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Survive the Dome

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Jamal Lawson just wanted to be a part of something. As an aspiring journalist, he packs up his camera and heads to Baltimore to document a rally protesting police brutality after another Black man is murdered. But before it even really begins, the city implements a new safety protocol...the Dome. The Dome surrounds the city, forcing those within to subscribe to a total mili Jamal Lawson just wanted to be a part of something. As an aspiring journalist, he packs up his camera and heads to Baltimore to document a rally protesting police brutality after another Black man is murdered. But before it even really begins, the city implements a new safety protocol...the Dome. The Dome surrounds the city, forcing those within to subscribe to a total militarized shutdown. No one can get in, and no one can get out. Alone in a strange place, Jamal doesn't know where to turn...until he meets hacker Marco, who knows more than he lets on, and Catherine, an AWOL basic-training-graduate, whose parents helped build the initial plans for the Dome. As unrest inside of Baltimore grows throughout the days-long lockdown, Marco, Catherine, and Jamal take the fight directly to the chief of police. But the city is corrupt from the inside out, and it's going to take everything they have to survive.


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Jamal Lawson just wanted to be a part of something. As an aspiring journalist, he packs up his camera and heads to Baltimore to document a rally protesting police brutality after another Black man is murdered. But before it even really begins, the city implements a new safety protocol...the Dome. The Dome surrounds the city, forcing those within to subscribe to a total mili Jamal Lawson just wanted to be a part of something. As an aspiring journalist, he packs up his camera and heads to Baltimore to document a rally protesting police brutality after another Black man is murdered. But before it even really begins, the city implements a new safety protocol...the Dome. The Dome surrounds the city, forcing those within to subscribe to a total militarized shutdown. No one can get in, and no one can get out. Alone in a strange place, Jamal doesn't know where to turn...until he meets hacker Marco, who knows more than he lets on, and Catherine, an AWOL basic-training-graduate, whose parents helped build the initial plans for the Dome. As unrest inside of Baltimore grows throughout the days-long lockdown, Marco, Catherine, and Jamal take the fight directly to the chief of police. But the city is corrupt from the inside out, and it's going to take everything they have to survive.

30 review for Survive the Dome

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kosoko Jackson

    IDK, i think its pretty rad.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vee_Bookish

    The bleakest, most realistic dystopian novel I have read, this story is one that I could see becoming reality within a few years, and balances the more futuristic elements with events that we already recognise - Black Lives Matter protests, violent cops and corrupt Governments. I loved that this book had Queer rep! There's a moment when Jamal reflects on his and Marco's fast connection, and acknowledges that they might have connected faster due to the situation, which felt accurate. There's no in The bleakest, most realistic dystopian novel I have read, this story is one that I could see becoming reality within a few years, and balances the more futuristic elements with events that we already recognise - Black Lives Matter protests, violent cops and corrupt Governments. I loved that this book had Queer rep! There's a moment when Jamal reflects on his and Marco's fast connection, and acknowledges that they might have connected faster due to the situation, which felt accurate. There's no insta-love or the like in this story, just two people clinging on to each other during the sheer chaos of the situation. We never really got a good grip of who the hackers Nemesis were, as they were introduced early on then quickly disappeared before reappearing later. I did feel like I was missing a little something off of the ending, and it did leave room for a potential sequel - I don't yet know if this is a standalone or not.

  3. 5 out of 5

    kate

    Fast paced, action packed, powerful and brilliantly self aware. The intensity of this book started from page one and continued to build until the last. I really enjoyed Kosoko Jackson’s easy to read and punchy writing style and whilst I do wish the plot and chat ages had been a little more developed (I think stretching it out over a longer period of time would have helped?) overall this was a thrilling contemporary that just so happened to have a few terrifying dystopian elements. Kosoko bought Fast paced, action packed, powerful and brilliantly self aware. The intensity of this book started from page one and continued to build until the last. I really enjoyed Kosoko Jackson’s easy to read and punchy writing style and whilst I do wish the plot and chat ages had been a little more developed (I think stretching it out over a longer period of time would have helped?) overall this was a thrilling contemporary that just so happened to have a few terrifying dystopian elements. Kosoko bought very real life events, truths and atrocities into this story in an uncomfortable, honest, terrifying but ultimately brilliant and engaging. I’m intrigued to see if this continues as a series as the ending definitely left me craving more from the characters and their future. Overall, I was throughly hooked by this book and wouldn’t hesitate to recommend it. TW: racism, racist slur, police brutality

  4. 5 out of 5

    Celia

    Reasons to read: great plot, character-driven story-line, queer reps Personal rating: this pro-BLM will resonate with many people and resonating is what I love best! Jamal, a budding journalist, attends a BLM protest after the police killing of a Black man, hoping his photos will boost his chances of getting into a college of his choice. Not long after arriving does something incredible happen: a giant dome drops on the city, trapping those in and keeping others out save for law enforcement. After Reasons to read: great plot, character-driven story-line, queer reps Personal rating: this pro-BLM will resonate with many people and resonating is what I love best! Jamal, a budding journalist, attends a BLM protest after the police killing of a Black man, hoping his photos will boost his chances of getting into a college of his choice. Not long after arriving does something incredible happen: a giant dome drops on the city, trapping those in and keeping others out save for law enforcement. After an altercation with an officer, Jamal meets Marco and together they navigate the city, keeping out of sight and figuring out a way to hack the dome. What I liked: The fast-paced action and tension really drives this novel. Because tech is affected, nobody is able to call for help, so you get the sense that the world beneath the dome is much smaller. And more dangerous. I have never been to a BLM protest or any protest at all, but I trust that Kosoko knows what he's talking about. I like that Jamal knows what to pack and where to park. I also love that medical stations were set up along with provisions like water etc and it shows you that a lot of protests are very organized and planned well. The book is rooted in some harsh truths. The compelling idea that someone with power would trap an entire city over a protest isn't too far-fetched and I think it paints an accurate picture of what the "other side" feels about those advocating for the lives of others, like BLM, and gives us a chance to see through someone else's eyes. What I didn't like: Jamal was not a very driven character and a lot of the situations he was thrown into really didn't do his character justice. He was saved multiple times and seemed to be a bystander to everything happening rather than someone deeply involved. I understand it takes time for a normal human being to adapt to such a situation, but I expected a bit more agency from him. At times, I thought he was more interested in getting with Marco and admiring his lean form rather than getting out of the city. Overall, this is a book about fighting for change, and the searing courage it takes to intact such change. It gives me hope that humans will fight back against adversity, even on this grand of a scale. Love one another. Protect one another. Be brave.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Janae (The Modish Geek)

    I'm not going to make this too long because I don't like bashing things I don't like. I didn't enjoy this. I appreciated what Jackson was trying to do, but if this wasn't an eARC, I would've DNF'd it. Keep that in mind. Five things that kept me from enjoying this book: 1. The main character. Jamal is insufferable, cocky, inconsistent, and self-centered. Being inside of his head was the worst. He waffled so much in his motivations, concerns, actions, and priorities. 2. The dialogue. It was cheesy an I'm not going to make this too long because I don't like bashing things I don't like. I didn't enjoy this. I appreciated what Jackson was trying to do, but if this wasn't an eARC, I would've DNF'd it. Keep that in mind. Five things that kept me from enjoying this book: 1. The main character. Jamal is insufferable, cocky, inconsistent, and self-centered. Being inside of his head was the worst. He waffled so much in his motivations, concerns, actions, and priorities. 2. The dialogue. It was cheesy and heavy-handed. Who's gaze is this for?! It's also repetitive. The amount of times Jamal reminded us that he was a journalist, or described Marco's physicality, or felt like 30 minutes was 2 hours, or bit his tongue and tasted blood was TOO MURCH. 3. Characterization. There was limited personality and depth for anyone. The villians were cartoonish, the side characters had one lane, and all the relationships felt forced. 4. The Dome. This one is on me, but I was expecting more interaction with the Dome and the tech/science behind it. It was basically background noise. 5. The end. Came out of left and felt silly and over-the-top. And I'm sorry, but I know NO Black mother who would've reacted the way Jamal's did. I hope I'm in the minority on this. Shout out to SOURCEBOOKS Fire for the eARC.

  6. 5 out of 5

    charlotte,

    On my blog. Rep: Black gay mc, Black gay li, Latina side character CWs: police brutality, racism, racial slurs, gun violence Galley provided by publisher Survive the Dome is a perfectly decent read, fast-paced, action-packed, with the right balance of realism and idealism to carry off the plot and ending. It was a book I liked, but it wasn’t a book that could beat Jackson’s debut for me. This is not necessarily a negative thing—I really enjoyed Yesterday Is History, I think in part, because it wa On my blog. Rep: Black gay mc, Black gay li, Latina side character CWs: police brutality, racism, racial slurs, gun violence Galley provided by publisher Survive the Dome is a perfectly decent read, fast-paced, action-packed, with the right balance of realism and idealism to carry off the plot and ending. It was a book I liked, but it wasn’t a book that could beat Jackson’s debut for me. This is not necessarily a negative thing—I really enjoyed Yesterday Is History, I think in part, because it was a new author and I went in with no expectations. This time, I had expectations. Survive the Dome met them, but it didn’t exceed them. This is not a subtle story, and of course it doesn’t have to be, but it did lend the story to being somewhat straightforward and predictable. On some level, I was expecting this—it’s pretty clear from the blurb, I think, how it’ll go. So it’s a good thing it’s fast-paced. It’s a book that leans into the thriller aspect of it, which is probably how it should go. Because, in all honesty, this is not a book with huge amounts of depth and nuance. Again, the latter is something it doesn’t have to have, but I can’t help but think a bit of it might have helped it along. I think there were attempts at nuance, for some of the characters, but it was almost half-hearted. The villains felt almost cartoonish and, given the extent of their plan, how am I really supposed to believe three teens are able to stop it apart from entirely suspending my disbelief? Despite all of this, though, what I will say is that the main characters are all great. You’ll be rooting for them from the start and, by the end, you’ll want more time with them even after the book is over. That is, to me, the best type of character. Alright, so the romance was a bit instalove-y, but that’s something I can forgive when the characters are this good. That’s what I’ve enjoyed most about Jackson’s books. So when I say I liked this book, I mean really that its ceiling for me was 3-stars. I liked it. I liked the characters and the pacing, and I overall enjoyed the hours I spent reading it. But not much more.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Stilted dialogue, a whole lot of plot holes, and if you’re going to use a real city as your setting I feel like you should bother to get the geography, the street names, building types, or the character at least a little bit right.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trans-cending-literature

    I really enjoyed the concept of this book but the actual book didnt play out for me sadly.. The characters felt very flat and unrealistic, and the conclusion felt too unbelievable for me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Mandina

    I really enjoyed the last book I read by this author, Yesterday is History, and was very excited when the publisher sent me a copy of this one to review as well. And this book really hit it out of the ball park! It was a science fiction story set in a pretty close today time period. The author pulled in all of the police brutality and other types of unrest that people have been feeling more and more lately, as well as in the beginning of the book he included the names of Black people killed by po I really enjoyed the last book I read by this author, Yesterday is History, and was very excited when the publisher sent me a copy of this one to review as well. And this book really hit it out of the ball park! It was a science fiction story set in a pretty close today time period. The author pulled in all of the police brutality and other types of unrest that people have been feeling more and more lately, as well as in the beginning of the book he included the names of Black people killed by police officers in one town alone, I believe that is what his notes say. There’s so much to unpack with this one. It’s not only the corrupt police, but also the politicians that are above them, handing down the decisions that make things even worse. The story also takes a look at how police officers may get convicted, but the punishment they receive oftentimes is like a slap on the wrist. But it’s more than just that. The character reflects on the younger officer that seems to not quite buy in yet to all the things the more seasoned officers just take for granted. And he makes a point about how often the brand new officers don’t have any experience with using a gun, or shooting people, etc. Really he brings up a lot of good points that I never really thought about. The science of the dome was interesting, what few details we got were enough to keep the story moving without bogging down too much for anyone who might not want all of that. Things happened, like the prison basement, or should I say basement prison, that reflected past moments in history. And in the end, while there was an ending, I like how the author made it more of an open one. Not all loose ends tied up. That’s realistic in my opinion. Not only that, but while I don’t think this is going to be a series, or have a sequel, I could totally see one based on where the characters were at the end. Another book from this author that I really enjoyed and will be putting on the shelves of the library for my students to read. Review first posted on Lisa Loves Literature.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Starr ❇✌❇

    I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: racism & police violence, gun violence, strangulation 3.5 Jamal's plan was to attend a peaceful protest, write an article. He wasn't expecting The Dome. Trapped with no one outside aware of what's happening to them, and the the police completely in charge, it's clear this isn't the peaceful holding cell it's been sold as. It's a cage, and it may become a slaughter house. I do appreciate when speculative fiction leans into that speculative angle, touching our I received an ARC from Edelweiss TW: racism & police violence, gun violence, strangulation 3.5 Jamal's plan was to attend a peaceful protest, write an article. He wasn't expecting The Dome. Trapped with no one outside aware of what's happening to them, and the the police completely in charge, it's clear this isn't the peaceful holding cell it's been sold as. It's a cage, and it may become a slaughter house. I do appreciate when speculative fiction leans into that speculative angle, touching our realities enough that what is futuristic almost doesn't seem to be. So I applaud Jackson for this horrific idea that truly sounds possible. This is also, of course, a very politically relevant book. I can see this sparking interest in real social justice and I can also see this resonating with those who already are aware and invested. I also my be wrong, but this book seems to set the stage for a potential series of political/activist adventures, and I definitely see how there could be a market for that. This book and potential books like it work well in our current climate. For me, however, I just didn't get much out of this book. First of all, because Jamal seemed so unrealistic to me. He is, in some ways, aware of what it is to be Black in America- as he should be- and apparently interested in social justice. And he still can't grasp basic ideas and lies to his mom about packing essentials just to bring candy to a protest? He doesn't straddle the line of newly educated or actually, organically a politically aware Black boy well. This book was also by and large too quick and too over the top for me. While the concept is one that feels relevant and timely, the way it's actually written is too cheesy to strike a real chord. This is also how I feel about the stakes and about the characters, and any growth there may have been in either of those characters gets made impossible by the frantic pacing. I especially dislike the sudden romance for this reason- I don't know either one of them, so not only does the romance feel weird and unrealistic, but I have zero reason to care about. I think some people will enjoy this book, and it's the right kind of book politically. However, the actual execution was lacking.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    "Darkness and pain and hate and anger come slowly, creeping like ivy, and they strangle you, and before long, you're a victim of it like everybody else." ------------------------ Jamal is a high schooler hoping for a journalism scholarship who decides to attend a protest after a cop gets away with killing another black man. Jamal is a little naive and when things get violent at the protest, he hitches himself to a handsome stranger, Marco. Marco tries to help Jamal but gets him tangled in the web "Darkness and pain and hate and anger come slowly, creeping like ivy, and they strangle you, and before long, you're a victim of it like everybody else." ------------------------ Jamal is a high schooler hoping for a journalism scholarship who decides to attend a protest after a cop gets away with killing another black man. Jamal is a little naive and when things get violent at the protest, he hitches himself to a handsome stranger, Marco. Marco tries to help Jamal but gets him tangled in the web of a counter culture group. When they discover Baltimore has been isolated from the rest of the world by a dome until the violence is under control, Jamal is forced to act. He and Marco and another stranger come up with a plan to challenge the chief of police and end martial law to release the dome. Oof, this one is hard to rate. I liked the concept, although it is appropriated from other dystopian stories (Under the Dome and Hunger Games to name two biggies). The main character is immediately likeable and relatable. As the story goes on though, he becomes quite muddled and it's harder to see his character through the influence of others. He is a good kid wanting to do the right thing while "not betraying his race." I was really surprised by his blind belief and trust in others simply because they had similar skin color, to me this felt very uncomfortable, especially after it bit him in the butt a few times. There is a ton of action, so if you like a face paced read with lots of violence and an MC that is constantly getting out of scrapes in convenient ways, you will enjoy this one. The science and technology proposed are pretty cool and I liked the hacker aspect of the story. But, I didn't understand the need to perpetrate the idea that all cops and government officials are "bad" people who never do "good" things and all people of color are "good" even if they choose to do "bad" things. Marco and Jamal have this good people doing bad things conversation many times and it bordered on dangerous to me. The cops in this are atrocious, I wanted more depth on both sides of the colored fence, the reality is much more nuanced. There is not one ally or positive adult role model in this whole thing (except Jamal’s mother who is in it for only a few pages).  The synopsis does not make it clear how anti-cop the novel is going to be or I may have passed on it altogether. I've read several YA black voices novels that just tackled the subject better and more realistically. That said, it is a dystopian and the threats were meant to loom large, I get that. I think this one could have been a phenomenal commentary on race and policing with fantastical fantasy elements. Instead, I think it was a little messy and heavy handed and it sucked the entertainment out. It's possible to enthrall and teach at the same time without overdoing it, there are so many great examples of that in dystopian novels. I finished it because I was interested in how it would wrap up but I personally wouldn’t recommend this book. Too much hate without hope for my taste. Thanks to Netgalley for advanced access to this novel. All opinions above are my own.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Faith Noelle

    Survive the Dome is a fast-paced, action-packed, sci-fi exploration of police brutality and racism. It stars a queer Black protagonist, Jamal, through whom readers get to explore the difficult questions that come up when we are faced with trying to stay safe while also standing up for what's right. I found the concept of the story really interesting and chilling, and it's almost scary that many will find things in this book all too relatable. I also really liked the way the book indirectly posed Survive the Dome is a fast-paced, action-packed, sci-fi exploration of police brutality and racism. It stars a queer Black protagonist, Jamal, through whom readers get to explore the difficult questions that come up when we are faced with trying to stay safe while also standing up for what's right. I found the concept of the story really interesting and chilling, and it's almost scary that many will find things in this book all too relatable. I also really liked the way the book indirectly posed a lot of thought-provoking questions. Jamal is in a situation no one would ever expect themselves to be in, and things move so quickly that he has to make decisions without much time, and it gives a good look at the different kinds of decisions people make and why. There were times I felt he had a little too much disregard for his own safety or made decisions I found too rash, but then again, he's a teenager in a high-pressure situation. I found this book a really quick read. There were some times where the pacing felt a little too rushed to me, but overall there's a lot of good fast-paced action that keeps it exciting. For me the biggest downside is that I didn't get to connect with the characters as much as I wanted to. We get to know Jamal as the protagonist pretty well, but Marco is one of the major characters and I felt like he remained a little too much of a mystery by the end of the story. A lot of side characters come and go without much intrigue, and I just wish there was a little more. That being said, the book's ending sets itself up well for a sequel, so I'm interested to see where this could go. Notable content warnings: this book does depict heavy violence, police brutality, swearing, and racial slurs. There's definitely heavy material, but it's also nicely balanced with a bit of romance and some fun snarky humor. Also, there's a scene where Jamal tries beer for the first time and hates it, and I related so hard. Let's normalize teens who hate the taste of alcohol and just aren't interested in it! Overall a good read for anyone looking for modern science fiction touching on timely topics.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karen Barber

    Survive the Dome is a fast-paced story, forcing us to confront our ideas about direct action and the role of the police. Our main character is aspiring journalist, Jamal, who is determined to head to Baltimore to chronicle the protests taking place over the killing of a black man by a police officer. Drawing heavily on events of the last year (and, I’m fairly sure, the continuing reality for many) the upset and hurt caused by such events is palpable. As a young black man Jamal is all too aware of Survive the Dome is a fast-paced story, forcing us to confront our ideas about direct action and the role of the police. Our main character is aspiring journalist, Jamal, who is determined to head to Baltimore to chronicle the protests taking place over the killing of a black man by a police officer. Drawing heavily on events of the last year (and, I’m fairly sure, the continuing reality for many) the upset and hurt caused by such events is palpable. As a young black man Jamal is all too aware of the risks he’s taking in attending the protest, but he is determined to stand up to the things he sees as wrong. Unfortunately, the protest coincides with a truly terrifying advancement in public order. The Governor has initiated a device called The Dome which effectively isolates any community it is placed over, allowing those in control to do as they please in order to keep the peace. While this might seem a device with possibilities, when it is being used to perpetuate racist ideologies we can see just how scary it is. So it falls to Jamal and the teens he encounters during the course of his experience to try and take down the Dome. From start to finish this blends contemporary issues with disturbing scientific ideas. Those Jamal is up against are horribly plausible in some ways, though there’s a fair number of unpleasant characters along the way. Everything seems to fall into place remarkably easily when you review the book in its entirety, but the ending hints that Jackson might not yet be finished with these characters. My only real bugbear was the romance element which bubbled along throughout but which didn’t really (for me) offer much to the story. I’m grateful to NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read this before publication in exchange for my honest thoughts.

  14. 4 out of 5

    em!

    I was looking forward to picking this up, and it sort of let me down. I think the plot itself is very strong! It is incredibly impactful and scary because this dystopian society is not too far from the society we live in today. The overarching theme of police brutality against Black people is one that is reflected in our country’s very bones. What I didn’t like about this book wasn’t due to the plot itself, but more so with the writing and character development. I found the writing style to not b I was looking forward to picking this up, and it sort of let me down. I think the plot itself is very strong! It is incredibly impactful and scary because this dystopian society is not too far from the society we live in today. The overarching theme of police brutality against Black people is one that is reflected in our country’s very bones. What I didn’t like about this book wasn’t due to the plot itself, but more so with the writing and character development. I found the writing style to not be my cup of tea. It just felt almost younger than ya at times. Also, I wish we got to see Jamal & Marco’s relationship develop more than it did. That’s why I can’t give this book more than 3 stars, sadly.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Heather Horror Hellion

    This book gave me horrible anxiety. It is definitely one of those books you read and think these things could happen. The characters in the book were written so well that I got out of breath running from the cops with them. Everytime there was an interaction with law enforcement I knew one of my favorite characters was going to die. Did that happen? I'm not going to tell you because that would be a spoiler. I definitely have had some of the same thoughts as the character like maybe I shouldn't we This book gave me horrible anxiety. It is definitely one of those books you read and think these things could happen. The characters in the book were written so well that I got out of breath running from the cops with them. Everytime there was an interaction with law enforcement I knew one of my favorite characters was going to die. Did that happen? I'm not going to tell you because that would be a spoiler. I definitely have had some of the same thoughts as the character like maybe I shouldn't wear my hoodie at night, don't look suspicious, if an officer talks to you keep your answers short. This book is fast paced and I really suggest you pick it up if you want to raise your anxiety.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    4.5* **Content Warning, via author: "This book contains death, police violence, and slur words toward Black and brown minorities." I knew this book would be both incredibly important and extremely heartbreaking from the first page. Because on said first page (and several subsequent pages) the author lists Black people whose lives were taken by the police. I really think it is important to read each name, and pause to remember them. And then keep them in mind when you read this story, yes, but also 4.5* **Content Warning, via author: "This book contains death, police violence, and slur words toward Black and brown minorities." I knew this book would be both incredibly important and extremely heartbreaking from the first page. Because on said first page (and several subsequent pages) the author lists Black people whose lives were taken by the police. I really think it is important to read each name, and pause to remember them. And then keep them in mind when you read this story, yes, but also after you finish the story and go out in the world. The story begins Jamal, an aspiring journalist, wanting to attend a Black Lives Matter rally. Not just for the journalistic side, but because he wants to stand up for what is right. But he never expects to end up trapped inside a dome, encasing the attendees of the rally (plus other people who just happen to be living or working or existing in an area the government deemed "unsavory") inside a military state, basically. So, since he is a journalist in search of answers, and also not particularly wanting to be trapped, he and his new friend Marco set out to find out what is going on. Things get even dicier as secrets are found out, and people in power become more desperate. That's all I'll say about the plot of the book, but suffice it to say it's very exciting and action packed. But there are also a lot of wonderful reflective moments among the characters, where we get to learn more about who they are, and also, their reactions to what is happening in their city, and to them on both a personal and group level. Obviously there is a lot of incredible societal commentary woven into the story, which is done really well through thoughts and conversations between Jamal and his new friends. I did maybe want a bit more from the ending, but overall, this was a really solid book. Bottom Line: Exciting and very readable, this book provides both entertainment and really important analysis on current events. You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight

  17. 5 out of 5

    goldenbookhunter

    Love this story!!! I have soooo much to say. Probably too much. I haven’t stopped thinking about this story since I read it. So this story is described as The Hate U Give meets Internment. 100% accurate!!! I’ve read both, and while reading Survive the Dome, T.H.U.G. and internment kept coming to mind. The blend of those two stories is exactly what this book is. This story is so timely. Kosoko even wrote in the acknowledgments that the idea came to him three days after George Floyd was killed. Th Love this story!!! I have soooo much to say. Probably too much. I haven’t stopped thinking about this story since I read it. So this story is described as The Hate U Give meets Internment. 100% accurate!!! I’ve read both, and while reading Survive the Dome, T.H.U.G. and internment kept coming to mind. The blend of those two stories is exactly what this book is. This story is so timely. Kosoko even wrote in the acknowledgments that the idea came to him three days after George Floyd was killed. This is not just another story about a Black person getting killed and people coming to protest. The plot starts there, but the story is really about the aftermath and the lengths governments will go to stop people from peacefully going against the system. Jamal, an aspiring journalist goes to document a rally where people are protesting police brutality, but soon after arriving…chaos! Aka the dome comes into play. The city turns on a dome which doesn’t allow anyone in or out AND no messages/broadcasts in or out. Y’all basically the ruling authorities in Baltimore have gone rogue and initiated martial law as well. Why you may ask. To shut down the voices of protesters, find those who choose to defy the government’s demand to shut up about police brutality, and of course hide how they’re treating people who have the audacity to exercise their right to protest. How are they treating those people you may ask. They’re beating, killing, and arresting them. So Jamal went to this protest by himself, chaos happens, then he meets a hacker named Marco and Catherine later on who is an AWOL basic-training graduate. Together they work together to shut down the dome. One of the things I love about this story is watching Jamal’s transformation. He goes from this timid character who needs to be helped and protected to this confident young man who risks everything to protect others. Also, I love that in a story where 2 of the main characters are boys and one is a girl, it’s the girl who is the most physically strong. This story was such an emotional experience. The plot easily pulled me in. I was rooting for Jamal. I was rooting for Baltimore. I was rooting for justice. I’m saddened, but not surprised by the lengths people in the story went to in order to silence protesters. This story in some ways reflects what Black people are currently experiencing, but also Jackson takes it to an extreme that seems like it could be a reality one day. 100% recommend this book. The end made it seem like there will be a second book. I really hope so. Thank you to NetGalley and sourcebooks fire for the eARC!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Reading Our Shelves

    Full review at: https://readingourshelves.wordpress.c... Our main character is Jamal, a gay black teen in Annapolis. He drives to Baltimore, where there are some BLM protests going on. The governor of Maryland has been wanting to test the new Dome invention, and the protests offer the perfect opportunity. Now, Jamal is trapped inside. Not only can the citizens not get in or out, but neither can any electronic information – cell calls and texts, emails, etc. In addition to the Dome, there is one ot Full review at: https://readingourshelves.wordpress.c... Our main character is Jamal, a gay black teen in Annapolis. He drives to Baltimore, where there are some BLM protests going on. The governor of Maryland has been wanting to test the new Dome invention, and the protests offer the perfect opportunity. Now, Jamal is trapped inside. Not only can the citizens not get in or out, but neither can any electronic information – cell calls and texts, emails, etc. In addition to the Dome, there is one other new technology that the government/police unveil during their Dome experiment: the police have powerful suits of armor that are all linked. The officers wearing the suits are basically super-soldiers. The only caveat is that the suits are pretty bulky, which makes them a little sluggish. Jamal falls in with Marco, a wannabe hacker with contacts in Nemesis (analogous to the real world’s Anonymous). Marco is a pretty good hacker himself, with high ideals of changing the world, but he hasn’t been accepted into Nemesis because of his criminal record. They also team up with Catherine, who is just a little older than them. She just got out of basic training, so her military background is useful. At first, she is cagey about herself – how does anyone know who they can trust in this situation? – but eventually we learn that Catherine is fighting to find her parents, who have been taken by the government. The action here is non-stop, which makes this book move fast. Each chapter picks up right where the last stops, with virtually no down time. The entire story takes place over just a couple days. I thoroughly enjoyed the book, but I will say that Jamal seems too idealistic at times. He often puts himself in harm’s way to save anyone he comes across, including random people he sees on the streets. He’s precious, but almost too precocious to be a survivor in this harsh environment. The views on police and government in the story are BLEAK. I’m not even saying they’re out of place, mind you, but they obviously come from a very frustrated place. We see leaders as the villains in most dystopian stories, though – think “The Hunger Games” – so it is really only striking in that these leaders are supposed to represent the ones we have in our present times. This was a fast-paced read that has a lot of social commentary about the times we live in. I was able to read an advanced copy through NetGalley.

  19. 4 out of 5

    kaz auditore

    This is a pro-BLM book, the time is placed in a BLM protest after the police killing a Black man, we’re following Jamal, a journalist student and wanted to go take photos to boost his chances getting a college he wish for. As he arrives at the protest, a dome drops on the city, trapping people from going in and out, and cutting networks too which makes it a lot more dangerous quickly thinking law enforcement was present to stop the protest. Jamal will meet Marco during an altercation with a cop This is a pro-BLM book, the time is placed in a BLM protest after the police killing a Black man, we’re following Jamal, a journalist student and wanted to go take photos to boost his chances getting a college he wish for. As he arrives at the protest, a dome drops on the city, trapping people from going in and out, and cutting networks too which makes it a lot more dangerous quickly thinking law enforcement was present to stop the protest. Jamal will meet Marco during an altercation with a cop and will rescue him, he will find he’s a hacktivist and they will try to find a way to hack the dome. This was fast-paced, was telling a lot of harsh truth, it shows the author knows what he’s saying with the details. It was focused on the message and succeeded in making it powerful, it was an interesting read about Black Lives Matter mixed science-fiction. Although the dome isn’t a new concept and even “old”, I’ve felt deja-vu at some parts and the characters are not bad, they're just the typical character now, they’re likeable and nice to read about though. My little problem was how sometimes Jamal seemed more interested in admiring Marco’s curves than getting out of the dome, i put that under the fact that they’re young and it’s more likely human to have a little escape from that reality for a few seconds and I can’t lie I like the casual rep even in books like this. I will definitely read the next book if it comes, the setting is all there and I’ll be interested to read more from this author.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Celeste

    so here's the thing. while i do think this book has good things to say about police brutality and is engaging and easy to read like a popcorn action movie, i didn't really enjoy it because i could not get past how unrealistic all the characters were. mostly their dialogue. like...so much of the dialogue was not something a real person would ever say. and i also don't really understand a lot of their actions? they'd meet and two seconds later be inseparable. i understand it was a high stress scen so here's the thing. while i do think this book has good things to say about police brutality and is engaging and easy to read like a popcorn action movie, i didn't really enjoy it because i could not get past how unrealistic all the characters were. mostly their dialogue. like...so much of the dialogue was not something a real person would ever say. and i also don't really understand a lot of their actions? they'd meet and two seconds later be inseparable. i understand it was a high stress scenario but still...they never doubted each other like Jamal met Marco and 2 minutes later is willing to follow him wherever. speaking of Jamal and Marco i felt like their romance had no chemistry and id have rathered the book just focused on the story rather than shoehorning in a romance for the sake of oh it's a ya it has to have romance. also at the end with jamal's mom...i don't think any mother ever would have that reaction without him completely explaining his choices to her. also the last chapter was super cheesy. i did appreciate that it was set in my mediocre home state of maryland though!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    The perfect book to deal with frustrations over racial tension and COVID seclusion anxiety. Jamal is a teen journalist who knows how to speak with his pen and camera but he finds himself in over his head once he decides to attend a demonstration in Baltimore that gets violent. He along with thousands gets literally trapped under an impenetrable dome containing the rioters and inner city neighborhoods cutting him off from his mom and the life he knew. He is saved by Marco, a young latino hacker w The perfect book to deal with frustrations over racial tension and COVID seclusion anxiety. Jamal is a teen journalist who knows how to speak with his pen and camera but he finds himself in over his head once he decides to attend a demonstration in Baltimore that gets violent. He along with thousands gets literally trapped under an impenetrable dome containing the rioters and inner city neighborhoods cutting him off from his mom and the life he knew. He is saved by Marco, a young latino hacker who is working underground with a secret protest organization and Catherine, ex-military who is there trying to free her imprisoned parents. Political corruption, violence, chase scenes, light romance and technology make it a high octane mash-up of Mr. Robot, Robocop and Stephen King's UNDER THE DOME. This is the first in what looks to be a series of an unusual Three Musketeers team of young activists taking on all of society's evils. Young adult but there would be adult interest as well. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mireya

    [Note: I received an e-Arc from netgalley and the publisher in exchange of an honest review] Did I read this book in less than 48 hours? Yes I did; no regrets😅🤣 Futuristic technology mixes with present struggles in this full-of-action book that I couldn't put down even if I had had wanted to, but I didn't, so I kept reading until I was done with it and was hoping to get something more, because I wanted to know more about the characters, but it is what it is and I enjoyed it a lot. It consumed me😅 S [Note: I received an e-Arc from netgalley and the publisher in exchange of an honest review] Did I read this book in less than 48 hours? Yes I did; no regrets😅🤣 Futuristic technology mixes with present struggles in this full-of-action book that I couldn't put down even if I had had wanted to, but I didn't, so I kept reading until I was done with it and was hoping to get something more, because I wanted to know more about the characters, but it is what it is and I enjoyed it a lot. It consumed me😅 So, the technology of the Dome and all the thinking behind it was quite interesting and explained in a way that wasn't hard to understand. And, even if it's supposed to be futuristic and it's marked as sci-fi, is something that could actually happen in our time😬 Regarding the characters, I loved all of them, but I have to say that Jamal was my favorite, not only because he was the protagonist, but because he was the one I related to the most: all the thinking, and 'what ifs' and everything make him so relatable🙌. I also loved how direct Marco was with Jamal. And their interactions with Catherine. Found Family at it's finest👌 I want to finish the review saying that I think Survive the Dome is a pretty good read, and an important one, for everybody. Because, no matter how futuristic/sci-fi the Dome may be, the struggles that Black people, and POC people in general, have to face in America are very real and present and we can't turn our face to the other side and not see it. Even if this book is a work of fiction, we can learn something from it. Finally, thank you to netgalley and the publisher for letting me read an e-ARC. It was a fantastic read!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    Jamal is a high school student and budding journalist hoping to receive a college scholarship, and he yearns to snag the photos to secure it. He travels to Baltimore for what’s supposed to be a peaceful protest of police brutality after a Black man is murdered. He’s not there long before chaos erupts and the Dome descends over the city, trapping him inside. The action begins almost immediately when Jamal scrambles to survive and has no choice but to place his trust in strangers. Luckily he finds Jamal is a high school student and budding journalist hoping to receive a college scholarship, and he yearns to snag the photos to secure it. He travels to Baltimore for what’s supposed to be a peaceful protest of police brutality after a Black man is murdered. He’s not there long before chaos erupts and the Dome descends over the city, trapping him inside. The action begins almost immediately when Jamal scrambles to survive and has no choice but to place his trust in strangers. Luckily he finds a couple of valuable allies he can count on who lead him to safety – temporarily at least. After that, be prepared for some cringe-worthy violent scenes and the occasional racial slur. I really liked the concept of the Dome, and pacing moves right along in this quick read. What I missed was becoming better acquainted with the characters. Other than Jamal, I didn’t feel like I knew them very well. Although Marco plays a prominent role, he remains a mystery for the most part, which might be why I didn’t feel the romantic connection between him and Jamal. Catherine is given less page time, but her backstory is delved into a little more, and I understood her motivations. Survive The Dome can be a tough read at times since real-life events are interlaced with this dystopian novel, but it’s a powerful story and politically relevant. The ending makes me think a sequel is in store, and it’s something I’d be interested in reading. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kimberley Pecino

    Despite quite a bit of action happening, I found the pacing quite slow at times. It also seemed as if Jamal was more interested in ogling Marco than actually coming up with a solution for how to get out of the mess they found themselves in. I wanted to know more about the characters - their motivations, their back stories, their relationships. I'm glad there will be a sequel, and I hope this is further explored! Some events felt completely unbelievable, and almost ridiculous- then again, I suppo Despite quite a bit of action happening, I found the pacing quite slow at times. It also seemed as if Jamal was more interested in ogling Marco than actually coming up with a solution for how to get out of the mess they found themselves in. I wanted to know more about the characters - their motivations, their back stories, their relationships. I'm glad there will be a sequel, and I hope this is further explored! Some events felt completely unbelievable, and almost ridiculous- then again, I suppose we'd have to suspend our disbelief for the whole premise of the book, anyway? All in all, an enjoyable read, with a great start up and premise for a sequel. Special thanks to Netgalley and Sourcebooks Fire for providing me with this digital advanced reader copy in exchange for an honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Alma

    Despite his mother’s disapproval, Jamal felt a moral obligation to attend the BLM protest in Baltimore after the recent police killing of another Black man. As a budding photojournalist, he knows his photos from the event will boost his college application. Upon arrival Jamal is immediately accosted by a cop but is rescued by Marco, a handsome stranger. Read more on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.... Despite his mother’s disapproval, Jamal felt a moral obligation to attend the BLM protest in Baltimore after the recent police killing of another Black man. As a budding photojournalist, he knows his photos from the event will boost his college application. Upon arrival Jamal is immediately accosted by a cop but is rescued by Marco, a handsome stranger. Read more on my blog: https://shouldireaditornot.wordpress....

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    DNF. Got half way through and started skimming and realized I had "fast-forwarded" nearly to the end and still felt like nothing much had happened. The writing is stiff and the storyline is super predictable and while I believe teenagers often have "superpowers" IRL that adults refuse to see, these teens are just kind of ridiculously grown. The Dome is more believable than some of the decisions the characters make. DNF. Got half way through and started skimming and realized I had "fast-forwarded" nearly to the end and still felt like nothing much had happened. The writing is stiff and the storyline is super predictable and while I believe teenagers often have "superpowers" IRL that adults refuse to see, these teens are just kind of ridiculously grown. The Dome is more believable than some of the decisions the characters make.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Rating: 3.5/5 stars TW: Police brutality, death, slurs towards black and brown minorities, racism Jamal is a journalist from his local high school set on using photos from a Black Lives Matter protest to help push his application for colleges. However, the last thing anyone expects is for a massive dome to encompass all of Baltimore and leave everyone there victim to the police inside. Through the help of unlikely allies and determination, Jamal will have to find a way to make it out alive and bri Rating: 3.5/5 stars TW: Police brutality, death, slurs towards black and brown minorities, racism Jamal is a journalist from his local high school set on using photos from a Black Lives Matter protest to help push his application for colleges. However, the last thing anyone expects is for a massive dome to encompass all of Baltimore and leave everyone there victim to the police inside. Through the help of unlikely allies and determination, Jamal will have to find a way to make it out alive and bring the dome down. This story is set in our world, but more futuristic, where advanced technologies make it more possible for institutionalized racism to be carried out. As a result, this story is slammed with a lot of powerful messages and images that need to be heard. However, because these make up a majority of the book, it does make it extremely heavy emotionally, and I highly recommend reading this if you feel you are emotionally and mentally prepared for this kind of book. As dark as it is, I really loved the concept. The horrifying reality of what this kind of situation would be like and the repercussions it would have on marginalized communities was terrifying to think about, that in some world, this could be our future. Reading how cops and higher authorities treated the characters of color was disgusting and immediately threw me back to June 2020 when all the protests occurred and how things took a turn for the worse when cops got involved. It could be our future, and sometimes even fictionalized renditions of real life events have just as powerful as an impact, which I felt this did. However, I will say I cannot speak to the accuracy of this representation of police brutality and racism as I am not a person of color, and instead push you to read reviews from people of color and marginalized communities to understand the quality of the representation. When it came to characters, they felt pretty two-dimensional for me. Jamal had his moments that broke through from this, but otherwise he read to me, especially at the beginning, as just being defined by the fact that he is a journalist and he needs to break down the truth. I'm a journalist and I also understand that drive. However, it's not something that fully defines a person, and I felt it was Jamal's main character trait for a while. He breaks away from it a bit at the end, which I liked. Catherine was absolutely badass, and I liked Marco. I will admit that I wasn't a huge fan of the romance between Jamal and Marco, and felt the story could have been better off without it, even though it never took a major forefront of the story. The ending for me felt... kind of anticlimactic? It's weird for me to describe. I don't want to say it was predictable but it kind of was? I like how it doesn't end with "racism is solved hooray" because that will take so long to fix. It gives us and the characters this hope that they'll be able to make a bigger difference, and maybe sets up for a sequel but I don't think this book needs it. But a part of me also thought it went too smoothly. I don't want to get into too much without reaching into spoiler territory, but it felt like the ending could have been more solid. Survive the Dome is a powerful, jaw-dropping story about community, love, power, and the brutality of the real world we find ourselves in. I received a copy of this story as an e-ARC from NetGalley. Any and all thoughts and opinions are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    As as apsiring journalist, Jamal wants to make a difference in the world. That's what brings him to one of the biggest protests in Baltimore against police brutality. He wants to document it in order to show the rest of the world. Especially since Black men just keep getting murdered by the police. However, right before the protest begins, something happens. The city implements a new safety measure called the Dome. No one can come in, and no one can get out. With no one to turn to, Jamal is unsur As as apsiring journalist, Jamal wants to make a difference in the world. That's what brings him to one of the biggest protests in Baltimore against police brutality. He wants to document it in order to show the rest of the world. Especially since Black men just keep getting murdered by the police. However, right before the protest begins, something happens. The city implements a new safety measure called the Dome. No one can come in, and no one can get out. With no one to turn to, Jamal is unsure of where to go. Until he meets Marco, a hacker determined to take down the police force. Together, they form an alliance to help take down the Dome. No matter the cost. Thanks to Sourcebooks Fire and NetGalley for an advanced copy of this to review! This book was on my radar after reading Kosoko Jackson's book, Yesterday Is History, and it hits all of the right notes. If you're looking for a timely YA book that highlights real world issues, this is the book for you! Kosoko Jackson has a really easy to read writing style that's fast paced and pulls you along in the story. This specifically works well for this particular story, because everything is happening at a rate that adds stress and anxiety to the characters. What also makes this book work well is the fact that (unfortunately) this is something you could see playing out today. Which honestly makes it feel all the more real. While the writing and story is relevant, some of the dialog and other writing elements could have used a bit of tweaking. Some of the conversations between characters just didn't feel realistic to me, and I wanted a bit more character development in the story. It felt like, at times, there was more telling than showing. But I do think that's something that gets better the more that you write! All in all, this is a fast-paced, dystopian-esque story that will definitely get you thinking.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an electronic copy to read in exchange for an honest review. I was blown away by this book! Jamal is a student journalist who goes to Baltimore to cover protests (very much like the Black Lives Matter protests). Once he is in the city he meets Marco, another teen at the protests. While they are trying to extricate themselves from a confrontation with a police officer, Jamal receives a call from his mother telling him to leave the city immediately. Bef Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an electronic copy to read in exchange for an honest review. I was blown away by this book! Jamal is a student journalist who goes to Baltimore to cover protests (very much like the Black Lives Matter protests). Once he is in the city he meets Marco, another teen at the protests. While they are trying to extricate themselves from a confrontation with a police officer, Jamal receives a call from his mother telling him to leave the city immediately. Before he can get more information the call is dropped and a Dome is installed over part of the city. Sticking together Jamal and Marco find a place to lay low and figure out what is going on. As the story progresses Jamal and Marco make enemies, get into troublesome situations, make friends, and work together to find answers on how to stop the Dome. This story will stick you for a while- the Dome seems like it might be farfetched; but is it really?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aarika

    A must read for 2022 This book does have some trauma but it’s worth the read. The message, results and resistance were amazing. I felt like I was there fighting and surviving with the characters. I hope to read more from these characters.

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