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Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and the Personal Computer

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Tells the story of how Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak developed the personal computer. Written in graphic-novel format.


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Tells the story of how Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak developed the personal computer. Written in graphic-novel format.

30 review for Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and the Personal Computer

  1. 5 out of 5

    StrictlySequential

    Wozniak the wizard unfortunately needed the conniving of Jobs the scumbag to make their machines appropriately marketable to the world. The historical heroism goes to Wozniak because got out before Jobs made Apple into a global corporate monster.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ebookwormy1

    This is a simple, and sanitized, account of the relationship between two pioneers of computing, the electronics engineer, Steve Wozniak and the marketing visionary, Steve Jobs. Some of the surrounding facts are questionable (did Atari pay Jobs $1000 or $5000?), but the basic storyline, with a brief reference to tensions between the men, seems fairly consistent with public accounts. The personalities of the men, their initial funding challenges and associates are included. The narrative begins wi This is a simple, and sanitized, account of the relationship between two pioneers of computing, the electronics engineer, Steve Wozniak and the marketing visionary, Steve Jobs. Some of the surrounding facts are questionable (did Atari pay Jobs $1000 or $5000?), but the basic storyline, with a brief reference to tensions between the men, seems fairly consistent with public accounts. The personalities of the men, their initial funding challenges and associates are included. The narrative begins with Steve Wozniak in the "late 1960s" and runs through 1984 with a final page that references "Computing Today" to include business reports, music downloads and personal on-line video calls. The weakness of the account is the artwork. Being a history that runs from the 1960s through the 1980s, I didn't mind the old school green grid lines. Far more problematic for me was that Steve Jobs looks like a woman in the first panel in which he is introduced. Furthermore, as everyone wears beards, I found myself stumbling over the drawings, trying to figure out who was saying what. The illustrators have decided to go with changing clothing styles, which is fine, but something as simple as always showing Jobs in black (which became his trademark) or Wozniak in blue would have gone a long way to being able to quickly identify who was who. It was distracting instead of enhancing. This book doesn't cover anything else beyond the titled storyline. While inventions of others are referenced as inspiring to the men and 'competitors' are mentioned generally, there is no reference to... IBM or Motorola or anything else in the tech world. This is a strength in producing a cohesive historical narrative that does not age, but a weakness in purchasing the book. It turns out the information age is a challenge to explain to children who are growing up in it like fish in water. I would be interested in any other recommendations that educators have for either the computer industry or the information age for elementary or middle school students. The History of Computers (Inventions that Changed the World), Raum, 2008 https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrés Yonda Zamora

    Una ilustración gráfica genial de algunos hitos importantes de Apple. Uno más para la colección.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hamza Kaya

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. sdcsadsa

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    I thought that this might be a fun way for my kids to learn about the birth of Apple - they've only ever seen it as successful, I thought that they might be interested in reading about how it got started. Thing is...they won't touch it because the graphics on the cover say "old", not to mention the guys on the cover (says "nerd"). If you flip through the pages, the drawings are all like that - which means that even if they got past the cover, they wouldn't get past the first couple of pages. The I thought that this might be a fun way for my kids to learn about the birth of Apple - they've only ever seen it as successful, I thought that they might be interested in reading about how it got started. Thing is...they won't touch it because the graphics on the cover say "old", not to mention the guys on the cover (says "nerd"). If you flip through the pages, the drawings are all like that - which means that even if they got past the cover, they wouldn't get past the first couple of pages. The story ends in 1985, so no talk either about how they revolutionized personal music players, and usability in general, and how they changed the music industry. These are the things that the kids would be interested in! They missed the boat on this - I didn't even get nostalgic when I saw the old computers. I don't know what their market is, but it certainly wasn't anyone I know.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Stacia

    I thought this was interesting and well done... although the graphics (character-wise) are a bit lacking... and the story seems to just end and skip many years from 1984, on. Overall - a good graphic read that is a good introduction for learning about the history of computers, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Apple.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Another Capstone Graphic Library non-fiction book. Simple, accessible history of Apple Computer and its founders, Jobs and Wozniak.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Moodhy Alajab

    Inspiring ! i loved Steve jobs more and no wonder why i use ALL Mac products now lol Smart,Simple, Creative, practical and fits me. I don't have to change anything in my head to fit it. Inspiring ! i loved Steve jobs more and no wonder why i use ALL Mac products now lol Smart,Simple, Creative, practical and fits me. I don't have to change anything in my head to fit it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Van

  10. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tetty Canastaria

  12. 5 out of 5

    Regina

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Wayner

  14. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Celii

  15. 4 out of 5

    Reed S

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Saavedra

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashlee

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Blocker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Travis

  23. 4 out of 5

    Abdallah Diwan

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gabe

  27. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sufi Oktifiani

  30. 5 out of 5

    hawkpath

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