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The Pain Gap: How Sexism and Racism in Healthcare Kill Women

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Explore real women’s tales of healthcare trauma and medical misogyny with this meticulously researched, in-depth examination of the women’s health crisis in America—and what we can do about it. When Anushay Hossain became pregnant in the US, she was so relieved. Growing up in Bangladesh in the 1980s, where the concept of women’s healthcare hardly existed, she understood how Explore real women’s tales of healthcare trauma and medical misogyny with this meticulously researched, in-depth examination of the women’s health crisis in America—and what we can do about it. When Anushay Hossain became pregnant in the US, she was so relieved. Growing up in Bangladesh in the 1980s, where the concept of women’s healthcare hardly existed, she understood how lucky she was to access the best in the world. But she couldn’t have been more wrong. Things started to go awry from the minute she stepped in the hospital, and after thirty hours of labor (two of which she spent pushing), Hossain’s epidural slipped. Her pain was so severe that she ran a fever of 104 degrees, and as she shook and trembled uncontrollably, the doctors finally performed an emergency C-section. Giving birth in the richest country on earth, Hossain never imagined she could die in labor. But she almost did. The experience put her on a journey to explore, understand, and share how women—especially women of color—are dismissed to death by systemic sexism in American healthcare. Following in the footsteps of feminist manifestos such as The Feminine Mystique and Rage Becomes Her, The Pain Gap is an eye-opening and stirring call to arms that encourages women to flip their “hysteria complex” on its head and use it to revolutionize women’s healthcare. This book tells the story of Hossain’s experiences—from growing up in South Asia surrounded by staggering maternal mortality rates to lobbying for global health legislation on Capitol Hill to nearly becoming a statistic herself. Along the way, she realized that a little fury might be just what the doctor ordered. Meticulously researched and deeply reported, this book explores real women’s traumatic experiences with America’s healthcare system—and empowers everyone to use their experiences to bring about the healthcare revolution women need.


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Explore real women’s tales of healthcare trauma and medical misogyny with this meticulously researched, in-depth examination of the women’s health crisis in America—and what we can do about it. When Anushay Hossain became pregnant in the US, she was so relieved. Growing up in Bangladesh in the 1980s, where the concept of women’s healthcare hardly existed, she understood how Explore real women’s tales of healthcare trauma and medical misogyny with this meticulously researched, in-depth examination of the women’s health crisis in America—and what we can do about it. When Anushay Hossain became pregnant in the US, she was so relieved. Growing up in Bangladesh in the 1980s, where the concept of women’s healthcare hardly existed, she understood how lucky she was to access the best in the world. But she couldn’t have been more wrong. Things started to go awry from the minute she stepped in the hospital, and after thirty hours of labor (two of which she spent pushing), Hossain’s epidural slipped. Her pain was so severe that she ran a fever of 104 degrees, and as she shook and trembled uncontrollably, the doctors finally performed an emergency C-section. Giving birth in the richest country on earth, Hossain never imagined she could die in labor. But she almost did. The experience put her on a journey to explore, understand, and share how women—especially women of color—are dismissed to death by systemic sexism in American healthcare. Following in the footsteps of feminist manifestos such as The Feminine Mystique and Rage Becomes Her, The Pain Gap is an eye-opening and stirring call to arms that encourages women to flip their “hysteria complex” on its head and use it to revolutionize women’s healthcare. This book tells the story of Hossain’s experiences—from growing up in South Asia surrounded by staggering maternal mortality rates to lobbying for global health legislation on Capitol Hill to nearly becoming a statistic herself. Along the way, she realized that a little fury might be just what the doctor ordered. Meticulously researched and deeply reported, this book explores real women’s traumatic experiences with America’s healthcare system—and empowers everyone to use their experiences to bring about the healthcare revolution women need.

30 review for The Pain Gap: How Sexism and Racism in Healthcare Kill Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lisa of Troy

    Interesting read but the description is completely misleading. The Pain Gap by Anushay Hossain covers a wide range of traditional women's rights issues: abortion, childbirth, paid leave, women and pregnant women being excluded during vaccine testing, domestic violence, and unfair child rearing responsibilities. Pros: *Contains some interesting stories from women in their medical journey *Touches on a multitude of hot topics in the realm of women’s rights Cons: *The target audience is not clear. The au Interesting read but the description is completely misleading. The Pain Gap by Anushay Hossain covers a wide range of traditional women's rights issues: abortion, childbirth, paid leave, women and pregnant women being excluded during vaccine testing, domestic violence, and unfair child rearing responsibilities. Pros: *Contains some interesting stories from women in their medical journey *Touches on a multitude of hot topics in the realm of women’s rights Cons: *The target audience is not clear. The author spent a great deal of time discussing proposed policy issues and introducing a large number of organizations. This information was extremely boring. Women struggling with a health condition need help now, not wait for some policy which may or may not go into effect. *The author spent considerable time on the issue of mental health and cited how women and WOC have such a high rate of depression. However, these statistics are greatly exaggerated because doctors overprescribe antidepressants. If a woman walks in with a difficult health problem, it is extremely easy to label her as “crazy” and write a script for an antidepressant. *This book was billed as “The Pain Gap: How Sexism and Racism in Healthcare Kill Women.” However, most of the book did not cover this issue. Instead, it was a feminist manifesto (which I have absolutely no problem with) but it wasn’t as good as the book, White Feminism by Koa Beck. Being through the health system this last year, I actually have put together my own list of tips that I will include at the very end of this review because the sick and dying can’t wait. Overall, the author and I share many of the same ideologies; however, the book would have been better if the author had focused more on sharing the stories of women in their healthcare journey instead of a broad issue book covering nearly every women’s issue. *Thanks, NetGalley, for a free copy of this book in exchange for my fair and honest opinion. Tips For Your Healthcare Journey: 1) If you can afford it, hire a Private Patient Advocate. These are some of the things that my advocate has done for me: a. Finds and schedules high quality doctors who are professional, respectful, and won’t stop until they find out what is going on. b. Moves me up off the waitlists. Who can wait 2 years to see a doctor? c. Reviews my medical records and prepares me for what to expect for my appointments. d. She can get on the phone with my doctors and ask medical questions and let them know that they need a better plan and question if they have considered all alternatives. 2) You have to be your own doctor. Read as many health articles as you can. Stand your ground. Many, many doctors simply don’t care about your pain or how difficult your life is. However, if you quote medical articles to them, it is extremely difficult for them to brush you off as crazy. a. Talk to other people on Reddit (ask questions and find support). Find out who the good doctors are and who to avoid like the plague. 3) If your doctor says that you are depressed or have a “Functional Neurological Disorder”, question that diagnosis. 4) Never give up on yourself. If you aren’t getting answers that make sense or you have a poor quality of life, see someone else (another doctor, nurse, physical therapist, acupuncturist). 5) Really inform yourself about labor if you are expecting because you can’t rely on the doctors being honest or explaining all of your choices. If you go to a large OB practice, there will be no continuity of care because you will see a new doctor at every appointment. Some of these doctors will literally schedule you for a 5-minute appointment. When you go into labor, you might end up with a doctor who you have never met before, and the doctor will only appear once the baby is crowning. At least with a midwife, they will take you through your entire labor, and you can be assigned to one person instead of being passed around like a hot potato to so many different doctors.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emily (Books with Emily Fox)

    A very important and broad topic but I feel like the book barely scrapes the surface. Well written/good audiobook, still worth a read!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    This book starts off pretty strong and unfortunately devolves. I think one of the issues with this book is that it’s marketed incorrectly. The majority of this book is centered on the COVID-19 pandemic, and feels almost TOO current. While the information in this book is definitely worth acknowledging and reading about, there are sections that seem like they may be irrelevant when the pandemic is over (if it ever truly ends). Much of the information in this book is very necessary and needs to be This book starts off pretty strong and unfortunately devolves. I think one of the issues with this book is that it’s marketed incorrectly. The majority of this book is centered on the COVID-19 pandemic, and feels almost TOO current. While the information in this book is definitely worth acknowledging and reading about, there are sections that seem like they may be irrelevant when the pandemic is over (if it ever truly ends). Much of the information in this book is very necessary and needs to be talked about, especially the stories about specific women’s experiences. My biggest complaint, however, is that this book comes across as very disorganized and jumbled, as well as having a lot of repeated information/anecdotes. The author constantly is referring back to her pregnancy experience, but never really adding to the original story she began with, just repeating the same story. There are other examples of repeating the same/similar anecdotes or information that comes across as being filler, rather than adding to the book. Good idea, not the greatest execution, inaccurate marketing.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Afonso | Books Of My Own

    (3.25) A good read, with smart points, arguments and statistics that I wasn’t familiar with before. Good approach to the intersectionality of racism, sexism and ableism. However, I’d highlight the feminism as the more prominent voice. Didn’t know it would focus so much on covid-19, but makes sense that it does. It’s important to discuss the impact of this pandemic in healthcare systems, namely how it aggravates inequalities that existed before. The chapter that aimed to focus only on the gendered (3.25) A good read, with smart points, arguments and statistics that I wasn’t familiar with before. Good approach to the intersectionality of racism, sexism and ableism. However, I’d highlight the feminism as the more prominent voice. Didn’t know it would focus so much on covid-19, but makes sense that it does. It’s important to discuss the impact of this pandemic in healthcare systems, namely how it aggravates inequalities that existed before. The chapter that aimed to focus only on the gendered impact of the pandemic and lockdown was my favourite actually. I’m only disappointed that the following chapters became a little repetitive and didn’t bring many new arguments to the table, ending up repeating the same issues and pressing again on the covid issue. As a woman with autoimmune and chronic illnesses I found this a necessary read and a good conversation starter.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sophia Bailey

    4.5. tragic and heartbreaking and angering and horrible and inspiring and real and validating.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The Pain Gap illustrates the gap in medical care women in America, and more so women of color in America, face. It uses statistics and anecdotes from women who have experience poor medical care, particularly maternity care. It's a difficult read that tries to find balance between honestly illustrated the problem, without leaving the reader feeling hopeless. Hossain does a good job of balancing what individual women can do to advocate for themselves, while also acknowledging that systemic problem The Pain Gap illustrates the gap in medical care women in America, and more so women of color in America, face. It uses statistics and anecdotes from women who have experience poor medical care, particularly maternity care. It's a difficult read that tries to find balance between honestly illustrated the problem, without leaving the reader feeling hopeless. Hossain does a good job of balancing what individual women can do to advocate for themselves, while also acknowledging that systemic problems like the bias in maternal healthcare can't be fixed just by individuals advocating for themselves, but by systemic change.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sahitya

    This was another audiobook I picked at random while browsing my library catalog but it instantly felt like it was something I’ll like reading. And it was an interesting mix. I absolutely loved reading the personal stories - both of the author and her mom back in Bangladesh and the conditions of healthcare, especially for women. I felt very sympathetic to the situation because until a few decades ago, it was pretty much the same in India as well. But it was the chapters about how racism and misog This was another audiobook I picked at random while browsing my library catalog but it instantly felt like it was something I’ll like reading. And it was an interesting mix. I absolutely loved reading the personal stories - both of the author and her mom back in Bangladesh and the conditions of healthcare, especially for women. I felt very sympathetic to the situation because until a few decades ago, it was pretty much the same in India as well. But it was the chapters about how racism and misogyny drastically affects the health outcomes for women of color in America that hit me hard. Just like the author, I never expected that this was the reality in the richest country in the world, and though I’ve personally not experienced anything of such sort, it’s hard to digest that many women suffer so much just to get the right diagnosis or medication. I’ve read numerous horror stories from women on Twitter and this book reinforced the same. And I absolutely detested the chapter about the global gag rule and how US govt uses its monetary aid as a tool to impose its religious hegemony over the poor and destitute countries in the world, negatively impacting the thousands and millions of women who actually need that aid. I didn’t realize that this book would include issues that women of color have faced during this pandemic. I guess I just didn’t see when it released. These were some heartbreaking stories. But many of the chapters then talk about the policy issues on a more broader level and it felt like a disconnect from the other half of the book which was about women’s stories. While I appreciate everything the author talks about policy changes that need to be made at the federal and state level to better the health outcomes of women of color, I also felt that it missed the point which the personal experiences in the book were making - any amount of policy changes can’t change the bias and prejudice and discrimination that exists in medicine and it’s practitioners because racism and misogyny is so entrenched in the system. It needs both a change at the education level to remove bias from the teachings at medical school, as well as a personal reckoning for all the doctors and other medical staff with their own prejudices. And the women advocating for their own health can definitely use some pointers in how to do it in a way that they are heard by the doctors and treated with the dignity and respect they deserve. Overall, this was an informative but difficult read and I learnt quite a bit which I didn’t know. But I also thought it was a bit too broad for it’s short length and couldn’t cover everything it needed to in a succinct manner. However, I would still suggest you check it out if it’s a topic that interests you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    shenoyreads

    Rating - N/A The pain gap was a very eye opening book for me. The author, Anushay Hossain is clear about what she wants to discuss and bring out in this book. I agree with other reviews addressing the fact that the blurb did not justify the range of topics that this book covers. Hossain is primarily focused on maternal health and the healthcare system in America. However, she also focuses on other topics like racial prejudice that is still inherent and how it affects maternal health for women of Rating - N/A The pain gap was a very eye opening book for me. The author, Anushay Hossain is clear about what she wants to discuss and bring out in this book. I agree with other reviews addressing the fact that the blurb did not justify the range of topics that this book covers. Hossain is primarily focused on maternal health and the healthcare system in America. However, she also focuses on other topics like racial prejudice that is still inherent and how it affects maternal health for women of colour, the effects that the pandemic has had on women in domestic settings, including mental health topics like depression, the stress caused by women forced into the role of primary caregiver in the family, as well as domestic violence which she calls the "shadow pandemic". The stories and case studies she brings out in the book had me invested in the topic for the entirety of the book. However, the one drawback for me with this book was that I didn't find it very relatable as it mainly focuses on the issues faced in America. I did read some reviews where they had warned me that the discussions that Hossain presents on the various policies in place as well as the ones that are being developed were boring. But i couldn't agree less with this kind of thought. I would rather say that the discussions on the major policies which the author hoped would change the situation were not relatable to me as I am not an American. But these policies need to be highlighted and will probably be helpful for women or anyone who will benefit from it in America. The author brings forth the following conversation anticipating that the topics she discusses in this book may not be very relatable to people from other countries, she noted : " But one woman asked me how a book on women's health in America would make any difference for a Bangladeshi woman. Her question gave me pause. Then I answered that if we can't rectify women's health and human rights in America, women in the rest of the world will effectively be 'screwed'. " While this is a very condescending thought and I'm always sceptical about all this talk about - 'if the developed nations have it bad, the developing nations will have it worse', I would believe that anyone reading this book will no longer have the misconception that everything is the far west, the developed nations and America is perfect. Hossain follows these thoughts by noting : " I was reminded of how we are all connected......... Sisterhood is truly global, and if there has ever been a time for women to tap into our collective power, it is now because the need to revolutionize women's healthcare is urgent. " This is a very good conclusion to this book as I believe that even if not everyone may relate to the problems from the first world countries, it is undeniable that women globally face many issues on a day to day basis and it is high time that we also speak up and prioritize women's healthcare and maternal healthcare.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    If this doesn’t make you furious… I’m not sure what will. It’s time to stand up for what’s right! The Pain Gap solidified I’m not alone, by exploring how sexism & racism in healthcare endanger and kill women, especially women of color, in America. 🙅🏻‍♀️I’m aware of this disparity. Many of us are. I’ve suffered from it tremendously. Friends of mine have too. But after reading this book, and the stories of SO MANY other women, the lack of adequate research and the vast absence of empathy in the Amer If this doesn’t make you furious… I’m not sure what will. It’s time to stand up for what’s right! The Pain Gap solidified I’m not alone, by exploring how sexism & racism in healthcare endanger and kill women, especially women of color, in America. 🙅🏻‍♀️I’m aware of this disparity. Many of us are. I’ve suffered from it tremendously. Friends of mine have too. But after reading this book, and the stories of SO MANY other women, the lack of adequate research and the vast absence of empathy in the American health system I’m not mad, I’m furious. I’m screaming mad. Crying hysterically mad… and if you’re a woman, or love a woman, you should be too. 🙅🏻‍♀️This book has content warnings galore. Racism. Sexism. Death. Maternal mortality. Medical trauma. Misogyny. But how could it not? If a nonfiction book is going to even dip a toe into the healthcare industry it wouldn’t be possible not to. Which is why this book is so important to read. Knowledge is power. We must arm ourselves with knowledge in order to stand up for ourselves and advocate for our health… and the heath of all women. 🙅🏻‍♀️Think I’m over exaggerating? Did you know in 1986 a study was conducted on a group of MEN to explore how obesity impacts breast and uterine cancer? For those in the back, men don’t have a uterus. Hossain has done a fantastic job compiling a ton of information, both through research and anecdotal to tear down the veil and expose the disparities in our health system. She then discusses how to advocate for ourselves, loved ones, and for a real change in the medical industry itself. I do feel there could be a bit of an edit, some chapters do carry on a bit, and for the average reader a cleaner more precise focus would be more effective… but overall this was still a fantastic read that I recommend everyone to add to their TBR. Thank you @anushayhossain @netgalley & @tillerpress for the eARC in exchange for my fair and honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Verónica Fleitas Solich

    Honestly, a rather depressing but necessary reading on a topic that on the surface seems not to exist but that unfortunately is reflected in a deficit in the attention that women receive and that seems to feel like something normal, when it shouldn't be. Honestly, a rather depressing but necessary reading on a topic that on the surface seems not to exist but that unfortunately is reflected in a deficit in the attention that women receive and that seems to feel like something normal, when it shouldn't be.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Avory Faucette

    This survey of differential treatment of women, and especially women of color, in United States healthcare presents stories and statistics that really should be shocking. Perhaps the saddest reality is that they are not, or at least won’t be to women of color and other readers who’ve followed the state of healthcare in this country. This book is just one more account of how bad things have become, blending a plethora of women’s personal stories with chilling statistics and accounts from non-prof This survey of differential treatment of women, and especially women of color, in United States healthcare presents stories and statistics that really should be shocking. Perhaps the saddest reality is that they are not, or at least won’t be to women of color and other readers who’ve followed the state of healthcare in this country. This book is just one more account of how bad things have become, blending a plethora of women’s personal stories with chilling statistics and accounts from non-profit leaders, other writers in the field, and healthcare professionals on the front lines. Focusing primarily on maternal health, most of the challenges this book shares are not new, but the need for awareness is as crucial as ever and presented here specifically through the lens of the COVID-19 pandemic. Hossain offers an important reminder that the US is unnecessarily the worst Global North country when it comes to maternal mortality, that women’s pain is routinely dismissed by doctors with horrifying consequences, and that race and gender intersect to make the statistics particularly abysmal for women of color. While I’ve read a fair bit about the horrors of hospital birth in this country and have personally experienced the way doctors dismiss feminized pain, I still had some of my own assumptions challenged. For example, I learned that pregnant women aren’t prescribed most drugs not because of known risks but rather because it’s expensive and inconvenient to include pregnant women in clinical trials. This is just another example both of how profit dominates healthcare in the US and birthing parents are objectified as carriers of the all-important future child, rather than treated as humans capable of making choices and in need of consideration. Though current narratives around choice center the imminent reversal of Roe v. Wade, it’s also important to understand that denial of choice in pregnancy is about the autonomy to make all medical care decisions, not only the choice of whether to carry to term. While privilege is a huge factor in medical outcomes, readers may be surprised to read stories of even wealthy women of color in leadership positions, including women who are doctors themselves, being denied care and harassed by male staff. Hossain uses these examples and confirming statistics to show that while access to care is an important issue, racism alone creates massive disparities and status saves no one. Racist beliefs about Black women having higher pain tolerance and a greater likelihood of abusing pain medication, for example, remain common among medical professionals. Hossain interviewed over a hundred women for the book, and you’ll find heartbreaking stories of women of color being ignored in emergency rooms while bleeding to death, shouted at to shut up while in excruciating pain during childbirth, and “dismissed to death” when experiencing pain they intuitively recognize as a major warning signal. In Louisiana, for example, 59% of Black maternal deaths were found to be preventable compared to 9% of white deaths. It’s hard to miss that this isn’t just about sexism or even access—it’s about systemic racism. Hossain covers women of color’s experiences with refreshing specificity. She highlights issues for individual communities including the dramatic impact of the pandemic on Filipino nurses in New York, how maternal depression disparately impacts Black women experiencing cultural pressure against therapeutic support, and how Asian-American victims of domestic violence may find it even harder to access care in the fact of racist beliefs about the virus. Hossain also considers the anti-Black history of banning community midwives, questioning the norm of hospital birth, and points out that early pandemic policies disproportionately affected Black women, who often need a doula to advocate against medical racism and were not allowed to have both a doula and a partner present. Hossain does make a strategic choice not to focus exclusively on racialized women, though they form the center of her narrative. As she points out from her own experience lobbying for the Feminist Majority Foundation, policy conversations in DC are exceedingly white, and white policymakers frankly tend not to care about issues framed as a “Black woman’s problem” or a woman-of-color problem. I personally worked for several years in this space, and while I’m not sure I ever met Hossain I suspect we were in some of the same rooms (full disclosure, several of the folks she interviewed were colleagues, including my first boss in DC). I made similar observations, noting that the folks in the room (especially senior leaders) tended to be white and that discussions of women’s health frequently placed racial disparities as a sidebar to issues that affect all women. It’s a sad fact, but treating women of color as canaries in a coal mine that white women should pay attention to for their own self-interest really is likely the most effective strategy at the federal level. Hossain makes an effort to show that healthcare issues are part of a much broader problem of systemic sexism and racism. COVID in particular has shown how the US model of “no support systems, women as the backup” can be devastating. She points out that even successful career women are staying home in droves so higher-earning male partners can earn an income while the kids are at home, with many essentially sacrificing their careers. Women with abusive partners not only found it harder to leave during lockdown, but often experienced greater violence given the mental health impact of lockdown on those partners, and continue to risk infection in shelters. And of course frontline workers (largely women of color) have no choice but to risk serious illness and death, with no safety net if they do contract the virus. While these aren’t new issues, Hossain’s hope is that their exacerbation during this crisis is waking more US residents up to how bad things really are. The author’s personal lens is somewhat unusual, as her interest in maternal mortality stems from the shock of having her own pain dismissed and barely surviving childbirth in a country she’d seen as the gold standard growing up in Bangladesh. She makes a direct comparison in telling the story of a beloved nanny who died in childbirth and was only even able to access healthcare due to luck—something that we might see as a “development issue,” but is in fact very similar to the US, where positive birth experiences are more about luck of the draw than American prosperity or superiority. I found Hossain’s writing compelling and accessible on the whole, if a little unfocused at times. I think the book would have been served by limiting the scope to maternal health, as its overall flow doesn’t build as clearly as it could towards the conclusion that birth justice is a crucial part of the fight against systemic racism. Readers expecting broader coverage of the issues women of color face in healthcare may be confused and frustrated by the fact that maternal health is the primary focus of the book, since that’s not fully evident from the title or introductory chapters. As written, chapters are a little uneven and the reader may occasionally get slightly lost. It might have served the flow of the book to introduce up front some of the broader context including police brutality, the history of medical experimentation on Black subjects, and how female subjects are excluded from medical research even around gender-specific health conditions before going into examples. I needed to make certain connections across chapters on my own—for example, how the theme of women’s choices connects the global gag rule, the tough decision pregnant people had to make around getting vaccinated in the absence of any medical guidance, and the tendency of hospitals to mandate unnecessary C-sections and other procedures. I expect most readers will ultimately draw the necessary conclusions, but the “hit” isn’t as strong as it could be with more guidance. That said, I really appreciated how towards the end Hossain brings things back to the fundamental need to believe women of color. She calls this a “radical” proposal, highlighting the connections between #MeToo, medical denial of female pain, and the larger problems of systemic racism. But she also frames justice as “possible and so within our reach,” and suggests that COVID has created an opportunity by shining a spotlight on “parallel pandemics” including racism, police brutality, maternal health, and domestic violence. The specific solutions she proposes to get there vary, and what’s challenging is that we have to admit as one expert does in the solutions chapter that women of color often simply don’t have options. Self-advocacy can be framed as drug-seeking or rebellious behavior, while silence leads to abuse. Hossain attempts to reframe “hysteria,” the term used for thousands of years to dismiss women’s frame, as a powerful collective voice with potential for change, but the political establishment is still largely white and male and that’s a larger problem to solve. In my view, what we’re talking about here is major systemic overhaul of US institutions at every level, not traditional party politics, and so I found Hossain’s trust in the Biden administration overly optimistic. Perhaps the most intriguing to me was the story of a birth center in Florida that’s virtually training clinicians in its patient-centered model, drastically improving outcomes for Black pregnancy. Community solutions may be the best way forward while books like these continue to raise awareness of a system that is well and truly broken. (ARC provided through NetGalley.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristen Pesta

    Let me start by saying this is such an important topic, and one that I strongly believe needs to be discussed more. However, if someone were to ask me if I recommended this book to learn more about how racism and sexism affect people in healthcare, I would say absolutely not. For starters, the synopsis is not entirely accurate. While the author does discuss racism and sexism in healthcare, there are so many tangents into different topics that it's not effective. It is also incredibly surface-lev Let me start by saying this is such an important topic, and one that I strongly believe needs to be discussed more. However, if someone were to ask me if I recommended this book to learn more about how racism and sexism affect people in healthcare, I would say absolutely not. For starters, the synopsis is not entirely accurate. While the author does discuss racism and sexism in healthcare, there are so many tangents into different topics that it's not effective. It is also incredibly surface-level, and doesn't dive into the topic nearly as much as I hoped it would. There was so much political talk in this book, and while that could have been incredibly productive to the topic, it was not used that way. It really boiled down to a lot of undeserved praise for Biden. For a book that talks about the importance of "believing women" it wasn't very convincing when she had so many positive things to say about our current president. Lastly, there was inconsistent usage of inclusive language in this book. At certain points the author would use the term "pregnant people/person" and the rest of the time only used "pregnant women." Consistently using inclusive language would have been nice to see.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    It’s the ultimate SMDH book. Except it’s SMHS, shake my head sadly. Heartbreaking stories that are all too familiar, at least from a chronic pain patient perspective. The worst, “You should have said something!” she scolded. Or “…well, it turns out I have a really high threshold for pain,“ yup. Docs are impressed how well I take huge steroid shots into tender spots. Imagine how much pain I deal with every day when that seems pretty negligible. This was Padma Lakshmi about endometriosis. I related It’s the ultimate SMDH book. Except it’s SMHS, shake my head sadly. Heartbreaking stories that are all too familiar, at least from a chronic pain patient perspective. The worst, “You should have said something!” she scolded. Or “…well, it turns out I have a really high threshold for pain,“ yup. Docs are impressed how well I take huge steroid shots into tender spots. Imagine how much pain I deal with every day when that seems pretty negligible. This was Padma Lakshmi about endometriosis. I related to this a LOT. I hate lupus. When she asked for an epidural she had to prove she was in enough pain first. How do you prove you’re in enough pain? Several people reported doctors making them do this. I wonder if any of those doctors were people who’d given birth? “Women should act more, not less, “hysterical“ when it comes to our well-being, and that begins by telling our stories loudly.“ She reported that even though 70% of chronic pain patients are women, but 80% of pain studies continue to be on men or male mice.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anastaseya Kulikova

    (3.9) i think this is a great book to really grasp the maternal problem we have in this issue. i especially appreciated the stories from women, which is crucial in the process of listening and believing women. however, i wish the book discussed more thoroughly the systemic issues of maternal health. while she does discuss the lack of trust of women and dismissing us as “hysterical” (which i have experienced personally), i want to know more about *why* doctors are trained to still think like this (3.9) i think this is a great book to really grasp the maternal problem we have in this issue. i especially appreciated the stories from women, which is crucial in the process of listening and believing women. however, i wish the book discussed more thoroughly the systemic issues of maternal health. while she does discuss the lack of trust of women and dismissing us as “hysterical” (which i have experienced personally), i want to know more about *why* doctors are trained to still think like this even after a whole decade of medical training. also, the book lacks a thorough guide on the ways we can address these issues. towards the end, Hossain talks about the different solutions and bills being put in place. But, we need more systemic solutions, specifically in the medical field. for example, how do we tackle implicit and unconscious bias in the medical field? overall, great beginner book! i still recommend it, but many questions are left unanswered.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Emilia

    I think that this book covered a lot of topics in the span of 300 pages, I would even say too many as they were all barely covered and honestly, you could say a lot more about each of them. The title, I would say, is also very broad as it doesn't; just touch upon the sexism and racism of the world but as well the pandemic, health problems, pregnancy and a whole other variety of things. I would recommend this purely because you can get a glimpse of what is happening in the world, but I would rese I think that this book covered a lot of topics in the span of 300 pages, I would even say too many as they were all barely covered and honestly, you could say a lot more about each of them. The title, I would say, is also very broad as it doesn't; just touch upon the sexism and racism of the world but as well the pandemic, health problems, pregnancy and a whole other variety of things. I would recommend this purely because you can get a glimpse of what is happening in the world, but I would research more into the topics provided.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amber

    i learned a lot about midwifery, reproductive justice, and how america prevents abortion access and reproductive care abroad. i was surprised that the book is so contemporary and discusses the pandemics affect on pregnant people and working women.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Wojnowski

    Us women need to take back the meaning of hysteria for our rights in healthcare!! So much information about such an important issue.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Smileitsjoy (JoyMelody)

    I enjoyed this book. I think Hossain does a very good job of covering topics that can be super complicated in a simple and easy to digest. My only issue is that she kind of dropped the ball and lacked the analysis when she addressed the Black Lives Matter and George Floyd. The flat analysis is what made me give this book four stars. I still think this is a good book for someone who has no prior knowledge of these topics, this book is perfect.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Rohbock

    4.5⭐ Content warnings: Pregnancy, maternal mortality, racism, death, Covid, medical trauma Remember when the J&J vaccine was paused in the US because 6 in 6,000,000 women vaccinated experienced blood clots? As a white American woman, I am more likely to die in childbirth than to experience vaccine-related complications and that's honestly wild given that our health care systems is one of the best in the world. Anushay Hossain dives into the reasons why women are not believed for the medical pain th 4.5⭐ Content warnings: Pregnancy, maternal mortality, racism, death, Covid, medical trauma Remember when the J&J vaccine was paused in the US because 6 in 6,000,000 women vaccinated experienced blood clots? As a white American woman, I am more likely to die in childbirth than to experience vaccine-related complications and that's honestly wild given that our health care systems is one of the best in the world. Anushay Hossain dives into the reasons why women are not believed for the medical pain they experience and how this directly correlates with the maternal mortality rate. She goes beyond the important statistics to share stories of the people who make up those numbers. I learned: +The root of the word "hysteria" is the Greek word for uterus so women are termed as hysteric because of our anatomy 🙄 +Due to hormonal cycles screwing with research trial data, women were largely excluded from medical research trials and it wasnt until 2016(!!!) that the NIH recognized this bias and mandated that studies receiving research grant money must include women +Because many research trials do not include women, it makes doctors less likely to diagnose women with medical issues because women can (and often do) experience different symptoms than men for the same medical issue +Doulas are extremely important for women especially women of color because their advocacy for women during birth results in better recognition of medical issues occuring during or after birth +Women of color have much higher maternal mortality rates because they are even less listened to by their doctors and nurses so midwife and birth centers prioritize mothers of color to help ensure they receive the advocacy they need +Covid made so many of these issues even worse as less people were allowed to attend doctors appointments or be in birthing rooms resulting in less advocacy for women, particularly women of color I read the ARC of this book and I do hope this book continues to be edited. There were several long chapters where it felt like the focus of the book became lost. I loved the focus of race in this book but wish there had been more trans representation or other minority issues. Even so, I think this book is incredibly important for all women and men to read, especially anyone who plans to have kids and especially for people of color and their allies. There are so many challenges that surround the care we give to expecting and new mothers in this country that many aren't exposed to until having children. This book taught me so much and I plan to continue learning and thinking about how I can use this book to make change.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Le Chat Noir

    8/5/22: 10% - not in the right mind frame to read this, will come back later. When it comes to our health and rights, the truth is women aren’t being hysterical enough. Throughout history, we have been too quiet. We are still staying silent and polite—and it’s literally killing us. Depending on which political party is in power, America’s role in international family-planning efforts changes, especially on the issue of abortion. US funding for family planning/reproductive health is governed by a f 8/5/22: 10% - not in the right mind frame to read this, will come back later. When it comes to our health and rights, the truth is women aren’t being hysterical enough. Throughout history, we have been too quiet. We are still staying silent and polite—and it’s literally killing us. Depending on which political party is in power, America’s role in international family-planning efforts changes, especially on the issue of abortion. US funding for family planning/reproductive health is governed by a few legislative and policy restrictions, including a legal ban on the direct use of US funding overseas for abortion as a method of family planning, something that has been in effect since 1973. Working on the Hill gave me a front-row seat to how America exports its own abortion politics to the rest of the world. In addition to lobbying with this coalition to increase US assistance to international family-planning programs, one of our major objectives was for the United States to repeal a policy called the Mexico City Policy, or the Global Gag Rule (GGR), an American policy that prohibits foreign nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from “performing or actively promoting abortion as a method of family planning,” the policy states, and using funds from any source (including non-US funds) as a condition of receiving US government global family-planning assistance. Under the GGR, in order for an organization to remain eligible for US government funds, doctors, midwives, nurses, and civil society advocates cannot even mention the word “abortion”—much less provide abortion services—even in countries where abortion is legal and a woman requests it. Organizations that choose not to meet these restrictions lose all US government funding, including that for essential supplies of contraceptives as well as technical assistance such as sonogram machines. “Organizations are presented with the choice to either give up talking about abortion or lose all of their US funding,” Akila Radhakrishnan, president of the Global Justice Center, a New York City–based nonprofit, explained to Vice. “There are not a lot of organizations that have the ability to refuse US aid.” It’s important to note that the GGR is not just denying funding for abortion—it’s a prohibition on talking about abortion as well. It is, quite literally, a gag order. Since 1973, the Helms Amendment has prohibited NGOs that receive federal funds from using those funds “to pay for the performance of abortions as a method of family planning.” Due to this amendment, the US government has maintained a de facto ban on funding abortion care with foreign-assistance dollars for more than forty years. But this wasn’t restrictive enough for some GOP politicians who want to police language as well. It’s also important to point out that American NGOs are not required to make the same certifications, because the policy violates the constitutional right to free speech. Foreign NGOs, on the other hand, are considered fair game. It is criminal that in this day and age, US foreign assistance is blatantly weaponized to attack women’s reproductive health and rights globally. Though the official intention of the GGR is to reduce the number of abortions around the world, the Gag Rule has cruel consequences for the health and lives of poor women and their families. Implementation of the Global Gag Rule resulted in people in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East losing US government–donated contraceptives, and many organizations and clinics have been forced to lay off staff or shut down altogether. The result has been particularly devastating for women in rural areas, where there is often just one clinic providing an array of services, usually one receiving US funding. The GGR was first formulated under the Reagan administration and has been rescinded and reinstated like clockwork by subsequent administrations along party lines. It was repealed by President Bill Clinton, reestablished by President George W. Bush, and rescinded again by President Barack Obama. Under President Donald Trump, not only was the GGR reinstated in 2017, but expanded in 2019. The Trump administration’s application of the policy extends to the vast majority of US bilateral global health assistance programs, including funding for HIV under PEPFAR, maternal and child health, malaria, nutrition, and other initiatives. American women need to know and should be enraged about how US domestic abortion politics have spilled onto the international arena, creating barriers between women and their ability to access safe and legal abortions—even if they are legal in their own countries. There is perhaps no policy that demonstrates better than the GGR how disproportionately US domestic politics can affect everyone else. A twenty-country study from Stanford University examining the Global Gag Rule in sub-Saharan Africa found that countries with “high exposure” to the policy experienced a relative decline in the use of modern contraceptives and an increase in the induced abortion rate. In Madagascar, health experts point out that the GGR is forcing women to choose between buying food or paying for contraceptives. Because so many providers are afraid to lose their funding if they have even a slight connection to an organization associated with abortion in any way, these policies create panic and end up making basic sexual and reproductive healthcare inaccessible in countries where women need fewer barriers to surmount, not more. In recent years, Nepal and Kenya changed their abortion policy in an effort to reduce high maternal mortality rates because they recognized how unsafe abortions were needlessly killing women and girls. Women in Nepal and Kenya experience high rates of sexual- and gender-based violence, but it is an American policy, like the GGR, that is preventing these countries from addressing this crisis. We must end the Global Gag Rule. As was expected, one of the first actions President Biden took after coming to office was to immediately repeal the GGR, rescinding expansions that were made under the Trump administration. But that is not good enough. We need to permanently eliminate this policy and stop playing politics with women’s health and reproductive rights—at home and abroad. Although Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) does not accept US government funding, the medical aid charity issued a statement after Biden repealed the GGR. The group spoke about the harm the policy had on limiting women’s access to healthcare. In 2019, MSF treated more than 25,800 women and girls with abortion-related complications. “We’ve seen women who have used pens, broken glass, or sticks to try to induce an abortion,” Dr. Manisha Kumar, head of MSF’s task force on safe abortion care, said in a statement on the organization’s website. “We’ve seen women who drank chlorine or poisons.… We can only guess how many women lost their lives over the last several years because access to this essential health care was cut off. And we know that policies such as the Global Gag Rule disproportionately affect black women and women of colour.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Holloway Jones

    This book thoroughly covers an extremely relevant subject matter in our current political climate in the US. I found this book to be well written and extremely well researched. I felt that I learned a lot about the background of this issue and how it affects different racial groups. I have lived through a lot of the issues as a woman in America and was extremely interested in learning more about what it is like to be a woman of color. I think this is a must read for all people. I was particularl This book thoroughly covers an extremely relevant subject matter in our current political climate in the US. I found this book to be well written and extremely well researched. I felt that I learned a lot about the background of this issue and how it affects different racial groups. I have lived through a lot of the issues as a woman in America and was extremely interested in learning more about what it is like to be a woman of color. I think this is a must read for all people. I was particularly intrigued about the information about home births and how these were abolished and why they are widely re-emerging into our country as an option.. Thanks for the ARC, NetGalley. I found this read to be eye-opening and very current.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Mac

    Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC of this book. I enjoyed reading this book and I learned a lot about the experience of women of colour in the healthcare system. It was also interesting and timely to read a book that discussed healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. That being said, some of the chapters felt like they were lacking in a thesis and felt somewhat rambling. Overall I recommend this book to readers who want to learn more about women’s experiences in healthcare, particularly women of Thanks to Net Galley for the ARC of this book. I enjoyed reading this book and I learned a lot about the experience of women of colour in the healthcare system. It was also interesting and timely to read a book that discussed healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic. That being said, some of the chapters felt like they were lacking in a thesis and felt somewhat rambling. Overall I recommend this book to readers who want to learn more about women’s experiences in healthcare, particularly women of colour.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I debated whether or not I wanted to read this now because, to be frank, it seemed like it would be a bit of a downer. Is that the note I wanted to end 2021 on? I decided, yes, why the hell not? And, well, the book was just as distressing as I imagined. Even though the subject was one I was already familiar with, and I’ve experienced first-hand the ways medical professionals dismiss the pain of women, reading the individual stories of women neglected and harmed by our inadequate healthcare syste I debated whether or not I wanted to read this now because, to be frank, it seemed like it would be a bit of a downer. Is that the note I wanted to end 2021 on? I decided, yes, why the hell not? And, well, the book was just as distressing as I imagined. Even though the subject was one I was already familiar with, and I’ve experienced first-hand the ways medical professionals dismiss the pain of women, reading the individual stories of women neglected and harmed by our inadequate healthcare system was nonetheless hard to handle. While this was an interesting read, I felt that the title was a bit misleading, as the focus seemed to be primarily pregnant women and mothers, even though the healthcare system also regularly fails women who don’t fall into either of those categories. (I would also like to point out that women are not the only ones who can become pregnant and that the medical community continues to fail these folks as well, something that is essentially glossed over within this book.) Though Hossain briefly covers topics such as chronic pain conditions, abortion and access to birth control, and the shocking ways women have historically been left out of clinical drug trials and other medical studies, the vast majority of the book centers pregnancy and motherhood and the appallingly high maternal mortality rate in the United States. The author also spends a lot of time highlighting the many societal failings the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated, including domestic violence rates and the inequity in the division of household labor and childcare. While these issues definitely relate to women’s health, perhaps they should take up less space in a book purporting to be about healthcare. There’s nothing wrong with focusing on the perils of childbirth, or focusing on how the pandemic has emphasized and exacerbated gender inequalities that existed pre-covid. I was fascinated to learn about how racist policies initially contributed to the shift in popularity from home births to hospital births in the early 20th century, and how the failures of hospitals in the present day has led to an uptick in the popularity of home births once again. But neither of these subjects feel like they align with what the title and subtitle of the book promised. Overall, even though I appreciate how meticulously this book was researched, I recognize how important the topics are, and I did come away feeling more informed, it felt as though the author attempted to cover too much.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I'm giving this one the benefit of the doubt since the title is very misleading. With a better title I give it 4 stars. I really liked the information presented here and the personal stories coupled with statistics. However, it is less about pain assessment and more about women's health in general. It also HEAVILY focuses on motherhood and childbirth without really acknowledging that this is not a universal female experience. In fact at one point she actually claims that motherhood is a universa I'm giving this one the benefit of the doubt since the title is very misleading. With a better title I give it 4 stars. I really liked the information presented here and the personal stories coupled with statistics. However, it is less about pain assessment and more about women's health in general. It also HEAVILY focuses on motherhood and childbirth without really acknowledging that this is not a universal female experience. In fact at one point she actually claims that motherhood is a universal female experience. As someone who not only is in a relationship with another woman, but who also does not have and will never have kids, this turned out to be less applicable to my own life and more of an informational session about what it is like for other women. At one point she explains that the birth rate is dropping, implying that this is a bad thing, but personally I feel like our planet is overcrowded and the world is in no shape for more babies. Many people are choosing not to have children because of societal and financial issues, and she fails to acknowledge this at all. I appreciated that this book is current and includes a chapter on Covid, however once again this didn't seem to fit with the topic of the book. The author claims that women's labor needs to be paid, and schools need to be open, but she fails to give any explanation on how we can do that while keeping kids and teachers (many of whom are also women) safe from Covid. Another area that missed the mark was the section on women in hetero relationships quitting their jobs to be stay at home moms while their husbands continued working. She gave a lot of statistics but didn't go any deeper into WHY this is happening. She just stated it as fact the women were making this change and men weren't stepping up to parent. There are a lot of social and personal reasons why couples would do this, but it doesn't have to be the case and she just assumed that it did. Basically what I'm saying is that women who silently allow this change to take place without talking to their partner are just as culpable as their husband who does the same. She says that she basically had to give her husband a divorce ultimatum in order to change their parenting load, and I'm just like, DANG you guys haven't even talked about this together at all before now??? THAT ISN'T NORMAL. And if it is the norm for MF couples, IT SHOULDN'T BE. But beyond all that I would have liked her to talk about more WHY women were making this choice. Is it because more women than men have a flexible job? Is it because men feel more societal pressure to be bread winners and have a more stable job? Is it because women tend to not have a job with growth opportunities because they plan to quit to have babies at some point? Let's explore this further please. Another similar weak area was her claim that the treatment of mothers is indicative of women's health overall- which she backed up with no stats or evidence. As a woman who will never be a mother, this actually applies to me and I would have liked to see her explore more about how this affects all women. Could have been a whole additional chapter to explain this point! I'm rating this book highly because while it did have faults, I think the main thesis is important and should be talked about. Health in America is horrible, and women's health even more so. I hope this encourages people to speak up and gets this information out to the public.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie (Melting Pages)

    Final Rating: 3.5/5 I loved learning about this topic, but I do think the synopsis is a bit misleading. It focuses more on pregnancies and how women are treated by the healthcare system when I thought it would be a variety of different medical topics. It also has a pretty strong focus on COVID-19 and how that is affecting how women give birth, but again, I thought it would cover more on how women are often misdiagnosed in areas other than just pregnancies. The writing is also a bit weird, a few t Final Rating: 3.5/5 I loved learning about this topic, but I do think the synopsis is a bit misleading. It focuses more on pregnancies and how women are treated by the healthcare system when I thought it would be a variety of different medical topics. It also has a pretty strong focus on COVID-19 and how that is affecting how women give birth, but again, I thought it would cover more on how women are often misdiagnosed in areas other than just pregnancies. The writing is also a bit weird, a few times I thought that my audiobook was repeating sentences but the author would just repeat herself pretty frequently. I also couldn't quite grasp who exactly this was for, if it was meant to educate people not familiar with the topic or to give additional information to people who know already about reproductive justice. It also skipped around from the author's personal life, to anecdotes from other women, to quoting legislature that was passed or is being lobbied for. Overall, it's an extremely important topic and the book is definitely worth it for that alone, but it just wasn't what I was expecting it to be.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    3.5 stars I'm rounding up to 4 stars because the stories of women's medical trauma are so important and need constant amplification. However, this book is marketed in a completely misleading way: it appears to be primarily about the perils of childbirth in the United States and about medical trauma in relation to birthing, but the majority of the book is really about covid. While that's an equally important topic, I didn't expect to read so much about women's health in covid when I was led to bel 3.5 stars I'm rounding up to 4 stars because the stories of women's medical trauma are so important and need constant amplification. However, this book is marketed in a completely misleading way: it appears to be primarily about the perils of childbirth in the United States and about medical trauma in relation to birthing, but the majority of the book is really about covid. While that's an equally important topic, I didn't expect to read so much about women's health in covid when I was led to believe this was about women dying unnecessarily in childbirth. I also felt like Hossain's opening remarks about how American women should weaponize their hysteria to push for better and more equitable healthcare was not really given enough time on the page for her to explain her ideas. It felt like an afterthought even though she presented it as something the whole book would discuss. Still an important read, especially as we continue to live with covid, but really misleading blurbs.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jessa Michelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. EVERYONE needs to read this. We need to start properly educating ourselves on racism, sexism, healthcare & laws. As a white woman I've always tried my best to educate myself since I'm an outsider looking in while doing the best I can to also stand up & make a change & I still do. This book made me so emotional for all of the right reasons. While a lot of facts within this book are already known or repeated more then necessary just to make the point it also brought a lot of information into the li EVERYONE needs to read this. We need to start properly educating ourselves on racism, sexism, healthcare & laws. As a white woman I've always tried my best to educate myself since I'm an outsider looking in while doing the best I can to also stand up & make a change & I still do. This book made me so emotional for all of the right reasons. While a lot of facts within this book are already known or repeated more then necessary just to make the point it also brought a lot of information into the light & a lot of advice that needs to be applied such as what women of color (honestly everyone in general too) can do to advocate for themselves, their health & how to find the right providers that will take care of them. I'm also happy it stressed some random points such as the importance of voting especially as women, the bills that are being brought to congress, etc.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sam S

    3.5 stars Overall, I did enjoy this book, but I think the subtitle describes the content better than the main title. There is a lot of focus on specifically obgyn/maternity health care. Some on women and general health care and emergency health care. There was also quite a bit on the covid 19 pandemic and the general effects that has had in women, their careers, division of labour etc, which while interesting and informative, was not what I was expecting in this book. It did get looped back aroun 3.5 stars Overall, I did enjoy this book, but I think the subtitle describes the content better than the main title. There is a lot of focus on specifically obgyn/maternity health care. Some on women and general health care and emergency health care. There was also quite a bit on the covid 19 pandemic and the general effects that has had in women, their careers, division of labour etc, which while interesting and informative, was not what I was expecting in this book. It did get looped back around into pandemic lockdowns, domestic violence against women, and these vulnerable women seeking treatment. I think it works have benefited splitting up the medical treatment and pandemic topics into 2 separate books, because both are interesting and important topics.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 3 STARS 2022; Tiller Press I love the message of this book, and agree with all that it has to say about racism and sexism in medical spheres, but I just couldn't get into the writing. I understand that Hossain is injecting herself and her story into the book to create some connection with the reader (and maybe to show her own personal examples, and how she came to notice this in the first place). At times, it read like a biography and other times like an article, essays strung together, so RATING: 3 STARS 2022; Tiller Press I love the message of this book, and agree with all that it has to say about racism and sexism in medical spheres, but I just couldn't get into the writing. I understand that Hossain is injecting herself and her story into the book to create some connection with the reader (and maybe to show her own personal examples, and how she came to notice this in the first place). At times, it read like a biography and other times like an article, essays strung together, so I kind of lost focus with it. I am glad I read it as I can now look for more literature and resources out there. I think it is important to get this information out so it can be eradicated. ***I received a complimentary copy of this audiobook from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.***

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