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The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem

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A thrilling retelling of the Star Wars saga in the style of classic epic poetry “I look not to myself but to the Force, In which all things arise and fall away.” Journey to a galaxy far, far away like never before—through lyrical verse and meter. Like the tales of Odysseus and Beowulf, the adventures of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Princess Leia, Jyn Erso, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Darth A thrilling retelling of the Star Wars saga in the style of classic epic poetry “I look not to myself but to the Force, In which all things arise and fall away.” Journey to a galaxy far, far away like never before—through lyrical verse and meter. Like the tales of Odysseus and Beowulf, the adventures of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Princess Leia, Jyn Erso, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Darth Vader, and the Emperor are fraught with legendary battles, iconic heroes, fearsome warriors, sleek ships, and dangerous monsters. Beginning with Rogue One’s rebel heist on Scarif to secure the plans to the Death Star and continuing through the climax of Return of the Jedi, author Jack Mitchell uses the ancient literary form of epic poetry to put a new spin on the Star Wars saga. Punctuated with stunning illustrations inspired by the terracotta art of Greek antiquity, The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem presents the greatest myth of the 20th century as it would have been told nearly 3,000 years ago.


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A thrilling retelling of the Star Wars saga in the style of classic epic poetry “I look not to myself but to the Force, In which all things arise and fall away.” Journey to a galaxy far, far away like never before—through lyrical verse and meter. Like the tales of Odysseus and Beowulf, the adventures of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Princess Leia, Jyn Erso, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Darth A thrilling retelling of the Star Wars saga in the style of classic epic poetry “I look not to myself but to the Force, In which all things arise and fall away.” Journey to a galaxy far, far away like never before—through lyrical verse and meter. Like the tales of Odysseus and Beowulf, the adventures of Luke Skywalker, Han Solo, Princess Leia, Jyn Erso, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Darth Vader, and the Emperor are fraught with legendary battles, iconic heroes, fearsome warriors, sleek ships, and dangerous monsters. Beginning with Rogue One’s rebel heist on Scarif to secure the plans to the Death Star and continuing through the climax of Return of the Jedi, author Jack Mitchell uses the ancient literary form of epic poetry to put a new spin on the Star Wars saga. Punctuated with stunning illustrations inspired by the terracotta art of Greek antiquity, The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem presents the greatest myth of the 20th century as it would have been told nearly 3,000 years ago.

50 review for The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem

  1. 4 out of 5

    Thom Willis

    Lucasfilm announced this book on April Fool's Day 2021, but it seems like it's a real thing. As a lifelong Star Wars fan and a Classics student/teacher I've been hoping for something in this vein for quite a while. Lucasfilm announced this book on April Fool's Day 2021, but it seems like it's a real thing. As a lifelong Star Wars fan and a Classics student/teacher I've been hoping for something in this vein for quite a while.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    As a longtime Star Wars fan, I always enjoy an opportunity to appreciate the first three movies from a new perspective. In this regard, I found The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem to be a fun, very readable reinterpretation of the original trilogy. (I received an advance copy of the book through Goodreads' Giveaways in exchange for my review.) The back cover describes this project as "the greatest myth of the twentieth century as it would have been told nearly three thousand years ago." Author As a longtime Star Wars fan, I always enjoy an opportunity to appreciate the first three movies from a new perspective. In this regard, I found The Odyssey of Star Wars: An Epic Poem to be a fun, very readable reinterpretation of the original trilogy. (I received an advance copy of the book through Goodreads' Giveaways in exchange for my review.) The back cover describes this project as "the greatest myth of the twentieth century as it would have been told nearly three thousand years ago." Author Jack Mitchell retells the events of A New Hope, The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi in verse, and it's a delightful way to revisit these stories. His poetry has the effect of emphasizing the mythic qualities the films have always possessed. Star Wars is a larger-than-life saga, and The Odyssey of Star Wars appropriately leans into its source material's epic nature. Mitchell's expressive use of language is also a good fit for Star Wars. This is not a literal recitation of the original trilogy; the poetry excels at conveying emotion over details. My favorite example of this is the section recounting the destruction of Alderaan, which has never felt more chaotic or cataclysmic than it does here. But even in smaller moments--such as Leia first seeing Vader's mask or Luke and company entering Mos Eisley--Mitchell finds the words to make things feel fresh and exciting. Fans who are knowledgeable about the movies will note that Mitchell has taken some liberties in adapting the narrative to verse. In some instances this results in new scenes: Mon Mothma greeting Leia upon her arrival at Yavin IV, for example, or Vader and the Emperor plotting between the events of A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back. Perhaps most significantly, Mitchell reorganizes how the story of Return of the Jedi is told in such a way to emphasize the familial connections among the Skywalkers in a very interesting manner. Fans will also find that Mitchell has woven into his poem elements from other Star Wars productions (e.g., the prequel trilogy, Rogue One, Solo), adding more depth to this epic tale. Also worth mentioning is the book's antiquity-inspired design by Diane Shaw. This is an attractive tome, befitting its contents. If you want to relive the wonder of the original trilogy from a fresh perspective, The Odyssey of Star Wars is an excellent way to do so.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arezou

    Popular culture is home to many modern day mythologies. With the epic scale, the tragedy, and of course, a single very powerful, very dramatic family causing chaos far and wide, Star Wars definitely ranks up there as one of the closest comparaisons to the epics of old. As such, it was only fitting that the story of the Skywalker family be given the Homeric treatment in Jack Mitchell’s The Odyssey of Star Wars. As I said, the book is written in the style of famous Homeric poems The Iliad and The O Popular culture is home to many modern day mythologies. With the epic scale, the tragedy, and of course, a single very powerful, very dramatic family causing chaos far and wide, Star Wars definitely ranks up there as one of the closest comparaisons to the epics of old. As such, it was only fitting that the story of the Skywalker family be given the Homeric treatment in Jack Mitchell’s The Odyssey of Star Wars. As I said, the book is written in the style of famous Homeric poems The Iliad and The Odyssey. Though, as someone who studied both in college, I will say that the resemblance does come down in part to which translation you read, and the stylistic choices of that particular poet. That said, Jack Mitchell manages to capture the heart and spirit of those epic poems without ever making it inaccessible to readers who might be less than familiar with older texts. Something many writers tend to forget when they try and imitate an older style, is that just because the language or syntax of the text is difficult for present day readers to understand does not mean that it was difficult for readers - or listeners - of the time. The Homeric epics were written to be performed orally, to listeners of all walks of life. Reading The Odyssey of Star Wars, it was hard not to picture this text being recited to a similarly captive audience, with a new poetry being given to a tale we all know so well. Adapting a story across mediums is never as straightforward as it seems, and credit goes to Mitchell for taking liberties with the text where needed to suit the style of epic poetry. While he does on occasion narratively jump back and forth between two scenes, generally each “book” - the Homeric equivalent of a chapter - generally takes place within a single location, or following a single plot thread. In moments where the back and forth jump is necessary, he often finds clever ways to keep the narrative voice within the present location, while moving the action around as needed. For instance, the rescue of Han and the defeat of Jabba the Hutt is framed as a story Luke is telling Ben when he returns to Dagobah to complete his training. I must also commend Mitchell for resisting the inclination to alter the text and make it fit better in an ancient Greek setting. All the sci-fi terminology is retained, and even some of the more contemporary language. The style is Homeric, but he never tries to pretend that the story is of that time. I often say that one of the things I enjoy most about Star Wars, and the current canon in particular, is the way it all ties together like a tapestry. Jack Mitchell, it seems, takes a similar approach. Though the book is ostensibly focused only on the Original Trilogy, there are references and callbacks to Rogue One, Solo, The Clone Wars and Rebels. There is even a quick reference to the Aftermath novels. Because of the large role Anakin Skywalker plays in the story, the mentions of the Prequel Trilogy are numerous, making thematic connections between the two trilogies where necessary, while never divulging more information than the present characters need to know at any given time. My sole regret is that other than a mention of Jakku and Ach-To, there aren’t really any hints or foreshadowing about the Sequel Trilogy or that era. There must be a literary device within the epic poem that allowed for it, but it’s a small quibble with a text I otherwise enjoyed very much. It might not be strictly necessary to adapt Star Wars to different, much older mediums, but if it must be done, Jack Mitchell has identified the way to do it: get out of your own way, take the story for what it is, and don’t lose the heart. The Odyssey of Star Wars is available now. Special thanks to Abrams Books for the advance copy for review purposes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    Just got this and devoured it. I was expecting a parody like the Shakespeare's Star Wars series, but this is an honest to God epic poem, as serious as it gets (except for R2D2 and C3po and the Ewoks, which are light like in the movie but aren't prominent). It's like Homer's Odyssey and Iliad combined (hero's journey + huge battles), but unlike with Homer you the names and plot already because it's Star Wars. First time I've ever read a long poem like this and honestly it didn't seem long at all, Just got this and devoured it. I was expecting a parody like the Shakespeare's Star Wars series, but this is an honest to God epic poem, as serious as it gets (except for R2D2 and C3po and the Ewoks, which are light like in the movie but aren't prominent). It's like Homer's Odyssey and Iliad combined (hero's journey + huge battles), but unlike with Homer you the names and plot already because it's Star Wars. First time I've ever read a long poem like this and honestly it didn't seem long at all, it really races along. If I were a teacher I would get my students into poetry using this, teenagers would love it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eva B.

    You had me at Rogue One

  6. 5 out of 5

    Azah Bukhari

    My mother gave me this because she knows I love the Odyssey. It doesn't follow the story of the Odyssey, it follows the story of Star Wars (which I also like), but the heroic style is the same. It uses the same rhythm as Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey which I also liked. It moves fast like the Odyssey and has lots of beautiful language and images. Leia is my favorite character in the movies and she is great here, especially as a leader of the rebels and when she kills Jabba, if anythi My mother gave me this because she knows I love the Odyssey. It doesn't follow the story of the Odyssey, it follows the story of Star Wars (which I also like), but the heroic style is the same. It uses the same rhythm as Emily Wilson's translation of the Odyssey which I also liked. It moves fast like the Odyssey and has lots of beautiful language and images. Leia is my favorite character in the movies and she is great here, especially as a leader of the rebels and when she kills Jabba, if anything she has a bigger role than in the films. If you like adventure stories you will love this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fronia

    I predict this will become a classic of our time, both for Star Wars fans and for people who come to it for the poetry. It is in the true tradition of epic, a swiftly moving tale with vivid descriptions and thoughtful insights. This poetic treatment gives depth to a well-loved story, treating it with full respect.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

    I mostly got this book with my husband in mind. He's more of the Star wars fan. However what I can tell so far is that this book has a high level of attention to detail. The author spent a lot of time marrying the Star Wars universe to the style of poetry that "The Odyssey" is famous for. This is going to take some time to examine and complete due to the format. I will add my impressions as I work my way through it. The illustrations are so much fun and definitely done in the ancient Greek-ish s I mostly got this book with my husband in mind. He's more of the Star wars fan. However what I can tell so far is that this book has a high level of attention to detail. The author spent a lot of time marrying the Star Wars universe to the style of poetry that "The Odyssey" is famous for. This is going to take some time to examine and complete due to the format. I will add my impressions as I work my way through it. The illustrations are so much fun and definitely done in the ancient Greek-ish style. So formatting definitely is evoking that epic poem feel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Armstrong

    The thing is, this is a success on the technical, concept to product execution side of things. But it's also just...not a fun read. Even at its most reverent, Shakespeare Star Wars had a winking sense of joy. This feels like a purely academic exercise. The thing is, this is a success on the technical, concept to product execution side of things. But it's also just...not a fun read. Even at its most reverent, Shakespeare Star Wars had a winking sense of joy. This feels like a purely academic exercise.

  10. 5 out of 5

    QOH

    This is fun and it works well, given Lucas's reliance on classical tropes. This is fun and it works well, given Lucas's reliance on classical tropes.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Cleveland

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nelson

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Zukowski

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carlos

  16. 4 out of 5

    Robynn Merkel

  17. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  18. 4 out of 5

    Donna

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Lindsey

  20. 4 out of 5

    Guillermo Salazar

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Sickora

  22. 4 out of 5

    Luba

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric Geller

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mackenzie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kesh

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Trokey

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Re

  29. 5 out of 5

    Faithreading18

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alivia Hartz

  31. 5 out of 5

    .pesky sniper.

  32. 5 out of 5

    Balu

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

  34. 5 out of 5

    Julián

  35. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

  36. 4 out of 5

    Neal

  37. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  38. 5 out of 5

    Coeruleum

  39. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

  40. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

  41. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

  42. 4 out of 5

    Kels

  43. 4 out of 5

    Aesma Daeva

  44. 5 out of 5

    Erin Rose

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  46. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  47. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  48. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

  49. 5 out of 5

    M.R.T. Layton

  50. 5 out of 5

    Sharon

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