Hot Best Seller

The Law of Liberty: A Practical Look at the Judeo-Christian Tradition

Availability: Ready to download

G.K. Chesterton said, “Anyone who takes down a piece of a fence should always first pause as to why it was put up in the first place.” I give Chesterton credit for coming to the truth that we do, indeed, need a fence, but he missed the mark in not pausing long enough to question the fence itself. When the traditions in the Bible were altered and the fourth commandment beca G.K. Chesterton said, “Anyone who takes down a piece of a fence should always first pause as to why it was put up in the first place.” I give Chesterton credit for coming to the truth that we do, indeed, need a fence, but he missed the mark in not pausing long enough to question the fence itself. When the traditions in the Bible were altered and the fourth commandment became relative, an ancient wall was torn down, and in its place a fence was erected that merely resembles a wall. Ever since that time man has been tearing down and rebuilding this fence, and implicit in this ridiculous action lies the fact that the entire fence is inadequate. The anxious drive toward the security of ancient Babel has again emerged. It has taken sway over the average man’s conviction and has undermined traditional values. This has destroyed the authority of the family and of religion, and placed that authority in the hands of the secular academy. This book demonstrates that without an orthodox religious practice, progressivism triumphs over traditional values, and erodes our way of life.


Compare

G.K. Chesterton said, “Anyone who takes down a piece of a fence should always first pause as to why it was put up in the first place.” I give Chesterton credit for coming to the truth that we do, indeed, need a fence, but he missed the mark in not pausing long enough to question the fence itself. When the traditions in the Bible were altered and the fourth commandment beca G.K. Chesterton said, “Anyone who takes down a piece of a fence should always first pause as to why it was put up in the first place.” I give Chesterton credit for coming to the truth that we do, indeed, need a fence, but he missed the mark in not pausing long enough to question the fence itself. When the traditions in the Bible were altered and the fourth commandment became relative, an ancient wall was torn down, and in its place a fence was erected that merely resembles a wall. Ever since that time man has been tearing down and rebuilding this fence, and implicit in this ridiculous action lies the fact that the entire fence is inadequate. The anxious drive toward the security of ancient Babel has again emerged. It has taken sway over the average man’s conviction and has undermined traditional values. This has destroyed the authority of the family and of religion, and placed that authority in the hands of the secular academy. This book demonstrates that without an orthodox religious practice, progressivism triumphs over traditional values, and erodes our way of life.

35 review for The Law of Liberty: A Practical Look at the Judeo-Christian Tradition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Yates

    Primeau's book is a treatise on the loss of liberty as a result of compromising the Judeo-Christian morals founded in God's Law. The author uses an interesting mix of essay, narrative, and even poetry in describing how the Law functions as the ethical foundation upon which true liberty stands. While I certainly agree with that premise, I was curious as to how this could actually be restored at this point in America. Biblically, true personal freedom is found in obedience to the Word of God; but Primeau's book is a treatise on the loss of liberty as a result of compromising the Judeo-Christian morals founded in God's Law. The author uses an interesting mix of essay, narrative, and even poetry in describing how the Law functions as the ethical foundation upon which true liberty stands. While I certainly agree with that premise, I was curious as to how this could actually be restored at this point in America. Biblically, true personal freedom is found in obedience to the Word of God; but historically, fallen humans have never been able to maintain a government based on morality. The sin nature of man will always corrupt through power and the desire for wealth. I would be interested in reading a sophomore work that would detail the practicality of such an idea. A very engaging and interesting read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Schneider

    A very interesting read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Benjamin

  4. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Cheresnick

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Garrett

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan The Book Dragon Campton

  8. 5 out of 5

    Shantel

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hil

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kye Cantey

  15. 4 out of 5

    Scott L. Frost

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lady Goodman

  17. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Phung

  18. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  20. 5 out of 5

    Collette

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Adams

  22. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

  23. 5 out of 5

    amy

  24. 5 out of 5

    natalie

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alison

  26. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  27. 5 out of 5

    angela

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Peterson

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christina Stockard

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brooke

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  32. 4 out of 5

    V Dixon

  33. 5 out of 5

    Pat

  34. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

  35. 4 out of 5

    Raymond Stone

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...