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Everything Will Be Okay: Life Lessons for Young Women (from a Former Young Woman)

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30 review for Everything Will Be Okay: Life Lessons for Young Women (from a Former Young Woman)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Peyton

    I've had so many wild, overly-ambitious dreams: to be an astronaut, forensic sculpturist, marine biologist, trauma surgeon, etc. But these career ideas were overly-ambitious for the sole reason that I didn't know where to start. I didn't know how to use practical skills to turn a dream into a goal. Dana fills in those gaps. She addresses the hard, in-between life phases. She uses her grace, wisdom, and vulnerability to pave the way for women to walk into a room, knowing their worth and wearing t I've had so many wild, overly-ambitious dreams: to be an astronaut, forensic sculpturist, marine biologist, trauma surgeon, etc. But these career ideas were overly-ambitious for the sole reason that I didn't know where to start. I didn't know how to use practical skills to turn a dream into a goal. Dana fills in those gaps. She addresses the hard, in-between life phases. She uses her grace, wisdom, and vulnerability to pave the way for women to walk into a room, knowing their worth and wearing their dignity proudly. 10/10. 5 stars. 2 thumbs up. All the good things.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christina DeVane

    This is a book for the career woman looking to have promotions and work her way up in the world. So not much really applied to me as I’m not about to ask my boss for a raise!😂 But I still found it interesting as she talked about dressing appropriately for the job, being punctual and focused, creating boundaries, etc. I enjoyed her stories of working at the White House and with President Bush. She is a conservative, but this definitely not a political book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Allyson

    Listened to audiobook, read by author. Excellent career / life advice. I read a lot of books like these and many times the author can come across as inauthentic or self-absorbed. This book is not like that at all, I learned a lot and have some bits to take away / implement in my life. Would highly highly recommend.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Poorly written and tone deaf advice mid-pandemic. Just dress well, sit up straight, do pilates and yoga for mental health, and have zero work life balance and you'll succeed! Poorly written and tone deaf advice mid-pandemic. Just dress well, sit up straight, do pilates and yoga for mental health, and have zero work life balance and you'll succeed!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    A little background on me and Fox News and Dana Perino … of course Dana is mainly known these days due to her Fox News affiliation. I remember when she was George W. Bush’s press secretary. Then, like many former political animals, she ended up at Fox. When I first began watching Fox News, maybe a decade or so back, it was with such joy. I’ve learned that I can very quickly tell when a reporter/book/whatever is biased by my own feelings while observing. If I start to feel annoyed, stressed, or l A little background on me and Fox News and Dana Perino … of course Dana is mainly known these days due to her Fox News affiliation. I remember when she was George W. Bush’s press secretary. Then, like many former political animals, she ended up at Fox. When I first began watching Fox News, maybe a decade or so back, it was with such joy. I’ve learned that I can very quickly tell when a reporter/book/whatever is biased by my own feelings while observing. If I start to feel annoyed, stressed, or like my blood pressure is rising, I know it’s because a supposed “news” source is coming across in a subjective way, usually in a direction I don’t feel is factual. Fox News was a breath of fresh air after having only the big 3 networks, CNN, or PBS as news sources which almost always leaned left. One thing that did crack me up was the way the women on FNC were dressed — always in, um, “form fitting” dresses that were usually short and low-cut. The women wore bright colors and were usually pretty too. I found this kind of eye-rolling and annoying. I mean, it’s great to be pretty and all, but the men on FNC looked and dressed like men anyplace else. The whole look of the women came across as a little sexist to me, and if you know me you know I’m not one to make that charge frivolously. The years passed. I came to love Bill O’Reilly’s show and I miss it to this day. I like Tucker Carlson; Sean Hannity gets repetitive and to me rarely breaks new ground. The one FNC show I watch regularly is “The Five,” probably because it’s on while I am making dinner. Dana is on this show, and I’ve always viewed her as fairly vanilla — ie, playing it safe with pretty moderate comments and views. I’ve loved Kimberly Guilfoyle and Dagan McDowell, both of whom impress me with their intelligence. Among the men, I like Jesse Watters, and absolutely love Greg Gutfeld. Gutfeld shares my type of humor and he is wickedly smart. At the end of the show, the hosts will share little things, which increasingly seems to be that they’ve written a book. As an author, I feel a little miffed at this — it seems like such an obvious ploy for more money. A few of the books seem to have real merit, but most of them just seem like something to do since you’ve made a bit of a name for yourself and therefore have the coveted “platform” that authors are all dying for. I’ll admit that that’s how I approached Dana Perino’s latest, “Everything Will Be Okay: Life Lessons for Young Women.” I doubt I would ever have read it, but friend and commenter Leona wanted to, so I checked it out from the library for her and since she said it was a quick read, I read it too before returning it to the library. So, thanks for sticking with me this far. Here’s the actual book review: I was stuck by Dana’s confidence. Of course, it’s her book, and she’s somewhat famous, but still, she has a very high opinion of herself. In the intro, she describes asking an acquaintance, “Well, how do you think I became Dana Perino?” She goes on to write “I’m grateful that my advice has apparently been helpful to quite a few people,” “Hey, look at me … no Ivy (league education) here!” I guess, given that this is an advice book, she’d have to go into it feeling she had something to share. The book describes itself as containing advice “for young women from a formerly young woman,” and I’m almost a decade older than the 48-year-old Perino, but much of the advice given seemed very basic to me, really common sense. Read. Embrace change. Be grateful. Maybe today’s 20-somethings really need to read a book stating these things explicitly? Dana tries, in my opinion too hard, to be hip-to-the-young-folks with asides such as “amirite?”, lots of exclamation points, “facepalm emoji!,” etc. I did enjoy the autobiographical bits in this book; they reinforced my belief that everyone has their own stories, and really, most everybody’s are pretty interesting if you take the time to listen to them (or in this case, read them). Dana has been hugely blessed by a husband who apparently has done a lot in sacrificing his own desires in order to help her build her career. Now that she is at a fairly high career level, Dana shares her likes and dislikes in the workplace. A few things she doesn’t like in people working for her are wearing UGG boots (they make you shuffle), and saying “no worries.” These examples made me think how hard it can be to work for a boss. It can be next to impossible to know sometimes whether what you’re doing is annoying them. As an underling, MY non-famous-person piece of advice is to study your boss, learn what they like, and do it. This has helped me out a lot. Dana and I have a lot in common in that we both like achieving and “getting gold stars.” We’re both classic “good girls,” and yet I was disappointed in a few things. She used a few instances of profanity (either in the book itself or describing things she said), and in an incident with George W. Bush, she describes a time when she was asked to write a press release against gay marriage. Perino mentions that being against gay marriage “was a stand that many supported at the time” (WOW imagine how neanderthal people used to be!), but that Bush understood Dana’s pro-gay beliefs and told her she didn’t have to write the release since it contradicted her beliefs. She appreciated his loyalty to her … but this made me sad, particularly because Perino mentions “faith” several times, as well as praying, etc. All this adds to my image of her as a “vanilla” Republican, at best.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M Pereira

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My mind is in a lull at the moment so I thought it would be good to have a self help book to read. This was a surprisingly good book. I learned that Dana Perino worked for the GW Bush administration and is an anchor for Fox News. Not normally the kind of author I'd read being a pinko, but I'm pleasantly surprised. This book, bar a few comments is hardly political at all, its about how to get ahead in the office, whether that's the oval office or any other. It's a story about career and work, wor My mind is in a lull at the moment so I thought it would be good to have a self help book to read. This was a surprisingly good book. I learned that Dana Perino worked for the GW Bush administration and is an anchor for Fox News. Not normally the kind of author I'd read being a pinko, but I'm pleasantly surprised. This book, bar a few comments is hardly political at all, its about how to get ahead in the office, whether that's the oval office or any other. It's a story about career and work, working life and professionalism and it's not a bad account I should say. I've learned a thing or too from Dana about how to conduct myself with emails, how to communicate with colleagues and I agree with a lot of things she says about professional conduct and dealing with seniors, mentoring and not having fixed expectations sometimes. I'm pleasantly surprised by this title. If I come across another book she might do, I might even read it. To re-iterate, this book has almost no politics in it and is much more about the modern corporate world, and from the sounds of it, she's someone who has navigated both to some success.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cassandra Lucero

    I can see the practical use of this book for someone with an office job that wants to climb the ladder. I didn’t learn anything, there wasn’t any new information that hasn’t already been shared before time and again in every encouraging blog post, book, or email. So much of the book felt repetitive and honestly just ran on and on and on — she would do these little subject headers that said everything that needed to be said, in my opinion, but then she spent the next 3-5 pages going more in depth I can see the practical use of this book for someone with an office job that wants to climb the ladder. I didn’t learn anything, there wasn’t any new information that hasn’t already been shared before time and again in every encouraging blog post, book, or email. So much of the book felt repetitive and honestly just ran on and on and on — she would do these little subject headers that said everything that needed to be said, in my opinion, but then she spent the next 3-5 pages going more in depth just to talk all about herself and how wonderful she is and all the super stellar things she’s done. Much of it comes off pretentious and high-class. That’s a class I’m not interested in being part of - so maybe I’m biased on not being her target market AT ALL. This was given to me by my mother that is definitely in the target demographic. I appreciate the sentiment of the gift, given she knows I’ve truly been up and down and lost about my career and where to push forward next — but this wasn’t the book to help me in the least (not that I felt I needed one)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bella

    Few very good pieces of advice. However lots of generic fluffiness - things you hear / read anywhere. Found myself pretty bored towards the end and struggling to finish.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Piepie

    I'm in my 30s, and maybe not the target audience of this book (the focus is on "young" women, probably in their 20s), but I still loved it and brought home a lot of takeaways, even going so far as to snapping a picture of a page I particularly loved. I think whatever career you're in - business, politics, sales, retail - there is definitely something in here for everyone. I'm a fan of Perino's, and her dog Jasper, and have read and enjoyed her previous two books. This book was also a pleasure to I'm in my 30s, and maybe not the target audience of this book (the focus is on "young" women, probably in their 20s), but I still loved it and brought home a lot of takeaways, even going so far as to snapping a picture of a page I particularly loved. I think whatever career you're in - business, politics, sales, retail - there is definitely something in here for everyone. I'm a fan of Perino's, and her dog Jasper, and have read and enjoyed her previous two books. This book was also a pleasure to read. Recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    Great career advice! Dana’s advice was so universal, direct and realistic. She is honest and accountable in providing what you need to know, it’s up to the reader to apply it. I love that she doesn’t act like there are all these “secrets to success”. It’s practice, professionalism and hard work...old fashioned, but true.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cara Bristol

    I watch Dana Perino on The Five, a TV news talk show, so even though I am not a young woman, I wanted to read her book. Everything Will Be Okay is definitely geared to young, professional women with a few years of experience under their belts who are ready to advance to the next step. Based on her own experience, Perino delivers a pep talk and offers advice based on the appropriate behaviors needed to climb the career ladder. It boils down to this: take responsibility for your own actions: don’t I watch Dana Perino on The Five, a TV news talk show, so even though I am not a young woman, I wanted to read her book. Everything Will Be Okay is definitely geared to young, professional women with a few years of experience under their belts who are ready to advance to the next step. Based on her own experience, Perino delivers a pep talk and offers advice based on the appropriate behaviors needed to climb the career ladder. It boils down to this: take responsibility for your own actions: don’t complain, whine, or gossip; be willing to work hard, be a can-do team player, be open to new opportunities.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tess Buckley

    My grandma sent this to me and Dana seems very nice. There were a lot of contradictions going, but also some good advice about writing an email. More like 2 1/2 I guess.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mallory DeGroat

    Finally finished this guy :) thank you gram grams for the book! It had great advice for young women entering the professional world. I will definitely circle back to this book once I start working

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dorothy Dupree

    Readers can approach this book at any age and have some takeaways, but I do wish this book was there for me in my late teens/early 20s. I think this age group is who benefits most from this book. You can't help but feel upbeat and positive while engaging (albeit through text) with the author. Dana is very down to earth, but not afraid to dish tough love to encourage introspection. If you read a lot of self help books, you may not get a wealth of new info out of this book.. Go into it with an ope Readers can approach this book at any age and have some takeaways, but I do wish this book was there for me in my late teens/early 20s. I think this age group is who benefits most from this book. You can't help but feel upbeat and positive while engaging (albeit through text) with the author. Dana is very down to earth, but not afraid to dish tough love to encourage introspection. If you read a lot of self help books, you may not get a wealth of new info out of this book.. Go into it with an open mind though. There is "newer" advice in terms of dealing with technology, social media, etc. Otherwise, I do recommend buying a copy so you can make notes/highlight to refer back to later! Also important to note is that this book is not political in nature. Though Dana discusses her time in the White House under the Bush admin, politics is not the primary focus at all.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tatum

    I’ll be honest, my grandmother gave me this book after my graduation and I was hesitant. I was expecting overly-ambitious fluff rooted in politics. Instead I felt as if Dana Perino were speaking directly to me! If you are looking for pieces of encouragement & realistic advice without the cheesiness of ~girl boss~ literature, look no further. It is a valuable read for young women in the working world. Politics are not the focal point of this book—much to my grandmother’s dismay! Instead, Perino f I’ll be honest, my grandmother gave me this book after my graduation and I was hesitant. I was expecting overly-ambitious fluff rooted in politics. Instead I felt as if Dana Perino were speaking directly to me! If you are looking for pieces of encouragement & realistic advice without the cheesiness of ~girl boss~ literature, look no further. It is a valuable read for young women in the working world. Politics are not the focal point of this book—much to my grandmother’s dismay! Instead, Perino focuses on something that ties many of us together: the barriers for women breaking into the professional world. I would recommend to my friends!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Raini Leveen

    My grandfather sent me this book and I had no idea who Dana was before reading it, but I’m so glad I read this book. As a 22 year old (almost) college graduate I felt that I really needed to hear a lot of the advice Dana gives. I recommend everyone starting out in the workforce read this book because there is so much to learn!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alana

    A gift from my grandpa with a not so subtle nod at his political preference. I'm glad I convinced myself to keep an open mind to enjoy this light, yet thoughtful book. Not a must-read, but some of the career/life advice was nicely timed for my personal journey. A gift from my grandpa with a not so subtle nod at his political preference. I'm glad I convinced myself to keep an open mind to enjoy this light, yet thoughtful book. Not a must-read, but some of the career/life advice was nicely timed for my personal journey.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jan Reatherford

    I am not a fan of self help books but I would recommend this book to anyone in their 20s. It has common sense advice for navigating through a career and life in general. No instant answers but good solid advice for being able to look in the mirror every day and know you are doing ok. Integrity and character may not provide instant gratification but it will serve you well in the long run.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robin Wright

    A fun read that is part memoir, part great advice for young women who are serious about moving forward in life. A perfect graduation gift or for a twenty-something.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I recently stumbled upon Dana Perino's first book (And the Good News Is...) and was so excited to learn, just as I was finishing it, that this book would be coming out soon. As a "former young woman" myself, I can only imagine that this book would have been dogeared and colored with a highlighter from cover to cover had this been a resource 30 years ago. It's a great book, filled with practical advice that can be put into action by any woman, really at any age. She has such sound wisdom (and hum I recently stumbled upon Dana Perino's first book (And the Good News Is...) and was so excited to learn, just as I was finishing it, that this book would be coming out soon. As a "former young woman" myself, I can only imagine that this book would have been dogeared and colored with a highlighter from cover to cover had this been a resource 30 years ago. It's a great book, filled with practical advice that can be put into action by any woman, really at any age. She has such sound wisdom (and humor), and I have already sent a copy to my niece who is entering the working world next month. Also, if you need further convincing how excited I was about this book coming out...my husband gave it to me as part of an anniversary gift. :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Anthony

    2.5 maybe? My dad sent this to me for my birthday. I should be flattered he still considers me a young woman, but this book was definitely geared for women 10 years younger than me. I've either already made the mistakes she tries to advise against or figured out a way to avoid it. I don't read many advice/self-help books because I typically find them trite, and this was par for the genre. 2.5 maybe? My dad sent this to me for my birthday. I should be flattered he still considers me a young woman, but this book was definitely geared for women 10 years younger than me. I've either already made the mistakes she tries to advise against or figured out a way to avoid it. I don't read many advice/self-help books because I typically find them trite, and this was par for the genre.

  22. 4 out of 5

    J

    Scattered mess! Perino jumps all over and repeats the same thought over and over and over again. I read about half of the book and had no good, revelatory take-aways so put it down for good.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taryn Travis

    Knowing my values and morals and political beliefs theoretically oppose Dana's, my grandma gave me this book to read. I did not want to read it, but I knew that I should, on behalf of my grandma and also to potentially see Dana and her beliefs from a new perspective. Although I did learn some things about Dana that I had not known before, such as all of her involvement with women organizations across the world, I still felt as though I could not relate or even find connections with her at all. F Knowing my values and morals and political beliefs theoretically oppose Dana's, my grandma gave me this book to read. I did not want to read it, but I knew that I should, on behalf of my grandma and also to potentially see Dana and her beliefs from a new perspective. Although I did learn some things about Dana that I had not known before, such as all of her involvement with women organizations across the world, I still felt as though I could not relate or even find connections with her at all. For someone who supposedly loves supporting and encouraging woman, she was extremely misogynistic at times and deliberately overlooked the power she had in her life being a white, conventionally attractive, blonde woman. What bothered me the most was she obviously kept true to the title, constantly repeating the idea that "everything will be okay" IF you basically prioritize your job and money. She made it seem like everything would be okay if you followed her advice because it worked for her. She thought that it was rock bottom when she moved back to live with her family after school. If she thinks that is what rock bottom is, it is hard for me to then listen to any advice she has on mental health, especially involving yoga and pilates. She is extremely contradicting in how she approaches these lessons. For one, she will emphasize the importance of having a close community of friends and family, and making sure you are spending time with them and taking time for yourself. But also keep in mind, that you also should keep on trying to move up the ladder at any given moment! She emphasized work-life balance, but coming from Dana who is clearly more work centered than anything, she contradicted this whole idea, basically saying that work matters more until you make money. What also made me cringe was the "tips" that seemed so englighting for Dana to tell us about, but really is common knowledge. For example, posture! This is probably one of the most repeated words in her book. I wonder if I did not get that job I interviewed for because my posture was not at it's best... Also, what she had to say regarding the clothes women should wear to their jobs, and how they should walk (do not wear Uggs), is pointless to say the least in trying to make people, especially women, feel better about their life. All she does is call out the people who are overly negative, stressed, etc and say what not to do to become like "them." One thing that urked me the most was the comment about stress management and the "low calorie method". Dana's voice in this book, and especially this section, sounded like it came from a middle aged, white man. She is quite tone-deaf at times, especially relating to mental illness, stress, and COVID. The fact that she said that we do not want to be overly stresssed because one of the consequences would be ... gaining weight, is incredibly disgusting to read, especially as someone that comes from a background of body image and mental health issues. Not only did she completely miss the fact that people can also LOSE weight while stressed, but making the readers worry about their weight when they obviously would have other things stressing them, is not helping, instead making it worse. It is also saying that women should make sure to be concentrating on their weight and their outer appearance (which is normal in certain situations, especially keeping care of your physical and mental health), but making that seem like the priority instead of confidence in oneself and stress-relieving solutions. Instead of telling the readers about what stress overload can lead to, I would have rather heard about an instance in your life where you genuinely were stressed to the point of complete physical and mental burnout. In the case you did not have this expereince, you have no right to talk about it like some expert. "Picking up the phone" is NOT the first step. This book is targeted for young women, but more narrowly for future "Dana's", aka women who want to either work in the government or work desk jobs or manage a business. Although I do appreciate her effort to mention how women deserve to be in roles as such, it is hard to read and understand many of her situations given that she only uses stories from the White House. I'm glad she has such professional experience, but it does not help me see how everything will be okay, especially when the types of jobs she talks about are the types of jobs I want to stay away from. In conclusion, if you do not know how to write a respectful email, write a list, or want to see how internalized misogyny is outwardly displayed, read this book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Roth

    By the time I was two thirds of the way through Everything Will Be OK by Dana Perino a series of questions cropped up in my head. I wondered why such a book would limit its audience by focusing specifically on women. Can a woman write such a book as this for all career oriented people, or would men just dismiss it without a second glance because it was written by a woman? Don’t men need the same kind of advice, or are women the ones that need remedial help in foundations of leadership and career By the time I was two thirds of the way through Everything Will Be OK by Dana Perino a series of questions cropped up in my head. I wondered why such a book would limit its audience by focusing specifically on women. Can a woman write such a book as this for all career oriented people, or would men just dismiss it without a second glance because it was written by a woman? Don’t men need the same kind of advice, or are women the ones that need remedial help in foundations of leadership and career management? Why wouldn’t a businessman need or want a book on career advice written by a woman? Is theirs a skill set previously acquired naturally on athletic fields, during military service, or networking in locker rooms and strip clubs, that women just don’t get? A less than charitable thought meandered through my brain cells: men don’t need a book like Dana’s because traditionally they ride to the top on the backs of woman they manage, who make them look good while these male bosses take credit for women’s ideas and productivity. Then I got mad at myself for even thinking such a thing and said, “1960s, get out of my head! That’s sexist thinking!” One caveat, many male bosses are mentors, not jerks. I wondered if there was a male equivalent word for misogyny, and if there was, why didn’t I know it? I had to Google to find “misandry,” the hatred, contempt, and prejudice for men, which can be found in literature as early as 1803. Misogyny (per Wiki), on the other hand, was noted as a disease in Classical Greece mentioned by Cicero around 45 BC. Clearly men have a head start over women in this type of prejudice by about 2,066 years (unless an ancient cave drawing of Amazons celebrating a successful man hunt emerges). My next next thought was maybe women need a book about surviving and excelling in a predominately male business culture if you didn’t pick up such skills as “be on time” and “don’t criticize your boss in the workplace” while growing up. If such is the case, this book is for you. I have followed Dana Perino with awe since her days of inheriting the White House Press Secretary’s position from her boss Tony Snow. Why is it so easy to admire Dana, and so impossible to relate to her? She’s the person many women wish to be, and truly the skillful architect of all you see. Could anyone honestly be more self actualized than Perino? I say that out of sheer respect, and not criticism. I do believe one should take instruction from those who know what they’re talking about, and Dana is spectacularly successful in her personal and professional life. Perino’s many assets include winning the DNA jackpot, an impeccable uncanny fashion sense, combined with enormous gifts of intelligence, discipline, communication, deportment, sense of humor, a perfect dog (Jasper), a marvelously supportive spouse, a stable childhood with loving supportive parents who constructed a framework that facilitated success; it all boggles the mind. If she were Eve in the Garden of Eden, trust me, we’d still be there. The book does address numerous issues that she and her network of savvy successful women have faced. One driving force for her is financial independence, and she shares ideas and resources about that. She also provides many recommendations of podcasts, books, and people she follows for leadership insights. I once heard her say she often listens to audiobooks at 1.5 speed while she is power walking or running. I tried that, actually completing 75 books in a 7 month period, but it was a bit of a blur. I’ve now ratcheted back to 1.40, but the lesson learned is while most of us are lumbering along, she’s amping up her life learning experiences to a hyperdrive of 1.5 times reality. Few could compete with that on a daily basis. Perino’s no doubt a compassionate advisor and probably boss as well, but she may well reach a point where her definition of what personal responsibility is may not line up with your own perception, and at that juncture I expect she’d cut you off, albeit with a list of people you might go to for personal and employment help. She admonishes those who wish to follow in her footsteps, “I need you to commit to these three things to make this work: Make good personal choices, as in don’t stay out until last call on a weeknight, and never leave on a motorcycle you didn’t arrive on. Take responsibility for your actions and outcomes. Your dog has never eaten your homework; no one will ever buy that. Start turning worry that depletes you into energy that fuels you.”

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amalia

    This is almost like a female-oriented version of "Beyond Harvard". Dana has been on my family's TV for nearly my whole life, and yet I never questioned how she came to be where she was, as if the women I see on TV are just NPC's or something. Like they're just talking heads who look pretty. I was never sure if I could see them as role models or not, but now, after reading this, I realize what it took for Dana to talk in a panel with men. All of the advice she gave was very digestible and easy to This is almost like a female-oriented version of "Beyond Harvard". Dana has been on my family's TV for nearly my whole life, and yet I never questioned how she came to be where she was, as if the women I see on TV are just NPC's or something. Like they're just talking heads who look pretty. I was never sure if I could see them as role models or not, but now, after reading this, I realize what it took for Dana to talk in a panel with men. All of the advice she gave was very digestible and easy to read, and I found myself relating heavily to the thoughts that I didn't think she ever had. This book is aimed at women a bit further in their career paths than me, however, it's still valuable for any young woman to read especially if they don't have positive female role models in their lives already. For me, I found it funny that I heard my mom's voice in some of the advice Dana laid out, and I felt incredibly fortunate that I have someone like that in my life, however, it's useful to hear this kind of stuff from people currently in the professional field. It feels intimidating to read self-help books because it just lays out how someone has already lived their lives successfully and although they say "don't compare yourself", the entire book is kind of just you comparing yourself to this already successful woman. Overall, however, she listed a lot of helpful exercises that I'll actually do to feel more secure in my life as a freshman in college. The advice didn't feel repetitive or something you can find off some Buzzfeed article except for some of the really basic sentences. However, maybe I'm just annoyed because I'm reluctant to actually follow such "basic" advice even though there's a reason they're so well known. Overall, I'll definitely re-read this when I graduate.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kayleen

    Lockdown life has lead me to read a lot of self help books, and Everything Will Be Okay is my latest. I was never a Dana Perino Fan. Being Canadian and quite young when Bush was in office, she never really crossed my radar. My father however, who is a big fan of Fox News recommended this to me as I am attempting to climb the corporate ladder while also trying to discover who I really am as an independent woman. I was skeptical As I am not a fan of politics nor do I watch Fox News. After reading Lockdown life has lead me to read a lot of self help books, and Everything Will Be Okay is my latest. I was never a Dana Perino Fan. Being Canadian and quite young when Bush was in office, she never really crossed my radar. My father however, who is a big fan of Fox News recommended this to me as I am attempting to climb the corporate ladder while also trying to discover who I really am as an independent woman. I was skeptical As I am not a fan of politics nor do I watch Fox News. After reading other good reviews however I decided to give it a whirl. And boy, am I ever glad I did! A lot of the advice Dana gives in her book is common sense based but definitely worth the reminder. I found her very relatable as she seems like a perfectionist like myself and offers good advice to deal with this issue in life and on the job. I really appreciate her message about fighting for and standing up for yourself in the work place in order to get ahead and get what you deserve. This is something women need to hear and need to do. There are many great take aways from the book and I actually ended up taking 3 pages of notes for reference, but will likely reread the book in the near future to try out some of the exercise she suggests. I would highly recommend this book to other young women looking to find their place in the corporate world.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine K

    Everything Will Be Ok is an alright self-help book. My mom got if for me as a gift. Reading these reviews, it seems that a lot of people got it the same way. She must have promoted it on The Five and everyone’s conservative parents bought it for their kids haha. Its intended audience is definitely successful, educated young women who are having a crisis of confidence or are unsure about their professional path. The book has some interesting personal anecdotes and advice and is a quick and easy r Everything Will Be Ok is an alright self-help book. My mom got if for me as a gift. Reading these reviews, it seems that a lot of people got it the same way. She must have promoted it on The Five and everyone’s conservative parents bought it for their kids haha. Its intended audience is definitely successful, educated young women who are having a crisis of confidence or are unsure about their professional path. The book has some interesting personal anecdotes and advice and is a quick and easy read. Oftentimes she gives very specific advice (don’t wear UGGs is repeated several times, improve your posture, don’t respond to emails with “No worries,” etc.) I wish that some of the advice, especially around professional communications, was clearer. I think I’d actually buy that book, although I suppose it has already probably been written by someone else. It’s not too political - I’m extremely far from a conservative republican, and I found the book a nice read still. It’s a good book for young female professionals, especially those who are interested in politics. In my opinion, the personal anecdotes about her career, life, and screw-ups were the most interesting, Much of the other advice I think could have been delivered in a more encyclopedic fashion.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Audrey Donahue

    Since I have been retired for 17 years, the good advice was a little late for me, although I have started the huge task of deleting emails, and I will continue my list making, but will try to cross things off instead of copying them over to my new weekly list. I am a big fan of Dana Perino. She has so much class and shows so much kindness. I watch her every day on The Five. Everybody in my family knows not to call me from 5 to 6 on a weekday! ( Sorry, Dana, if you are reading this, I thought the Since I have been retired for 17 years, the good advice was a little late for me, although I have started the huge task of deleting emails, and I will continue my list making, but will try to cross things off instead of copying them over to my new weekly list. I am a big fan of Dana Perino. She has so much class and shows so much kindness. I watch her every day on The Five. Everybody in my family knows not to call me from 5 to 6 on a weekday! ( Sorry, Dana, if you are reading this, I thought the explanation point was necessary in this statement.) I also like her morning show with Bill Hemmer. They make a great team. This book is a must read for young women chasing a career. One more thing, I was so happy to see Dana say a statement that I have used with my family for years when dealing with little problems. "Put it in a bubble and blow it away." I use it so often that my family now, cuts me off, and says " we know just bubble it."

  29. 5 out of 5

    kglibrarian (Karin Greenberg)

    There is so much practical advice in this empowering book that helps young women (and older ones!) navigate their career paths. Every time I hear Dana speak, I'm in awe of her ability to share intelligent thoughts with a composure not often seen from today's news people. I try to channel her energy whenever I find myself discussing politics or any controversial topic. Her book gives off the same relaxed, conversational vibe that her TV presence does while also providing in depth guidance that ca There is so much practical advice in this empowering book that helps young women (and older ones!) navigate their career paths. Every time I hear Dana speak, I'm in awe of her ability to share intelligent thoughts with a composure not often seen from today's news people. I try to channel her energy whenever I find myself discussing politics or any controversial topic. Her book gives off the same relaxed, conversational vibe that her TV presence does while also providing in depth guidance that can be applied to every area of life. From interviews, emails, and time management, to relationships, faith, and determination. . .she touches on everything. And she adds her characteristic charm and humor to her writing so that it feels like you're talking to a friend. She advocates for women, stressing that the way to get ahead in life is to have agency instead of falling into the victim trap. A great read, not only for women of all ages, but for men as well!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jim D

    This is a very solid book of advice and mentoring from someone who has gone from small town America to center stage in national news. While there is nothing astounding or earthshattering, the manner in which it is presented and the humble tone is very reassuring. Although it is clearly written for young women in their 20's the tips are useful no matter what gender or age .She writes in a very folksy style. I think she really comes across as relatable as she grew up in a small town in Wyoming, th This is a very solid book of advice and mentoring from someone who has gone from small town America to center stage in national news. While there is nothing astounding or earthshattering, the manner in which it is presented and the humble tone is very reassuring. Although it is clearly written for young women in their 20's the tips are useful no matter what gender or age .She writes in a very folksy style. I think she really comes across as relatable as she grew up in a small town in Wyoming, then Denver, then went to a state college in a small city in Colorado. She makes two key points early on that i think are well worth repeating: 1.Being born in the US means you have already won the lottery of life. and 2.Being an educated American woman means you are already so far ahead in life. You have a head start most women around the globe could never imagine. Definitely worth giving as a gift to a young woman.

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