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India that is Bharat: Coloniality, Civilisation, Constitution

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India, That Is Bharat, the first book of a comprehensive trilogy, explores the influence of European 'colonial consciousness' (or 'coloniality'), in particular its religious and racial roots, on Bharat as the successor state to the Indic civilisation and the origins of the Indian Constitution. It lays the foundation for its sequels by covering the period between the Age of India, That Is Bharat, the first book of a comprehensive trilogy, explores the influence of European 'colonial consciousness' (or 'coloniality'), in particular its religious and racial roots, on Bharat as the successor state to the Indic civilisation and the origins of the Indian Constitution. It lays the foundation for its sequels by covering the period between the Age of Discovery, marked by Christopher Columbus' expedition in 1492, and the reshaping of Bharat through a British-made constitution-the Government of India Act of 1919. This includes international developments leading to the founding of the League of Nations by Western powers that tangibly impacted this journey. Further, this work also traces the origins of seemingly universal constructs such as 'toleration', 'secularism' and 'humanism' to Christian political theology. Their subsequent role in subverting the indigenous Indic consciousness through a secularised and universalised Reformation, that is, constitutionalism, is examined. It also puts forth the concept of Middle Eastern coloniality, which preceded its European variant and allies with it in the context of Bharat to advance their shared antipathy towards the Indic worldview. In order to liberate Bharat's distinctive indigeneity, 'decoloniality' is presented as a civilisational imperative in the spheres of nature, religion, culture, history, education, language and, crucially, in the realm of constitutionalism.


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India, That Is Bharat, the first book of a comprehensive trilogy, explores the influence of European 'colonial consciousness' (or 'coloniality'), in particular its religious and racial roots, on Bharat as the successor state to the Indic civilisation and the origins of the Indian Constitution. It lays the foundation for its sequels by covering the period between the Age of India, That Is Bharat, the first book of a comprehensive trilogy, explores the influence of European 'colonial consciousness' (or 'coloniality'), in particular its religious and racial roots, on Bharat as the successor state to the Indic civilisation and the origins of the Indian Constitution. It lays the foundation for its sequels by covering the period between the Age of Discovery, marked by Christopher Columbus' expedition in 1492, and the reshaping of Bharat through a British-made constitution-the Government of India Act of 1919. This includes international developments leading to the founding of the League of Nations by Western powers that tangibly impacted this journey. Further, this work also traces the origins of seemingly universal constructs such as 'toleration', 'secularism' and 'humanism' to Christian political theology. Their subsequent role in subverting the indigenous Indic consciousness through a secularised and universalised Reformation, that is, constitutionalism, is examined. It also puts forth the concept of Middle Eastern coloniality, which preceded its European variant and allies with it in the context of Bharat to advance their shared antipathy towards the Indic worldview. In order to liberate Bharat's distinctive indigeneity, 'decoloniality' is presented as a civilisational imperative in the spheres of nature, religion, culture, history, education, language and, crucially, in the realm of constitutionalism.

30 review for India that is Bharat: Coloniality, Civilisation, Constitution

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ravesh

    A masterpiece on Indian Decolonial thought While much of the global south has been colonised by the west. Almost all societies have provided something to the global decolonial thought. However, the asian countries and primarily Bharat has not been able to contribute much to the thought. J Sai Deepak starts a new chapter in such thought by writing this book. The book doesnt make much assertions, rather it presents the facts before the reader to make their own conclusions. It is throughly based on A masterpiece on Indian Decolonial thought While much of the global south has been colonised by the west. Almost all societies have provided something to the global decolonial thought. However, the asian countries and primarily Bharat has not been able to contribute much to the thought. J Sai Deepak starts a new chapter in such thought by writing this book. The book doesnt make much assertions, rather it presents the facts before the reader to make their own conclusions. It is throughly based on facts and research, and all the biases of the author were openly acknowledged at the begininng of the book, it is even mentioned by the author that the age of neutrality was long gone in the book itself, which is very rare for a author to admit. It is a must read for everyone who want to understand, how India has been colonised and its effect on Indian psyche(which is not talked much). Those commenting that the author is presenting only one side facts, probably havent read much in the book, or have indulged their bias while rating the book. The book is scholarly in nature, and all the jargon were effectively avoided to make it understandable to a common reader, however given the academic nature of the book, it might be a bit difficult for beginners. but is completely worth learning the concepts while reading the book. Must read for everyone, irrespective of their ideological spectrum.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Kulkarni

    I have followed J Sai Deepak for quite some time now through social media platforms, namely Facebook and Twitter. I have viewed some of his videos on the topics of Constitution and civilisation. What has always led me to admire him is that he puts across his points based on a plethora of research and evidence. This book is no different and I'm really glad that he has written this book as a part of a trilogy. This book essentially covers up to the year 1919, the same year in which the first Gover I have followed J Sai Deepak for quite some time now through social media platforms, namely Facebook and Twitter. I have viewed some of his videos on the topics of Constitution and civilisation. What has always led me to admire him is that he puts across his points based on a plethora of research and evidence. This book is no different and I'm really glad that he has written this book as a part of a trilogy. This book essentially covers up to the year 1919, the same year in which the first Government of India Act was passed. Although India has been subject to numerous invasions throughout its long history and has come under foreign rule, most prominently under the different Sultanates whose origins could be traced to West and Central Asia, and the British Empire, the after effects of the British Raj are felt more prominently and today's India has glaring evidence of the British or Western coloniality although they ruled this country for far shorter duration when compared to their predecessors. The author explains the reasons for this phenomenon based on the extensive research he has undertaken and his credentials as a lawyer practicing in the Supreme Court of India, the highest judicial seat in the country. Although we are now an independent nation so to speak, there is ample amount of colonial traits that are glaringly and subtly visible in our political, legal, administrative, and other circles. This book is an honest attempt at highlighting these colonial traits and raising awareness in this regard so that as Indians, we could contemplate how to truly contribute towards decolonising our nation. I'm looking forward to the next books in the trilogy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gautam Siddharth

    A state that rules its people and based on foreign ideals, values and hate for all that is India. This book brings a lot of clarity on state if affairs of Bharat and the sorry state that claims Bharats legacy but hates it to the core. A heavy read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mayur

    A society which looks at its culture and traditions through the eyes of colonizers is doomed for eternity. Till the day we see our morality through the eyes of colonizers we will always end up seeing our self as savages, brutes and uncivilized. Till the day our culture and traditions are scrutinized by the yardsticks set by colonizers we will always end up in self-loathing and self-flagellation Till the day our judiciary relies on the definitions set by colonizers to define us, our society and ou A society which looks at its culture and traditions through the eyes of colonizers is doomed for eternity. Till the day we see our morality through the eyes of colonizers we will always end up seeing our self as savages, brutes and uncivilized. Till the day our culture and traditions are scrutinized by the yardsticks set by colonizers we will always end up in self-loathing and self-flagellation Till the day our judiciary relies on the definitions set by colonizers to define us, our society and our civilization we can never hope for a fair judgement. Till the day we, as an individual, stop using the colonizers morality test to judge our society or using their outlook to understand our history or try to achieve the modernity as defined by our colonizers, we will remain colonized. A great read to understand the impact of British coloniality on our civilization, our country, our constitution, our politics, judiciary, policing, our consciousness and on our society as a whole. This book takes readers through the concept of decoloniality which seems to be the only option left with our civilization to survive the assault of coloniality which has been deeply imbibed in our consciousness.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sunil

    Magnificent read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bharath Chava

    Beacon of Hope: A Decolonial school of thought for Bharat I never even know that there are post-colonial & decolonial schools of thought existed prior to my reading of this book. This explains why we are much acquainted and aware of modern & postmodern schools of thought but not decolonial one. As brilliantly illustrated by Deepak here. It is high time Bharat looks at itself and pushes its own indic view instead of following the template set forth by western nations. With the current educationa Beacon of Hope: A Decolonial school of thought for Bharat I never even know that there are post-colonial & decolonial schools of thought existed prior to my reading of this book. This explains why we are much acquainted and aware of modern & postmodern schools of thought but not decolonial one. As brilliantly illustrated by Deepak here. It is high time Bharat looks at itself and pushes its own indic view instead of following the template set forth by western nations. With the current educational system & Laws framed with a colonial conscious. I see Bharat nowhere near to the society that Deepak proposed here yet there is hope. We are yet to see where this book takes its place in the Indian consciousness. will it revolutionize the course of Indian thought  ? or will it collect dust in the few personal libraries of people?. Too early to say. Let's wait for the next books in the series

  7. 4 out of 5

    Venky

    While Independence for India represented a tangible and symbolic disentanglement from the tyrannical yoke of colonisation, a free India found herself (and even after seven decades of freedom continues to find herself) inextricably, interminably and innately wedded to the constructs of colonialism. Hence an urgent and indispensable need for India as a nation represented (and continues to represent) an inculcation of a decolonial conscience rather than remaining smug in an illusory and metaphorica While Independence for India represented a tangible and symbolic disentanglement from the tyrannical yoke of colonisation, a free India found herself (and even after seven decades of freedom continues to find herself) inextricably, interminably and innately wedded to the constructs of colonialism. Hence an urgent and indispensable need for India as a nation represented (and continues to represent) an inculcation of a decolonial conscience rather than remaining smug in an illusory and metaphorical comfort offered by post-colonial philosophies. We are, putting it mildly, inhabiting interesting times. A mere acknowledgment (leave alone appreciation or assertion) of our indigenous Indic roots seems to trigger a fusillade of vitriol. Commencing with stereotyping, the allegations skirt the contours of illiberalism, gird the borders of intolerance before finally concluding with perorations of conflated acculturations and imagined affiliations. Thus we have conferences and symposiums proclaiming to engage in acts of “dismantling” certain notions. Pseudo-scholars with shallow credentials and suspect motives ascend the Bully Pulpit from whence they issue thunderous proclamations which are unfortunately laughable euphemisms for garbage. Hence Supreme Court Advocate and practicing lawyer, J. Sai Deepak ’s “India That is Bharat” comes as a timely and refreshing antidote to antiquated notions of thinking. The book lays out in an objective and lucid manner, the impact of colonialism on Bharat and some potential ways adopting which such impacts may be minimized, if not altogether, eliminated. The book itself is compartmentalized into three sections and forms the first installment in a trilogy. The first section, titled, “Coloniality”, dwells on the rapacious nature of settler colonialism. At the heart of this Section, lies the theory of Onto-Epistemology and Theology (OET). OET refers to a critical enquiry of a knowledge based on philosophy (epistemic), and theories based on theology. In the process of colonizing a nation, the colonizer by deliberately and carefully seeks to eviscerate the indigenous OET, before substituting the same with his own set of beliefs. A carefully orchestrated substitution of the coloniser’s own values and belief system ensures more or less a total obliteration of the identity of the colonized. This substitution ensures that even after unshackling itself from colonialism, a colonized nation charts its future economic, social and cultural trajectory based on the very values and beliefs which it has spent an agonizingly long time, getting rid of. The colonial mindset unconsciously remains etched in the consciousness of the colonized. This is where the key tenet of “decolonization” comes into play. The author in alluding to decolonization relies on a plethora of works produced by decolonization scholars such as Anibal Quijano , Walter D. Mignolo , Sylvia Wynter , Ramon Grosfoguel etc. The colonizer by labeling the colonized as heathen, soul-less and of a deprecating stock, completely fails to comprehend the faith system and culture that is the prerogative of the colonised’ A key failing of the colonizer is to totally disregard the land-ontology or the pristine and almost sacred relationship that exists between the native and her land. A relationship based on a symbiotic reciprocity. The normative Western mindset, incapable of both acknowledging and respecting such relationship proceeds to mercilessly pillage the land and enslave the native. As Sai Deepak paraphrasing the book, “The Spiritual Legacy of the American Indian” by Joseph Epes Brown , writes, “their relationship with the earth was one of ‘reciprocal appropriation’, that is to give and receive, ‘in which humans participated in the landscape while at the same time they incorporated the landscape and its inhabitants into the most fundamental human experience and understanding’. The invaders, nursing a Judeo Christian OET that places man at the pinnacle of animate and inanimate existence, not just dehumanized humanity but also objectified nature. This, in addition to a forced displacement of the indigenous education systems, also resulted in a top down imposition of Christianity, and in some cases, even a subtle and covert ‘Christianising’ of the native faith. The process of substituting Western OET for indigenous OET was rendered convenient due to a paucity of written records maintained by the native. A destruction of all places of worship by the colonizer placed him in a convenient position to manipulate the original belief system of the colonized so as to be malleable to the former’s own motives. This also accorded an opportunity for the colonizer to mock the OET of the colonized as abstruse and apocryphal flights of fancy. When it came to “Bharat” such attempts at obfuscation assumed menacing proportions. Drawing on the theology birthed by the Protestant Reformist Movement , the British placed all the civic and societal problems plaguing Bharat firmly at the doorstep of “Brahminism.” Brahminism thus became a convenient and unwitting scapegoat against which many irrelevant axes could be ground. This tendency, unfortunately prevails even to this day as one of most cliched phrases in social media talks about, “smashing Brahminical patriarchy.” With a view to ameliorating the malevolent designs of colonialism from constantly festering in the psyche of policy making mavens and the common man alike, decolonization attempts to “release production of knowledge from the stranglehold of the West, which could lead to greater diversity of thought and subjectivity, in particular, resurgence and re-existence of indigenous perspective.” The primary goals of decolonization as articulated by Sai Deepak include an untethering from the moorings of identity politics and a conclusive escape from the entrenched dogmas of exclusionary ethnocentrism (race politics in short). Section 2 of the book bearing the heading “Civilisation” strives to demonstrate how Bharat’s consciousness was impacted during the nation’s prolonged tryst with colonialism, coloniality and Colonisation. In arriving at informed conclusions and educated opinions, Sai Deepak draws liberally from the works of Dr. Balagangadhara , Professor emeritus of the Ghent University in Belgium, and Dr. Jakob De Roover , an Assistant Professor at Ghent University, Belgium. Sai Deepak while disagreeing with the Marxian claims of colonialism aiding and abetting development by way of establishing rail links etc, does not devote much space for rebutting this reformist tone of arguments. The intrepid and the intrigued may refer to the brilliant book “Inglorious Empire” by Shashi Tharoor , for an illuminating discussion of the subject. Instead Sai Deepak concentrates on the tools of “subalternalism” employed by the British to create divisions and fissures within the indigenous subconsciousness. Sai Deepak also vociferously strives to nullify the proposition that India did not possess an identity as a nation state prior to the Sepoy Mutiny of 1857. This antiquarian fallacy has received amplification from many Western scholars such as the likes of John Strachey who averred that ‘there is not and never was an India, or even any country of India, possessing, according to European ideas, any sort of unity, physical or political’. The polarization associated with such a controversial postulation may be gauged by contrasting opinions espoused by other Western authorities and Indologists. For example, Vincent Arthur Smith and George Chisholm boldly claim “India, encircled as she is by seas and mountains, is indisputably a geographical unit, and as such is rightly designated by one name...” The British, Sai Deepak argues, proceeded to systematically promulgate a series of statutes and legislations, which while outwardly positing a veneer of liberalism, were in fact devious mechanisms to strip the last vestiges of indigeneity characterizing the fabric of pre-Independence India. Even after Independence, the burnished language of colonialism remained intact. Justifying the encroachment into Indian land and usurpation of sacred Indian territory by the adventurous Chinese, the first Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru, incredulously remarked that the land occupied by the Chinese was where not a single blade of grass grew and constituted territory that was useless and uninhabitable. There cannot be a more searing example of the sacred land ontology being elided out of the human consciousness. Clergymen and zealots in the garb of missionaries also played their bit exemplarily well in endeavouring to eviscerate Indic OET. Claudius Buchanan a Scottish clergyman credited with corruption of the word “Jagannath” to “juggernaut”, portrayed Hinduism as a ‘bloody, violent, superstitious and backward religious system’, which required an immediate ‘social reform’. Brahmins again were the favourite whipping boys against whom cudgels could be wielded with gay abandon and elan. Conflating the Devadasi tradition with prostitution, the Britishers equated temples with sites of prostitution and hence vociferously advocated a State takeover of the management and affairs. This debauched caricature of Brahminism and Brahmins was even categorised under an esoteric term ‘priestcraft’. The sad and unfortunate precedent of unwarranted, interference with the religious practices continues to this day with many Governments in states such as Tamil Nadu, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh going to illogical lengths to intrude in the management of the affairs of temples by enacting the Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments Regulations. These statutes provide unfettered powers to the concerned State Government to assume the control, management, affairs and assets of Hindu temples. Interestingly Sai Deepak himself is at the forefront of a litigation against these draconian and anti-diluvian measures and the matter currently is pending adjudication by the Apex Court. The dangerous lengths to which even the colonized embraced the EOT representing a normative Western framework is highlighted in chilling fashion by Sai Deepak by reproducing a letter issued by the founder of the Brahmo Samaj, Raja Ram Mohun Roy , to the then Governor-General in Council, bemoaning the British intent to establish a Sanskrit educational institution. While the abuse of a venerable language such as Sanskrit by an ignorant and condescending elitist such as Thomas Babington Macaulay should come as no surprise to anyone possessing even a shard of literacy, it is downright lamentable, that a person of the stature of Mohun Roy protested and railed against the dissemination of Sanskrit. “The Sangscrit language, so difficult that almost a lifetime is necessary for its perfect acquisition, is well known to have been for ages, a lamentable check for the diffusion of knowledge; and the learning concealed under this almost impervious veil is far from sufficient to reward the labour for acquiring it…Again, no essential benefit can be derived by the student of Meemangsa from knowledge what it is that makes the killer of a goat sinless on pronouncing certain passages of the Veds, and what is the real nature and operative influence of passages of the Ved, etc.” These institutions of learning also furthered the objectives of proselytization and conversion by appealing not just to the allure of a native language but also to the innocence of an unsuspecting populace. The introduction of the Bible as a compulsory part of the curricula, bears ample testimony to this fact. The final part of the book traces the events leading to the establishment of the Government of India Act, 1919, the first concrete legislation that mulled the drafting of a Constitution for India with the objective of paving the way for self-governance. Even this exertion had at its underpinning a universalized Western standard of civilization that deemed Indic EOT as mainly rooted in bias, prejudices and superstitions. The Montagu-Chelmsford Reforms in fact had the temerity to propose that unless and until India confirmed to such universalized tenets, (assumed to be a vital pre-requisite for a ‘civilised’ nation), it would be deemed ‘unready’ for governance. This preposterous notion received a stinging rebuke from the lambent Lala Lajpat Rai. Part 3 of the book is particularly relevant in the context of recent developments such as the abrogation of Article 370 of the Indian Constitution, enactment of the CAA/NRC legislation etc. The reactions to the passing of these Bills have ranged from the sublime to the silly and asinine to the alarming. But they have all signified one unmistakable truth – that the attribute of colonialism is not just a detritus or a residue influencing the thought process of our nation. It is a powerful, pulsating and possessing force exercising and exerting its influence in a myriad of ways, overt and covert. The research undergirding the book is exhausting and humongous. The sources mined are diverse and it comes as no surprise that the notes to the book are capable of constituting a stand-alone block of precocious resources for further embellishing and distilling one’s knowledge in the domains of decolonization and Indic OET. The fact that Sai Deepak is an autodidact in so far as this sphere of knowledge goes, makes it all the more fascinating. Sai Deepak also brings to bear his enviable experience in the field of Constitutional Law and his involvement with some of the most controversial and path breaking cases that have warranted the attention of the Apex Court in recent times, such as the Sabarimala Case and the HRCE Rulings. “India That is Bharat” - Rapturous in sweep; reverberating in wake!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Suyogya Awasthy

    It is imperative on our part to refer to a uniform definition of Colonisation which is-“A subjugation process which entails various cultural and social changes”. Now, as one may surmise the definition and at the same instance comprehend its relevance and how it has been something that has been etched into our conscience and has verily hindered our ability to smite the illusions which have been put forth unto us in the name of modernity for it all has its roots in Colonisation and the book at han It is imperative on our part to refer to a uniform definition of Colonisation which is-“A subjugation process which entails various cultural and social changes”. Now, as one may surmise the definition and at the same instance comprehend its relevance and how it has been something that has been etched into our conscience and has verily hindered our ability to smite the illusions which have been put forth unto us in the name of modernity for it all has its roots in Colonisation and the book at hand tends to address the same in a very analytical fashion and a brief delineation of the same shall be done below. The length of the book is 492 pages and has been divided into 3 sections. The first one titled “Coloniality” sets the stage for the entire debacle to continue further in the next sections. The first section introduces the readers to the basic precepts of Colonisation and what it connotes and how the subjugation occurs. The author here has aptly presented the view as professed by scholars that society has the right to interpret coloniality and the decoloniality must be defined as something which it has experienced itself and at the same time has aptly presented the example with the pervasion that the European form of colonialism had over the world. The next chapter brings forth another trend which came in the form of a greater urge to assert a sense of autonomy and be a sovereign and the same came at the form of Native elites, but the same suffered inherent limitations for a positive digression from the pre-established precepts of independence which revolved around politico-legal sphere could not take place. The further chapters aptly present the pervasion of the European form of colonization and the relevant ways for the same which rely on institutionalizing and how the same has acted as a tool to fortify their imperatives of coloniality. The second section features the concept of Civilisation and here the author lays bare the basic precepts of the same and comes forth with a rather poignant analysis of how the colonial consciousness has been spawned in our minds and verily juxtaposes the pervasion of European Coloniality and how the same has hindered the true recognition of the Indic Civilisation. It must be noted that as the chapters progress further and till it ends the author has done a tremendous job setting forth a viewpoint that without a shade of doubt fleshes out certain imperatives which have guided the whole process of colonization and all the other factors which speak of its reality. The most remarkable job that the author has done is delineating the relevant facts which instill a sense of perspective in the reader and make them realize that there does exist a gap between the modernist imperative and valid reasoning behind the same, for the idea of the same stems from colonization. It must be noted that the writing style of the author has been kept very fluid and cuts straight to the chase by shedding relevant facts whose relevance is undeniable and most importantly the whole flow of the chapters makes this book an inclusive read for the topic which the author has presented in the form of the literary work has pedantic origins which may seem very daunting at first but once the reader begins, they end with a brief sense of the order of things.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Soham

    Biased and more like a conspiracy theory. The author is simply trying to put his biased narrow opinion forward. The author in a very shrewd way mixes up some random historical facts and mixes his opinion with them. And ultimately creates a new hochpoch khichdi conspiracy theory type narrative and present it to public. Something written in a very extraordinary English doesn't mean it to be true. In fact the author uses English in so difficult manner that it becomes hard to read for common person. Biased and more like a conspiracy theory. The author is simply trying to put his biased narrow opinion forward. The author in a very shrewd way mixes up some random historical facts and mixes his opinion with them. And ultimately creates a new hochpoch khichdi conspiracy theory type narrative and present it to public. Something written in a very extraordinary English doesn't mean it to be true. In fact the author uses English in so difficult manner that it becomes hard to read for common person. Full of legal language and difficult grammar. Moreover many of the opinion that the author is putting forward have no basis at all. It's simply based on the preconceived notions of the author himself. One thing i can speak jokingly. It seems to me that the author may be called as the ' Rana Ayub of the Indic wing' ( newly emerged far right spectrum in a different name ). To comment on this book in conclusion, I'll mention what supreme court said regarding the book written by rana ayub — " it is based upon surmises, conjectures, and suppositions and has no evidentiary value. " The one funny thing about Indian politics today is that left has one rana ayub but the right spectrum or the newly emerged far right spectrum in another new name ( Indic wing ) has more than one like her. In a simple word these types of people can be called as ' woke' and ' hyper active ' persons who like to remain in the cocoons and narrow spectrum of their bullshit rotten ideology — be it left, right, communist, feminist, hindutva, sanatanist, liberalist, etc. Ideology is just like a disease. It deviates a person from reality. Ideology has taken the shape of new age fanaticism. These ideology oriented intellctual people people will never understand the reality. And will continue spreading nonsense in the name of ideology and their beliefs. They see the world through the coloured glass of their ideology. Certain wise man rightly said once — " some ideas are so stupid that only intellctuals believe them ".

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jaya Prakash

    The author of the book 'India that is Bharat' — Shri J. Sai Deepak is a Supreme Court advocate who is a renowned constitutional expert and litigator in some of the most controversial, path-breaking landmark cases and his genius is known for his legal interpretations and constitutional studies, civilisation and history. He has delivered brilliantly articulate talks and debates on the current issues of historical importance and has offered intellectual alternative perspectives. His first book of th The author of the book 'India that is Bharat' — Shri J. Sai Deepak is a Supreme Court advocate who is a renowned constitutional expert and litigator in some of the most controversial, path-breaking landmark cases and his genius is known for his legal interpretations and constitutional studies, civilisation and history. He has delivered brilliantly articulate talks and debates on the current issues of historical importance and has offered intellectual alternative perspectives. His first book of the Bharat trilogy is a new dawn on Bharat's historical studies from a perspective of its constitution, civilisation, indigenous people, their faith systems, lived experiences and their history since the age of time and nature. At the beginning of the book, the author distinguishes the terminologies — ‘colonisation’, ‘colonialism’, ‘coloniality’ which the reader has to bear in mind while applying and examining the values and principles using a decolonial mind. In the book, the author revisits the notions and traces the origins of the Westphalian-nation-state and modern-liberal-secular-democratic-universalist Euro-centric framework of the current World Order that the colonialist, imperialist Western and the Global North powers had imposed systematically and normalised it on the colonised indigenous communities that originated on those colonised lands. The book emphasises moral and ethical relativism distinguished from the colonially perceived notions and confirmation bias — starting from The Age of Discovery marked with Columbus’ expedition in 1492 and race for competitive nationalism and colonialism, the Peace of Augsburg, Thirty Years’ War and the Peace of Westphalia of 1648 and how it led to the creation of sovereign States and the aftermath of it. European Nationalism, mercantilism and interdenominational competitiveness triggered by the Protestant Reformation and the Peace of Westphalia — parallels drawn between the Protestant Reformation and the projection of similar grievances onto institutions in Bharat by the European coloniser — which is shattering because of its contemporary relevance in political discourse, academic historical studies and socio-religious understanding. The author has provided references from the decolonial studies that how the Peace of Westphalia had the origin point of the present world's universal moral value systems and the governance models within the Christian political theology and how it then was gradually secularised and normalised over time. The Protestant politico-theological framework behind the distinction that the modern nation-states make between the spiritual and the temporal or secular. The institutionalisation of coloniality matrix codified and morphed into secular instruments through which Eurocentrism could be perpetuated in their colonies and the colonies had to abandon their indigenous consciousness and roots. Contrary to today's popular perception that 'globalisation' is a friend of diversity and heterogeneity — it had its origin since the centuries of colonialism and later evolved western imperialism culminated with the constitution of liberal Eurocentric and American capitalism (post-World Wars and the Cold War) as the new global power and the centre stage of the world ( the Anglo Saxon race) as the white supremacists hail themselves. The application of modern usage of the words “secular” and “secularism” has to be examined with its original Christian (Ontology, Epistemology and Theology) OET. Because it is the most exploited term used in legal, political, academic and casually applied in informal talks and conversations on social media in today’s Internet era. This book offers a great understanding of secularism’s origin and inflection point breaking all myths and colonial lies spread by the post-colonial and Marxist schools. The Enlightenment is celebrated for ushering the Age of Reason while its cartesian dualist approach to humans and nature led to the superiority of the ‘rational human mind‘ over the ‘non-rational nature’. Middle eastern coloniality and European coloniality and their attitude and disregard for the indigenous OETs relationship with nature, symbols and faith systems — and the introduction of ‘humanism‘, the Holy Alliance of ‘materialism‘ and ‘consumerism‘ and how the current decolonised countries still live in a post-colonial matrix of applying world view and their relationship with nature which is getting deteriorated having imbibed and blindly sticking to the Master's methods of only GDP-driven development goals and facing the wrath of the Nature every year that hinders the set goals. The western worldview of the ‘commodification of nature’ was the driving force behind colonialism and imperialism which gave birth to today’s capitalism and the universalist development models that Bharat has also adopted. As we can see in today’s geopolitical situation of handling and mitigating Climate Change adopted in the international treaty — the Paris Agreement, the developing countries (former colonies) have a challenge before them to mitigate the climate change and also having to achieve prosperity and wealth through industrial production and development which the western countries (the colonisers) had achieved earlier through Industrial Revolution. Both the colonial powers — Middle Easter Islamic and European Christian colonisers — perpetually undertook colonisation of Bharat to annihilate the ancient civilisation of Bharat, spread the coloniser’s faith onto its people — marking the Mughal Arab invasion in the 8th century and the Age of Discovery and European colonialism since the 15th Century — The Fall of Constantinople in 1453 — the capital of the Byzantine Empire captured by the Ottomans that severed trade routes between Europe and Asia, which led to exploration for new sea routes by the European powers to Asia and the “Age of Exploration.” Both these colonisers enslaved and evangelised idol-worshipping, polytheistic, nature-venerating indigenous societies. Bharat's civilisation had survived and has been able to preserve their religion despite the onslaught by the colonisers for about 1300 years and the ecclesiastical activities when compared to its counterparts in other parts of the world. Hence, Bharat and other Asian societies are in a better position to call out the Christian roots of European colonialism compared to the Western scholars on decoloniality, who hesitate on this front because they now belong to the same faith as that of their former colonisers. The author’s arguments for Bharat as a Civilisation-state and citations from the past Indic records and sources which also had been discussed by the Constituent Assembly during the preparation of the Draft Constitution by the Drafting Committee which led to the insertion of the word “Bharat” in Article 1 of the Constitution which says ‘India, that is, Bharat shall be a Union of States’. The distinction between civilisation-state and nation-state is clarified which may require Constitutional amendments to reflect and replace the colonial consciousness with civilisational consciousness. Quote from the book: 'A State that presides over a civilisation is not a Civilisation-State; instead, a State that is conscious of the civilisational character of its society and structures itself on the civilisational lines is a Civilisation-State.' Bharat as a civilisation-state is evident from its harmonious coexistence as a single civilisational unit for millennia and sheer diversity and existence has to be treated as an exemplar for the rest of the world. Bharat was a home of many coexisting races, cults and cultures, and the land of composite systems in respect of race, language, civil and personal law, social structure and religious cult. Bharat had been politically united and Sanskrit was the lingua franca as Latin was in Europe in the Middle Ages. The ancient Emporers of Bharat were more liberal than the modern Tzars or Kaisers and they never used force to standardise language, culture, creed or caste but left each group self-development suitable to its environment. But in modern India, both the State and the indigenous society have taken forward the sanctioning and judgement of the European coloniser with the zeal of a new convert, destroying those structures that kept the Indic ways of life alive through the ravages of time and history. The systems that were independent of the State remained untouched by the disruption of the State apparatus due to Islamic invasions and European colonisation, has been bright under the shadow of the State in modern India. This poses a serious and existential challenge to the long-term survival of the Indic consciousness while the State has given a greater degree of freedom to the Abrahamic faith systems and institutions in the name of secularism but institutionally discriminated and controlled the institutions of indigenous faith systems. The contemporary institutions of Independent India suffer from coloniality and its colonial consciousness deeply rooted in its framework without examining the intent behind them codified by its colonial predecessors from whom the national elites adopted the characteristics of the ruling. The reader can understand how coloniality is inherent in the contemporary legal framework and the legislations for the Hindu religious institutions such as the Hindu Religious and Charitable Endowments (HRCE) Act. As mentioned in the Constitution of India, for having to apply the Essential Religious Practices (ERP) test developed by the Supreme Court in matters involving the protection of religious practices, the coloniality can be traced to the Christian colonial distinction between essential and non-essential tenets. It is evident from the legal interpretation of terminologies using coloniser’s lexicon and the Judiciary unconsciously has applied the Christian concept of ‘religious denomination’ — a direct consequence of the Protestant Reformation — to the dharmic institutions and their practices in the past verdicts. Every society's subjective experience leads to the formation of its views on ontology ultimately forming the basis of its epistemology and theology. As the Indian institutions post-independence still suffer from their inherent coloniality in their consciousness and outlook, it is imperative to reexamine the OETs of the value systems that appear to have a moral high ground and universalist which are in fact the colonial Christian OETs as disclosed in the book. The author reveals with relevant facts and records that how racially and religiously the coloniser had their motives to wipe the indigenous people out of their roots through successive Charter Acts since the commencement of the Company's establishment in Bharat and then the transfer of administration to the Crown. There are enormous materials provided in the book on how the coloniser and the State-sponsored missionary activities rooted for demonising and destroying the indigenous people's culture, belief and faith systems. Evidence is shown how the European Christian coloniser attempted to make education a means to further the Christian civilising and reforming intent and the nexus between education, language and religious conversion can be thoroughly understood since the enacting of the Missionary Clause into the Charter Act. The racial filter applied by the coloniser of branding the indigenous people who had a diverse way of life of worshipping nature and symbols as a different race from the indigenous people of the mainland who themselves had a similar and diverse way of life, values and tradition. This colonial consciousness led to the creation and classification of Scheduled Tribes in the constitution — that provided a suitable climate for the lobbyists and Christian missionaries to do their magical and civilising conversion of the tribal people into Christianity which itself had been devoid of idolatry and paganism. The author has done impeccable research and it must be shattering for the reader to read "Classified" files and speeches that happened in the British parliament in the 18th and 19th centuries when he proves the Christian secular character of provisions contained in the framing of the Regulating Acts and Charter Acts. After the Great Rebellion of 1857 and the transfer of power from the Company to the British Crown in 1858, between 1858 and 1919-1920 — the Charter Acts were passed by the British Parliament successfully and aimed to prevent another rebellion that happened earlier by systematically subduing the nationalists by its carrot and stick policies. The book shows a series of events that happened in this timeline which enables the reader to understand the umbilical cord between the global history of European coloniality and India's tryst with it in particular in the realm of the constitution until 1919-1920. Christian western powers had arrogated to themselves the power to determine who is civilised and who is not, and applied the ‘Standard Of Civilisation’ as a legal requirement and standard for the entry of 'only civilised nations into the international society and legal prerequisite for membership to international bodies — the League of Nations. The book extensively deals with the events happening during the First World War in this timeline and the Montagu-Chelmsford Reforms of 1918 which formed the direct basis of the Government of India Act of 1919. The 1919 Act provided the foundation for the Government of India Act of 1935 which provided the broad framework for the Constitution of independent India as admitted by the Chairman of the Drafting Committee, Dr Ambedkar in the Constituent Assembly debates. The usual discourse on civilisation and ancient glory of Bharat is most of the times viewed and dubbed as "Hindu nationalism", juxtaposing the massacres, genocides perpetrated in the name of European nationalism and transposing the white man's guilt onto Bharat's civilisational awakening and box it under a particular one person or a group and one man's ideologue who had championed for the cause of awakening of civilisation and the fixation on Veer Savarkar as the mascot of "Hindutva". In this book, the author has put aside such narrative and has provided humongous literature of case studies and scholarly researches based on records and evidence on ‘civilisationalism’ by jettisoning the particular talisman who is/are usually claimed to be representing the cause for nationalism and dharmic civilisation reawakening. The book has a peculiar way of storytelling and kinds of literature of Indian history on colonialism, civilisation and historical underpinnings of the constitution. It is not a light-read book — but a sophisticated academic book. Its language is simple, does not have much jargon, and is meant also for the non-legal fraternity. The author has penned it methodically with facts and citations and hence the events are to be contemplated in multiple layers and tranches and have to be related to contemporary political, social, legal and economic affairs. He has dissected and vivisected the universalists values and colonial OETs and questions their origins and notions. Subjects and researches have been done separately on legal studies, constitutionalism, civilisational findings and studies, modern, post-modern and post-colonial histories so far. But the decolonial school of thought questions and reverses the entirety of the colonial entropy on all the stated subjects. It doesn’t crave an image of victimhood complex or competitive victimization of indigenous communities in matters that were suppressed by colonial and post-colonial political regimes in the past and relevant in the present and will be perpetuated to be alive in the future. Rather it is that the inversion of coloniality in academic, legal, political, administrative, social, economic and all other institutions and frameworks. The book makes the reader numb to the post-modernist and post-colonial schools and their world views and maligned and fabricated history being taught in the Macaulay-style education system that India then continued to imbibe post-independence. The book is antithetical to the previous schools and reflects on alternative systems. It doesn’t advocate pointing fingers at the West for all the sins had it done perpetually across the world and continues to carry forward through its sophisticated universalist instruments and international laws that it had framed. India and Bharat are not two different space-time continuums as interpreted in the modern (colonial) historical sense and western outlook. ‘India’ — that is Bharat is the giant civilisation that revived itself from the past onslaughts of ‘Bharat’ that after confronting Middle Eastern and European colonialities and it happened to adopt a colonial manifestation of its consciousness and its nature and stature shown to the world through a constitution and nation-statehood framework that reflected the spirit of the British-made constitution for India —the Government of India Act, 1935 and ornamenting of many other provisions and elements enacted later by the Drafting Committee on its skeleton. This book offers an alternative world view that is in an embryonic stage for the Indian institutions of academic, political and legal affairs.I hope this book will certainly leave a footprint and precedent for a fresh beginning of viewing Indian history and world history from a different lens. As the author mentions — 'applying decolonial lens'. The book clearly shows how the academic decolonial approach is better than the post-colonial approach in the realm of religion since the latter is less informed and privileges modern secularism without exploring the Christian OET and applies the Christain theological values as if they are native to the indigenous systems. "Decoloniality" is the vaccine against all sorts of colonial European, Middle-Eastern onto-epistemological-theological (OETs) variants and post-colonial and Marxist schools. It is not only the choice for the individuals and institutions in Bharat but a civilisational imperative to learn the pattern from the past, foresee the future of Bharat and the challenges it will have to confront if it does not come out of its colonial hangover sooner. "Coloniality" is a state of mind that lives on the subconscious systems of the Indians who carry their colonial genes from their ancestors. This book creates a ‘nudge effect’ that induces the indigenous consciousness and awareness by methodically reinforcing the cognitive thinking of the individuals and institutions by replacing the callus that is coloniality. 'India that is Bharat' is a masterpiece.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Uthara Kanya

    India that is Bharat Coloniality, Civilisation and Constitution by J Sai Deepak Ever since J Sai Deepak announced his plans to write a book on the Indic Civilisation and the effect of Coloniality on it and the constitution of Bharat, I was eager to get my hands on it. The book has delivered on all its promises and more and how. Before I review this book, I'd like to elucidate how difficult it is to review such a book as it poses more questions to the reader than it answers, it poses difficult, unc India that is Bharat Coloniality, Civilisation and Constitution by J Sai Deepak Ever since J Sai Deepak announced his plans to write a book on the Indic Civilisation and the effect of Coloniality on it and the constitution of Bharat, I was eager to get my hands on it. The book has delivered on all its promises and more and how. Before I review this book, I'd like to elucidate how difficult it is to review such a book as it poses more questions to the reader than it answers, it poses difficult, uncomfortable and yet very relevant and pertinent questions to the individual, the groups and the society as a whole and makes us question everything in our country from the administration of a Village Panchayat to the administration of our nation, from the mindset of the elite to that of the common man, from our approach to education to foreign policy, from our perspective on environment to development and much more. It is in this context that I put forward my review on a scholarly work which has perhaps arrived 40-50 years too late but is still going to be the bedrock on which all our future actions will build on to reclaim our glorious civilization and put it on a path that leads it to heights hitherto unheard. This absolutely brilliant piece of scholarship from Deepak I hope is only a beginning on this front from him and many others like him. The books deals with three aspects with the first of them being Coloniality. While I had knowledge of colonialism, like most others in India and British Colonialism to be precise, but had never heard of 'Coloniality'. Deepak wonderfully explains what is Coloniality and provides definitions from various authors and goes on to explain how Coloniality still pervades most of the colonised world and shows how Bharat is no exception to it. He then introduces 'Decoloniality', what it means, its origins and refers to the scholarship works on it. Decoloniality was first coined in Latin America and was first proposed in the 1980's and is now spread to South America and most parts of Africa. He goes on to explain in great detail what is decoloniality, it's methods of working, it's desired outcomes and its effect on society. He also goes on to explain it's importance to Bharat and it's civilisational existence. However, what surprises me most on Decoloniality is we in Bharat have never heard about it or have an idea that such a school of thought exists and what it's implications are formerly colonised societies. Introducing such an absolutely brilliant school of thought to Bharat, illustrating it's need and significance to a civilisation that is in dire need of intellectual capacity is in itself a huge achievement of Deepak and he doesn't stop there. He uses it illustrate to us it's civilisational relevance and puts a mirror to our face to show the true extent of Coloniality in our state and the urgent need to shed us off of this demon that has pervaded us in every aspect of society. This brings him to the second section of the book - 'Civilisation'. Here he talks about various aspects Christian OET (Onto Epistemological Thelogy) and it's colonising nature along with the existing Indic OETs of the time and how they were systematically destroyed by the White European Coloniser and it's successor Western Imperialism. He traces the roots of this ideology to 1493 CE and the age of enlightenment in Christian Europe and not the 18th century as widely believed when the English first setup trading posts in Bharat. He clearly demonstrates how it was Christian beliefs about race and superiority were the driving factors behind the colonial nature of European forces and that everything else was simply a by-product of that colonising nature. In this section he produces first hand material of various Christian bishops, leaders of states and provides the reader with first hand information on what the true nature and intent of colonialism was and goes on to show how present day nation states have a distinct Christian nature to them. He also shows us how the clashes between Roman Catholics and Protestants were the reason for various modern day concepts of 'Church and State', secularism, tolerance etc. However, the most important aspect of this section and the aspect where Deepak's brilliance shine through are where he discusses how the Christian OET was used to understand indigenous communities world over and Indic society with regard to Bharat. His brilliance with regard understanding the Christian nature of the Coloniser his acts of aggression, suppression against the native communities of Bharat and his Cartesian dual approach to mankind and clearly communicate to the reader the lens with which the coloniser looked at Indic communities are the outstanding contributions he will do for generations of Bharatiyas to come. Finally, he comes to the period of 19th century and onwards, which forms the third part of his book - Constitution, and what secular in the coloniser conscious meant and what is the effect of it on the present day lives of Bharatiyas. He again very clearly demonstrates with original transcriptions of Parliamentary debates, letters between various church officials and British officials and how Christian values were subtly but surely introduced in Bharat and what the intent and ultimate aim was of the Coloniser and how they wanted to achieve that. He goes into great detail on the Government of India acts of 1813, 1853, 1858 and the first Constitution of India of 1919 and what was the basis of their formation, their intent, their methods of achieving it and how they planned to support proselytisation through various missionaries. Here, the brilliance of Deepak the lawyer and student of law shines brightly through the such that the entire left-liberal gang will be thrown into the obscurities of dark hell (pun entirely intended). He finally shows us how Protestant Christian values were universalied through international laws, the League of Nations and other such world bodies and how it affects everyone even today and especially Bharat as it is the only standing civilisation since the dawn of Christianity and Islam. This is book is going to be remembered as the first attempt of decolonising the Indian mind and it is the very first step in what is a very long journey to decoloniality as Deepak points out Bharat has two colonialities in its present form and we will have to go as far as back as the 8th century to fully achieve decolonisation. However, the beauty of the book doesn't lie in its use of complex English terms, or Deepak's brilliance in matters of civilisation or his skills as a lawyer. Neither does it lie in his understanding of Christian nature and intent of the European Coloniser or in his ability to put it down in the form of a scholarly book. The beauty entirely lies in the ugly, uncomfortable and often terrifying and spine chilling questions it poses to the reader and how those questions put a mirror to the Indic society and the petrifying form of its present state of existence. Finally, just as the Bhagavad Gita has been the guiding light and continues to be so for a multitude of generations of Bharatiyas, this book is going to be a beacon of light for all of us on the Indic side and is but the first light and a ray of hope for all surviving Indic communities for a path towards complete decoloniality that will ultimately lead to the reflourishing of the Indic Civilisation across the sacred geography of Bharat and world over.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Uthara Kanya

    J Sai DeepakJ Sai DeepakIndia that is Bharat Coloniality, Civilisation and Constitution by J Sai Deepak Ever since J Sai Deepak announced his plans to write a book on the Indic Civilisation and the effect of Coloniality on it and the constitution of Bharat, I was eager to get my hands on it. The book has delivered on all its promises and more and how.  Before I review this book, I'd like to elucidate how difficult it is to review such a book as it poses more questions to the reader than it answers, J Sai DeepakJ Sai DeepakIndia that is Bharat Coloniality, Civilisation and Constitution by J Sai Deepak Ever since J Sai Deepak announced his plans to write a book on the Indic Civilisation and the effect of Coloniality on it and the constitution of Bharat, I was eager to get my hands on it. The book has delivered on all its promises and more and how.  Before I review this book, I'd like to elucidate how difficult it is to review such a book as it poses more questions to the reader than it answers, it poses difficult, uncomfortable and yet very relevant and pertinent questions to the individual, the groups and the society as a whole and makes us question everything in our country from the administration of a Village Panchayat to the administration of our nation, from the mindset of the elite to that of the common man, from our approach to education to foreign policy, from our perspective on environment to development and much more. It is in this context that I put forward my review on a scholarly work which has perhaps arrived 40-50 years too late but is still going to be the bedrock on which all our future actions will build on to reclaim our glorious civilization and put it on a path that leads it to heights hitherto unheard. This absolutely brilliant piece of scholarship from Deepak I hope is only a beginning on this front from him and many others like him.  The books deals with three aspects with the first of them being Coloniality. While I had knowledge of colonialism, like most others in India and British Colonialism to be precise, but had never heard of 'Coloniality'. Deepak wonderfully explains what is Coloniality and provides definitions from various authors and goes on to explain how Coloniality still pervades most of the colonised world and shows how Bharat is no exception to it.  He then introduces 'Decoloniality', what it means, its origins and refers to the scholarship works on it. Decoloniality was first coined in Latin America and was first proposed in the 1980's and is now spread to South America and most parts of Africa. He goes on to explain in great detail what is decoloniality, it's methods of working, it's desired outcomes and its effect on society. He also goes on to explain it's importance to Bharat and it's civilisational existence. However, what surprises me most on Decoloniality is we in Bharat have never heard about it or have an idea that such a school of thought exists and what it's implications are formerly colonised societies.  Introducing such an absolutely brilliant school of thought to Bharat, illustrating it's need and significance to a civilisation that is in dire need of intellectual capacity is in itself a huge achievement of Deepak and he doesn't stop there. He uses it illustrate to us it's civilisational relevance and puts a mirror to our face to show the true extent of Coloniality in our state and the urgent need to shed us off of this demon that has pervaded us in every aspect of society.  This brings him to the second section of the book - 'Civilisation'. Here he talks about various aspects Christian OET (Onto Epistemological Thelogy) and it's colonising nature along with the existing Indic OETs of the time and how they were systematically destroyed by the White European Coloniser and it's successor Western Imperialism. He traces the roots of this ideology to 1493 CE and the age of enlightenment in Christian Europe and not the 18th century as widely believed when the English first setup trading posts in Bharat. He clearly demonstrates how it was Christian beliefs about race and superiority were the driving factors behind the colonial nature of European forces and that everything else was simply a by-product of that colonising nature.  In this section he produces first hand material of various Christian bishops, leaders of states and provides the reader with first hand information on what the true nature and intent of colonialism was and goes on to show how present day nation states have a distinct Christian nature to them. He also shows us how the clashes between Roman Catholics and Protestants were the reason for various modern day concepts of 'Church and State', secularism, tolerance etc.  However, the most important aspect of this section and the aspect where Deepak's brilliance shine through are where he discusses how the Christian OET was used to understand indigenous communities world over and Indic society with regard to Bharat. His brilliance with regard understanding the Christian nature of the Coloniser his acts of aggression, suppression against the native communities of Bharat and his Cartesian dual approach to mankind and clearly communicate to the reader the lens with which the coloniser looked at Indic communities are the outstanding contributions he will do for generations of Bharatiyas to come.  Finally, he comes to the period of 19th century and onwards, which forms the third part of his book - Constitution, and what secular in the coloniser conscious meant and what is the effect of it on the present day lives of Bharatiyas. He again very clearly demonstrates with original transcriptions of Parliamentary debates, letters between various church officials and British officials and how Christian values were subtly but surely introduced in Bharat and what the intent and ultimate aim was of the Coloniser and how they wanted to achieve that.  He goes into great detail on the Government of India acts of 1813, 1853, 1858 and the first Constitution of India of 1919 and what was the basis of their formation, their intent, their methods of achieving it and how they planned to support proselytisation through various missionaries. Here, the brilliance of Deepak the lawyer and student of law shines brightly through the such that the entire left-liberal gang will be thrown into the obscurities of dark hell (pun entirely intended).  He finally shows us how Protestant Christian values were universalised through international laws, the League of Nations and other such world bodies and how it affects everyone even today and especially Bharat as it is the only standing civilisation since the dawn of Christianity and Islam.  This is book is going to be remembered as the first attempt of decolonising the Indian mind and it is the very first step in what is a very long journey to decoloniality as Deepak points out Bharat has two colonialities in its present form and we will have to go as far as back as the 8th century to fully achieve decolonisation.  However, the beauty of the book doesn't lie in its use of complex English terms, or Deepak's brilliance in matters of civilisation or his skills as a lawyer. Neither does it lie in his understanding of Christian nature and intent of the European Coloniser or in his ability to put it down in the form of a scholarly book. The beauty entirely lies in the ugly, uncomfortable and often terrifying and spine chilling questions it poses to the reader and how those questions put a mirror to the Indic society and the petrifying form of its present state of existence. Finally, just as the Bhagavad Gita has been the guiding light and continues to be so for a multitude of generations of Bharatiyas, this book is going to be a beacon of light for all of us on the Indic side and is but the first light and a ray of hope for all surviving Indic communities for a path towards complete decoloniality that will ultimately lead to the reflourishing of the Indic Civilisation across the sacred geography of Bharat and world over. 

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abhilash

    If you want to decolonize your mind, this is the best book for you! Seriously, to the Westernized English speaking Indian who takes Western categories of political, social and legal discourse for granted, this book is the antidote. He goes step by step from the very beginning and explains how terms we use to explain nation and civilization came into being in the Western world and what their meaning meant in the Western context. Foundational words of Western civilization such as - modern, civiliz If you want to decolonize your mind, this is the best book for you! Seriously, to the Westernized English speaking Indian who takes Western categories of political, social and legal discourse for granted, this book is the antidote. He goes step by step from the very beginning and explains how terms we use to explain nation and civilization came into being in the Western world and what their meaning meant in the Western context. Foundational words of Western civilization such as - modern, civilized, secular, toleration, discovery, etc., are all examined. Their origins understood and their meaning scrutinized. Their lift and shift applicability in a different civilization that did not go through the same historical context is examined. The author explains with a clarity that no critic can ignore. This will have implications not only in India, but also in all the post-colonial societies and the society of their former colonial masters. The crystal clear clarity and linguistic precision along with context setting by extensively quoting primary sources make the material a compelling read. I feel like a fish seeing the water I am swimming in for the very first time!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shanmugam Ramasamy

    A great book to read and understand the contempt the british had for Indians, and how we shamelessly still aspire to be equal to the west , by showing how western(modern) we could be, rather than saying we were and are equal in our own skins and color . Some very strong points made . The language is definitely quite difficult to understand for a naive reader. Looking forward for the other books .

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sidhartha

    Superb book on decolonaialty. Read yourself to experience it. Don't want to ruin the experience 😉 Superb book on decolonaialty. Read yourself to experience it. Don't want to ruin the experience 😉

  16. 5 out of 5

    Selva Kumar

    Must read for every Indian.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sai Sourabh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nishu Thakur

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sridhar Tiruchendurai

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ananaya

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mayank Singh

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shreyansh Thakur

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sanmesh Kalyanpur

  24. 4 out of 5

    Prasad Ainapure

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mohit Rajoura

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lord

  27. 5 out of 5

    Umasankar

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aanchal Chowrasia

  29. 5 out of 5

    Prashant

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dhruv Mittal

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