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A Million Quiet Revolutions

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For as long as they can remember, Aaron and Oliver have only ever had each other. In a small town with few queer teenagers, let alone young trans men, they've shared milestones like coming out as trans, buying the right binders--and falling for each other. But just as their relationship has started to blossom, Aaron moves away. Feeling adrift, separated from the one person For as long as they can remember, Aaron and Oliver have only ever had each other. In a small town with few queer teenagers, let alone young trans men, they've shared milestones like coming out as trans, buying the right binders--and falling for each other. But just as their relationship has started to blossom, Aaron moves away. Feeling adrift, separated from the one person who understands them, they seek solace in digging deep into the annals of America's past. When they discover the story of two Revolutionary War soldiers who they believe to have been trans man in love, they're inspired to pay tribute to these soldiers by adopting their names--Aaron and Oliver. As they learn, they delve further into unwritten queer stories, and they discover the transformative power of reclaiming one's place in history.


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For as long as they can remember, Aaron and Oliver have only ever had each other. In a small town with few queer teenagers, let alone young trans men, they've shared milestones like coming out as trans, buying the right binders--and falling for each other. But just as their relationship has started to blossom, Aaron moves away. Feeling adrift, separated from the one person For as long as they can remember, Aaron and Oliver have only ever had each other. In a small town with few queer teenagers, let alone young trans men, they've shared milestones like coming out as trans, buying the right binders--and falling for each other. But just as their relationship has started to blossom, Aaron moves away. Feeling adrift, separated from the one person who understands them, they seek solace in digging deep into the annals of America's past. When they discover the story of two Revolutionary War soldiers who they believe to have been trans man in love, they're inspired to pay tribute to these soldiers by adopting their names--Aaron and Oliver. As they learn, they delve further into unwritten queer stories, and they discover the transformative power of reclaiming one's place in history.

30 review for A Million Quiet Revolutions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marieke (mariekes_mesmerizing_books)

    A Million Quiet Revolutions is a wonderful YA about two trans boys, written in verse, personal and lyrical, powerful and rhythmical, and so incredibly vulnerable. I like YA in verse. Instead of a word vomit like a cascade, a novel in verse is a gorgeous stream, bending and accelerating and then slowing down again, the words quietly rolling. This book is not your usual story from start to end. It’s more a stream of thoughts, texts, and letters of two trans boys that beautifully come together. Two t A Million Quiet Revolutions is a wonderful YA about two trans boys, written in verse, personal and lyrical, powerful and rhythmical, and so incredibly vulnerable. I like YA in verse. Instead of a word vomit like a cascade, a novel in verse is a gorgeous stream, bending and accelerating and then slowing down again, the words quietly rolling. This book is not your usual story from start to end. It’s more a stream of thoughts, texts, and letters of two trans boys that beautifully come together. Two teens in love, going through the same phases, deciding together they don’t want to use their deadnames anymore and choosing names that two women, possible trans men, used during the Revolution. Doubting themselves because sometimes it doesn’t feel right to just move from one gender to the other. Robin Gow doesn’t shy away from heavy, important topics, and I cried multiple times. I cried when Oliver came out to his parents, and they just hugged him and said they loved him. I cried when I read about the abuse in the Catholic Church. I cried because of Aaron’s winter poems. And sometimes, I just smiled. Because of all those special moments those two boys had. The quietness of A Million Quiet Revolutions touched me deeply and reflected the feelings of Oliver and Aaron so beautifully. The only criticism I have is that the POVs of Aaron and Oliver were quite similar. But you know what? Even with a bit of criticism, I’m giving this important novel five magnificent stars ⭐️ ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️! I received an ARC from MacMillan Children’s Publishing Group and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Anniek

    This has got to be one of the most romantic stories I've ever read. Seeing these characters being in love first, coming out to each other as trans later, and growing both together and apart, was so incredibly special to see. I loved how both of these characters, while they had a lot in common, were really different from each other and were in different situations. I loved how real they felt, how they almost jumped off the page with how they talked to each other, while being larger than life at t This has got to be one of the most romantic stories I've ever read. Seeing these characters being in love first, coming out to each other as trans later, and growing both together and apart, was so incredibly special to see. I loved how both of these characters, while they had a lot in common, were really different from each other and were in different situations. I loved how real they felt, how they almost jumped off the page with how they talked to each other, while being larger than life at the same time. I especially adored the second part of the book, which was almost entirely written in an epistolary format. It really reminded me of the emails in Red, White & Royal Blue, with an almost dreamy quality and a similar focus on queer history.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Toria

    I don't read much novels in verse but YA novels in verse that is also heavily based in LGBTQ + subjects is definitely one of the more intruiging and hard hitting novels. A million quiet revelations isn't a new favorite but was a very good audiobook even if I wasn't the biggest fan of the ending I don't read much novels in verse but YA novels in verse that is also heavily based in LGBTQ + subjects is definitely one of the more intruiging and hard hitting novels. A million quiet revelations isn't a new favorite but was a very good audiobook even if I wasn't the biggest fan of the ending

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Pride Book Tours and Fierce Reads for a finished copy in exchange for an honest review and promotion. All opinions are my own. I am very emotional after reading this. A Million Quiet Revolutions is a YA contemporary novel in verse that follows the journey of two trans boys who are best friends and fall in love with each other. When they find the story of two trans men in the Revolutionary war, they adopt their names: Aaron and Oliver. Just as they feel like their relationship is blo Thank you to Pride Book Tours and Fierce Reads for a finished copy in exchange for an honest review and promotion. All opinions are my own. I am very emotional after reading this. A Million Quiet Revolutions is a YA contemporary novel in verse that follows the journey of two trans boys who are best friends and fall in love with each other. When they find the story of two trans men in the Revolutionary war, they adopt their names: Aaron and Oliver. Just as they feel like their relationship is blossoming, Aaron is forced to move away. The two continue to write letters to each other and cling to the hope of love, identity and finding their place in history. This book broke me. I am a void after reading this heartbreaking and breathtaking story of two trans boys in love. I loved how much these two boys cared for each other. I loved the exploration of queer culture, Latine culture and Jewish culture that we got in this novel. Aaron and Oliver's journeys to acceptance are different for them both, but each was powerful. I loved watching Aaron find a community for himself, including other queer Latine people. I loved seeing Oliver dive deeper into history and finding stories of queer heroes. Oliver's home life is much more accepting and I loved how easily his parents supported him. Aaron has a tougher time, but the way his relationship with his older brother, Jose, is explored was amazing. I loved seeing these two open up to each other and how Jose was always willing to help Aaron if that's what he wanted. Overall, this was a moving and evocative story and I loved it with my whole heart. Jewish gay trans male MC, Puerto Rican Christian gay trans male MC, Latine queer nonbinary side character, Puerto Rican cishet side characters, various queer side characters, Black male side character. CWs: Homophobia/homomisia, transphobia/transmisia, deadnaming, misgendering. Moderate: misogyny, consensual sexual content, sexual assault, rape, sexual violence, religious bigotry, dysphoria. Minor: Antisemitism.

  5. 4 out of 5

    noah

    "a love story between two transgender boys who come out to each other the weekend before their senior year" this sounds like the single most romantic book i will ever read. can't believe i have to wait two years for it. "a love story between two transgender boys who come out to each other the weekend before their senior year" this sounds like the single most romantic book i will ever read. can't believe i have to wait two years for it.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrae

    a love story about two trans boys WRITTEN IN VERSE 2022 come sooner

  7. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    "We thrive in any time we want. We could belong there " I'm always hesitant to call a book perfect because books are written by people and people are not perfect but this book is all encompassing and emotional and vulnerable and romantic and dare I say, perfect. I wanted to cry upon finishing this book. It truly is a feat to have a book that's told in verse where at the end of the story you feel so intensely connected to the characters. I am honestly kind of speechless. A million quiet revolutions "We thrive in any time we want. We could belong there " I'm always hesitant to call a book perfect because books are written by people and people are not perfect but this book is all encompassing and emotional and vulnerable and romantic and dare I say, perfect. I wanted to cry upon finishing this book. It truly is a feat to have a book that's told in verse where at the end of the story you feel so intensely connected to the characters. I am honestly kind of speechless. A million quiet revolutions is about two queer trans boys who are in love and they grow up together and they come out together and when one of them moves away they write letters to each other. They connect their transness and their queerness through stories of queer history and are able to find solace and validity and identity within these moments and queer history that aren't told. The writing in this book is lyrical and illustrative and romantic and sweeping. It is magical to be honest. I loved the discussions about family relationships and coming out and having insecurity about coming out even though you know that coming out was the best thing you did. It is fucking hard to come out. I don't care how many people say that it is easy to come out in 2022, it is still so freaking hard and so freaking scary. Even when you have parents who you think will support you, it is terrifying. Aaron and Oliver have different familial situations and they both have some struggles and some triumphs and I really enjoyed that subplot of the book. I think one of my favorite parts about a million quiet revolutions is how complex and intricate we are as individuals. There are so many pieces to us and none of them reflect our entirety but they all make us who we are. We aren't just one label but each of our labels affects our existence. Both Aaron and Oliver are so much more than just trans boys but their transness and their queerness affects every decision and every thought that they have. I'm not sure what else I can say So I'm going to leave you with a few more quotes that I loved. "It's hard to search for someone like yourself when you're not even sure who you are." "I wonder why it has to be me and somewhere deep in my core I think how wildly beautiful it is to exist in spite of all the places the stories of men like you, like us, are left untold." "I've been thinking about all the ways the world makes us feel not real. I think people imagine transphobia and queer phobia as people shouting at us and hurting us, which of course it is sometimes, but really mostly at school and in town I feel like people are trying to erase us like they just don't want to see us, which is just another type of violence. "We've been erased from so much history. Someone needs to write us back in."

  8. 4 out of 5

    atlas ♡

    ➳ 𝟮 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗿𝘀 this book is so important for young trans people like myself. the representation was done amazingly and it was definitely the highlight of this book. i also adored the latino representation! this novel did trans/queer latino representation at it's finest. my favorite section was probably the letters section while my least was the reenactment section. the letters were a very fun way to see the development of their relationship! the section after that was just alright. i enjoyed reading a ➳ 𝟮 𝘀𝘁𝗮𝗿𝘀 this book is so important for young trans people like myself. the representation was done amazingly and it was definitely the highlight of this book. i also adored the latino representation! this novel did trans/queer latino representation at it's finest. my favorite section was probably the letters section while my least was the reenactment section. the letters were a very fun way to see the development of their relationship! the section after that was just alright. i enjoyed reading about both of the main characters but did sometimes get confused with their POVs. they had very similar voices so it was hard to differentiate at times. they were both very fleshed out though! i didn't love their relationship either despite how much I liked the characters. lots of things that were supposed to be seen as romantic just weren't for me. them having sex in a cemetery is one example. i love queer history so much but i found the characters love for it to be obsessive at times. and that's coming from someone who's about to start writing a 10 page research paper on trans people in history– for school but still! the romanticization of war was just a big no. I've never read a novel written in verse before but I think it worked very well here! the writing style was lyrical and made the book very flowy and easy to read. overall i was very excited for this book but ended up liking the premise for than the execution. thank you to pride book tours for a finished copy in exchange for my honest review!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ashlee » libraryinthecountry

    I am beyond taken by this book. It is told in verse, and is one of the most romantic and reflective stories I've read. Highly, HIGHLY recommend the audiobook especially—the narrators do beautiful job of bringing these characters to life. This is a coming-of-age story of two trans teens, best friends Aaron and Oliver, who adopt the names of Revolutionary War soldiers they believe were trans men in love. The story is an exploration of love, identity, culture, and religion, as well as navigating the I am beyond taken by this book. It is told in verse, and is one of the most romantic and reflective stories I've read. Highly, HIGHLY recommend the audiobook especially—the narrators do beautiful job of bringing these characters to life. This is a coming-of-age story of two trans teens, best friends Aaron and Oliver, who adopt the names of Revolutionary War soldiers they believe were trans men in love. The story is an exploration of love, identity, culture, and religion, as well as navigating the intersection of communities and reclamation of one's self and history. I am all in my feels right now and the in verse format, as well as exchange of letters between characters is so easy to sink into and find yourself lost within.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rooke

    Full of achingly beautiful lines, 'A Million Quiet Revolutions' is told in verse, often through letters, between trans boys Oliver and Aaron, whose struggles are paralleled with soldiers from the Revolutionary War period. It reads like a long-form poem, and there were so many gorgeous, relatable, emotional quotes that I loved reading throughout. Personally I didn't enjoy some choices, such as the sex scene in the cemetery. Although I understand the thematic significance of the setting, it just d Full of achingly beautiful lines, 'A Million Quiet Revolutions' is told in verse, often through letters, between trans boys Oliver and Aaron, whose struggles are paralleled with soldiers from the Revolutionary War period. It reads like a long-form poem, and there were so many gorgeous, relatable, emotional quotes that I loved reading throughout. Personally I didn't enjoy some choices, such as the sex scene in the cemetery. Although I understand the thematic significance of the setting, it just didn't work for me as a reader. Moreover, the subplot of the child sexual abuse in a church setting was something I was entirely unprepared for, and I wish there had been a content warning about this provided beforehand. If I had been prepared to read this subject matter, I would have enjoyed the novel more. In 2022, books including CSA should include content warnings. CW: Child sexual abuse in a religious context (church); generally transphobic cultural context, although one character's parents are much more affirming than the other.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley for review purposes. This in no way influences my review; all words, thoughts, and opinions are my own. Content notes: (view spoiler)[sexual content, mention and references to sexual assault/abuse in Catholic Church/by priests, references to queermisia and transmisia, references to war, battle re-enactments (hide spoiler)] Oh my gosh, I don’t even know what to say about this book. This is a delight and emotional and wonderful and a book I I received an advance copy from the publisher via Netgalley for review purposes. This in no way influences my review; all words, thoughts, and opinions are my own. Content notes: (view spoiler)[sexual content, mention and references to sexual assault/abuse in Catholic Church/by priests, references to queermisia and transmisia, references to war, battle re-enactments (hide spoiler)] Oh my gosh, I don’t even know what to say about this book. This is a delight and emotional and wonderful and a book I feel everyone should read. Aaron and Oliver are best friends, boyfriends, and the one who they came to understand their trans identity with. And they gave each other their name. But when Aaron’s older brother, José, comes forward about the sexual abuse in their Catholic Church, Aaron and his family move away from small-town Kutzman to New York. Aaron and Oliver try to stay in contact via letters like the Revolutionary War soldiers they named themselves after, thinking of the 1778 Aaron and Oliver as trans history and something they want to embody. This book was so emotional to read, and I am so glad I was able to read an early copy. I loved Oliver’s Jewish identity and the bits of his Jewishness that shaped his character. Seeing a queer Jewish trans man character, and seeing him getting a happy story, fills my heart with such joy. This book is told in verse, and I really feel that added to the emotional impact throughout. Oliver and Aaron navigating their identity, their family, and their distance was such a fulfilling story. I highly recommend this for anyone looking for more trans stories with teens finding love and happiness and acceptance. Plus the blending of history and Oliver’s fascination with history just added so much depth. I adored this book and cannot wait for more people to get to read it~

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah McGrath

    Add this one to your TBR, folx! Written in verse, this book to me is the Poet X meets Felix Ever After. A queer, trans coming-of-age story from two POVs, Oliver and Aaron. Oliver is obsessed with history - and believes he discovered that there were these trans men that fought in the Revolutionary War as soldiers. This causes him to wonder how many other queer stories haven’t been told or been erased or… straight-washed (?) throughout history, and definitely goes down the rabbit hole following thi Add this one to your TBR, folx! Written in verse, this book to me is the Poet X meets Felix Ever After. A queer, trans coming-of-age story from two POVs, Oliver and Aaron. Oliver is obsessed with history - and believes he discovered that there were these trans men that fought in the Revolutionary War as soldiers. This causes him to wonder how many other queer stories haven’t been told or been erased or… straight-washed (?) throughout history, and definitely goes down the rabbit hole following this lead. I should also mention Oliver and his family are Jewish, and that was nice to see because I don’t see that representation in a lot of books, and just the thought of having a bar vs bat mitzvah and some of the things he dealt with/thought about that were different from Aaron and his family. Aaron’s family is from Puerto Rico and very Catholic. When something happens with his brother José, his family decides to move away before Oliver and Aaron can enjoy their senior year together, figuring out how they are and exploring their budding romance. They’re best friends turning maybe more, but now they’re going to be separated by a long distance. How will they survive it? I think this is a wonderful read. There’s parts that are heartbreaking, humorous, lovely, and awkward (weren’t we all in high school when we were still figuring out who we were and what we wanted in life?). There’s depth and there’s growth. There’s great imagery and you FEEL what the characters are feeling. Gow really has a wonderful way with words! I hope you pick this one up in March 2022! TW: transphobia/homophobia/sexism, deadnaming [deadnames not mentioned, author uses ****], sexual assault/pedophilia (referenced).

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather Freeman

    This novel-in-verse, told from dual perspectives (split down the middle, with a center section of letters and texts), is a FABULOUS, heartwarming, and truly affirming portrait of trans teen boyfriends. Its hook of focusing on potential trans men in the revolutionary war and the wider idea of historically 'hidden' queer folks throughout time was wonderful, and the modern focus on the central pair, with their worries about coming out to their families and friends, getting in to college, and naviga This novel-in-verse, told from dual perspectives (split down the middle, with a center section of letters and texts), is a FABULOUS, heartwarming, and truly affirming portrait of trans teen boyfriends. Its hook of focusing on potential trans men in the revolutionary war and the wider idea of historically 'hidden' queer folks throughout time was wonderful, and the modern focus on the central pair, with their worries about coming out to their families and friends, getting in to college, and navigating a newly long-distance relationship, was so well done and engaging. Can't wait to handsell this book once it comes out in March!!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Enne

    a love story between two transgender boys,,, can u hear me crying

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    Publication date: March 22, 2022 A coming of age poetry in verse, multi genre first (queer) love story that brings in small town drama as well as American Revolution reenactments. It is hard to define. Follow this with Fine by Rhea Ewing.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Isaiah

    To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I did not know this would be in verse otherwise I would not have asked for it. I often find novels in verse are lacking a lot of emotional and character depth, this novel falls into that category very hard. There was no real emotion or plot or character development that happened. It was often hard in the first section to even know where in the timeline of growing up they were in. There are three sections of the book: one from To see more reviews check out MI Book Reviews. I got an ARC of this book. I did not know this would be in verse otherwise I would not have asked for it. I often find novels in verse are lacking a lot of emotional and character depth, this novel falls into that category very hard. There was no real emotion or plot or character development that happened. It was often hard in the first section to even know where in the timeline of growing up they were in. There are three sections of the book: one from Oliver’s point of view, one that is letters, and one that is in Aaron’s point of view. I could not tell either character apart. Thankfully the book was formatted to have Oliver’s words on one side and Aaron’s on the other. The issue is still I do not know which one was which. So left side was Jewish and had supportive parents. Right side was Puerto Rican, Catholic, and had parents who did not support. If the book did not have the formatting that put them on the other side from each other, I would not have been able to follow anything. The main plot for a lot of the book appears to be sexual assaults of children in churches, which is the plot the 20 year old older brother of right side faces. I know so much more about that than I do anything else. There was just a lot of nothing happening. The author is genderqueer, so the next point is especially annoying to me. The resources section uses an outdated term that has been deemed to be problematic for at least the last decade. So it seems like a huge oversight to have it. So overall, I loved the idea of this book and the description more than the actual book. I ended up not finishing it at about 78%, which was only an hour or two of reading. It just felt like nothing had happened and I doubted the ending would redeem it enough to get me to be invested.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Trans-cending-literature

    I’m not the biggest fan of verse, but I think it did work well for this book. I really liked the focus on queer history and think this will connect alot with younger trans people I did struggle with the characters, they both had very similar voices and I struggled to separate them. And their relationship didn’t really have any chemistry, especially on Aaron's side. I appreciated the focus on queer history but found the whole historical reenactment section a bit odd. As a queer history buff I can I’m not the biggest fan of verse, but I think it did work well for this book. I really liked the focus on queer history and think this will connect alot with younger trans people I did struggle with the characters, they both had very similar voices and I struggled to separate them. And their relationship didn’t really have any chemistry, especially on Aaron's side. I appreciated the focus on queer history but found the whole historical reenactment section a bit odd. As a queer history buff I can understand feeling connected to trans people of the past who’ve been erased, but naming yourself after them and reenacting who you think they are is a bit obsessive to me

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erikka

    I like the main characters in this book, even though they sounded a bit too much alike for a split POV story. I was a little thrown off by how much the plot jumped around. Also, it’s more of a snapshot than a story—there’s not much of a plot to speak of, which isn’t my kind of story. I do love the authentic presentation of two trans boys trying to make sense of their world and the exploration of love in its different forms, though.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    [I received a physical copy from PrideBookTours for an honest review] A Million Quiet Revolutions is a moving story of best friends who come out as transgender to each other. After discovering love letters between soldiers, they decide to take on the soldiers' names as their own. When a family move separates them, they decide to channel their new namesakes and write letters to each other to keep in touch. But growing up isn't easy, and they have to figure out a way to navigate figuring how to be [I received a physical copy from PrideBookTours for an honest review] A Million Quiet Revolutions is a moving story of best friends who come out as transgender to each other. After discovering love letters between soldiers, they decide to take on the soldiers' names as their own. When a family move separates them, they decide to channel their new namesakes and write letters to each other to keep in touch. But growing up isn't easy, and they have to figure out a way to navigate figuring how to be comfortable in their identities and not losing the connection they have between them. "Kissing behind the crooked tombstone in the graveyard at dusk, cheese fries at the snack shake filling Tupperware with fireflies." This is such a beautiful story and not just because of its poetry. Two trans best friend, who while have so much in common, have just as many things that the other can't relate to. Not saying Oliver's coming out or his journey to his identity was easy, but he had a smoother transition with his home life than Aaron. His parent's right away ask questions and accept his decisions.. They are supportive and let him know how much they love him, no matter his pronouns. Yet, socially, he is still living in a town without friends who understood him. While Aaron's parents ignore his coming out and treat it like a phase, not acknowledging his pronouns or his new name. Thankfully, when he joins the Queer club at school he has supportive friends and at least at home he had his brother in his corner. It hurt to read as Aaron pulls away from Oliver the longer they were apart. I loved the way they wrote actual letters to each other like soldiers in the Revolution, it was an interesting way to tell continue their story. I was pleased with their reunion and the ending, but I wish we got a little glimpse into their future. I'll just be over here, picturing them in their thirties living in an apartment together with a dog. "The other me is bold and queer. He has hair dyed red. He wraps himself in a trans flag. He doesn't care what his family thinks. I don't know who I am sometimes between the two of me or what it would look like for those two mes to come together." I think this is an important book for Young Adults. It shows the struggles of figuring out your identity, how it can affect how others see you , how not everyone has families are quick to accept, and the importance of supportive friends. I liked the way it addressed how everyone is different even when having the same sexual identity, in reference to hormone usage and what personal anatomy terms one is comfortable with. "I kind of like queer to describe LGBTQIA+ people from different times. Queer says there's so much room to explore uniqueness. Says there are so many ways to exist." Overall, A Million Quiet Revolutions by Robin Gow was a moving Young Adult Queer Contemporary with best friends, Queer history, battle reenactments, graveyard kisses, morning pancakes, family and a hope for the future. Content Warning : on page sexual intimacy, sexual assault by Catholic priest affecting a secondary character

  20. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    4.5 stars Aaron and Oliver have shared a lot together. As two of the few queer teens in their small towns, they were a lot of each other’s firsts. They came out as trans to each other, finding their first binders, finding new names. And now, they might just be falling for each other. However, before their new romantic relationship can fully blossom, Aaron moves away. The two promise to keep in touch despite the distance with written letters. Like Oliver’s inspirations from queer history, specifica 4.5 stars Aaron and Oliver have shared a lot together. As two of the few queer teens in their small towns, they were a lot of each other’s firsts. They came out as trans to each other, finding their first binders, finding new names. And now, they might just be falling for each other. However, before their new romantic relationship can fully blossom, Aaron moves away. The two promise to keep in touch despite the distance with written letters. Like Oliver’s inspirations from queer history, specifically the Revolutionary War. They are each other’s solace and comfort. However, as they grow up in different places, will their love stay strong? Or will they start to drift apart? Thanks to NetGalley and Macmillan Children’s for an advanced copy of this to review! Immediately drawn in by the cover, I knew this was a book that needed to be on my radar. And for good reason! I don’t think there’s another book quite like it in the YA market, and it is the perfect time for it. To start, this is a novel in verse, which I definitely didn’t realize before picking it up. But no matter! I absolutely love novels in verse. For Aaron and Oliver’s story, I also think it works really well. There’s an entire section in the middle that is basically told just from their letters, and it’s beautifully done. The formatting also helps in distinquishing between their voices when we get different points of view. Even though this is a novel in verse, you still get incredible emotion from the main characters, which isn’t always easy to do. You come to care about them as you read, rooting for them to make it, to be together. They’re just two queer teens trying to figure themselves out, and what a wonderful journey it is. Finally, one of my favorie things about this is Oliver’s determination to find queer people throughout history is inspiring. And also enlightening. You know there were LGBTQ+ people at every moment of important history, but too often their stories are silenced. And Oliver wants to make sure they get told, which is it’s own kind of revolution in itself. All in all, if you love emotional, moving novels in verse, this is definitely one you should pick up at the end of the month!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Tarah Schaeffer

    I myself also live in Kutztown. It is a small and very conservative town and the more “open-minded” members of the population are usually not its full-time residents, but the college students who are only here when class is in session. Though I myself do not identify as Transgender, I do to a certain degree understand the uncomfortableness of being unable to be my true self publicly around here. I am a cis female, but I am bisexual and it’s not something I announce publicly (outside of social me I myself also live in Kutztown. It is a small and very conservative town and the more “open-minded” members of the population are usually not its full-time residents, but the college students who are only here when class is in session. Though I myself do not identify as Transgender, I do to a certain degree understand the uncomfortableness of being unable to be my true self publicly around here. I am a cis female, but I am bisexual and it’s not something I announce publicly (outside of social media) in-person to folks until I know them very well. Being that LGBTQ folks that are publicly out are fewer here Aaron and Oliver for much of their time together have only ever had each other to lean on. They have only had each other to come out to. First, as queer and then coming to the realization they were both Trans. They have only recently become the couple they have always wanted to be. So, it is all the more heartbreaking when Aarons's parents tell him that they must move away due to his brother being the victim of a heinous crime. With no one to lean on now that Aaron has moved away, Oliver feels lost and Aaron is in for a bit of a culture shock due to the fact that he goes from living in a small town to a big city. There are many more people from all walks of life with much more open minds. This is a lyrical novel so it is a quick but thought-provoking read. I think you will really enjoy it and maybe even empathize with these wonderful characters regardless of how you identify.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie • bujo.books

    Written in verse, this debut YA novel follows a couple approaching their high school graduation as they are realizing their identities as trans boys and find comfort in the story of two Revolutionary War soldiers that they believe are trans men in love. They lean on each other as they deal with coming out to those around them and how people like them have been erased from history. TW: (view spoiler)[transphobia/queerphobia, mentions of molestation. (hide spoiler)] This is such a great story that w Written in verse, this debut YA novel follows a couple approaching their high school graduation as they are realizing their identities as trans boys and find comfort in the story of two Revolutionary War soldiers that they believe are trans men in love. They lean on each other as they deal with coming out to those around them and how people like them have been erased from history. TW: (view spoiler)[transphobia/queerphobia, mentions of molestation. (hide spoiler)] This is such a great story that will resonate with the queer youth. Aaron and Oliver have a sweet relationship, that also manages to stay realistic as they have to spend time apart. They each have their own anxieties about different aspects of their identities, but they're never dismissive of themselves. Aaron in particular is dealing with the stresses of coming from a stricter and more religious family that is not as accepting of his identity, which was sad to read but I felt was handled well and realistically. I really enjoyed Oliver's dives into queer history, particularly that of the American Revolution, so much so that I am interested in doing my own research into queer people at the time. The author provided plenty of resources in the back of the book to do so! Overall, this is a YA novel that I will be highly recommending to just about everyone, but especially to queer teens.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing this eARC in exchange for an honest review. A Million Quiet Revolutions is a novel in verse which follows two trans boys through their senior year of high school, as they navigate their own identities, new family dynamics, romance, and unwritten history. This book was sweet, romantic, sad, heartwarming, and just all around beautiful. Aaron and Oliver both had very different journeys, and yet we were shown both where they were different and whe Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for providing this eARC in exchange for an honest review. A Million Quiet Revolutions is a novel in verse which follows two trans boys through their senior year of high school, as they navigate their own identities, new family dynamics, romance, and unwritten history. This book was sweet, romantic, sad, heartwarming, and just all around beautiful. Aaron and Oliver both had very different journeys, and yet we were shown both where they were different and where they overlapped. The writing was soft, gentle, loving. The plot itself was incredibly character-driven, and leaned into moments that weren't entirely linear for the sake of deepening our understanding of the characters. I particularly enjoyed part 2, in which Aaron and Oliver exchange letters, as the emotional conflict of their story deepens. I loved this quick, thought-provoking, important story, and would definitely recommend it to anyone looking for a swift, sweet, important read.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Leslie (LellieReads)

    Childhood friends to lovers come out as trans boys in their senior year of high school. Oliver is a history buff, especially interested in the revolutionary war. Feeling discouraged about never seeing queer people in history, he comes across two trans soldiers of the war named Aaron and Oliver. The two decide to use the soldiers for their new names as trans boys. Shortly after, Aaron has to move to new York City and the two decide to write letters to each other like the soldiers would have durin Childhood friends to lovers come out as trans boys in their senior year of high school. Oliver is a history buff, especially interested in the revolutionary war. Feeling discouraged about never seeing queer people in history, he comes across two trans soldiers of the war named Aaron and Oliver. The two decide to use the soldiers for their new names as trans boys. Shortly after, Aaron has to move to new York City and the two decide to write letters to each other like the soldiers would have during the revolutionary war to try and keep each other close. Rep & highlights: -YA novel in verse -2 trans boy MCs -childhood friends to lovers -jewish mc, Puerto Rican MC I love novels in verse and I enjoyed this one as well! I read it quickly and enjoyed it. I thought both sets of parents were realistic and that using a maybe/maybe not fictional queer historical figure couple as a means to cope is relevant to queer people everywhere. Thanks to the author and macmillan for a free copy in exchange for an honest review and spot on the book tour.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Valerie Kehoe

    This was such an emotionally driven story. I was initially hesitant about the format but the more I read, I found it really worked for this story to describe the intense feelings these characters went through. The format created a really rich and intimate feeling and made me feel very connected to Aaron and Oliver. I loved how Robin Gow was able to display the diversity and uniqueness within the trans experience. It's often common for people to assume that the trans experience looks a certain wa This was such an emotionally driven story. I was initially hesitant about the format but the more I read, I found it really worked for this story to describe the intense feelings these characters went through. The format created a really rich and intimate feeling and made me feel very connected to Aaron and Oliver. I loved how Robin Gow was able to display the diversity and uniqueness within the trans experience. It's often common for people to assume that the trans experience looks a certain way or should follow a direct path. Aaron and Oliver were both trans boys but each had their own unique journeys and ways of understanding their identities. It's important to recognize that there are endless ways of expressing gender and each individual person will have a unique path. I also felt that this book did a great job at displaying the grief and intensity of growing up and becoming an adult after high school. So many great conversations about how queer people are represented within history as well. 5/5

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charles Bush

    I love this book so much! It’s hauntingly beautiful and spoke to me in a way no book has in quite some time. One of my all time favourite novels is PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER. That book felt so honest, so real. It pulled me in and I found myself waking up at all hours just to read Charlie’s next letter. I bring this up because A MILLION QUIET REVOLUTIONS felt like a queer version of that…and I’m so here for it!! I just love how it’s written, how intimate it feels between Aaron, Oliver, and the I love this book so much! It’s hauntingly beautiful and spoke to me in a way no book has in quite some time. One of my all time favourite novels is PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER. That book felt so honest, so real. It pulled me in and I found myself waking up at all hours just to read Charlie’s next letter. I bring this up because A MILLION QUIET REVOLUTIONS felt like a queer version of that…and I’m so here for it!! I just love how it’s written, how intimate it feels between Aaron, Oliver, and the reader. Truly, the intimacy Gow managed to capture with the reader is incredible. I’m telling you, if you want to read a beautiful book that will pierce your soul with its prose…read A MILLION QUIET REVOLUTIONS 💜💜🌈🌈

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eva B.

    The thing about novels-in-verse is that they click for me or they don't, and this one unfortunately did not. Which is too bad, because queer history and revolutionary war history are two of my favorite niches of history to learn about and I feel like this is one of those books that would've hit me harder as a prose novel. But I'm sure a lot of people will really connect with the poetry aspect of this one, which is nice. The thing about novels-in-verse is that they click for me or they don't, and this one unfortunately did not. Which is too bad, because queer history and revolutionary war history are two of my favorite niches of history to learn about and I feel like this is one of those books that would've hit me harder as a prose novel. But I'm sure a lot of people will really connect with the poetry aspect of this one, which is nice.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Clara Goldberg

    This is one of the most beautiful books I’ve read in my entire life. It wasn’t perfect, not in any way, the graveyard scene was not it, but fuck it, this book was beautiful. I know verse scares a lot of people but I’m telling you, push yourself out of your comfort zone and fucking read the piece of art that was this book. It was touching, thought provoking, and it breaks you down in ways that always contain the glimmer of hope that soon, you’ll be put back together again.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anne-Marie

    While American history is not my thing and military history even more so, I loved this book. The power of imagination and storytelling and writing our queer selves into history because we know we were there in some form, is breathtaking and breath making. There are no easy answers in this book, no smooth paths, but it feels all the more real, all the more magical for that. This is a book that opens its emotional eyes and dives deep. Thank the universe it does.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Shaila

    Through this novel in verse we see our trans protagonists, Aaron and Oliver, as they navigate identity, relationships (with one other and with family), and fulfillment of dreams. The novel is a relatively quick read and was enjoyable throughout, although there were some slower moments (especially towards the end with the reenactment). I think this is a title that I will be adding to my classroom library, as it’s important for my students to see themselves in books. In the afterword, Robin Gow wr Through this novel in verse we see our trans protagonists, Aaron and Oliver, as they navigate identity, relationships (with one other and with family), and fulfillment of dreams. The novel is a relatively quick read and was enjoyable throughout, although there were some slower moments (especially towards the end with the reenactment). I think this is a title that I will be adding to my classroom library, as it’s important for my students to see themselves in books. In the afterword, Robin Gow writes about the question of “who is telling their stories, if their stories are being told at all.” These stories need to be told, and I’m glad that Gow wrote this novel.

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