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Flying Kites: A Story of the 2013 California Prison Hunger Strike

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A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice behind prison walls After guards find a book in his cell containing the pencilled name of a suspected gang member, Rodrigo Santiago is "validated" for gang affiliation and sent to indefinite solitary confinement in the Pelican Bay State Prison Secure Housing A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice behind prison walls After guards find a book in his cell containing the pencilled name of a suspected gang member, Rodrigo Santiago is "validated" for gang affiliation and sent to indefinite solitary confinement in the Pelican Bay State Prison Secure Housing Unit, or SHU. Life in the SHU is monotonous, isolating, and enraging. It literally drives prisoners insane. Rodrigo resolves to survive. He struggles to maintain a connection to his daughter, Luz, through letters that are his only happiness. As Luz grows up, though, she presses Rodrigo for more insight into his daily life. She wants the real him. Willing to give her anything she asks, but finding himself at a loss for words, Rodrigo makes a mistake that threatens to destroy the trust between them. Meanwhile a bold, state-wide hunger strike in California prisons gathers force. Gang enmities are set aside. Improbable alliances are forged. Activists and prisoner families organize on the outside. Finding herself increasingly politicized over this issue, Luz fears she can never help her dad. Rodrigo fears he 's lost his daughter forever. On opposite sides of the prison walls they fight to end the torture of endless isolation. Based on the events of the historic 2013 California prison hunger strike, Flying Kites is a story about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice.


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A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice behind prison walls After guards find a book in his cell containing the pencilled name of a suspected gang member, Rodrigo Santiago is "validated" for gang affiliation and sent to indefinite solitary confinement in the Pelican Bay State Prison Secure Housing A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice behind prison walls After guards find a book in his cell containing the pencilled name of a suspected gang member, Rodrigo Santiago is "validated" for gang affiliation and sent to indefinite solitary confinement in the Pelican Bay State Prison Secure Housing Unit, or SHU. Life in the SHU is monotonous, isolating, and enraging. It literally drives prisoners insane. Rodrigo resolves to survive. He struggles to maintain a connection to his daughter, Luz, through letters that are his only happiness. As Luz grows up, though, she presses Rodrigo for more insight into his daily life. She wants the real him. Willing to give her anything she asks, but finding himself at a loss for words, Rodrigo makes a mistake that threatens to destroy the trust between them. Meanwhile a bold, state-wide hunger strike in California prisons gathers force. Gang enmities are set aside. Improbable alliances are forged. Activists and prisoner families organize on the outside. Finding herself increasingly politicized over this issue, Luz fears she can never help her dad. Rodrigo fears he 's lost his daughter forever. On opposite sides of the prison walls they fight to end the torture of endless isolation. Based on the events of the historic 2013 California prison hunger strike, Flying Kites is a story about resilience, forgiveness, hope, and what it means to find your own voice.

30 review for Flying Kites: A Story of the 2013 California Prison Hunger Strike

  1. 4 out of 5

    Elliott

    Haymarket Books runs a great program. For $30 a month you can get a print and digital copy of every book they publish in addition to a 50% discount on all their other books. There are less expensive options which include just digital copies and the discount but I enjoy the books Haymarket puts out, and I am fortunate to be able to afford the monthly $30. I would encourage anyone reading my review to look into this program, and if you can afford it I would highly recommend starting a subscription Haymarket Books runs a great program. For $30 a month you can get a print and digital copy of every book they publish in addition to a 50% discount on all their other books. There are less expensive options which include just digital copies and the discount but I enjoy the books Haymarket puts out, and I am fortunate to be able to afford the monthly $30. I would encourage anyone reading my review to look into this program, and if you can afford it I would highly recommend starting a subscription. If nothing else $30 per month buys a lot more than the cover prices of all the books that are included. My copy of Flying Kites arrived courtesy this subscription. You have the option to opt out of any of the books published monthly although I never have because I wouldn’t have necessarily chosen to read a lot of the books had they not come courtesy Haymarket. Flying Kites is a good example. I generally don’t read a lot of graphic novels and so I wouldn’t have found this book browsing on my own. Yet, this was another solid installment courtesy Haymarket Books. The artistry is deceptively simple. There’s actually a great amount of detail and feeling contained in every panel. The story itself is a simple one and a short one but so well done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Natalie Park

    4.5 stars. Shines a light on a practice that is so inhuman. I also just discovered the Stanford graphic novel project and love it!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joshua McCoy

    4.5 rounded up to 5. My first graphic novel as an adult. The last one I read was _Maus_ in high school. This was a great account of the 2013 california prison hunger strike with peaked at 30,000 prisoners across 34 prisons. The conditions of prisoners is beyond cruel, but secure housing units (SHU), or solitary confinement, are downright diabolical. This graphic novel covered so much ground: dynamics of family life; mental health; violence and domination; and prison organizing. The combination or na 4.5 rounded up to 5. My first graphic novel as an adult. The last one I read was _Maus_ in high school. This was a great account of the 2013 california prison hunger strike with peaked at 30,000 prisoners across 34 prisons. The conditions of prisoners is beyond cruel, but secure housing units (SHU), or solitary confinement, are downright diabolical. This graphic novel covered so much ground: dynamics of family life; mental health; violence and domination; and prison organizing. The combination or narrative and illustrations was fantastic. Easy to read, but no less substantive. Even more impressive considering this is the result of a collaborative class project from the 2019 Stanford Graphic Novel project, produced in only a matter of months. The only thing I would’ve liked to see is a more overt political angle considering prison reform is an inherently political subject. For instance, an analysis of prisons as being necessarily violent and needing to be abolished would’ve been very fitting. If there was a minor character who was pushing for this more radical demand, that would’ve also given a chance for the story to include the prison abolitionists who were part of the organizing. All in all, great, quick read. I do recommend.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jamila Mikhail

    It’s actually a penpal from San Quentin who lived through this hunger strike that recommended this book to me and I’m glad that I read it. This graphic novel was beautifully written and illustrated but a tad short for my taste especially for a book that deals with such a deep and important topic. The artwork was excellent, entertaining from beginning to end. The story too was captivating and I actually read the book in one sitting. I particularly appreciated the real world statistics at the end It’s actually a penpal from San Quentin who lived through this hunger strike that recommended this book to me and I’m glad that I read it. This graphic novel was beautifully written and illustrated but a tad short for my taste especially for a book that deals with such a deep and important topic. The artwork was excellent, entertaining from beginning to end. The story too was captivating and I actually read the book in one sitting. I particularly appreciated the real world statistics at the end of the book. Whatever your reason is to want to pick up this novel, it’s very educational and you won’t be left feeling indifferent by the time you reach the end.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    A neat graphic novel to come out from the Stanford Graphic Novel project, this student authored piece of historical fiction tells the story of the real 2013 California Prison Hunger Strike against the systematic mistreatment of prison inmates. While the art definitely reflects the student nature of the project, the quality storytelling immerses the reader in a piece of recent history they likely are unfamiliar with.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    very illuminating book from a very cool project and a very rad publisher

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lena

    This book does such a great job talking about a huge and heart breaking issue. i learned a lot from this and it also coincidentally made me feel like i have to go to stanford so i can take this class

  8. 4 out of 5

    Diane

  9. 5 out of 5

    D Coulombe

  10. 4 out of 5

    Skyler

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie Barrett

  13. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Evers

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean Denicola

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Sola

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  17. 4 out of 5

    Emily Chao

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  19. 4 out of 5

    Librarian

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paulina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kaid

  22. 5 out of 5

    ArchaeoLibraryologist

  23. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle H

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarie Finfin

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  27. 4 out of 5

    danny

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erendira

  29. 5 out of 5

    James Doherty

  30. 4 out of 5

    Keith

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