I especially enjoyed being transported to a time I don't often get to go in books. I love the 1920s and I love ancient Egypt and this rolls it nicely into one. I'm glad I was reading the Kindle version because I had fun selecting a term or name and being able to Google it to learn more about it or see a Thank you NetGalley for the ARC of this well-crafted and well-researched story about such an exhilarating event. I felt like I got to be a fly on the wall in the discovery of King Tut's tomb and I especially enjoyed being transported to a time I don't often get to go in books. I love the 1920s and I love ancient Egypt and this rolls it nicely into one. I'm glad I was reading the Kindle version because I had fun selecting a term or name and being able to Google it to learn more about it or see a visual. Made for an even more immersive story! This story came precisely when I needed an escape from my life; and this was so beautifully written, with some descriptions being sheer poetry. The love story was so beautiful to witness and it was fun to see the unveiling of the story, even at a relatively slow pace. I found myself always excited to pick it back up again, and that's when I know I have a good read on my hands—doesn't matter the pacing, as long as I look forward to revisiting that world the author so enchantingly creates. I'm impressed with the research that went into creating this seamless story and the editing was top-notch even for an ARC. I truly enjoyed EVERY moment of this book and I look forward to rereading this one again.

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