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Radiant Black, Vol. 1

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"The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing Invincible..." - Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead, Invincible) THE MOST-ACCLAIMED NEW SERIES OF 2021! Visionary writer Kyle Higgins (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Ultraman) and artist Marcelo Costa reinvent super heroes for a new generation! Nathan Burnett has just turned thirty and things aren't great -- he's working (and fail "The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing Invincible..." - Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead, Invincible) THE MOST-ACCLAIMED NEW SERIES OF 2021! Visionary writer Kyle Higgins (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Ultraman) and artist Marcelo Costa reinvent super heroes for a new generation! Nathan Burnett has just turned thirty and things aren't great -- he's working (and failing) at two jobs, his credit card debt is piling up and his only move... is moving back home with his parents. But when Nathan discovers the ethereal, cosmic RADIANT, he's given the power to radically change his fortunes...unless the Cosmic Beings who created them succeed in taking them back by any means necessary. Oh, and did we mention there's a RED RADIANT who wants Nathan dead? The next must-read comic book series STARTS HERE. Collects RADIANT BLACK #1-6


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"The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing Invincible..." - Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead, Invincible) THE MOST-ACCLAIMED NEW SERIES OF 2021! Visionary writer Kyle Higgins (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Ultraman) and artist Marcelo Costa reinvent super heroes for a new generation! Nathan Burnett has just turned thirty and things aren't great -- he's working (and fail "The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing Invincible..." - Robert Kirkman (The Walking Dead, Invincible) THE MOST-ACCLAIMED NEW SERIES OF 2021! Visionary writer Kyle Higgins (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers, Ultraman) and artist Marcelo Costa reinvent super heroes for a new generation! Nathan Burnett has just turned thirty and things aren't great -- he's working (and failing) at two jobs, his credit card debt is piling up and his only move... is moving back home with his parents. But when Nathan discovers the ethereal, cosmic RADIANT, he's given the power to radically change his fortunes...unless the Cosmic Beings who created them succeed in taking them back by any means necessary. Oh, and did we mention there's a RED RADIANT who wants Nathan dead? The next must-read comic book series STARTS HERE. Collects RADIANT BLACK #1-6

30 review for Radiant Black, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Broke and feeling like a failure, aspiring young writer Nathan Burnett moves from LA back to his parents in smalltown Illinois to regroup and figure out what he’s doing. And then, on a night out with his snarky best bud, they stumble across a blue glowing mini black hole - and Nathan’s world is suddenly changed. Now he’s a superhero: Radiant Black! Power Rangers/Ultraman writer Kyle Higgins teams up with artist Marcelo Costa to create his own robot-looking superhero series, and their first volum Broke and feeling like a failure, aspiring young writer Nathan Burnett moves from LA back to his parents in smalltown Illinois to regroup and figure out what he’s doing. And then, on a night out with his snarky best bud, they stumble across a blue glowing mini black hole - and Nathan’s world is suddenly changed. Now he’s a superhero: Radiant Black! Power Rangers/Ultraman writer Kyle Higgins teams up with artist Marcelo Costa to create his own robot-looking superhero series, and their first volume of Radiant Black isn’t radiant bad. I liked the failed writer angle the best because that felt the freshest part of this otherwise fairly derivative story. It was compelling to see what happens when someone fails at achieving their dreams and how they cope with that, as well as showing what it takes to actually be a professional writer and the sheer grunt work of getting words on a page every day. It’s all very well for us consumers to read so much without realising how difficult the creation of these books actually are and what someone who wants to do it has to go through to get there. It felt very genuine and honest and a welcome and unusual aspect to write about in a superhero comic. And the story of Nathan getting superpowers isn’t boring - it’s a slickly-told origin - but there’s too much here that’s been done before. It’s every superhero origin story, again. So Nathan and his bestie Marshall come up with superhero names, geek out about the powers, slowly learn what it’s all about, etc. There’s also an evil Radiant, Red, and the two go through the motions of the obligatory superhero punch-ups. It’s too many cliches. The Power Rangers comparisons are really highlighted towards the end of this one and the mini black hole that is the Radiant looks a lot like Shanhara from Valiant’s XO Manowar. And the character designs as well are very Ultraman/Power Rangers-y. I liked how the Radiant started to change the way Nathan thought so the alien language started integrating with his mind and Higgins does switch things up in the final act regarding who you think the main character of this series is - the Radiant isn’t wedded to the one person like Venom. And Red’s origin story also isn’t bad but, like Nathan’s, wasn’t that amazing either. Marcelo Costa’s art is as competent, kinetic and flashy as it needs to be for a superhero comic and he’s done the best he can with Radiant Black’s design to make it distinct (although the comparisons keep coming to me - at one point the Radiant looks like GIN-GR, a character from another Valiant series, Unity). Eduardo Ferigato drew most of the fifth issue and I liked his art even more. In some ways Radiant Black isn’t like most superhero comics (the failed writer/struggling to find a purpose angle), and in others it’s identical to most superhero origins (finding your feet with the new powerset, etc.). As such, I found it to be a fairly middling first volume. Readable, never too boring, interesting at times, bland once the generic superhero stuff kicks in - overall, it’s a fine start to what could be the best robot-looking superhero series Kyle Higgins has written yet (which makes sense, to save his best stuff for his creator-owned work).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Radiant Black is a superhero story that basically has nothing new to tell. You've read it all before, and probably better. It's almost painfully derivative, sucking the art along into its unoriginality maelstrom, where the superhero designs are almost creative in their dullness. If the characters were especially fun, and the dialogue crackling, that would make up for a lot. The characters are thuddingly okay. They make little jokes, that sometimes work, but mostly read like the kind of jokes char Radiant Black is a superhero story that basically has nothing new to tell. You've read it all before, and probably better. It's almost painfully derivative, sucking the art along into its unoriginality maelstrom, where the superhero designs are almost creative in their dullness. If the characters were especially fun, and the dialogue crackling, that would make up for a lot. The characters are thuddingly okay. They make little jokes, that sometimes work, but mostly read like the kind of jokes characters in these kind of superhero stories tell. And it all feels strangely rushed. Our main character attains his superpowers in the first chapter, and that's it! He's almost instantly accepting of this turn of events, he'll be a guy with superpowers now. Why even bother with an origin story if you seem to want it out of the way as quickly as possible? Of course there is someone who also has these powers and is using them for selfish reasons. There's a reveal that's supposed to be surprising, I think, but most will have seen coming (eventhough the art in this regard makes little sense). The main book ends with chapter 5, and then there's a chapter 6 showing the origin story of the bad guy, and that also seems off. Basically the bad guy goes bad because their partner has been bad. Surely it would be more logical for the partner to go bad, I don't feel it's a very strong incentive for the actual bad guy to actually go bad. Hello, are you still there..? Three artists have worked on the book, and dull hero designs aside, the art is functional at best. The last chapter features more manga-inspired art, with some weird facial features and body proportions. If this is truly as hyped as it is presented, I can't see why. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    When Nathan Burnett hits rock bottom and has to move back in with his parents, he finds a strange orb and becomes Radiant Black, a cosmic super hero... Radiant Black sparked my interest when I first saw the costume on twitter but I don't buy single issues anymore so I had to wait an eternity and a day before I finally got the trade, containing issues 1-6. The book is a lot more complex than my teaser indicates but I don't want to spoil too much. The first couple issues are pretty standard, establi When Nathan Burnett hits rock bottom and has to move back in with his parents, he finds a strange orb and becomes Radiant Black, a cosmic super hero... Radiant Black sparked my interest when I first saw the costume on twitter but I don't buy single issues anymore so I had to wait an eternity and a day before I finally got the trade, containing issues 1-6. The book is a lot more complex than my teaser indicates but I don't want to spoil too much. The first couple issues are pretty standard, establishing the hero and his powers, etc. The pace was more Bronze Age than most modern books so I was into it. The whole "Writing Day" issue felt like a misstep. Some serious shit happens not long after that and I now I'm all in on the book. The writing is above average, some quips but not enough to undermine the action. Higgins led me off by the hand and then pantsed me and took my lunch money, a great quality in a writer. The art is computer colored but not obnoxiously so. It's a good looking book but not too flashy. The use of perspective and panel design is pretty fantastic, though. It took a couple issues but it looks like I'm following another current comic. Radiant Black. Buy it. Read it. Four out of five stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lukasz

    I liked it, but I think it's overhyped. Nathan Burnett, a young and aspiring writer, feels like a failure. His writing lacks something, and his day job doesn't pay enough. Nathan returns to his hometown to live with his parents and write the work that will secure him a big deal. Instead, he gets superpowers. Some parts of the story feel fresh (a failed author arc), others not so much (coming to power, learning to control power, geeking out about names, classic superhero stuff). Fortunately, the w I liked it, but I think it's overhyped. Nathan Burnett, a young and aspiring writer, feels like a failure. His writing lacks something, and his day job doesn't pay enough. Nathan returns to his hometown to live with his parents and write the work that will secure him a big deal. Instead, he gets superpowers. Some parts of the story feel fresh (a failed author arc), others not so much (coming to power, learning to control power, geeking out about names, classic superhero stuff). Fortunately, the writers play with reader expectations early in the story, and Nathan's story takes a surprising turn. Maybe it won't even be a superhero origin story, but a superteam origin story. I loved the art and vibrant colors; they enhance the reading experience . All told it's a fun, if a little silly, romp that gets more serious in the second half. I am not ( fully ) sold on it, but I am excited to see where the story goes from here. ARC through Edelweiss

  5. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I own this book. This book was sold to me as Power Rangers, but for adults, and man, that is such a good description. Radiant Black is the story of Nathan, a failed writer who has to move home after accumulating $38k in debt. After a night out in town with his best friend Marshall, they are walking home drunk near the railway tracks when they come across a weird anomaly, it looks like a mini isolated black hole and when Nathan touches it he transforms. He can also suddenly fly and lift things I own this book. This book was sold to me as Power Rangers, but for adults, and man, that is such a good description. Radiant Black is the story of Nathan, a failed writer who has to move home after accumulating $38k in debt. After a night out in town with his best friend Marshall, they are walking home drunk near the railway tracks when they come across a weird anomaly, it looks like a mini isolated black hole and when Nathan touches it he transforms. He can also suddenly fly and lift things which he accidentally demonstrates when he lifts a train in the air. The next day, the police come to tell him that he can be a hero and help them catch the red version of himself who is robbing banks. Nathan starts having weird dreams, hearing weird stuff and decides to buy into the whole superhero thing, spurred by Marshall. After meeting the red version of himself and getting busted, he decides the next time, he will win. However, when they meet again, Nathan ends up in a coma and Marshall takes up the mantle of Radiant Black, determined to get revenge but when he catches up with the red being, they are apologetic. Suddenly a yellow and a purple version appear vowing evil and then the evil shows up... I loved Power Rangers growing up, I was definitely that kid. This comic has spurred that love again. I loved the art and the energy in the comic series and it is definitely worth the hype it's been getting. Issue 7 has even sold out at distribution level, WILD. I'm so excited for Volume 2.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Down on his luck writer Nathan returns home in defeat. But a chance encounter with a mysterious energy source from another galaxy changes his entire world - he is Radiant Black! But what does that really mean? And, if he's Radiant Black, then who's that red guy in a similar looking suit? Kyle Higgins' first arc of Radiant Black is a doozy. Like, a real doozy. The first issue sets up the characters pretty well, establishing where they've been and where they're going (spoiler alert: nowhere fast). Down on his luck writer Nathan returns home in defeat. But a chance encounter with a mysterious energy source from another galaxy changes his entire world - he is Radiant Black! But what does that really mean? And, if he's Radiant Black, then who's that red guy in a similar looking suit? Kyle Higgins' first arc of Radiant Black is a doozy. Like, a real doozy. The first issue sets up the characters pretty well, establishing where they've been and where they're going (spoiler alert: nowhere fast). But then along comes Radiant Black to shake everything up, and by issue 4, everything you thought you knew was completely wrong. There are some very bold storytelling choices that I won't spoil here, but suffice to say that Higgins keeps you on your toes. There are glimpses of a bigger mythology at work here, and I'm exciting to see it all unfold, but it's the personal stuff that really hits home. Nathan and his best friends' relationship feels authentic, as does the strained one he has with his parents. The final issue of the volume puts the spotlight on a new character, and that one-and-done manages to flesh her out amazingly well in just 20 pages. Some very tight storytelling going on here. The artwork is primarily Marcelo Costa, who gives me Ryan Ottley vibes. There's no surprise that Radiant Black has drawn Power Rangers comparisions from the morphing sequences and the general look of the Radiant suit, but Costa's artwork and especially Becca Carey's colours sing across the page. David/Darko LaFuente shows up for the final spotlight issue, and he's toned down his enormous heads a huge amount, so his work is the best it's ever been. Radiant Black is big and bold when it wants to be, and intensely personal when it's not blowing shit up. It's a peculiar new series that will throw you through a loop at least once, and that's just in the first six issues. Highly recommended indeed.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    This starts out as the kind of exuberant, easily-read superhero comic book many people had given up on hoping to read again. It might not have the frisson of the new, but it is still very enjoyable indeed. A lowly writer has to pack up his hopes of making it in the city, and return to the parental home, where his old bezzie immediately chastises him for failing. But the pair soon discover a little floating black hole thingy, that our hero manages to absorb, thus giving him superpowers. He immedi This starts out as the kind of exuberant, easily-read superhero comic book many people had given up on hoping to read again. It might not have the frisson of the new, but it is still very enjoyable indeed. A lowly writer has to pack up his hopes of making it in the city, and return to the parental home, where his old bezzie immediately chastises him for failing. But the pair soon discover a little floating black hole thingy, that our hero manages to absorb, thus giving him superpowers. He immediately outdoes Superman in lifting modes of transport as a debut trick, but before issue two is out he's found an evil variant of himself, and so it speeds on through all the old tropes. And then it stiffs itself on the writer's block idea, showing our man diligently tapping away with a failed noir piece, and not even doing his stand-by job of being a kind of Uber driver. And you have to wonder why this kind of padding was deemed necessary, for it does nothing else to the book. When it is allowed to get going, it really gets going – and flavour-wise, for me the best comparison is with Valiant's X-O Manowar. That's not to say the gubbins speaks back to the wearer, but it has the same kind of bond with the target human, who is only reluctantly bearing the powers. And ultimately the book is about as good as a Valiant title (for new readers, that equates generally to not much). Nemeses, characters that appear to be nemeses but are helpful, twists we saw coming two issues ago – all show up amidst what is quite a ploddy-ploddy fight scene. And then the book ends with a second origin story, making us ask where the heck we're going. Nowhere fast, is the ultimate answer. The series as a whole might have more than enough gumption to pull everything together and provide something fresh and new, but this opening book is over-long (for all its brevity), woolly and just far too disposable to convince future volumes are necessary purchases. If it had kept with the pace of the opening pages, I'd have loved it, but it for some reason went down the route of 'trying something new – only to find things nobody had done before because they weren't worth doing'.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    For many Westerners, including myself, Saban’s Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was their introduction to the Tokusatsu genre, even though the American show was an adaptation of sorts on numerous seasons of the Super Sentai series, a unique Japanese take on superheroes. Since then, this particular genre has expanded its horizons through numerous media, such as Kyle Higgins making a name for himself by writing the Power Rangers comics for Boom! Studios. Higgins may no longer writes the colourful rang For many Westerners, including myself, Saban’s Mighty Morphin Power Rangers was their introduction to the Tokusatsu genre, even though the American show was an adaptation of sorts on numerous seasons of the Super Sentai series, a unique Japanese take on superheroes. Since then, this particular genre has expanded its horizons through numerous media, such as Kyle Higgins making a name for himself by writing the Power Rangers comics for Boom! Studios. Higgins may no longer writes the colourful rangers piloting their Zords, but he presents a different take to the Tokusatsu genre with Radiant Black for Image Comics. Turned thirty and in financial trouble, struggling young writer Nathan Burnett makes the decision to move back to Lockport, Illinois at his parents’ house. Don’t know what to do, despite his mother’s encouragement to continue writing and his father’s insistence on finding work, Nathan goes out for a drink with his friend Marshall, only to discover and unlock the ethereal cosmic “Radiant”. Donning this cosmic suit that has gravity-based powers, could this be the answer to Nathan’s financial troubles, or should he use these abilities for something greater? Although properties like Power Rangers are aimed at children, it was interesting seeing Higgins taking an adult approach towards this genre, and I don’t mean throwing in sex and violence. Nathan Burnett is compellingly relatable as having aspirations from an early age, here is a somewhat directionless adult. However, the comic doesn’t drown itself in constant sorrow as the banter between Nathan and Marshall is fun and the few dramatic moments with his father are touching. You do see familiar tropes of the superhero origin, such as the initial training on how to use the powers and the responsibility that comes with having such abilities, but Higgins quickly and cleverly deconstructs the origin. As this volume is subtitled “(Not So) Secret Origin”, the first people to find out about Nathan’s identity as Radiant Black are two policemen. There are other aspects of deconstruction, such as finding out the true nature of the antagonist Radiant Red and halfway through the volume, there is a huge change in the status quo, which I’m still uncertain, though Higgins keeps bringing in the element of surprise, it’ll be interesting how it will play out in the long game. Reminiscent of the art style of Ryan Ottley, Marcelo Costa’s work is surprisingly multi-layered from his well-crafted action sequences to varying use of panel layouts. However, his biggest accomplishment is how expressive his characters are, as you can see a wide range of emotions through his illustrations, even how the two Radiants are feeling through their masks. A lot of issue #3 delves into Nathan going through writer’s block and you can see the level of concentration and difficulty from his facial expressions, contrasting alongside panels and even whole pages that is just text as Nathan writes his story. There are a couple of guest artists in the fifth issue that is one explosive cliffhanger, whilst the sixth issue is a backstory issue that visually works on its own merit. The first volume certainly feels like a tease for something bigger and more cosmic in the next arc, but Kyle Higgins and Marcelo Costa do so much right here and I’m excited to see where the characters and the world-building goes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    I knew people said Radiant Black was good but I also heard stuff from people I respect that said otherwise. So I was surprised to see how good this is. This deals with a lot of modern issues, especially where finance comes in. As a writer myself I can feel Nathan's sense of hopelessness. The writer's block, the follow-ups, the need to post reminders, and even getting out of comfort zones to refocus on perspective. But most importantly, how the plans fell apart because despite a good setup, he got I knew people said Radiant Black was good but I also heard stuff from people I respect that said otherwise. So I was surprised to see how good this is. This deals with a lot of modern issues, especially where finance comes in. As a writer myself I can feel Nathan's sense of hopelessness. The writer's block, the follow-ups, the need to post reminders, and even getting out of comfort zones to refocus on perspective. But most importantly, how the plans fell apart because despite a good setup, he got caught up in all of the risks involved. It felt hard seeing him dealing with life back in his hometown, especially with a mountain of debt. Then there's how Nate handles the superhero plot he stumbled into. It doesn't feel like an escape from all the misery or a curse; it's just something he picked up. He didn't even do superheroing as a way to distract himself after a day of writer's block; he just decided to help people even if he fumbled at it. He has that kind of everyman charm to him. Also seeing the covers that served as spoilers for me a bit actually filled me with some anticipation to his fate, especially since his powersuit can't get off him less he's dead. I just hope his friend gets a little more development down the line because right now he's that comic relief guy who tries to be supportive but is really annoying. As for the other characters, apparently debt and plans gone awry is something of a theme here. Like "Radiant Red" who after a few close calls was really looking to be a real bad guy; I still don't know how Red came across intel on Nate. That is until last issue gave more context on how difficult it is to get out of the situation Red's in. Given the inspirations from Super Sentai/Power Rangers, I hope all of the personalities get some time to shine.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Trike

    This seems to be a case of hype hurting a book, as those who’ve heard of this are disappointed. Fortunately I’m in the other camp, having never heard of this until the other day and I got it just because it looked cool, and I was pleasantly surprised. At first I wasn’t terribly impressed, but then once the story kicks up a couple notches it really took off. The beginning is stuff we’ve seen before, with a guy getting superpowers and not knowing how to use them. It’s The Greatest American Hero or This seems to be a case of hype hurting a book, as those who’ve heard of this are disappointed. Fortunately I’m in the other camp, having never heard of this until the other day and I got it just because it looked cool, and I was pleasantly surprised. At first I wasn’t terribly impressed, but then once the story kicks up a couple notches it really took off. The beginning is stuff we’ve seen before, with a guy getting superpowers and not knowing how to use them. It’s The Greatest American Hero or Heroes or Invincible, Vol. 1: Family Matters in that regard. Higgins adds some writer angst for flavor, probably in a “write what you know” vein, which is slightly unusual, but then he throws in a few twists and that’s when the book gets more interesting. So yeah, I liked it. It’s not breaking brand new ground but it’s different enough to have my attention.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    So there's this guy who's down on his luck, and he's a writer, because we can't get enough of writer protagonists, can we? He's been reduced to driving for not-Uber, and moved back in with his parents, and on his first night out with his old hometown best mate there's a weird space thing and suddenly he has superpowers! Which he doesn't really understand! Except now a couple of people he'd maybe rather didn't know his secret, do, and also there's another bod in Chicago who has the same powers an So there's this guy who's down on his luck, and he's a writer, because we can't get enough of writer protagonists, can we? He's been reduced to driving for not-Uber, and moved back in with his parents, and on his first night out with his old hometown best mate there's a weird space thing and suddenly he has superpowers! Which he doesn't really understand! Except now a couple of people he'd maybe rather didn't know his secret, do, and also there's another bod in Chicago who has the same powers and costume (but in a different colour scheme) and is doing crimes! And also, his dad's on at him to get a job! It's all executed about as winningly as it could be, but this is very, very familiar territory, and I tend to feel that any new indie superhero book launching at this point needs a distinctive sell – whether that be the powers, the voice, the world, the lead, *anything*. Which Radiant Black does not have. And I don't just mean because I'm immersed in decades of other superhero comics and films; even if you'd given me this as a kid in the eighties, I'd probably have remarked on the similarities to The Greatest American Hero, except that this has fewer laughs. Yeah, there's a big twist towards the end of the first volume, because Radiant Black's ambitions clearly include being the new Invincible, but even that completely failed to ruffle my cerebellum, much less blow my mind. Not a bad comic in any respect, just entirely surplus to requirements. (Edelweiss ARC)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    It took me a while to figure out what I really think about this one. On one hand, we have a pretty original origin story for a likable character that has dark, foreboding undertones of what's to come. It also has a very unexpected twist that completely changes the story in the final act and sets up a much larger world for future volumes. On the other hand, and I fully admit that this might be a little petty, there's the other last act revelation that transforms the villain of the beginning of the It took me a while to figure out what I really think about this one. On one hand, we have a pretty original origin story for a likable character that has dark, foreboding undertones of what's to come. It also has a very unexpected twist that completely changes the story in the final act and sets up a much larger world for future volumes. On the other hand, and I fully admit that this might be a little petty, there's the other last act revelation that transforms the villain of the beginning of the story so thoroughly that it drastically changes the way their body is drawn. It's something minor to the story, but it annoyed me how that character was suddenly drawn with a completely different body. If the same person was always in the suit, they should have kept the shape the same. I'm fully aware that it's a minor detail in what is otherwise a strong story, but it annoyed me enough that I ended up finding little holes in other parts of the story and then I just lost all interest in it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Bollenbacher

    So far up my alley; this is filling the Invincible-shaped hole in my heart!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Well, when you have Robert Kirkman on the cover saying "The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing INVINCIBLE..." of course I'm going to check this out. Certainly has potential. It didn't hook me right away, but that's okay as I've learned that some of these comics need a bit of a build up before they click for me. It wouldn't surprise me that I later come back and re-rate this at 4 stars once I know where it's all going. I liked this superhero origin, it's gotta be hard coming up with new and Well, when you have Robert Kirkman on the cover saying "The perfect superhero comic for anyone missing INVINCIBLE..." of course I'm going to check this out. Certainly has potential. It didn't hook me right away, but that's okay as I've learned that some of these comics need a bit of a build up before they click for me. It wouldn't surprise me that I later come back and re-rate this at 4 stars once I know where it's all going. I liked this superhero origin, it's gotta be hard coming up with new and exciting origin stories, but Kyle Higgins manages to keep it interesting. Artwork is really nice too.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Duvall

    I don’t think I’ve enjoyed an indie superhero comic this much since Invincible ended.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Shea

    This series is so damn good.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    It was an interesting concept and the opening issues were kinda cool, but it ended up going in a direction that didn't really grab me. It was an interesting concept and the opening issues were kinda cool, but it ended up going in a direction that didn't really grab me.

  18. 5 out of 5

    AJ Kallas

    Excited to see where this is going! Feels like it's just getting started and I'm digging it! Excited to see where this is going! Feels like it's just getting started and I'm digging it!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Isaac

    Initially went in due to the pre-release hype and with the first few issues, didn't feel it but I stuck with it. It really does improve and you can get where Higgins is going. I really do enjoy that by the end, it does feel like a fresh story and does what Higgins does best, giving nastagia and upgrade by taking those pleasant feelings of Saturday mornings and had it grow up along side the reader. The thing that made me meh at the beginning was kinda just me feeling the main characters being a d Initially went in due to the pre-release hype and with the first few issues, didn't feel it but I stuck with it. It really does improve and you can get where Higgins is going. I really do enjoy that by the end, it does feel like a fresh story and does what Higgins does best, giving nastagia and upgrade by taking those pleasant feelings of Saturday mornings and had it grow up along side the reader. The thing that made me meh at the beginning was kinda just me feeling the main characters being a duo that I feel like has been seen quite often. But ya know, they improve and there is joy in seeing their delight in having new power. Then the turn comes. So far I like what it is building and I'll guess I will keep checking it out.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Superhero comic series which is pretty good with some original touches. A budding writer returns to his home town and becomes a superhero in strange circumstances. With a friend to help him, he learns that he is not alone as a Radiant and they aren’t all heroic. Fights and mayhem ensue. The characters are interesting and quite well-developed and the plot has good pace. My review does not cover #6 but I certainly enjoyed the story and the artwork which is effective and clear. I received a copy of Superhero comic series which is pretty good with some original touches. A budding writer returns to his home town and becomes a superhero in strange circumstances. With a friend to help him, he learns that he is not alone as a Radiant and they aren’t all heroic. Fights and mayhem ensue. The characters are interesting and quite well-developed and the plot has good pace. My review does not cover #6 but I certainly enjoyed the story and the artwork which is effective and clear. I received a copy of this in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Lau

    Collected in single issues and bought the volume too because I love it that much! Radiant Black is my favorite new comic that I've read this year and, now on issue #7, the series just gets better and better. For my full thoughts, check out this episode of Committed Critics! Collected in single issues and bought the volume too because I love it that much! Radiant Black is my favorite new comic that I've read this year and, now on issue #7, the series just gets better and better. For my full thoughts, check out this episode of Committed Critics!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin P

    As far as super hero stories go, it's pretty vanilla. With that being said, Kirkman knows what he's doing and it's got some interesting elements that set it apart from his previous fare. Will stick around to see what comes about from this run. As far as super hero stories go, it's pretty vanilla. With that being said, Kirkman knows what he's doing and it's got some interesting elements that set it apart from his previous fare. Will stick around to see what comes about from this run.

  23. 4 out of 5

    André Habet

    A few pages with great page breakdowns but otherwise damn. Writers make boring pedantic superheroes. Was grateful for the penultimate issue twist. Will read the next volume.

  24. 4 out of 5

    LibraryLass

    4.5 stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jipi Perreault

    Half way through, it goes in so many directions that I'm not sure what to think of it. It certainly a pretty good beginning but I hope the pacing will fix itself eventuallyi. Half way through, it goes in so many directions that I'm not sure what to think of it. It certainly a pretty good beginning but I hope the pacing will fix itself eventuallyi.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Bud Latanville

    call it 4.5 ⭐s Excellent characters and writing, vibrant and energetic art. It's why you read "comic" books, right? call it 4.5 ⭐s Excellent characters and writing, vibrant and energetic art. It's why you read "comic" books, right?

  27. 4 out of 5

    Markus Seaberry

    I really enjoyed this book!! I liked the themes of failure and redemption, and I thought that it was a unique take on a superhero story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Really good... lots of potential. Review submitted to Diamond Bookshelf for potential professional publication.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hannahri

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sebulba

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