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The Good Left Undone

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From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns. Matelda, the Cabrelli family's matriarch, has always b From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns. Matelda, the Cabrelli family's matriarch, has always been brusque and opinionated. Now, as she faces the end of her life, she is determined to share a long-held secret with her family about her own mother's great love story: with her childhood friend, Silvio, and with dashing Scottish sea captain John Lawrie McVicars, the father Matelda never knew. . . . In the halcyon past, Domenica Cabrelli thrives in the coastal town of Viareggio until her beloved home becomes unsafe when Italy teeters on the brink of World War II. Her journey takes her from the rocky shores of Marseille to the mystical beauty of Scotland to the dangers of wartime Liverpool--where Italian Scots are imprisoned without cause--as Domenica experiences love, loss, and grief while she longs for home. A hundred years later, her daughter, Matelda, and her granddaughter, Anina, face the same big questions about life and their family's legacy, while Matelda contemplates what is worth fighting for. But Matelda is running out of time, and the two timelines intersect and weave together in unexpected and heartbreaking ways that lead the family to shocking revelations and, ultimately, redemption.


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From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns. Matelda, the Cabrelli family's matriarch, has always b From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns. Matelda, the Cabrelli family's matriarch, has always been brusque and opinionated. Now, as she faces the end of her life, she is determined to share a long-held secret with her family about her own mother's great love story: with her childhood friend, Silvio, and with dashing Scottish sea captain John Lawrie McVicars, the father Matelda never knew. . . . In the halcyon past, Domenica Cabrelli thrives in the coastal town of Viareggio until her beloved home becomes unsafe when Italy teeters on the brink of World War II. Her journey takes her from the rocky shores of Marseille to the mystical beauty of Scotland to the dangers of wartime Liverpool--where Italian Scots are imprisoned without cause--as Domenica experiences love, loss, and grief while she longs for home. A hundred years later, her daughter, Matelda, and her granddaughter, Anina, face the same big questions about life and their family's legacy, while Matelda contemplates what is worth fighting for. But Matelda is running out of time, and the two timelines intersect and weave together in unexpected and heartbreaking ways that lead the family to shocking revelations and, ultimately, redemption.

30 review for The Good Left Undone

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader

    A gorgeous cover for a gorgeous book with vibrant characters that climbed right inside my heart. About the book: “From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns.” I love a generational family saga, and The Good Left Undone is ju A gorgeous cover for a gorgeous book with vibrant characters that climbed right inside my heart. About the book: “From Adriana Trigiani, "a master of visual and palpable detail" (The Washington Post), comes a lush, immersive novel about three generations of Tuscan artisans with one remarkable secret. Epic in scope and resplendent with the glorious themes of identity and belonging, The Good Left Undone unfolds in breathtaking turns.” I love a generational family saga, and The Good Left Undone is just that with its past through present with multiple narrators. As ever, Adriana Trigiani’s characters jump off the pages, and in this instance, it’s the Cabrelli family the reader will join at the dinner table. From the 1920s to the present day, this is a novel of the richness of a family’s bond and its darkest secrets and trauma. It also contains the most beautiful love story. Set between Tuscany, Marseilles, and Scotland, I learned about a less well known historical event from World War II. The stories of Matelda and her mother, Domenica; I could not get enough. The richness is in the details of the lives of this family, especially the women. I fell into the story with my arms open wide. It’s a chunk at almost 450 pages and a loving tribute to families, and their love, grief, and hope across generations. This is Trigiani’s best work yet. I received a gifted copy. Many of my reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com and instagram: www.instagram.com/tarheelreader

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    An epic, multigenerational story centered around three generations of the women in the Cabrelli family in the coastal town of Viareggio, Italy. This novel has two timelines…. the first starts before World War ll, and then the present. Family…the heart of the story!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Adriana Trigiani is a treasure and The Good Left Undone is a gem: a sweeping epic that spans a century. Chronicling the fallout from the cataclysmic sinking of the Arandora Star — torpedoed by a German U-Boat in 1940 — this extraordinary novel manages to mourn the dead, celebrate the living, and remind us that every family has secrets that are heartbreaking, heartwarming, and (yes) inspiring.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Melike

    I loved being transported to Tuscany, Marseilles, and Scotland while reading about Domenica's story. It was engaging, interesting, and informative and the settings were described in great detail. I could feel Domenica's joys and pains since her character was developed so well. However, I was bored with the rest of it. When the book switched to Matelda and her granddaughter's stories, I found them lacking in purpose. I didn't feel that they were facing the same questions as Domenica and therefore I loved being transported to Tuscany, Marseilles, and Scotland while reading about Domenica's story. It was engaging, interesting, and informative and the settings were described in great detail. I could feel Domenica's joys and pains since her character was developed so well. However, I was bored with the rest of it. When the book switched to Matelda and her granddaughter's stories, I found them lacking in purpose. I didn't feel that they were facing the same questions as Domenica and therefore, I cared less about those parts and found the book too long.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Marisa

    One of the most transporting books I’ve ever read. A book I didn’t want to end I could have read hundreds of more pages. Absolutely beautiful and poignant. Told from the perspective of 4 generations of strong women. The flow the plot the characters. Everything. Brilliant job, Adriana

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Sakash

    3+ stars? I'm always saddened by the senseless loss of war-time stories. This did not have a particularly fast pace, similar to the other book I read by the same author. There were a lot of characters spread out over several generations, which was sometimes confusing to keep straight. I think the biggest disconnect for me was that the same character starts and ends the book, but most of story is really about her mother's life. This makes it hard to relate to the daughter's story. Given the strong 3+ stars? I'm always saddened by the senseless loss of war-time stories. This did not have a particularly fast pace, similar to the other book I read by the same author. There were a lot of characters spread out over several generations, which was sometimes confusing to keep straight. I think the biggest disconnect for me was that the same character starts and ends the book, but most of story is really about her mother's life. This makes it hard to relate to the daughter's story. Given the strong theme of family, we don't get very much of her own history, including anything about her relationship with her husband - not even how they met. And some of the dialogue wasn't particularly thrilling: "I hope you like the sandwiches... Do you like them?" :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    As a new mom, my time is at a premium right now; reading has been largely pushed to the back burner in favor of raising a baby. (When baby sleeps, mom is supposed to sleep...right?) I've loved all of Adriana's books, but I've always told people that The Shoemaker's Wife was my favorite. Not anymore. Reading this book was like eating an exceptionally decadent serving of tiramisu - rich with detail, wonderfully textured, and completely satisfying. I was delighted to be given the chance to read The As a new mom, my time is at a premium right now; reading has been largely pushed to the back burner in favor of raising a baby. (When baby sleeps, mom is supposed to sleep...right?) I've loved all of Adriana's books, but I've always told people that The Shoemaker's Wife was my favorite. Not anymore. Reading this book was like eating an exceptionally decadent serving of tiramisu - rich with detail, wonderfully textured, and completely satisfying. I was delighted to be given the chance to read The Good Left Undone and I found myself staying up ridiculously late, diving into chapter after chapter of Adriana's incredible work. I came away feeling simultaneously thrilled with the masterful storytelling and sad that it had come to an end. Adriana wove the history of Matelda Cabrelli and her mother, Domenica, presenting readers with a vibrant tapestry of one family's history, complete with love, tragedy, and triumph. I can't wait for the book to be published so I can purchase a copy, reread it, and share it with everyone I know.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shereadbookblog

    This is a multigenerational family saga that is told with warmth, humor, and poignancy. Moving back and forth in time, it tells the story of four generations of women as they live life and experience history. Taking place primarily in Italy, there are portions of the tale set in France and Scotland as well. Some of the narrative takes place during World War II where the reader is introduced to the inhumane treatment of the Italians who had emigrated to Scotland, even though they were contributor This is a multigenerational family saga that is told with warmth, humor, and poignancy. Moving back and forth in time, it tells the story of four generations of women as they live life and experience history. Taking place primarily in Italy, there are portions of the tale set in France and Scotland as well. Some of the narrative takes place during World War II where the reader is introduced to the inhumane treatment of the Italians who had emigrated to Scotland, even though they were contributors to the Scottish society, some even having fought for the UK in World War I. I was struck again, as I often am reading books that take place in this time period, how we don’t learn from history and continue to inflict injustices on our fellow man. Trigiani’s vivid descriptions transport the reader to the actual locations where one can experience the tastes, the smells, the climate, the beauty. I particularly enjoyed her observations of the aging process….they were painfully omniscient while also amusing. This was a wonderful story…….. Thanks to #Netgalley and #Penguin for the DRC Follow me on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/shereadbook...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Allie Hutchens

    Too long and way too many characters to keep track of. Made the story difficult to follow.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    Adriana Trigiani's upcoming novel, The Good Left Undone is an epic, sweeping story about a family of artisans in Tuscany, Italy. The Cabrelli family has been creating and selling beautiful jewelry for generations, and now Matelda, the elderly matriarch, is reflecting on her life as her 25 year-old great-granddaughter Anina is questioning the choices she has made in her own life. The story is told in present day and in the days leading up to WWII where Domenica is a young nurse who runs afoul of Adriana Trigiani's upcoming novel, The Good Left Undone is an epic, sweeping story about a family of artisans in Tuscany, Italy. The Cabrelli family has been creating and selling beautiful jewelry for generations, and now Matelda, the elderly matriarch, is reflecting on her life as her 25 year-old great-granddaughter Anina is questioning the choices she has made in her own life. The story is told in present day and in the days leading up to WWII where Domenica is a young nurse who runs afoul of the local parish priest and is sent away from her family to Marseille, France to work with nuns in a hospital. She meets handsome Scottish sea merchant captain John McVicars there and quickly falls in love. As war approaches France, Domenica is sent to Scotland, and then Liverpool, England, where Italians are sent to an internment camp because the British government feels they can't be trusted, as Mussolini has aligned Italy with the Nazis. Trigiani once again gives us a fantastic generational family story, and layers in a historical lesson that many of us did not know- Italians (many whom had lived in England and Scotland for years) were rounded up and imprisoned based solely on their heritage. (Susan Elia MacNeal's The King's Justice dealt with this topic as well.) This is similar to what the United States did to people of Japanese descent after Pearl Harbor. One of the best things about reading an Adriana Trigiani novel is that it is a treat for all of your senses.You can hear the tents snapping in the wind at Carnevale, smell apple strudel baking, taste the delicious cherry cake (I would love that recipe!), and see in your mind's eye the beautifully crafted jewelry "glistening like ribbon candy" in its case. As someone who grew up attending Catholic school, I appreciated the nuns in the story. The care they provided as nurses to their charges, the kindness they showed to Domenica, the strength they exhibit, these are the women I grew up knowing. One of my favorite scenes occurs when Anina and her fiancé go to their parish priest for advice. The priest is a wise man, who listens to their concerns and relates his best advice- "Forgive.Forget.Repeat." At a time when we have all missed seeing our family- parents, grandparents, cousins, aunts, uncles- falling into this big, beautiful book about, as Matelda says, how "a family is only as strong as its stories" will encourage us to share our own family's stories with each other. And as Father Fracassi says, we must "reflect on the past, (and) make peace with it. You cannot control the evil done to you. You cannot turn back and right the good left undone." There is so much to ponder in The Good Left Undone, it's the kind of book that once you turn the last page, you want to immediately begin to reread it. I give it my highest recommendation. It publishes in April, preorder it today from your favorite bookseller.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Fern

    Another engaging family-driven story from Ms. Trigiani, although some of the long-held family secrets didn’t quite make sense to me and a few too many diversions slowed the story somewhat. I imagine I’m in the minority here but I also found the constant expounding on the preeminence of family a bit tedious. Still, a compelling and mostly fast read. Appreciated the story arc about Scotland during WWII, which I knew little about.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tina Panik

    An immersive, satisfying novel. Domenica, and her family, are memorable for both their perseverance and honesty. Trigiani’s pen seamlessly showcases the artisans of Italy, as well as a little known aspect of Scottish/Italian history, making this one of her best novels yet. This was an ARC.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jillian Doherty

    Sweeping, multigenerational storytelling - it wraps you up like a warm blanket from start to finish. Delightfully balanced; the contemporary view offers a vibrant contrast to the flashbacks of their family's matriarchs - who you come to rely on for their deftly drawn strength and perseverance. This heartfelt and passionate Italian family allows you to easily connect with their experiences over time - love, loss, secrets, and adventure~ equally for male/female readers alike. Galley borrowed from t Sweeping, multigenerational storytelling - it wraps you up like a warm blanket from start to finish. Delightfully balanced; the contemporary view offers a vibrant contrast to the flashbacks of their family's matriarchs - who you come to rely on for their deftly drawn strength and perseverance. This heartfelt and passionate Italian family allows you to easily connect with their experiences over time - love, loss, secrets, and adventure~ equally for male/female readers alike. Galley borrowed from the publisher.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    Domenica's story was a 3.5 star. Everything else! This has made me question and ponder. What I love about Italy. And being Italian in so much of my heritage. And the stereotypes of Italian women abounding, those especially. Groan, this was filled with bickering, complaining, and at the same time guilt ridden. For this level of depth? Well, it sure isn't this- that's for sure. Other than the Domenica sections, I was fully disappointed. Suffice it to say, I liked her earliest works way, way more th Domenica's story was a 3.5 star. Everything else! This has made me question and ponder. What I love about Italy. And being Italian in so much of my heritage. And the stereotypes of Italian women abounding, those especially. Groan, this was filled with bickering, complaining, and at the same time guilt ridden. For this level of depth? Well, it sure isn't this- that's for sure. Other than the Domenica sections, I was fully disappointed. Suffice it to say, I liked her earliest works way, way more than her latest 3 or 4. And this one, near the bottom. This book is immensely overrated on Goodreads. Absolutely in the running for most overrated fiction of 2022. I just trudged on past the 200 page mark. Only because of her past books, did I continue. Every "now" section! OMG. Over detailed, fill of manufactured angst and also almost universally insipid people. Plus it was twice as long as it needed to be. Both the sentence structures and the introductions of multiple, multiple characters at different life ages? Confusing, and at times conflated any "knowing" of them because of the various eyes or interactions of that period of their life. The men were treated this way throughout the book entire. Except for John. This is constantly mentioning Tuscany. Well, most of the places are much more Liguria if NOT Liguria sea front and south, I would not describe as country Tuscan. Some of my favorite parts of Italy are South of the Cinque Terra. Secrets? Huh! Over, over described in very similar pandering phrases and the people are not "known" to me at the same time. Especially Matelda and her granddaughter. UGH! I should have stopped this one near the beginning when she was phone absorbed while visiting her Grandmother. I would love to hear from my Mother how she would feel about this book. Her Sicilian would come out on these moderns big time and I bet she would say. "They are crying with a loaf of bread under each arm." But she was smarter than I am. She would probably have stopped this one at about page 60. Lastly and yet I have said this 4 times at least in the last 2 years; family sagas should never be put into switching time periods and narrators. The more generations the worse the interpretations. Think Pachinko- the same exact problem. Most especially in this tome length case, the modern characters are always done the worst- like fodder aftermath. Too much for one book and the depth of individual actions in the modern players becomes superficial and repetitive while also trivial and banal by comparison.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Julie Durnell

    Beautiful! One of her best in my opinion.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Camie

    I try to read a variety of books but historic fiction is always my favorite genre. High marks for this new release which is a rich multigenerational story following the legacy of the Cabrelli family and the tumultuous times in their small Italian coast village before, during, and after WW 11. Covering a 100 year time span and Italy, Marseille, Scotland, and Liverpool, it focuses on the strong family matriarchs and how alike the hardships, joys, and desires of each generation can be. My Grandmoth I try to read a variety of books but historic fiction is always my favorite genre. High marks for this new release which is a rich multigenerational story following the legacy of the Cabrelli family and the tumultuous times in their small Italian coast village before, during, and after WW 11. Covering a 100 year time span and Italy, Marseille, Scotland, and Liverpool, it focuses on the strong family matriarchs and how alike the hardships, joys, and desires of each generation can be. My Grandmother lived to be nearly 100 years old so some of my older Grandchildren were able to be part of the 5 th generation of her family. Perhaps that is why I especially enjoy family sagas which embrace a “ wisdom of the ages” type of storyline. If you want to know who you are …. look to those who came before you. 5 stars- read for BOMC favorites

  17. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I was looking forward to this one - I love historical fiction and Italy. Unfortunately, it fell flat for me. I felt like the story dragged and there were too many side characters. I got confused several times as to who I was reading about and where they were - Scotland or Italy? I was also unsure about how these other characters fit into the main story, other than they were all going through the war in some way. Overall, too long, too many characters, and I never really felt invested in any of t I was looking forward to this one - I love historical fiction and Italy. Unfortunately, it fell flat for me. I felt like the story dragged and there were too many side characters. I got confused several times as to who I was reading about and where they were - Scotland or Italy? I was also unsure about how these other characters fit into the main story, other than they were all going through the war in some way. Overall, too long, too many characters, and I never really felt invested in any of them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Pauline

    The story of one family through three generations and multiple timelines. I enjoyed parts of the book but I found the change of timelines and characters challenging and I’m sorry that this affected my enjoyment of this book. Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin Michael Joseph UK for my e-copy in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Strawser

    "When Domenica had returned to Viareggio last fall with her daughter, it appeared that everything was broken, from the pier, to the roads, to her heart. She found herself tiptoeing around the pieces when she rediscovered the only thing that could make her whole." Nobody weaves a multi-generational saga quite like Adriana Trigiani—with beauty, authenticity, unflinching honesty, and a wide-open heart. Her latest novel sweeps us away to a seaside village in Italy, a convent in Scotland, a military "When Domenica had returned to Viareggio last fall with her daughter, it appeared that everything was broken, from the pier, to the roads, to her heart. She found herself tiptoeing around the pieces when she rediscovered the only thing that could make her whole." Nobody weaves a multi-generational saga quite like Adriana Trigiani—with beauty, authenticity, unflinching honesty, and a wide-open heart. Her latest novel sweeps us away to a seaside village in Italy, a convent in Scotland, a military vessel in World War II, and back again. But more than that, it transports us inside the life of one family doing their best to keep hold of one another, stay true to who they are, and leave no GOOD LEFT UNDONE. My deepest thanks to the publisher for the opportunity to read an early copy via Netgalley: Put this one on your must read list for spring.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle Miller

    I enjoyed the story, especially learning about the sinking of the Arandora Star. I also didn’t realize how the Italian immigrants were treated during WWII. History has a lot of lessons, and one is that we need to do better with handling the displaced people of “enemy” nations. But I digress… The story was interesting, however, the writing was choppy. The writer would just suddenly change perspectives without any warning and leave me slightly confused for a moment. There were also stories of secon I enjoyed the story, especially learning about the sinking of the Arandora Star. I also didn’t realize how the Italian immigrants were treated during WWII. History has a lot of lessons, and one is that we need to do better with handling the displaced people of “enemy” nations. But I digress… The story was interesting, however, the writing was choppy. The writer would just suddenly change perspectives without any warning and leave me slightly confused for a moment. There were also stories of secondary characters included in a way that didn’t feel like it fit. It honestly felt like there were multiple stories in the book that the author tried to fit together and it just didn’t always work that well. I glad I read it, I won’t reread it or keep it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Qian Julie

    In The Good Left Undone, masterful storyteller Adriana Trigiani gifts us with an immersive epic that follows one family through generations and across the world. With her trademark humor and eye for detail, Adriana weaves a warm, rich, and majestic tapestry of matriarchs, secrets, and delights. No one with a beating heart will be able to resist the Cabrelli family, or soon forget their love or resilience--proof of Adriana's wisdom that "a family is only as strong as their stories." In The Good Left Undone, masterful storyteller Adriana Trigiani gifts us with an immersive epic that follows one family through generations and across the world. With her trademark humor and eye for detail, Adriana weaves a warm, rich, and majestic tapestry of matriarchs, secrets, and delights. No one with a beating heart will be able to resist the Cabrelli family, or soon forget their love or resilience--proof of Adriana's wisdom that "a family is only as strong as their stories."

  22. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    Don’t miss the incredible family saga!!! 😊 Full review to follow.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christina (Confessions of a Book Addict)

    This sweeping saga starts with Domenica Cabrelli and her friend, Silvio, on an adventure in coastal, Viareggio, Italy. Domenica marches to her own beat as she is a woman during a time where they aren't afforded many options, but that doesn't stop her from dreaming big. Her best friend, Silvio, is the town outcast, as he is a bastard, but, again, that doesn't deter her from being good friends with him. As the years go by, Silvio and his mother leave the town, but Domenica never forgets him. She s This sweeping saga starts with Domenica Cabrelli and her friend, Silvio, on an adventure in coastal, Viareggio, Italy. Domenica marches to her own beat as she is a woman during a time where they aren't afforded many options, but that doesn't stop her from dreaming big. Her best friend, Silvio, is the town outcast, as he is a bastard, but, again, that doesn't deter her from being good friends with him. As the years go by, Silvio and his mother leave the town, but Domenica never forgets him. She starts to study to become a nurse and them gets herself into trouble with the powerful Catholic Church. As her punishment, the church sends her away for a period of time to practice her nursing in France, so her world changes in the blink of an eye. While there, she truly comes into her own and she also meets Captain John McVicars, a Scottish sea captain, and despite their differences a romance blooms. Meanwhile, things are getting dangerous as Italy is getting involved in WWII. Fast forward to present day and Domenica's daughter, Matelda, is reaching the end of her life. She has stories that should be shared and family secrets that need to be told, especially as her granddaughter starts to question aspects of her life. Adriana Trigiani's multi-generational saga, The Good Left Undone, won't disappoint fans and historical fiction lovers will be wholly entertained. Read there rest of my review here: http://www.confessionsofabookaddict.c...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Obsesses over Books & Cookies

    4.5 stars. I was not expecting to like this as much as I did. Adriana Trigiani has written so many books and the one's I've read, I've loved (especially the big stone gap series) but she just proves that her talent does not fade. It's a big story about a family, because her books are about family and Italy and food and art. Matilda is old and she's sensing she's about to leave the world but before she does she wants to pass on her story which is about her mother, Domenica. So it's a dual timeline 4.5 stars. I was not expecting to like this as much as I did. Adriana Trigiani has written so many books and the one's I've read, I've loved (especially the big stone gap series) but she just proves that her talent does not fade. It's a big story about a family, because her books are about family and Italy and food and art. Matilda is old and she's sensing she's about to leave the world but before she does she wants to pass on her story which is about her mother, Domenica. So it's a dual timeline from right before WW2 to the present. Domenica is educated and a nurse working in Italy but when she gives a woman who comes in asking how to prevent pregnancy and Domenica helps her she is punished for it by a priest. She is sent away to work off her punishment, disappearing until it blows over. And of course there is a man involved and there's a little bit of war and a lot of relationships and what it means to be a family and what you leave behind. I was fully engaged with each timeline. The writing is great and definitely recommend it if you enjoy historical fiction.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kathy (Bermudaonion)

    THE GOOD LEFT UNDONE tells the story of three women of the Cabrelli family as the matriarch, Domenica, approaches the end of her life. Readers are taken from the 1920s to the present day as you learn of the family’s loves, losses, and disappointments. With great attention to detail, Trigiani weaves a historical event I was unfamiliar with into this terrific story. The best part of the story for me, however, is the fabulous characters - they felt so real to me so I was completely invested in thei THE GOOD LEFT UNDONE tells the story of three women of the Cabrelli family as the matriarch, Domenica, approaches the end of her life. Readers are taken from the 1920s to the present day as you learn of the family’s loves, losses, and disappointments. With great attention to detail, Trigiani weaves a historical event I was unfamiliar with into this terrific story. The best part of the story for me, however, is the fabulous characters - they felt so real to me so I was completely invested in their story. This book is sure to be a hit!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    This is a family saga spanning several generations that only a gifted storyteller like Adriana Trigiani can tell. Characters and settings come to life as she chronicles their love and hardships while enabling us to visualize the time and place. This multi-generational story reveals past loves and secrets in the hopes of strengthening the family unit. The author does not disappoint and this is another book to be added to her wonderful collection.#TheGoodLeftUndone #AdrianaTrigiani #NetGalley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    THE GOOD LEFT UNDONE Adrina Triglani This is a dual timeline novel that examines the Cabrelli family generation after generation. Matelda and Silvio were certainly my favorite characters. I loved how the timelines crossed World War II and several countries. 5 stars Happy Reading!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Spencer

    I chose this as my April Book of the Month Club pick, and while it took me a while to get into the story, it ended up being a fantastic read. If you like big, meaty family sagas, this one delivers. Moving back and forth in time between the present day and 1930a/40s Italy and Scotland, we follow the elderly Matelda and her family, particularly her granddaughter Anina, as well as Matelda's mother, Domenica Cabrelli and her father, Scottish sea captain John McVicars. We get to know the characters as I chose this as my April Book of the Month Club pick, and while it took me a while to get into the story, it ended up being a fantastic read. If you like big, meaty family sagas, this one delivers. Moving back and forth in time between the present day and 1930a/40s Italy and Scotland, we follow the elderly Matelda and her family, particularly her granddaughter Anina, as well as Matelda's mother, Domenica Cabrelli and her father, Scottish sea captain John McVicars. We get to know the characters as we see them relating to one another, and because of how the book is constructed, we see how long ago events echo across generations. This is one of those books that meanders through the characters' lives, sometimes pausing to go down side trails of minor characters' stories. It took me a little while to get into it, but once I did, I was hooked as the story built up to its emotional ending. This is ultimately a story about identity, family and legacy, and while it starts off slowly, it builds to a powerful ending. CW: discussion of the Holocaust, persecution violence against Jews and Italians during WWII, domestic abuse, bullying

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Actual rating, 4.25-4.5 stars, but rounding up because I loved this one! Goodness me! "A Family is only as strong as its stories. It's been years since I have picked up an Adriana Trigiani book after I fell in love with one of her earlier works The Shoemaker's Wife and for the life of me, I cannot image why! She is such a profoundly talented storyteller and she was sharing certain details in the first 100 pages of this novel that I wondered "why?" and then, I just gave myself over to this story, Actual rating, 4.25-4.5 stars, but rounding up because I loved this one! Goodness me! "A Family is only as strong as its stories. It's been years since I have picked up an Adriana Trigiani book after I fell in love with one of her earlier works The Shoemaker's Wife and for the life of me, I cannot image why! She is such a profoundly talented storyteller and she was sharing certain details in the first 100 pages of this novel that I wondered "why?" and then, I just gave myself over to this story, and wove my hearts with these characters, and it all came together in the end. Trust her. It's a beautiful journey. Not unlike some Rosamunde Pilcher novels I have read, and if you know me or have read any of my reviews, you know that is HIGH praise indeed. Pilcher is queen in my book. At the heart of this story, are 4 generations of Cabrelli women and their stories span from WWII France to the rolling hills of rural Scotland to the modern day oceanic shores of Viareggio, Italy. What unfolds is captivating, heartfelt, & poignant. It is the mingling of the present with the past, reconciling stories long told across generations of a family, and the secrets we hide. I learned some new aspects of WWII, a subject I have read widely about, loved learning even more about wartime nursing, and, of all things, about gem mining in India and gem cutting artisans in Italy. I was entertained & delighted indeed as I turned each page. While it did take me a bit to get into, after the initial set up, it swallowed me up and I gulped down all 430+ pages of it in a little less than 4 days like a smooth, Italian espresso & gelato! Loved it & highly recommend. Make sure this one is on your Summer Reading List.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I loved the connection between daughters and their mothers that spanned four generations in this book. This book also offered a different WWII experience than many of the historical fictions I've read. I loved the connection between daughters and their mothers that spanned four generations in this book. This book also offered a different WWII experience than many of the historical fictions I've read.

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