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Kundo Wakes Up

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In this standalone follow-up to the fan favorite The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday Saad Z. Hossain continues to mix futurism with fable, and shows how strange our lives might become. While Gurkha introduced us to the techno utopia of Kathmandu, Kundo takes us to Hossain’s native Bangladesh, to the fading city of Chittagong, which is slowly crumbling into the sea as even Ka In this standalone follow-up to the fan favorite The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday Saad Z. Hossain continues to mix futurism with fable, and shows how strange our lives might become. While Gurkha introduced us to the techno utopia of Kathmandu, Kundo takes us to Hossain’s native Bangladesh, to the fading city of Chittagong, which is slowly crumbling into the sea as even Karma goes silent. But Kundo’s contemplation of his dying city is interrupted when his wife leaves him and then goes inexplicably missing, and soon Kundo starts to connect the dots between a number of disappearances. But this is Hossain, and so there’s more afoot than techno shenanigans. Kundo will find that the veil between worlds is paper-thin, and the djinn have their own stake in the matter. Filled with enough ruminations on tea and coffee to wake anyone up, this mystery/fantasy/science fiction/myth is a genre-breaker with something for everyone to love.


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In this standalone follow-up to the fan favorite The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday Saad Z. Hossain continues to mix futurism with fable, and shows how strange our lives might become. While Gurkha introduced us to the techno utopia of Kathmandu, Kundo takes us to Hossain’s native Bangladesh, to the fading city of Chittagong, which is slowly crumbling into the sea as even Ka In this standalone follow-up to the fan favorite The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday Saad Z. Hossain continues to mix futurism with fable, and shows how strange our lives might become. While Gurkha introduced us to the techno utopia of Kathmandu, Kundo takes us to Hossain’s native Bangladesh, to the fading city of Chittagong, which is slowly crumbling into the sea as even Karma goes silent. But Kundo’s contemplation of his dying city is interrupted when his wife leaves him and then goes inexplicably missing, and soon Kundo starts to connect the dots between a number of disappearances. But this is Hossain, and so there’s more afoot than techno shenanigans. Kundo will find that the veil between worlds is paper-thin, and the djinn have their own stake in the matter. Filled with enough ruminations on tea and coffee to wake anyone up, this mystery/fantasy/science fiction/myth is a genre-breaker with something for everyone to love.

30 review for Kundo Wakes Up

  1. 4 out of 5

    K.J. Charles

    A wonderful, strange addition to Hossain's climate-collapsed world of djinn and nanotech. I adore these books, and this is a fabulous addition. Kundo is a painter in a drowning city, determined to find out why his wife left. He puts together a team to search that includes a djinn, a single mum with toddler, an officially dead lady, and a gangster with Alzheimer's. This is peak Saad Hossain, but it's also a strikingly moving story of loss, love, friendship, and building something real in a broken A wonderful, strange addition to Hossain's climate-collapsed world of djinn and nanotech. I adore these books, and this is a fabulous addition. Kundo is a painter in a drowning city, determined to find out why his wife left. He puts together a team to search that includes a djinn, a single mum with toddler, an officially dead lady, and a gangster with Alzheimer's. This is peak Saad Hossain, but it's also a strikingly moving story of loss, love, friendship, and building something real in a broken world. Can be read as a standalone, but why you wouldn't read the whole lot (start with Djinn City) escapes me. Marvellous, imaginative, vivid, and always unexpected.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gerhard

    For all the people we have lost; I hope there are other worlds where they thrive. If you have not read The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, then I definitely suggest you read that first. Yes, you can read Kundo Wakes Up without having done so, but many past events referenced in the background will go over your head and you’ll lose a lot of the texture as a result. Texture is key here, as Saad Hossain’s second foray into his AI/djinn techno-utopia is surprisingly gritty and melancholic, as opposed For all the people we have lost; I hope there are other worlds where they thrive. If you have not read The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, then I definitely suggest you read that first. Yes, you can read Kundo Wakes Up without having done so, but many past events referenced in the background will go over your head and you’ll lose a lot of the texture as a result. Texture is key here, as Saad Hossain’s second foray into his AI/djinn techno-utopia is surprisingly gritty and melancholic, as opposed to the superhero antics of the first novella. At first, I did not know what to make of Hossain’s quietly meditative tone, but the story accretes slowly around you like a secretive coral reef, building to an elegiac and satisfying resolution. Hossain’s work kind of reminds of the Dead Djinn Universe series by P. Djèlí Clark. Maybe this now constitutes an official subgenre!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cozy Reading Times

    4.5* Even though it took me some time getting into it, in the end I loved Kundo Wakes Up even more than The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. CW: drug abuse, depression, suicidal thoughts, suicide (off page), corpses, body horror, corpses, cyberstalking, vomiting, mention of necrophilia There are two things I have to mention first: 1. While it's not required (as this works as a standalone novella), I do recommend you read The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday first. There are several mentions and minor s 4.5* Even though it took me some time getting into it, in the end I loved Kundo Wakes Up even more than The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. CW: drug abuse, depression, suicidal thoughts, suicide (off page), corpses, body horror, corpses, cyberstalking, vomiting, mention of necrophilia There are two things I have to mention first: 1. While it's not required (as this works as a standalone novella), I do recommend you read The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday first. There are several mentions and minor spoilers of that story in here. 2. Compared to The Gurkha, this book is much darker, especially in the beginning. It's narratively somewhat of the opposite to that novella, with this story starting out bleak and hopeless but getting more hopeful throughout the plot. I stuggled a little bit getting into this, as my favourite part of The Gurkha was Hussain's incredible sens of humour. Furthermore did I not click with Kundo ar first, he seemed spiteful and a little petty. It didn't help that the whole set up of this book is very bleak. But then, slowly, did I find myself sliding into the story, understanding Kundo a bit better and getting invested. As the story gradually built up a weirdly wonderful found family around Kundo and we got to explore more of Chittagong (a city beaten but not dead yet), I felt myself falling in love. The themes are the foremost reason that I suggest reading The Gurkha first, as it's the contrast to Kathmandu that showcases so profoundly what Chittagong is lacking and how much nuance there is to this world Hussain has created. Aside from the at time very disturbing cyber punk elements (and Kundo's musings about his wife's hypothetical sex life with other men), this was an incredible read, moving, fascinating and definitely memorable. To the return of the kPop-Retrogirl!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bina

    Bit slower and more mellow than Hossain's other works I've read. But I still really enjoyed it, especially how he adds to the same universe, the character dynamics and the quest style. Bit slower and more mellow than Hossain's other works I've read. But I still really enjoyed it, especially how he adds to the same universe, the character dynamics and the quest style.

  5. 5 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    Not the ending or the climactic moment I was expecting, but it was exactly what I needed. And the author's acknowledgment was everything. Full FTC. I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review Not the ending or the climactic moment I was expecting, but it was exactly what I needed. And the author's acknowledgment was everything. Full FTC. I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lukasz

    A solid satire about our addiction to devices and virtual reality. It blends Arabic mythology, futuristic technology, and throws lots of referencers to popular games in the mix It's enjoyable and quick to read but not as good as Hossain's previous books. A solid satire about our addiction to devices and virtual reality. It blends Arabic mythology, futuristic technology, and throws lots of referencers to popular games in the mix It's enjoyable and quick to read but not as good as Hossain's previous books.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ming

    This is the 4th title by Hossain that I've read (and right after having read the 3rd one). He is extraordinarily imaginative. These sci-fi and fantasy stories feature characters from Bangladesh, and thus the perspectives are refreshing and innovative (I'm so glad he counters the white-dominant SF/F stories). SF/F is not my favorite genre but here, I am well entertained. He taps online gaming to craft an arc of a missing wife. The husband takes on an adventure to learn what happened to her. Along This is the 4th title by Hossain that I've read (and right after having read the 3rd one). He is extraordinarily imaginative. These sci-fi and fantasy stories feature characters from Bangladesh, and thus the perspectives are refreshing and innovative (I'm so glad he counters the white-dominant SF/F stories). SF/F is not my favorite genre but here, I am well entertained. He taps online gaming to craft an arc of a missing wife. The husband takes on an adventure to learn what happened to her. Along the way, he assembles a group of ragtag and unique individuals, each with an acerbic personality. The writing is fun and funny. This book is short and the pacing fast. The storycrafting is satisfying. I would definitely read more from Hossain.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sydney S

    4.5 stars. Firstly, I know this is marked as a standalone, but please read the first book, The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, before this one. You will appreciate it so much more, and things will make a lot more sense. There's also a character from the first book in this one. Hossain is brilliant. I love how he mixes genres in absurd ways and infuses his stories with effortless humor. He's now on my auto-buy list. 4.5 stars. Firstly, I know this is marked as a standalone, but please read the first book, The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, before this one. You will appreciate it so much more, and things will make a lot more sense. There's also a character from the first book in this one. Hossain is brilliant. I love how he mixes genres in absurd ways and infuses his stories with effortless humor. He's now on my auto-buy list.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kaa

    3.5. Interesting read, but I didn't find it quite as captivating as the previous novella in this universe. I would still absolutely come back for another story, though. 3.5. Interesting read, but I didn't find it quite as captivating as the previous novella in this universe. I would still absolutely come back for another story, though.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I read this courtesy of NetGalley. Firstly, for those who have read The Ghurka and the Lord of Tuesday, this is set in the same universe but is not a sequel; so there's no pistachio-cracking Gurung, no Melek Ahmar getting furious about the world. One blurb describes it as a "companion"; it is still a world in which the climate crisis has reached epic proportions; in which some cities are run by an AI called Karma (a different version in each city, it seems); and humans can basically only survive I read this courtesy of NetGalley. Firstly, for those who have read The Ghurka and the Lord of Tuesday, this is set in the same universe but is not a sequel; so there's no pistachio-cracking Gurung, no Melek Ahmar getting furious about the world. One blurb describes it as a "companion"; it is still a world in which the climate crisis has reached epic proportions; in which some cities are run by an AI called Karma (a different version in each city, it seems); and humans can basically only survive when they're in sufficient numbers that the nanites they create are at such density that they can make the climate liveable. In Karma cities, there is no money; there's just points for good deeds, which you can 'spend' to get what you want. And when there's points, there's always going to be people who have none - who are zeroes... Oh, and also there are djinn. This time, the focus is Chittagong, Bangladesh. And things are not going particularly well - either for the city, or for Kundo, once a famous-enough artist, now a man whose wife has left and whose life is such a stretch of nothing that he easily loses track of days. The focus of the story is on Kundo looking for his wife; I have to admit that I was a bit worried about where the story would go - there are good reasons for wives to leave, and Kundo admits he was never a great husband - but I shouldn't have been concerned; Hossain dealt with that aspect of the story skilfully. In the course of trying to find his wife, Kundo gets a team together - a struggling mum, a has-been underworld figure, and a junky coder. Together they try and figure out the world, and get enough to eat, and maybe some basic human dignity as well. It's another really great story from Hossain. He explores the variety of humanity: what they need - and what they want; frustrations and desires and ways of relating; what's good for one but not for another... all in the context of quite a frightening view of the future, actually, that still manages to have some redemption and goodness in it. I'm hoping that we get more stories from this world.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    High technology is associated with the developed world; the rest of the world consists of consumers. At least, that's the paradigm. But the development, adoption and adaptation of high technology in the rest of the world has a storied history in fiction, from the 'Arabic cyberpunk' of George Alec Effinger's Budayeen books, to...Saad Hossain's shared world stories of a Bangladesh and Kathmandu ruled by AIs, occupied by djinns, and populated by world-class gamers and coders. Hossain has a clear visi High technology is associated with the developed world; the rest of the world consists of consumers. At least, that's the paradigm. But the development, adoption and adaptation of high technology in the rest of the world has a storied history in fiction, from the 'Arabic cyberpunk' of George Alec Effinger's Budayeen books, to...Saad Hossain's shared world stories of a Bangladesh and Kathmandu ruled by AIs, occupied by djinns, and populated by world-class gamers and coders. Hossain has a clear vision of the future developing world he is creating, with some shared characters between the stories. His work features indelible characters, many of whom are quite funny, and some who are sort of hapless. The titular character, Kundo, is a semi-famous painter who has hit a stumbling block when his wife unexpectedly left him. Trying to find his wife is the plot driver, which leads him into the dark world of gaming and the mysterious world of the djinn. Hossain's combination of a world of cyberpunk, gaming, and djinn-based magic is quite alluring. The borders blur when hackers (who are magicians, of sorts) start interacting with djinn. Computer coders are the new sorcerers. But as with the old sorcerers in the ancient stories of the djinn, you'd better be careful if you're going to deal with creatures of air and fire.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    Another fantastic book from Hossain - short but filled with deft world building and great characters. After a period of being 'fallow,' artist Kundo searches for his missing wife - perhaps lost to an immersive video game. On his quest he builds a community and finds a much bigger mystery. Another fantastic book from Hossain - short but filled with deft world building and great characters. After a period of being 'fallow,' artist Kundo searches for his missing wife - perhaps lost to an immersive video game. On his quest he builds a community and finds a much bigger mystery.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarmat Chowdhury

    The latest novella from Hossain, "Kundo Wakes Up" follows the story of the titutal character Kundo in Chittagong, Bangladesh, a coastal city that has fallen from grace due to the changes in the environment and society of Bangladesh, and the abscence of people and Karma (the AI seen in other books that Hossain has authored and Kundo begins to wonder about his wife having left and "disappeared" (even the PI that he had hired to track her down has also vanished when he goes to check in on him) and The latest novella from Hossain, "Kundo Wakes Up" follows the story of the titutal character Kundo in Chittagong, Bangladesh, a coastal city that has fallen from grace due to the changes in the environment and society of Bangladesh, and the abscence of people and Karma (the AI seen in other books that Hossain has authored and Kundo begins to wonder about his wife having left and "disappeared" (even the PI that he had hired to track her down has also vanished when he goes to check in on him) and that is when he discovers that even within the VR game that many folks are playing in, there is a hidden game that pits players against each other to be chosen by an entity going by Horus (a Djinn) to be taken to anther world. The book has an eclectic cast of characters, mostly new but with some familiar faces returning to continue the story. While the story and characters are a strong part of why the book works, its also the juxtaposition of Bangladesh, its culture, and the blend of technology and the change for humanity and those challenges that make the books by Hossain in this series so enthralling. Can't wait to see what he comes up with next.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Runalong

    Another very great piece of storytelling that in the best ways possible this mix of SF, fantasy and characters with heart reminds me of Pratchett. Well worth your time Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl... Another very great piece of storytelling that in the best ways possible this mix of SF, fantasy and characters with heart reminds me of Pratchett. Well worth your time Full review - https://www.runalongtheshelves.net/bl...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (That's So Poe)

    I am such a fan of the world building that Hossain has done in this series, an eco-dystopia with themes revolving around economic inequality, a mixture of science fiction and mythological djinn, all set in Nepal. It's also a bit cyber-punky with that heavy focus on a disillusioned guy at its center, which just isn't my cup of tea, but if you want to read some cyber-punk set in a fascinating new setting, this is a good one to pick up. Content Warnings: male gaze, stalking, infidelity, illness, addi I am such a fan of the world building that Hossain has done in this series, an eco-dystopia with themes revolving around economic inequality, a mixture of science fiction and mythological djinn, all set in Nepal. It's also a bit cyber-punky with that heavy focus on a disillusioned guy at its center, which just isn't my cup of tea, but if you want to read some cyber-punk set in a fascinating new setting, this is a good one to pick up. Content Warnings: male gaze, stalking, infidelity, illness, addiction, suicide, ecological disaster

  16. 4 out of 5

    Peter Hollo

    What a delight. After having no sign that Djinn City would have a sequel, we one (Cyber Mage) alongside the related novella The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. And now comes this, which manages to be a sequel to ALL of them. It's a very sweet tale of coming to peace with yourself. What a delight. After having no sign that Djinn City would have a sequel, we one (Cyber Mage) alongside the related novella The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. And now comes this, which manages to be a sequel to ALL of them. It's a very sweet tale of coming to peace with yourself.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Grenier

    3.75-⭐️ (rounded up): This book is a touch more emotionally charged than The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. There is this perpetual sense of abandonment which I could never shake. I genuinely felt sad for Kundo—not only had his wife left him without a trace, but his artistic inspiration had been depleted. “Maybe Karma knew; maybe Karma didn’t care.” This book turns slower than the previous book in this series/duology, but it is set in a new environment, following new characters. Kundo is most c 3.75-⭐️ (rounded up): This book is a touch more emotionally charged than The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday. There is this perpetual sense of abandonment which I could never shake. I genuinely felt sad for Kundo—not only had his wife left him without a trace, but his artistic inspiration had been depleted. “Maybe Karma knew; maybe Karma didn’t care.” This book turns slower than the previous book in this series/duology, but it is set in a new environment, following new characters. Kundo is most certainly a flawed character, but those traits are not really explored. What we get is a shell of a man who’s feeling so little of himself. In this world ruled by an A.I. system like Karma, he has transactional value, but is still lacking: “When you depreciate an asset down to zero, you have something called scrap value left. That’s what we are, Kundo, you and I. Scrap value only.” I loved the dark comedic tone from Gurkha, but that wasn’t the same atmosphere of this book. This oddest thing, is that each time Kundo met a new character, that person is a bit belligerent or combative, but they quickly warm up to him like he was an old friend. The only time this script is flipped is (view spoiler)[ ironically, when Kundo meets the devil (hide spoiler)] . I hope Hossain has more books coming in this same world. It tickles me! Thank you very much to Tordotcom for sending me an advanced proof for review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Abigail Pankau

    Kundo has been living only half-aware the last few years in Bangladesh. The city is falling into ruin with rising sea water encroaching on the streets, and more and more people leaving the city. The city’s A.I. has even seemingly given up on the city, having gone mostly silent. Kundo’s wife is one of the ones who left many years ago, and now he’s discovered that his friend Hassem the hacker has left too, leaving behind a cryptic note for Kundo. Tracking Hassem to an illegal game “The Black Road, Kundo has been living only half-aware the last few years in Bangladesh. The city is falling into ruin with rising sea water encroaching on the streets, and more and more people leaving the city. The city’s A.I. has even seemingly given up on the city, having gone mostly silent. Kundo’s wife is one of the ones who left many years ago, and now he’s discovered that his friend Hassem the hacker has left too, leaving behind a cryptic note for Kundo. Tracking Hassem to an illegal game “The Black Road,” Kundo stumbles upon something that is more than just advanced technology, something from Bangladesh’s djinn-filled past. This was a fun novella that’s an interesting mix of cyberpunk dystopia and the djinn of myth. It explores people’s connection to others, what really makes a community, and how one person’s perfect life might be different from another person’s. Only complaint is that all of the pop culture references are contemporary, even though it’s in the distant future. But otherwise, great world-building and interesting characters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Poonam

    Kundo is a painter in a slowly dilapidating city. His wife left him a while ago and after.some time of depression he wants to figure what happened to her. Teaming up with a few strangers he sets out to find out where his wife may have gone and if it's related to the increasing number of people leaving and disappearing.  This was a great novella. The author really has a fantastic way with world building. I'm super intrigued and just want to know more, but this story fits really nicely into novella Kundo is a painter in a slowly dilapidating city. His wife left him a while ago and after.some time of depression he wants to figure what happened to her. Teaming up with a few strangers he sets out to find out where his wife may have gone and if it's related to the increasing number of people leaving and disappearing.  This was a great novella. The author really has a fantastic way with world building. I'm super intrigued and just want to know more, but this story fits really nicely into novella size. Its a mix of science fiction post climate apocalypse and magic with Djinn. Its always nice to see the genre mix done well. This story is also about the people who are left behind for various reasons finding their own community in a way and about coming to terms with yourself. The ending is left a little bit ambiguous, which was surprisingly kind of nice.  Thank you to Tor Books and Netgalley for the ecopy!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amber (seekingdystopia)

    This felt like Mr. Robot meets Ready Player One and I loved every second of it. It also made me hungry 🤤 In this short book we follow Kundo, a once-famous artist who has lost his touch. He has fallen into a depression because his wife disappeared, and decides to set out and find her. Along the way he meets a cast of very different, very lovable characters that quickly become a found family. This is a companion novel to the Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, so it is in the same world but follows a d This felt like Mr. Robot meets Ready Player One and I loved every second of it. It also made me hungry 🤤 In this short book we follow Kundo, a once-famous artist who has lost his touch. He has fallen into a depression because his wife disappeared, and decides to set out and find her. Along the way he meets a cast of very different, very lovable characters that quickly become a found family. This is a companion novel to the Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, so it is in the same world but follows a different set of characters. It was interesting to see how Karma, the AI that powers many cities, behaved in this one. The writing style was easy to follow and the pacing flowed smoothly. Even though the book was short (~200 pages), it felt long enough to be satisfied with the journey. I highly recommend this for a quick, unique read! Thank you to the publisher for the gifted ARC!

  21. 4 out of 5

    D. B. Guin

    Like with The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, so many different adjectives can apply here. Weird. Unique. Irreverent. Kundo is a former painter living in a micro-society, a city controlled by an AI in a world destroyed by climate disaster. His life is depressed and empty, meaningless after his wife left him. And then... shenanigans. I'm really not even sure how to explain it, but he gets roped in with a poverty-stricken single mom, a drug addict hacker, and a former crime boss to uncover a myster Like with The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, so many different adjectives can apply here. Weird. Unique. Irreverent. Kundo is a former painter living in a micro-society, a city controlled by an AI in a world destroyed by climate disaster. His life is depressed and empty, meaningless after his wife left him. And then... shenanigans. I'm really not even sure how to explain it, but he gets roped in with a poverty-stricken single mom, a drug addict hacker, and a former crime boss to uncover a mystery behind a secret computer game. The game unlocks a djinn secret, if you win. A secret that might explain Kundo's wife's disappearance. More than anything, this story is one of atmosphere and human feeling. It encapsulates isolation, emptiness, and the spirit and hope of the lost and marginalized.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    A change in tone and style from The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, though set in the same future semi-dystopian universe. This was sadder and less absurd, though still an excellent and engaging story. The title character, Kundo, was a famous artist, though his wife disappeared prior to the start of the book, and he's been drifting and unable to paint ever since. He decides to try to find her, and picks up a posse of fellow outsiders and outcasts as they work to solve the mystery. A change in tone and style from The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, though set in the same future semi-dystopian universe. This was sadder and less absurd, though still an excellent and engaging story. The title character, Kundo, was a famous artist, though his wife disappeared prior to the start of the book, and he's been drifting and unable to paint ever since. He decides to try to find her, and picks up a posse of fellow outsiders and outcasts as they work to solve the mystery.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Harmony Williams

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This started out more interesting than it ended up. I liked the found family aspect, the theme of "zeros" sticking together. But the ending felt abrupt, like there should be more in between the two last chapters. And I'll be honest, searching for his wife to make sure she's alive is one thing, but watching her to make sure she doesn't have a lover before he leaves her to her life is just creepy. It lowers Kundo in my estimation. (How is it different from what Hassem did to Fara?) The fact that t This started out more interesting than it ended up. I liked the found family aspect, the theme of "zeros" sticking together. But the ending felt abrupt, like there should be more in between the two last chapters. And I'll be honest, searching for his wife to make sure she's alive is one thing, but watching her to make sure she doesn't have a lover before he leaves her to her life is just creepy. It lowers Kundo in my estimation. (How is it different from what Hassem did to Fara?) The fact that the only "fat man" in the text has deplorable, deviant morals is also problematic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Darcy Roar

    A sibling book to The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday that stands on it's own, Kundo Wakes Up goes a different direction than I expected. It's a mystery to be sure (and sleep related to boot), but where Gurkha felt like a wide/systemic level adventure, Kundo feels like a much closer and intimate journey, while still looking at a grassroots retooling of a broken world. It isn't what I expected and is perhaps a bit too abrupt in places, but I certainly enjoyed reading it! A sibling book to The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday that stands on it's own, Kundo Wakes Up goes a different direction than I expected. It's a mystery to be sure (and sleep related to boot), but where Gurkha felt like a wide/systemic level adventure, Kundo feels like a much closer and intimate journey, while still looking at a grassroots retooling of a broken world. It isn't what I expected and is perhaps a bit too abrupt in places, but I certainly enjoyed reading it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    A decent followup to The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday but it's missing the driving character that our djinn Melek Ahmar was. Set in the same world but only loosely connected, Kundo explores a dystopia of mixed magic and tech to find his missing wife. The book ends the only way it could, but somehow it's still not quite enough. An enjoyable read overall though. A decent followup to The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday but it's missing the driving character that our djinn Melek Ahmar was. Set in the same world but only loosely connected, Kundo explores a dystopia of mixed magic and tech to find his missing wife. The book ends the only way it could, but somehow it's still not quite enough. An enjoyable read overall though.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ciara

    A short, interesting read. Was not expecting the turn that happened in the last act, which did feel a bit rushed and under-explained. Turns out this is a companion to another novella, which probably explains much of the missing scene development. Still, even not having read the other book, I really liked this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    This novella is set in the same world as The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, a future of AI and djinn. Kundo is an artist who doesn't draw anymore; his wife has completely disappeared. He assembles a ragtag group of people who are still trying to life in the dying city to try a find her. You get some found family, future tech, gaming, and more. Another good one. This novella is set in the same world as The Gurkha and the Lord of Tuesday, a future of AI and djinn. Kundo is an artist who doesn't draw anymore; his wife has completely disappeared. He assembles a ragtag group of people who are still trying to life in the dying city to try a find her. You get some found family, future tech, gaming, and more. Another good one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Groucho42

    Another novella in the same universe of AI and djinn. This one is in a town almost dead, with no real explanation why the AI let it die. Kundo is aimless because his wife disappeared, meets a cast of character, , and they try to figure it out. ReGi shows up for no apparent purpose. This is a failure. There's not enough interesting or new, it's too derivative. Another novella in the same universe of AI and djinn. This one is in a town almost dead, with no real explanation why the AI let it die. Kundo is aimless because his wife disappeared, meets a cast of character, , and they try to figure it out. ReGi shows up for no apparent purpose. This is a failure. There's not enough interesting or new, it's too derivative.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    I really enjoyed this one. It was a bit melancholy but overall still a hopeful book. I love reading about this world that Saad Hossain has created. It's so vibrant and every character is interesting. I can't wait for his next book. I really enjoyed this one. It was a bit melancholy but overall still a hopeful book. I love reading about this world that Saad Hossain has created. It's so vibrant and every character is interesting. I can't wait for his next book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ray

    Honestly, took me until the first half of the book to get into it, but it really pulled through. Found family and unexpected magic in a dying world. A really beautiful ending. I think the quote on the back of the book explains it all, a book that "finds humor and pathos in human failure." Honestly, took me until the first half of the book to get into it, but it really pulled through. Found family and unexpected magic in a dying world. A really beautiful ending. I think the quote on the back of the book explains it all, a book that "finds humor and pathos in human failure."

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