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Plutoshine

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Terraforming - the megascale-engineering of a planet's surface to one more Earth-like - is now commonplace across the Solar System, and Pluto's is set to be the most ambitious transformation yet. Four billion miles from the Sun and two hundred degrees below zero, what this worldlet needs is light and heat. Through captured asteroids and solar mirrors, humanity's finest sci Terraforming - the megascale-engineering of a planet's surface to one more Earth-like - is now commonplace across the Solar System, and Pluto's is set to be the most ambitious transformation yet. Four billion miles from the Sun and two hundred degrees below zero, what this worldlet needs is light and heat. Through captured asteroids and solar mirrors, humanity's finest scientists and engineers are set to deliver them. What nobody factored in was a saboteur - but who, and why? From the start, terraformer Lucian is intrigued by nine-year-old Nou, traumatised to muteness after a horrifying incident that shook the base and upended her family into chaos. If he could reach her, perhaps he could understand what happened that day - and what she knows about the secrets of Pluto. For Nou possesses unspoken knowledge - something that could put a stop to the terraforming. But crippled by her fears, and unable to trust her family, there is no one she can talk to. Only through Lucian's gentle friendship does she start to rediscover her voice - and what she has to say will transform our sense of place in the Universe.


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Terraforming - the megascale-engineering of a planet's surface to one more Earth-like - is now commonplace across the Solar System, and Pluto's is set to be the most ambitious transformation yet. Four billion miles from the Sun and two hundred degrees below zero, what this worldlet needs is light and heat. Through captured asteroids and solar mirrors, humanity's finest sci Terraforming - the megascale-engineering of a planet's surface to one more Earth-like - is now commonplace across the Solar System, and Pluto's is set to be the most ambitious transformation yet. Four billion miles from the Sun and two hundred degrees below zero, what this worldlet needs is light and heat. Through captured asteroids and solar mirrors, humanity's finest scientists and engineers are set to deliver them. What nobody factored in was a saboteur - but who, and why? From the start, terraformer Lucian is intrigued by nine-year-old Nou, traumatised to muteness after a horrifying incident that shook the base and upended her family into chaos. If he could reach her, perhaps he could understand what happened that day - and what she knows about the secrets of Pluto. For Nou possesses unspoken knowledge - something that could put a stop to the terraforming. But crippled by her fears, and unable to trust her family, there is no one she can talk to. Only through Lucian's gentle friendship does she start to rediscover her voice - and what she has to say will transform our sense of place in the Universe.

30 review for Plutoshine

  1. 5 out of 5

    Justine

    2.5 stars Oh dear. I was so excited about this book. A colony on Pluto! Written by someone with a PhD in Planetary Science! I'm not someone who gets too hung up on somewhat questionable science in my SF, but, having said that, I don't think it's totally unreasonable to expect the bar to be slightly raised when the author has a PhD in a relevant discipline. My friend Lindsay touches on some of the immediate head scratchers in his review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Handwaving the scienc 2.5 stars Oh dear. I was so excited about this book. A colony on Pluto! Written by someone with a PhD in Planetary Science! I'm not someone who gets too hung up on somewhat questionable science in my SF, but, having said that, I don't think it's totally unreasonable to expect the bar to be slightly raised when the author has a PhD in a relevant discipline. My friend Lindsay touches on some of the immediate head scratchers in his review: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... Handwaving the science I'm actually OK with, but I do need a story and characters I can get behind. This is really where I had some difficulty. Usually when I'm getting confused or a story seems muddled or suspect I tend to think it's me and not the book. (Why do I do that?!) Plutoshine incorporated time shifts in the storytelling that I found confusing and difficult to follow in some parts. Also, the idea that the kind of abuse that was happening within any family could go unnoticed in such a close-knit and isolated community didn't make much sense. These abusive relationships read how a person from a supportive family with no real experience or understanding of that kind of thing might imagine it would be, but it was just very unrealistic. I liked the fact the main characters were super keen science people. But, that said, Lucian, in particular, was also a bit of a geeky Gary Stu. Genius scientist who loves kids (especially tragic ones), indie rock bands, cats, and cinnamon bagels. Is also apparently an ace pilot and works exceedingly well under imminent threat of death. He is genuinely nice, doesn't ever feel frustrated or lose his temper, and continues to maintain his childlike sense of wonder no matter what. Even the one questionable thing he did (view spoiler)[ by not disclosing the existence of the aliens as soon as he found out about them (hide spoiler)] actually made zero sense. Any real scientist as wholly taken by the thrill of discovery as Lucian is described to be would never do that. There was a flavour to this that reminded me of Becky Chambers. The difference is that Chambers writes flawed characters. Regular people reacting in the ways people react, which is a huge complicated mix. Plutoshine has all the sweetness and none of the grit. The "good" characters are painfully good and the "bad" characters are kind of two-dimensional. Kissick doesn't seem to be able to commit to the bad in humans the same way she so obviously celebrates the good. All that said, I still wouldn't say don't read this. There are a lots of people who like a sweet story where (and this should not come as any surprise given what I've said above) it all turns out in the end. The book for me was not great, 2.5 stars, but Kissick herself seems so genuine and earnest that I would feel like are real heel if I didn't round it up. I do think she has potential, and I and hope she keeps writing and improves the next time around.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    A novel about human colonization and terraforming of Pluto was always going to be straining credulity. Like, why Pluto? Why not Triton? Basically the same composition and size and it's a hell of a lot easier to get to because there's a huge gravity sink for deceleration right next door. Plus Triton as a moon of Neptune is on a nearly circular orbit, whereas Pluto's more extreme elliptical orbit is going to make stable terraforming insanely difficult. And that's only the thoughts I had immediatel A novel about human colonization and terraforming of Pluto was always going to be straining credulity. Like, why Pluto? Why not Triton? Basically the same composition and size and it's a hell of a lot easier to get to because there's a huge gravity sink for deceleration right next door. Plus Triton as a moon of Neptune is on a nearly circular orbit, whereas Pluto's more extreme elliptical orbit is going to make stable terraforming insanely difficult. And that's only the thoughts I had immediately ... as the book goes on I've got much bigger questions, like on a planet where the atmosphere regularly snows into a solid, what is a human colony doing with its waste heat? And that's all before we get to the prospect of life there and a terraforming process that is beyond ridiculous for a location that varies between 30 and 49 AU from the sun (did I mention elliptical orbit?). But then you actually get to the book itself and the systematic emotional abuse and basic abandonment of a pre-teen traumatized girl by a colony of smart close-knit people who must have had training on living in close quarters with each other. At this point you come to understand that it's not just outer planetary physics and astronomy that this author doesn't really get ... This gets more than one star simply because the location is extremely cool (hah! sorry) and I'm glad someone tried to make a novel about manned exploration of Pluto because the whole idea is fantastical and fascinating to speculate about.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katie Louise

    Book arrived this week and I really couldn’t put it down! I don’t usually go for sci-if (more fantasy genre) but the combination of amazing characters, thrilling storyline and beautifully imagined and described settings, made this a perfect read for me. I love reading books which take me to another world and Plutoshine did just that! The frozen landscape of Pluto was so beautifully described and the science of ‘terraforming’ so brilliantly explained that I found myself wanting to know more and mo Book arrived this week and I really couldn’t put it down! I don’t usually go for sci-if (more fantasy genre) but the combination of amazing characters, thrilling storyline and beautifully imagined and described settings, made this a perfect read for me. I love reading books which take me to another world and Plutoshine did just that! The frozen landscape of Pluto was so beautifully described and the science of ‘terraforming’ so brilliantly explained that I found myself wanting to know more and more about the world this story takes place. Not many authors have this effect on me and it’s a credit to the author’s scientific academic background that she is able to so vividly describe what life on Pluto would be like and how humanity could survive and thrive in such an environment. The explanation of the scientific basis wasn’t patronising or over simplified, it was straight forward and uncomplicated for me. My favourite thing about this book -somewhat unexpectedly - was the witty humour and genuinely likeable dialogue from the characters. The humour is brilliantly recognisable as experiences that any student, parent or under-appreciated child can sympathise with and relate to. I particularly like the mysteriously complicated character of Edmund Harbour and the development of this character I found really enjoyable. This isn’t a slow book, the action and drama moves at a great pace and I was never once tempted to ‘skip this boring bit’ which I’m ashamed to admit has been the case with some books in the past… It flowed brilliantly from meaningful scene to thrilling sequence and nothing felt too forced or just in to entertain. Everything leads to the beautiful and thrilling ending which had me absolutely absorbed (to the point where I voluntarily let my tea go cold so as not to be distracted from the pages!). I’m going to recommend this book to my friends who aren’t looking for a complicated ‘hard core’ sci fi novel but who, like me, love being transported to another place (planet!!) and are gripped by thrilling story lines and witty, likeable characters that make you care. Mercury sequel anyone?

  4. 5 out of 5

    Frasier Armitage

    Plutoshine is science fiction in its purest form. It’s an accomplished debut, complex and challenging in all the best ways, and a fantastic blend of invention, real-world science, and beautiful prose. It all starts on Pluto. A terraformer called Lucian arrives with plans to build a sun in orbit of the planet by creating a giant space mirror. He befriends a mute girl call called Nou, who’s hiding a secret that could change everything — not just about the project, but life itself. And if that wasn Plutoshine is science fiction in its purest form. It’s an accomplished debut, complex and challenging in all the best ways, and a fantastic blend of invention, real-world science, and beautiful prose. It all starts on Pluto. A terraformer called Lucian arrives with plans to build a sun in orbit of the planet by creating a giant space mirror. He befriends a mute girl call called Nou, who’s hiding a secret that could change everything — not just about the project, but life itself. And if that wasn’t enough, there’s also the prospect of a saboteur to contend with. Two mysteries run through the book. The first is what happened to Nou to make her incapable of speaking for a whole year. The second is who could be trying to sabotage the project. Both of these mysteries are compelling, but the real heart of this story lies in the relationship between Lucian and Nou. Lucian is the epitome of likeable — intelligent and caring, with a wicked sense of humour. Nou is wide-eyed and honest, but broken and in need of care. The friendship the two of them forge is the key to what makes Plutoshine work so well. It’s easy to invest in them, and as the strength of their friendship grows, so too does the strength of the book. The story is ingeniously structured, delivered in a series of five phases to mirror the process of terraforming. In each phase, there are standout moments of action and introspection, and the pacing is flawless. Phase four, in particular, is a non-stop, nail-biting, perfectly choreographed sequence which I couldn’t take my eyes away from. But Plutoshine is much more than just an interesting mystery set in space. The themes it explores are deeply personal and tender, stretching into the core of what it means to be a parent, what even constitutes life, and how that life should be treated. Refreshingly, the stakes seem very human, and there’s much to ponder on a personal level, as well as just the mind-boggling implications of other life in the universe. It’s a hefty, heady cocktail of subtle and substantial probings that spark all sorts of revelations, shedding light on the issues it raises. Lucian spends his time literally building a sun to shine on a world that has none, and I can’t think of a more perfect allegory for what the story manages to accomplish than that. In terms of style and tone, there’s a poetic and lyrical quality to the writing. It’s packed with technical flourishes, the kind of details that could only come from the mind of a scientist, but the chapters have also got a real literary quality about them, and the descriptions of Pluto are just as breathtaking to read as they are to imagine. Like all good mysteries, the book is packed with red-herrings and unexpected turns, and it kept me guessing until the end. The conclusion tied everything up nicely, leaving me satisfied. Terraforming is the act of refashioning something, repurposing it, and rejuvenating it. In a way, this book does exactly that. It takes all the familiar and traditional aspects of a hard sci-fi space story, and remoulds it into something fresh. Something new. It’s illuminating, mixing bold ideas with warmth, humanity, and above all, heart.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Runalong

    A hugely impressive piece of SF that takes the old and often dry terraforming a world plot and merges it with humans who actually have emotions, lives and even a little cake and biscuits. It’s so good to have a SF story that gives me a sense of awe and wonder - refreshing and recommended Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl... A hugely impressive piece of SF that takes the old and often dry terraforming a world plot and merges it with humans who actually have emotions, lives and even a little cake and biscuits. It’s so good to have a SF story that gives me a sense of awe and wonder - refreshing and recommended Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...

  6. 4 out of 5

    stop_tolkien_and_read

    Plutoshine puts the "science" in "science fiction." Plutoshine puts the "science" in "science fiction."

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    It’s been ages since last I read a hard sci-fi novel, a novel where there’s plenty of scientific facts and we are shown what will be in a century of time. But Plutoshine is more complex than that because it’s also the story of people, of their relationship. It’s the story of the relationship between a scientist, Lucian, and a child, Nou. And this is not enough because there’s also plenty of mysteries: what happened to Nou and her father, who is trying to sabotage the activities of the group of sci It’s been ages since last I read a hard sci-fi novel, a novel where there’s plenty of scientific facts and we are shown what will be in a century of time. But Plutoshine is more complex than that because it’s also the story of people, of their relationship. It’s the story of the relationship between a scientist, Lucian, and a child, Nou. And this is not enough because there’s also plenty of mysteries: what happened to Nou and her father, who is trying to sabotage the activities of the group of scientists? The author did an excellent job in balancing the different aspects of the story and never going in “all hard scientific facts” or “very poignant and emotional charged story”. All these elements are present but they’re part of a gripping and fascinating plot. There’s plenty of fascinating features in this book: Pluto, the remote non planet, an alien world dominated by ice; the terraforming and the construction of the mirror; the relationship amongst the characters and the mysteries. I think that Lucy Kissick can surely write, and I loved how she developed the world building and the characters. The storytelling is fascinating and kept me turning pages. I was fascinated by the scientific part: the author knows what they’re talking about and you feel they’re excellent science communicators. It was a fascinating reading experience, a classic sci-fi upgraded for the contemporary readers. It’s strongly recommended. Many thanks to Gollancz, Will O’Mullane, and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  8. 5 out of 5

    Derran Stokes

    An excellent first novel from Lucy Kissick. I don’t usually read sci-fi but was aware of Lucy through her PhD Diaries so thought I would read the book. Lucy is a gifted storyteller and the book had me hooked from the first page to the last. I believe a second novel is in the pipeline, I cannot wait. I really hope it’s a sequel as I want to know more about the main characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I need to say...I really love Lucien. He's such a sweet person in this book, and I just really loved how hard he tries with everyone. His bond with Nou was sweet, and I really love how she got a voice with him instead of just being ignored. Nou herself was a sweet character, even if I kept being thrown by how she was '0.004 years old'! I can't even imagine what it must have been like to grow on Pluto, but I guess Nou couldn't imagine what it's like to grow up on Earth either. The story of Plutoshi I need to say...I really love Lucien. He's such a sweet person in this book, and I just really loved how hard he tries with everyone. His bond with Nou was sweet, and I really love how she got a voice with him instead of just being ignored. Nou herself was a sweet character, even if I kept being thrown by how she was '0.004 years old'! I can't even imagine what it must have been like to grow on Pluto, but I guess Nou couldn't imagine what it's like to grow up on Earth either. The story of Plutoshine includes bringing the sun to the distant dwarf planet, and beginning the process of terraforming. I'm not a scientist, nor am I scientifically minded, so I have no idea if the science of Plutoshine is accurate enough. There was a lot of science babble in the book, which added to the realism but I can't confirm whether it's accurate or not! It made everything feel more realistic for me, though, so I certainly enjoyed it! I also really loved the description of Pluto itself. The little hints to real events, such as New Horizons, was great and I enjoyed how much love and attention Pluto was getting. Reading the description of Pluto's Heart made me wonder if the author was inspired to write this book after seeing the high definition images of Pluto a few years ago, or something. The whole plan of how to being the sun to far flung planets and moons was interesting, though I do wonder why we'd bother with Pluto of all places! Overall, a very easy and interesting read with some characters you really come to know and love!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    Hooray! A proper Sci-fi story! No surprise to find out just before reviewing this, that it was written by a scientist. What was a surprise, was to find out that it is this author's first book. What a start! Wow. The story is brilliant - I have been reading Sci-fi for more years than the author has been alive, yet I can very happily report that this does not remind me of any other books! That is a huge thing. Quite wonderful. The world/background is easily understandable, so there are no long expla Hooray! A proper Sci-fi story! No surprise to find out just before reviewing this, that it was written by a scientist. What was a surprise, was to find out that it is this author's first book. What a start! Wow. The story is brilliant - I have been reading Sci-fi for more years than the author has been alive, yet I can very happily report that this does not remind me of any other books! That is a huge thing. Quite wonderful. The world/background is easily understandable, so there are no long explanatory passages, which is great. The characterisation is very well done - there are characters that I loved (who would not love Nou?) and those that I loathed, yet it was carefully done, showing that initial impressions are not always right. I do find it hard to read a book in which I don't care about the characters (surprisingly common) - but that didn't happen in this book. I found the book very hard to put down, and was sad when it was finished. It was a complete story, so no cliffhangers or incomplete parts, and astonishingly I find myself a little sad about that, as I would love to return to this world. Perhaps a little way into the future? For a first book, quite brilliant. For a sci-fi book, full marks. Shame I can only give five stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kate Guest

    So enjoyed this great adventure. Fantastic characters and slick plotting.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Haley Renee The Caffeinated Reader

    https://thecaffeinatedreader.com/2022... Full review on blog in link above ^ This was pretty much sci-fi perfection. The actual science melding with this amazing plot that has terraforming via 'sun bringers' to Pluto and the mystery of a saboteur. Seriously, this re-cemented my adoration of sci-fi. There was brilliance in the way this was set up, you were actively engaged in the engineering, terraforming, xenobiology aspects of it while still having mystery at the forefront. The characters are bril https://thecaffeinatedreader.com/2022... Full review on blog in link above ^ This was pretty much sci-fi perfection. The actual science melding with this amazing plot that has terraforming via 'sun bringers' to Pluto and the mystery of a saboteur. Seriously, this re-cemented my adoration of sci-fi. There was brilliance in the way this was set up, you were actively engaged in the engineering, terraforming, xenobiology aspects of it while still having mystery at the forefront. The characters are brilliant and the lack of romance was a specific plus for me. I loved Nou and Lucian was fun while Edmund might have been my favorite just for his complexity. Again, stellar cast of characters. The amazing writing and on point pacing make this a super quick read without even realizing it. I'll be shouting about this book for the rest of the year. 5/5 Cups of coffee from me. Thank you so much to the publisher and NetGalley for an eARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    One of the BEST sci-fi novels I have read in the last few years! The debut book from Lucy Kissick is a thrilling testament to the courage and fortitude of explorers, scientists and humanity itself. Lucy Kissick manages to softly blend scientific theories and method with adventure, excitement and genuinely moving relationships between characters. From the first sentence I was hooked in and eager to follow the developing relationship between young Nou and father-like figure Lucian. It is this rela One of the BEST sci-fi novels I have read in the last few years! The debut book from Lucy Kissick is a thrilling testament to the courage and fortitude of explorers, scientists and humanity itself. Lucy Kissick manages to softly blend scientific theories and method with adventure, excitement and genuinely moving relationships between characters. From the first sentence I was hooked in and eager to follow the developing relationship between young Nou and father-like figure Lucian. It is this relationship between Nou and Lucian, which makes this book so compelling and rich in content. Far from the usual vapid and unconvincing romantic entanglements, of which we are so often subjected to in novels, the relationship which forms between Nou and Lucian is authentic, heart-warming and powerful. Lucy Kissick has a "Dickens"-like talent of making the reader care not just for the book's main characters, but develop even an affection and understanding of seemingly less important figures . From the likeable young PhD student Stan, to the tenacious and brilliant Halley, the depth and richness of the personalities is what draws the reader in and creates a genuine connection with the characters. I cant wait to read more from this author! Lucy Kissick

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    "Plutoshine" is one of those rare books that had me from the very first page - and it's a debut novel! Lucy Kissick writes solidly, has created characters that are incredibly real ("Nou" wins the "character I'd most like to adopt" award!), gives us a story that is hopeful and heartbreaking at the same time, and leaves me with one question: When is your next book coming?! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinio "Plutoshine" is one of those rare books that had me from the very first page - and it's a debut novel! Lucy Kissick writes solidly, has created characters that are incredibly real ("Nou" wins the "character I'd most like to adopt" award!), gives us a story that is hopeful and heartbreaking at the same time, and leaves me with one question: When is your next book coming?! My thanks to the author, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mr_noyes

    I think it's important to mention the core of the novel first, to temper expectations: A terraformer trying to unravel a mystery behind the muteness of a 9 year old girl while trying to implement a project on Pluto (with the project being the focus and the mystery happening in the background) - it's not about the shiny tech, the mind boggling extrapolated science or the profundity of human existence and most definitely not some noirish action packed thriller. At first glance the scope and the foc I think it's important to mention the core of the novel first, to temper expectations: A terraformer trying to unravel a mystery behind the muteness of a 9 year old girl while trying to implement a project on Pluto (with the project being the focus and the mystery happening in the background) - it's not about the shiny tech, the mind boggling extrapolated science or the profundity of human existence and most definitely not some noirish action packed thriller. At first glance the scope and the focus of this novel is something that would make me hesitant to recommend it or to even finish it. Your average mystery/psychological crime novel ... but in spaaaace might have its charms but its not what I look for in a science fiction novel. However, there is something in the execution that won me over and that ultimately leads to my recommendation. For one, to start with the vaguest of categories, the prose is really good. It's not purple like Hyperion, or mind boggling like Gene Wolf but it's certainly above the average of what you find in scifi. The dialogues are kept interesting, the inner life of the characters is cleverly presented without things becoming stale or boring and when things start to become hectic, the prose conveys it in quite a convincing fashion. Especially nowadays, where many authors go for a movie script approach I find it important to point out when an author - a debut author to boot - gets it right. However, where the book truly shines are the characters and - again - I am suitably impressed by what a debut author pulled off. For instance, the 9 year old kid. I'll be real here: I am not good with kids and I don't find it interesting to read about the adventures of plucky kids. And yet, the author managed to make the kid in the story bearable (yes, this is a compliment coming from me). While she is quite clever for a 9 year old girl, she is not cloyingly precocious, when she does stupid stuff you understand where she is coming from. Honestly, I really felt for that little girl and her troubles (one scene made me even flinch). Similarly, Lucian, the terraformer, also strikes a good balance. He's one of those jolly, slightly eccentric personalities but his portrayal deftly shows restraint before it becomes cringy wish fulfillment. His interactions with Nou made me even wonder if the author has experience with raising kids because there is a balance between treating the kid like a grown up and treating the kid like a kid. So yeah, if you like character focused scifi you might want to give this a try. It's a neat little story that wraps everything up with a bow without becoming too grim or saccharine. As a bonus, I found the audio book narrator really, really good. He got the characterization down to a t. The author is definitely someone I'll keep an eye out. If the next novel has a plot I find more interesting it will be winner.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Plutoshine is set in a future where terraforming is an established science, and the sights are set on Pluto. But as the project begins the crew have to deal with sabotage from within, and nine year old Nou witnesses something that has huge ramifications. I was quite interested in this book as the author has a doctorate in planetary science so the technology should be believable, and I don’t think I’ve ever read one that heavily features this far-flung planetoid. It starts off well for the first co Plutoshine is set in a future where terraforming is an established science, and the sights are set on Pluto. But as the project begins the crew have to deal with sabotage from within, and nine year old Nou witnesses something that has huge ramifications. I was quite interested in this book as the author has a doctorate in planetary science so the technology should be believable, and I don’t think I’ve ever read one that heavily features this far-flung planetoid. It starts off well for the first couple of chapters, detailing the science behind the project, and the incident with Nou occurs. But then basically the next 200 pages is character setup and interaction as Lucian slowly establishes his friendship with Nou, which on the whole dragged a bit for me – I really wanted to get back to the incident. When it finally happens the story does pick up the pace somewhat, but I was never fully invested in it. It was an easy read, with likeable characters, an interesting location and some detailed science, but for me a bit of a let down overall – just not enough science and too much focus on the characters I think.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lainy

    I didn't enjoy this at all. I was expecting more alien life and maybe more interaction with said alien life but it was lacking in alien 👽 life. There was a cat so that was a good thing. I didn't enjoy this at all. I was expecting more alien life and maybe more interaction with said alien life but it was lacking in alien 👽 life. There was a cat so that was a good thing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Philip Orange

  19. 4 out of 5

    Imie (mythicreader)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Decco999

  21. 5 out of 5

    David Kennedy

  22. 5 out of 5

    David John Kay

  23. 5 out of 5

    Claire Swallow

  24. 5 out of 5

    Johan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julian Sheridan

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tiemen Zwaan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Khalifa Alsuwaidi

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arkady Bogdanov

  29. 5 out of 5

    sue carroll

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chanel Coppard

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