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Two Moons, Vol. 1: The Iron Noose

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RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil h RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil he and his new friend, nurse Frances Shaw, face. Together - and apart - Frances and Virgil combat madness and hell itself. Collects TWO MOONS #1-5


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RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil h RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil he and his new friend, nurse Frances Shaw, face. Together - and apart - Frances and Virgil combat madness and hell itself. Collects TWO MOONS #1-5

30 review for Two Moons, Vol. 1: The Iron Noose

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Take Mike Mignola's Lord Baltimore series and move it to the Civil War while replacing the vampires with demons and you have Two Moons. The story is about a Pawnee who was raised by a white family. He's a private in the Union Army when he starts seeing some of the soldiers on both sides as monsters or evil spirits. These first 5 issues don't do enough to setup the premise of the series. It's little more than Virgil (or Two Moons) sees monsters and kills them. The artwork and dark colors worked we Take Mike Mignola's Lord Baltimore series and move it to the Civil War while replacing the vampires with demons and you have Two Moons. The story is about a Pawnee who was raised by a white family. He's a private in the Union Army when he starts seeing some of the soldiers on both sides as monsters or evil spirits. These first 5 issues don't do enough to setup the premise of the series. It's little more than Virgil (or Two Moons) sees monsters and kills them. The artwork and dark colors worked well for the most part. However, the coloring often made it hard to tell the Union and Confederate soldiers apart as there wasn't enough contrast. The monsters looked menacing and scary. Everything else about the art was very solid.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    It's not easy to write war series without making them look like propaganda. But here in the Civil War, there's plenty of talk between who's in the right and who's not. Our titular character looks like he's hallucinating demons, which given how some of the soldiers on either side act that's understandable. Of course there then comes the theme of being obscured from heritage. As a Pawnee, he ends up having to deal with an evil feeding off the war. So when he fully embraces his name as Two Moons, t It's not easy to write war series without making them look like propaganda. But here in the Civil War, there's plenty of talk between who's in the right and who's not. Our titular character looks like he's hallucinating demons, which given how some of the soldiers on either side act that's understandable. Of course there then comes the theme of being obscured from heritage. As a Pawnee, he ends up having to deal with an evil feeding off the war. So when he fully embraces his name as Two Moons, there's some catharsis but also a bit of fear from people seeing it. Like after being held back, the savage people think he is comes out. Man, there were times when I felt like a tragedy was going to befall him for racial reasons. The artwork always kept the uneasy mood and suspense. The dark colors really fit well into war stories. The way some angles arrange filled me with dread in some cases.

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

    3.75 stars. This is set during the American Civil War. Our main character, Virgil Morris, is Pawnee. However, his parents died when he was young and he was raised by a white family and now fights on the side of the Union army. With hints and spiritual visits from his ancestors, he learns of something mystical and evil that feeds on hatred and anger. What a better time to feed than during a war. Now it’s up to him to get people to believe him and fight back. At first, I was struggling with this a 3.75 stars. This is set during the American Civil War. Our main character, Virgil Morris, is Pawnee. However, his parents died when he was young and he was raised by a white family and now fights on the side of the Union army. With hints and spiritual visits from his ancestors, he learns of something mystical and evil that feeds on hatred and anger. What a better time to feed than during a war. Now it’s up to him to get people to believe him and fight back. At first, I was struggling with this as the writer was using slang and speech from the 1800s making it sometimes hard to follow. But as I progressed further, I got used to it and started getting sucked into the story. The Book had a raw art style that I thought fit the time period of this story. I’d definitely read more of this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    Solid horror story set in the Civil War about a young Pawnee man who was raised by a white couple after his family died of smallpox. He’s disconnected from his Pawnee ancestors until he starts seeing visions of demons, then the ghost of his grandfather comes to offer him vague warnings and direction. Trouble is, no one else can see the demons possessing the men, setting up a classic “no one believes the hero” horror story. A well done version of that. The art is terrific, telling the story clearl Solid horror story set in the Civil War about a young Pawnee man who was raised by a white couple after his family died of smallpox. He’s disconnected from his Pawnee ancestors until he starts seeing visions of demons, then the ghost of his grandfather comes to offer him vague warnings and direction. Trouble is, no one else can see the demons possessing the men, setting up a classic “no one believes the hero” horror story. A well done version of that. The art is terrific, telling the story clearly, with lots of gruesome demons, exciting action, and interesting layouts.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I am a sucker for westerns and I have an eager interest in Civil War era storytelling in comics. Two Moons exceeded my expectations! Please read my full review over @ Diamond Bookshelf (link forthcoming).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bobzen

    Civil War-era western and psychedelic horror mashed together, what's not to like? The last two chapters/issues become a bit flat compared to the gorgeous beginning especially regarding the artwork, which by the end was obvious tracings of customized 3D models. As a standalone I would have rated the volume lower, but since it's more of a setup for an ongoing or another miniseries, and an excellent one at that, I gave it a four-star (great) rating. Civil War-era western and psychedelic horror mashed together, what's not to like? The last two chapters/issues become a bit flat compared to the gorgeous beginning especially regarding the artwork, which by the end was obvious tracings of customized 3D models. As a standalone I would have rated the volume lower, but since it's more of a setup for an ongoing or another miniseries, and an excellent one at that, I gave it a four-star (great) rating.

  7. 4 out of 5

    David

    Fantastic art and an interesting story. Really needs a follow-up, so I do hope there is a vol. 2 in the works.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Clark Day

    Liked the artwork. Didn't know it was a horror series when I started reading, not really a genre I read, but enjoyed it nonetheless. I hope future issues develop more of his native american heritage. Liked the artwork. Didn't know it was a horror series when I started reading, not really a genre I read, but enjoyed it nonetheless. I hope future issues develop more of his native american heritage.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael J.

    I read this in the individual monthly issues, and I have to admit that it was the artwork that kept me going. I'm glad I stuck around because the story really picks up at the mid-point and becomes much more interesting. The depictions of civil war settlements, encampments, and battles is both authentic and realistic. The description style of artist Valerio Giangiordano and use of shading enhances the story so well. The color work by Dave Stewart and Bill Crabtree compliment the lush illustratio I read this in the individual monthly issues, and I have to admit that it was the artwork that kept me going. I'm glad I stuck around because the story really picks up at the mid-point and becomes much more interesting. The depictions of civil war settlements, encampments, and battles is both authentic and realistic. The description style of artist Valerio Giangiordano and use of shading enhances the story so well. The color work by Dave Stewart and Bill Crabtree compliment the lush illustrations perfectly. John Arcudi's story blends civil war realism with horror, starting out slowly and building the suspense and terror issue by issue. At first, it seems that perhaps main character Virgil Moore/Two Moons, a native American raised by foster parents and enlisted in the Union Army, may be going slightly mad from the hazards/trauma of war. He views his comrades and sees monsters underneath the uniform. Perhaps the visions are enhanced by the persuasive influence of his grandfather, who appears to him as a ghostly counselor. Or, maybe it was the magic mushroom that he was encouraged to locate and eat. Readers don't get any clarity until the middle of the first story arc, by this point everyone is aware of the threat. Arcudi uses the brutality and cruelty of the American Civil War as a perfect foil for his story of hidden monsters arising from the souls of soldiers on both sides of the battle. Two Moons learns the reality of the situation from a fellow soldier he revealed as a monster: "In this time, the spirit world is strong. The Nahurac are near - - but the Sehsekachan, the evil ones, the angry ones, cannot be controlled . . . . War brings them to life, into this world. The evil will always be strongest then. . . But this war of the white men goes on for years. Thousands die, brothers kill brothers and the dying souls, fat with the venom of hatred, feed the greedy Sehsekachan. . . . Sucking pain and resentment from those damned spirits, growing stronger." There's a resolution of sorts in the final chapter of the first story arc, setting the stage for further engagement to come. I'm going to be following this one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 Total review score: 2.8 Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 Total review score: 2.8

  11. 5 out of 5

    Yağız “Yaz” Erkan

    I really liked Two Moons. The blend of horror and civil war worked very well for me. I couldn't put it down once I started to read it. I also quite liked the illustration style and quality. It matches well the spirit of the story. I really liked Two Moons. The blend of horror and civil war worked very well for me. I couldn't put it down once I started to read it. I also quite liked the illustration style and quality. It matches well the spirit of the story.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    So there's a young soldier in the American Civil War who was born a Pawnee Native American, but brought up by parents of European blood. When the spirits start leaving him cryptic clues, and when he shoots an absolute monster in the back of the head, he begins to learn the truth about the place and the war, and his powers against the evils therein. For a lot of the soldiers are actually demonic, half-zombie, half-Cthulhu nasties pretending to be human, and once he triggers full realisation he ca So there's a young soldier in the American Civil War who was born a Pawnee Native American, but brought up by parents of European blood. When the spirits start leaving him cryptic clues, and when he shoots an absolute monster in the back of the head, he begins to learn the truth about the place and the war, and his powers against the evils therein. For a lot of the soldiers are actually demonic, half-zombie, half-Cthulhu nasties pretending to be human, and once he triggers full realisation he can go and slice them all up – if he makes sure his own side don't get to kill him first... This is quite a good read, and I'm not sure if my rating it in less-than exuberant manner is down to my not finding such Civil War dramas interesting at all, or not. Either way, it's not too bad – the story is a tidily self-contained arc, the design is fine, with the majority of action scenes being done really well. It does follow the standard genre trope where a character is awakened to their destiny, duffs up some baddies, the end, though. I think with a touch more clarity initially as to which side was which and where all allegiances lie, I might have stretched to four stars here, for it's a perfectly competent entertainment. As it is, three and a half stars will have to remain the top encouragement I can give to those with an interest in checking it out. Nobody is at all dissuaded from doing so.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bexa

    A strange retelling of the Civil War. An orphan Pawnee Two Moons, or Virgil Morris as he was renamed, is fighting for for the Union and just trying to survive the absolute slaughter that was the Civil War. Visiting the nearby town for supplies he see his grandfather, who speaks to him about recognizing the signs. Once he is back at camp Two Moons/Virgil begins to notice certain members of his troop are acting strange, and then they begin to morph into monsters/demons but only he can see them. I A strange retelling of the Civil War. An orphan Pawnee Two Moons, or Virgil Morris as he was renamed, is fighting for for the Union and just trying to survive the absolute slaughter that was the Civil War. Visiting the nearby town for supplies he see his grandfather, who speaks to him about recognizing the signs. Once he is back at camp Two Moons/Virgil begins to notice certain members of his troop are acting strange, and then they begin to morph into monsters/demons but only he can see them. I really didn't get where the monsters/demons come from, or why they were so focused on Two Moons, unless it was because he was the only one that could see them. It was a very fast paced novel with some unique characters, I don't know enough about time period to know if the actual historical parts are accurate, or if it was just a time period were you could blow a lot of people up in gruesome ways. I'm not sure if there will be more of this, but also, I will probably not be reading more of the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Pawnee child Two Moons lost his family to smallpox; raised by a white schoolmaster, he's now Union soldier Virgil Morris. But his heritage doesn't want to let him go so easily, and now he's getting messages from the dead, visions of spirits and monsters which soon put him in terrible danger. Arcudi is an underrated writer; on the art side, Giangiordano and Crabtree give good irruption of horror, though their more everyday scenes, while perfectly serviceable, don't have the same distinctiveness. Pawnee child Two Moons lost his family to smallpox; raised by a white schoolmaster, he's now Union soldier Virgil Morris. But his heritage doesn't want to let him go so easily, and now he's getting messages from the dead, visions of spirits and monsters which soon put him in terrible danger. Arcudi is an underrated writer; on the art side, Giangiordano and Crabtree give good irruption of horror, though their more everyday scenes, while perfectly serviceable, don't have the same distinctiveness. But for the most part I felt frustrated by this comic, which set up a question that interested me – what was it like to be a Native American soldier in America's Civil War? – and then mostly ignored it in favour of a story about an assimilated character getting dragged back into the myth-world of his people, and demons in human form feeding on the horror of war, all of which I feel like I've seen plenty of times before. (Edelweiss ARC)

  15. 5 out of 5

    A1Cvenom

    (4.5 stars) I gave this one a try due to the artwork alone. I figured a Native American/western/civil war horror could be really good or really terrible. I was half expecting a bunch of preachy modern messaging to be mixed in but nope. It was a good old fashion fun story with plenty of violence and great art. I also liked how there were demons on both sides of the battlefield and they didn’t try to simply shit on only the southern soldiers. They instead showed the brutality inflicted by and on b (4.5 stars) I gave this one a try due to the artwork alone. I figured a Native American/western/civil war horror could be really good or really terrible. I was half expecting a bunch of preachy modern messaging to be mixed in but nope. It was a good old fashion fun story with plenty of violence and great art. I also liked how there were demons on both sides of the battlefield and they didn’t try to simply shit on only the southern soldiers. They instead showed the brutality inflicted by and on both sides of the war. After these first five issues came to a very satisfying conclusion, I will probably pick up volume 2 someday. Recommended for any old school comic fan.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Very good supernatural comic series set during the American Civil War. Only 4 stars because I am not a great fan of horror comics. However this series, dealing with Virgil, a soldier fighting for the Union, as he discovers more about his Pawnee roots and takes on monsters benefiting from the war. It’s got some interesting characters and the story moves long at a good pace. The artwork is well-produced and detailed. An enjoyable series, well worth a look. I received a copy in exchange for an hones Very good supernatural comic series set during the American Civil War. Only 4 stars because I am not a great fan of horror comics. However this series, dealing with Virgil, a soldier fighting for the Union, as he discovers more about his Pawnee roots and takes on monsters benefiting from the war. It’s got some interesting characters and the story moves long at a good pace. The artwork is well-produced and detailed. An enjoyable series, well worth a look. I received a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Beautiful horror story set post Civil War in the west. Story follows former soldier Virgil Morris who is part Indian. He is followed by monsters from his Indian tribes lore. John Arcudi writes a great story. It was as good a horror tale that I have read in quite awhile. I loved Valerio Giangiordano's art work it was really quite lovely amidst the horror. Beautiful horror story set post Civil War in the west. Story follows former soldier Virgil Morris who is part Indian. He is followed by monsters from his Indian tribes lore. John Arcudi writes a great story. It was as good a horror tale that I have read in quite awhile. I loved Valerio Giangiordano's art work it was really quite lovely amidst the horror.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    This was a little slow for me at the start but it ended strong. Looking forward to Volume 2.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Scott E

    Don’t think I’ve read anything in the American Civil War setting so an interesting change of scenery

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emily Adams

    Great monster book - decent indigenous representation - amazing art.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cail Judy

    Arcudi + Civil War + First Nations protagonist + killer demons. Giangiordano killed the artwork! Looking forward to the series picking up again next month.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    Very bloody & violent. Almost kept me from finishing but glad I did. Great characters & interesting mythology

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    Great first volume. Good art, good demon killing action with cool story bits.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Travis Chesser

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Houston

  26. 5 out of 5

    Davide Saladino

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ololade Olakanmi

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric Saye

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rui Junqueira

  30. 4 out of 5

    Panyi

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