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The Drowning Sea

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"The bucolic setting, emphasis on family and leisurely pace make for a nice end run around traditional police procedurals." —The New York Times Book Review In The Drowning Sea, Sarah Stewart Taylor returns to the critically acclaimed world of Maggie D’arcy with another atmospheric mystery so vivid readers will smell the salt in the air and hear the wind on the cliffs. For t "The bucolic setting, emphasis on family and leisurely pace make for a nice end run around traditional police procedurals." —The New York Times Book Review In The Drowning Sea, Sarah Stewart Taylor returns to the critically acclaimed world of Maggie D’arcy with another atmospheric mystery so vivid readers will smell the salt in the air and hear the wind on the cliffs. For the first time in her adult life, former Long Island homicide detective Maggie D’arcy is unemployed. No cases to focus on, no leads to investigate, just a whole summer on a remote West Cork peninsula with her teenage daughter Lilly and her boyfriend, Conor and his son. The plan is to prepare Lilly for a move to Ireland. But their calm vacation takes a dangerous turn when human remains wash up below the steep cliffs of Ross Head. When construction worker Lukas Adamik disappeared months ago, everyone assumed he had gone home to Poland. Now that his body has been found, the guards, including Maggie's friends Roly Byrne and Katya Grzeskiewicz, seem to think he threw himself from the cliffs. But as Maggie gets to know the residents of the nearby village and learns about the history of the peninsula and its abandoned Anglo Irish manor house, once home to a famous Irish painter who died under mysterious circumstances, she starts to think there's something else going on. Something deadly. And when Lilly starts dating one of the dead man's friends, Maggie grows worried about her daughter being so close to another investigation and about what the investigation will uncover. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime, and village politics are woven throughout this small seaside community, and as the summer progresses, Maggie is pulled deeper into the web of lies, further from those she loves, and closer to the truth.


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"The bucolic setting, emphasis on family and leisurely pace make for a nice end run around traditional police procedurals." —The New York Times Book Review In The Drowning Sea, Sarah Stewart Taylor returns to the critically acclaimed world of Maggie D’arcy with another atmospheric mystery so vivid readers will smell the salt in the air and hear the wind on the cliffs. For t "The bucolic setting, emphasis on family and leisurely pace make for a nice end run around traditional police procedurals." —The New York Times Book Review In The Drowning Sea, Sarah Stewart Taylor returns to the critically acclaimed world of Maggie D’arcy with another atmospheric mystery so vivid readers will smell the salt in the air and hear the wind on the cliffs. For the first time in her adult life, former Long Island homicide detective Maggie D’arcy is unemployed. No cases to focus on, no leads to investigate, just a whole summer on a remote West Cork peninsula with her teenage daughter Lilly and her boyfriend, Conor and his son. The plan is to prepare Lilly for a move to Ireland. But their calm vacation takes a dangerous turn when human remains wash up below the steep cliffs of Ross Head. When construction worker Lukas Adamik disappeared months ago, everyone assumed he had gone home to Poland. Now that his body has been found, the guards, including Maggie's friends Roly Byrne and Katya Grzeskiewicz, seem to think he threw himself from the cliffs. But as Maggie gets to know the residents of the nearby village and learns about the history of the peninsula and its abandoned Anglo Irish manor house, once home to a famous Irish painter who died under mysterious circumstances, she starts to think there's something else going on. Something deadly. And when Lilly starts dating one of the dead man's friends, Maggie grows worried about her daughter being so close to another investigation and about what the investigation will uncover. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime, and village politics are woven throughout this small seaside community, and as the summer progresses, Maggie is pulled deeper into the web of lies, further from those she loves, and closer to the truth.

30 review for The Drowning Sea

  1. 4 out of 5

    PamG

    Sarah Stewart Taylor balances a police procedural with sleuthing by a former homicide detective and with family drama in The Drowning Sea , the third book in her Maggie D’arcy series. Maggie is currently unemployed and on vacation in the village of Rosscliffe on a remote West Cork peninsula in Ireland. Her daughter Lilly as well as her boyfriend Conor and his son Adrien are with her. When a tourist finds the body of construction worker Lukas Adamik, everyone seems to think he committed suicide Sarah Stewart Taylor balances a police procedural with sleuthing by a former homicide detective and with family drama in The Drowning Sea , the third book in her Maggie D’arcy series. Maggie is currently unemployed and on vacation in the village of Rosscliffe on a remote West Cork peninsula in Ireland. Her daughter Lilly as well as her boyfriend Conor and his son Adrien are with her. When a tourist finds the body of construction worker Lukas Adamik, everyone seems to think he committed suicide by jumping from the cliffs into the sea. However, as Maggie learns more about the village and its people, she thinks it could be murder. When Lilly starts dating one of Lukas’ friends, Maggie is determined to get answers and protect her daughter. The author does a great job of characterization. The characters, brimming with personality and depth, make it easy to bond with many of them and be wary of others. The protagonist is determined to solve the various mysteries and learn more about the history of the village, but she is far from perfect. Deciding whether to move from Long Island to Ireland is only the beginning. If she and Lilly move, what will Maggie do? There’s no going back to her old job in New York. How will Lilly adjust? While points of view shift throughout the novel, Maggie’s is the central one. The transitions worked well for me. This is a well-plotted story with some unpredictable moments and a few twists and turns. For a small and relatively remote village that is gaining tourist interest, there was a lot of action, deception, half-truths, secrets, mysteries, and outright lies. Nevertheless, which ones are important? I kept turning the pages wondering what I would surmise next. The world-building is excellent, transporting me to the coast of Ireland. I could easily visualize the village and the Ross Head peninsula and feel the wind blowing in from the sea. While this worked as a stand-alone novel for me, I believe it would have been beneficial to read the earlier books in the series first. The novel isn’t fast paced, but it held my interest throughout. Overall, this book was engaging, atmospheric, and suspenseful. It gave readers an opportunity to try to solve the multiple mysteries along with Maggie and the police. How successful will you be? This novel should delight those readers that enjoy international mysteries that have strong female characters and an absorbing plot. I’m looking forward to reading more from this author. St. Martin’s Press – Minotaur Books and Sarah Stewart Taylor provided a complimentary digital ARC of this novel via NetGalley. This is my honest review. Opinions are mine alone and are not biased in any way. Publication date is currently set for June 21, 2022. This review was originally posted at Mystery and Suspense Magazine. --------------------------------------- 3.5 stars rounded up to 4. Review coming soon.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    The Drowning Sea is the third in the Maggie D’Arcy series. And while I enjoyed the prior two, when Maggie was a police detective, this one was lacking something. Maggie has retired and come to Ireland to spend the summer with her boyfriend and decide if she wants to move with her daughter there permanently. They’re renting a lovely cottage in a small atmospheric town when a body washes ashore. Maggie is curious, but she’s not part of the active investigation. She’s also trying to help her landlo The Drowning Sea is the third in the Maggie D’Arcy series. And while I enjoyed the prior two, when Maggie was a police detective, this one was lacking something. Maggie has retired and come to Ireland to spend the summer with her boyfriend and decide if she wants to move with her daughter there permanently. They’re renting a lovely cottage in a small atmospheric town when a body washes ashore. Maggie is curious, but she’s not part of the active investigation. She’s also trying to help her landlord with a mystery from 1973, when the woman lived with her family in the manor house. There’s a decided division in the town regarding the proposed development of the old manor house, which has been abandoned for decades. Stewart does an excellent job painting the town and the cliffs. She doesn’t do nearly as good a job giving the reader a sense of the characters, of which there are a lot. And Maggie seems to float through the first half of the book, not really learning much about either mystery. We also hear from the local detective, Griz, as she investigates, which provides the reader with background on a prior murder as well as what’s happening with the active investigation. But there was a disjointed feeling to the story and I had trouble envisioning some of the scenes, especially as the book reached its climax. At times, the writing just felt clunky. This would not work well as a stand alone. It’s important to have Maggie and Lily’s background from the prior books. My thanks to Netgalley and St. Martin’s Press for an advance copy of this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shereadbookblog

    This is the third in the Maggie D’Arcy series; it is the first I have read. It works as a standalone but references to things in Maggie’s past made me wish I had read the others as well for better background. The prior novels bridged New York and Ireland; this one is set totally in the Emerald Isle. Maggie, no longer a New York detective, and her daughter are spending the summer in Ireland with her lover and his son in preparation for a permanent move there. While vacationing on the West Cork Sea This is the third in the Maggie D’Arcy series; it is the first I have read. It works as a standalone but references to things in Maggie’s past made me wish I had read the others as well for better background. The prior novels bridged New York and Ireland; this one is set totally in the Emerald Isle. Maggie, no longer a New York detective, and her daughter are spending the summer in Ireland with her lover and his son in preparation for a permanent move there. While vacationing on the West Cork Seaside, she is drawn into the local drama of controversy over the redevelopment of a rundown manor house and two suspicious deaths. Although the deaths are at the center of the story, this is not really a police procedural. Rather, it focuses more on Maggie and her “family” as well as the relationships, secrets, and conflicts of this small Irish village. With strong character development and atmospheric descriptions of the seaside environment, It takes a while for the mystery to develop. I had some difficulty keeping some of the characters straight and I thought the plot lines unraveled a bit near the end. Still it was an engrossing, entertaining read. Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for the DRC Follow me on Instagram at: https://www.instagram.com/shereadbook...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea | thrillerbookbabe

    This is the third book in the Maggie D'arcy series and the third one I've read. Thank you to Sarah Stewart Taylor and Minotaur Books for another chance to read one of her books. This one again centers around homicide detective Maggie, and her calm vacation by the sea. Her vacation quickly gets more interesting when a body washes up on the shore. While many people think it was a jumper, Maggie learns about the history of the area and about other deaths. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime, a This is the third book in the Maggie D'arcy series and the third one I've read. Thank you to Sarah Stewart Taylor and Minotaur Books for another chance to read one of her books. This one again centers around homicide detective Maggie, and her calm vacation by the sea. Her vacation quickly gets more interesting when a body washes up on the shore. While many people think it was a jumper, Maggie learns about the history of the area and about other deaths. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime, and village politics are woven throughout this small seaside community, and as the summer progresses, Maggie is pulled deeper into the web of lies, further from those she loves, and closer to the truth. Thoughts: I really love how atmospheric this series is! The writing is wonderful and the setting feels like a mysterious character. You don't have to read the other two books to get into this one, so don't worry about catching up! The setting of Ireland is fun, as well as the addition of a haunted house on a hill! The multiple mysteries tie together to create one great story. The plot builds over time as more and more comes out as Maggie investigates. I love the strong women in this book and the way their characters are written. This is a police procedural but it has plenty of domestic suspense thrown in a as well. 4-stars!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bam cooks the books ;-)

    In this third outing in the series, Maggie D'Arcy and her daughter Lilly have come to Ireland to spend the summer with Conor and Adrien, to decide whether to permanently move there. They've rented a cottage in West Cork on the coast and look forward to some peace and quiet. But a young man's body has been found in the sea at the bottom of the cliff and Maggie can't help but be a little curious. Was it suicide, an accident or murder? She also gets roped into looking into an old mystery by their e In this third outing in the series, Maggie D'Arcy and her daughter Lilly have come to Ireland to spend the summer with Conor and Adrien, to decide whether to permanently move there. They've rented a cottage in West Cork on the coast and look forward to some peace and quiet. But a young man's body has been found in the sea at the bottom of the cliff and Maggie can't help but be a little curious. Was it suicide, an accident or murder? She also gets roped into looking into an old mystery by their elderly landlord. The old and decrepit manor house on the cliff has secrets to tell. Could it be haunted? Meanwhile she dealing with her daughter's angst about making a permanent move to Ireland but maybe falling in love will ease the way... I enjoyed these characters with their many problems and secrets. The setting was creepily atmospheric and added to the tension of the plot. The ending kept me on pins and needles--quite dramatic! I'll definitely look forward to reading more in this series. NB: I received an arc of this new mystery from the publisher via NetGalley. Many thanks for the opportunity. My review is voluntary and the opinions expressed are my own.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Diana N.

    This book took me a bit to get into it. A summer vacation brought ex-detective Maggie Ireland and of course a body being discovered in the water reeled her back in to solve the mystery. I liked this book once it really got going, so over halfway in. There were so many characteristics to sort out, I was even a bit confused near the end. I did enjoy Maggie's family dynamics since that made them seem more relatable and real. I think the plot could have been streamlined a bit more instead of meanderin This book took me a bit to get into it. A summer vacation brought ex-detective Maggie Ireland and of course a body being discovered in the water reeled her back in to solve the mystery. I liked this book once it really got going, so over halfway in. There were so many characteristics to sort out, I was even a bit confused near the end. I did enjoy Maggie's family dynamics since that made them seem more relatable and real. I think the plot could have been streamlined a bit more instead of meandering so much. The 1970s history lesson part of the plot wasn't really necessary and didn't really add much. An old house and the cliffs added some of the eerie factor to the book, but not enough to have me on the edge of my seat. Overall enjoyable, but I left the end of the book with mixed feelings. Thank you to St. Martin's Press and Netgalley for providing me a copy of this ARC for my honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    ♥Rachel♥

    I’ve been a fan of the Maggie D’arcy series from the start and was eager to dive into the newest installment. For me, Maggie’s personal life is just as interesting as the mystery at the center of each new installment. Maggie has reunited with a man she met while trying to find her missing cousin in Ireland 23 years ago. They had a passionate few weeks together, but ended up parting ways for reasons that you’d have to read the book to understand. That mystery was solved in book one, with Maggie a I’ve been a fan of the Maggie D’arcy series from the start and was eager to dive into the newest installment. For me, Maggie’s personal life is just as interesting as the mystery at the center of each new installment. Maggie has reunited with a man she met while trying to find her missing cousin in Ireland 23 years ago. They had a passionate few weeks together, but ended up parting ways for reasons that you’d have to read the book to understand. That mystery was solved in book one, with Maggie assisting the Irish Garda, establishing the relationship between Maggie and Conor, and set up the rest of the stories to come. After the events from the last book Maggie is no longer working as a homicide detective in Long Island which leaves her and her teenage daughter, Lilly, free to spend the Summer in Ireland with Conor and his son. Maggie’s planning to move to Ireland and needs a way to break the news to Lilly. Maggie will have to start at the bottom of the police force in Ireland and the training is a bit of an issue for her and Conor. Spending the Summer in the beautiful coast of West Cork is just the respite they all need to recharge. However, Maggie always finds herself a few mysteries to solve. A young Polish worker goes missing and the rumor is he either committed suicide or fell off the treacherous cliffs into the sea. His girlfriend insists neither can be true. Also, Mrs. Crawford, owner of the idyllic cottage they’re staying at, has some childhood memories returning and she’s sure she remembers a blood-soaked rag hidden and a governess that went missing around the same time. Mrs. Crawford asks Maggie to look into it for her. These mysteries don’t seem like much danger at first, but the ending had me holding my breath for a second or two worried about how it’d all turn out! Sarah Stewart Taylor has a way of writing that brought Ross Head to life, with its stunning seaside cliffs and views! I’d love to stay in the cozy cottage described, minus the trouble Maggie encounters, of course. Although, maybe that might be a little fun, as long as it wasn’t too dangerous. The Maggie D’arcy series is best started from the beginning as the relationships and history are important to each story. I highly recommend the series for any who enjoy police procedurals with excellent characterization and beautiful, atmospheric writing. For audiobook lovers, the audios are fantastic! I alternately read and listened to all the books, and I was a little concerned because the narrator changed in this installment. However, Aoife McMahon was excellent with all accents. Maggie’s is a strange sort of Long Island/Irish mix and she nailed it, as the did the past narrator. The Irish accents were good, too, subtle, and genuine feeling, to me anyhow. An e-copy was kindly provided by Minotaur Books (I purchased the audio) in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edwin Hill

    I enjoyed this novel set in Ireland's Cork county enough that I booked a trip to Ireland to break out of my Covid funk. Stewart weaves an engaging story that's part mystery while centering the story around the Maggie D'arcy's domestic life as she struggles over whether to relocate to Dublin. The prose is beautiful and the descriptions of the Cork coastline are evocative and atmospheric. This can easily be read as a standalone. I enjoyed this novel set in Ireland's Cork county enough that I booked a trip to Ireland to break out of my Covid funk. Stewart weaves an engaging story that's part mystery while centering the story around the Maggie D'arcy's domestic life as she struggles over whether to relocate to Dublin. The prose is beautiful and the descriptions of the Cork coastline are evocative and atmospheric. This can easily be read as a standalone.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller

    In THE DROWNING SEA, Sarah Stewart Taylor’s third Maggie D’Arcy mystery, the former Suffolk County homicide detective from Long Island is on a summer vacation among the beautiful but dangerous cliffs of Ross Head in West Cork, Ireland. She is there with her teenage daughter, Lilly, and is sharing a cottage with her boyfriend, Conor, and his son, Adrien. Maggie seeks a fresh start after a rough finish to her time on the force, and she needs to sell her daughter on the idea of a permanent move to In THE DROWNING SEA, Sarah Stewart Taylor’s third Maggie D’Arcy mystery, the former Suffolk County homicide detective from Long Island is on a summer vacation among the beautiful but dangerous cliffs of Ross Head in West Cork, Ireland. She is there with her teenage daughter, Lilly, and is sharing a cottage with her boyfriend, Conor, and his son, Adrien. Maggie seeks a fresh start after a rough finish to her time on the force, and she needs to sell her daughter on the idea of a permanent move to Ireland. This will be tough as Lilly is still going through a lot following the death of her father just over a year ago. Maggie is adjusting to Ross Head quickly, which is marked not only by its scenic cliffs and pounding sea but also by Rosscliffe Manor, a huge, abandoned castle-like structure that must have some serious history behind it. She has befriended Lissa Crawford, who runs a bakery shop and happens to be their landlady for the summer. One day, while she is chatting with her, DS Ann Tobin of the Garda Síochána stops by and informs Lissa that a Belgian tourist found the remains of a body on the beach that morning. The corpse is that of Lukas Adamik, a Polish construction worker who had gone missing. Conor takes his family to a gastropub where they run into one of his academic colleagues, Grace, who invites them to join her. Dining at her large table are a number of locals who will play big roles in the story. Sam Nevin, Lukas’ former employer, is the main developer of Ross Head’s revitalization and is looking to turn Rosscliffe Manor into a fully functional hotel. Grace’s husband, Lorcan Murphy, is also a big cog in the wheel of this development machine from a financial standpoint. The D’arcys end their evening in the village with a visit to the tavern where a local band is playing. Alex, the lead singer, takes a shine to Lilly, and it’s not long before they become an item. It turns out that Alex is from Poland and was a friend of Lukas. Maggie does some digging and finds out from her contact at the Garda that Ross Head has been under investigation for drug trafficking for a number of years. Could this have played a role in Lukas’ tragic fate or perhaps be tied to the Polish workers in the village? Needless to say, Lilly’s new relationship with Alex does not leave Maggie with a warm and fuzzy feeling based on all the information she has gathered. It’s not long before a second body turns up on the beach. This time it’s Zuzanna, a waitress at the gastropub who dated Lukas and may have been silenced for whatever she might have known about his death. Meanwhile, others in the village are trying to claim that she took her own life out of grief. Now, both the Garda and drug enforcement officers have descended upon Ross Head, bringing to a halt all the construction and putting each resident under suspicion for what could be a string of possible homicides. THE DROWNING SEA is a perfect mystery novel. Not only are we presented with numerous suspects, the motive for any potential murder may lie in the village’s deep history. Ireland is a beautiful and mysterious place, and Ross Head is no exception. Sarah Stewart Taylor deftly handles all of this and more without letting the narrative become overstuffed. The finale is quite suspenseful with more than a few surprises, and I look forward to seeing how the series progresses. Reviewed by Ray Palen

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ruby Reads

    #Netgalley #TheDrowningSea Gorgeous and atmospheric murder mystery! If you love Ireland, you will enjoy this read immensely, as the setting is well depicted. Highly recommend for lovers of female detectives, gothic novels, and slow-burning suspense. This ARC was provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

    Menacing, twisty, and intriguing! In this latest novel by Taylor, The Drowning Sea, we head back into the life of Maggie D’Arcy, who, after recently leaving her job as a detective on Long Island, heads for a vacation in West Cork, Ireland, where things aren’t as quiet and relaxing as she hoped when the town she’s ends up staying in is rife with misfits, mayhem, a history of drug smuggling, and an estate, Rosscliffe Manor, that seems to have a lot of long-buried secrets of its own. The writing is c Menacing, twisty, and intriguing! In this latest novel by Taylor, The Drowning Sea, we head back into the life of Maggie D’Arcy, who, after recently leaving her job as a detective on Long Island, heads for a vacation in West Cork, Ireland, where things aren’t as quiet and relaxing as she hoped when the town she’s ends up staying in is rife with misfits, mayhem, a history of drug smuggling, and an estate, Rosscliffe Manor, that seems to have a lot of long-buried secrets of its own. The writing is crisp and tight. The characters are multilayered, dependable, and tenacious. And the plot is a captivating mix of twists, turns, red herrings, secrets, deception, obsession, manipulation, malicious intentions, small-town politics, and murder. Overall, I found The Drowning Sea to be another fabulous addition to the Maggie D’Arcy series by Taylor with its complex characters, sinister storyline, and exceptionally dramatic ending. Thank you to St. Martin’s Press – Minotaur Press for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sage

    This series is just fantastic, and #3 in the Maggie D’Arcy mystery series didn’t disappoint. I love the fact that this reads like a standalone — there are hints to the previous two books, but if you haven’t read them, it’s not a big deal. I loved the callbacks to the two other books especially because it’s been a while since I’ve read them, and it was a great memory jog. I love that this book was fully set in Ireland — the southern coast of Ireland, in West Cork. I haven’t been to Ireland (only This series is just fantastic, and #3 in the Maggie D’Arcy mystery series didn’t disappoint. I love the fact that this reads like a standalone — there are hints to the previous two books, but if you haven’t read them, it’s not a big deal. I loved the callbacks to the two other books especially because it’s been a while since I’ve read them, and it was a great memory jog. I love that this book was fully set in Ireland — the southern coast of Ireland, in West Cork. I haven’t been to Ireland (only spent 48 hours in Dublin once in 2015) in years but this was also a lovely bit of “armchair travel,” and reignited my desire to go back to Ireland someday soon. Once again, Maggie is a badass protagonist. I was a bit thrown at first how the narrative switched from Maggie to random chapters with Ann Toibin, Griz (love her!), Agnieska etc., but I really do think it added something extra to the narrative, and I did enjoy the other perspectives and seeing how everything came together at the end. Once again, Sarah Stewart Taylor destroys me with all of the PLOT TWISTS that I never ever see coming 🤣🥲 I really tried to predict this book, but gave up halfway through lol and by the end, I was basically just like !!!!!!!!!!!!!! Maggie and her daughter, Lilly, are spending the summer in Ireland with Maggie’s partner, Conor, and his son Adrian. For the first time in her adult life, Maggie is unemployed, and really doesn’t know how to chill out lol (relatable). Human remains are found nearby below the steep cliffs of Ross Head, and obviously she can’t stay away, and is lowkey, unofficially, back in the game. It’s always so fascinating to get inside Maggie’s head and see her mind spin in a million different directions as she’s trying to grasp the different threads and figure out what the heck is happening in this possible suicide-turned-murder investigation. Fantastic, atmospheric read full of twists and turns and jaw dropping moments. I absolutely flew through it. So many things happened in this book: - tension between Maggie and her 17-year-old Lilly about a potential move from Long Island to Dublin, and then tension about Lilly dating a friend of the murder victim (and being hella late for curfew without a courtesy text, which annoyed the heck outta ME lol) - History of Rosscliffe House, the Crawfords, painter/Maggie’s landlady Lissa Crawford (who sold the house to a local developer and now has regrets) - Small town/village vibes — everyone knows everyone and is everyone’s business - Drug investigations and illicit deals - Maggie lowkey investigating while navigating relationships with her partner, his ex-wife, locals in town, the local gardai force

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Having quit her job as homicide detective on Long Island, Maggie has taken her daughter to Ireland to see if the teen would be willing to relocate there, since Maggie would like to join the man she's loved for many years. Lilly's attraction for a young Polish musician living in the West Cork village where they are vacationing answers one question, but the deaths of two Polish workers who were friends makes Maggie just itch to get involved in the police investigation. Since she can't, she tries t Having quit her job as homicide detective on Long Island, Maggie has taken her daughter to Ireland to see if the teen would be willing to relocate there, since Maggie would like to join the man she's loved for many years. Lilly's attraction for a young Polish musician living in the West Cork village where they are vacationing answers one question, but the deaths of two Polish workers who were friends makes Maggie just itch to get involved in the police investigation. Since she can't, she tries to help their landlady, who used to be daughter of the now-deserted manor house, reclaim her lost memories of the last summer she spent there. Was a young woman killed there? Is the house really haunted? And does this old, old story have anything to do with more recent deaths? I gradually got used to reading a book written in the present tense, but it took a few chapters!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Suzan

    I loved this book. Reading the description of the west coast of Ireland made me long to go back and visit again. This book is book 3 in a series called Maggie D'arcy. I had not read the first two books yet (Oh but I will). I had no problem following the story if anything the references to the other books just made me want to read them more. A huge thank you to NetGalley, Sarah Stewart Taylor and St. Martins Press for the ARC copy. This review is my personal opinion. I loved this book. Reading the description of the west coast of Ireland made me long to go back and visit again. This book is book 3 in a series called Maggie D'arcy. I had not read the first two books yet (Oh but I will). I had no problem following the story if anything the references to the other books just made me want to read them more. A huge thank you to NetGalley, Sarah Stewart Taylor and St. Martins Press for the ARC copy. This review is my personal opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mehva

    This is an interesting book about a former police detective and her family, healing from recents traumas and trying to rebuild, stumbling into a town with lots of mysteries both current and many years ago. >|Likeable main characters, a little slow at first with so many characters and history of the town to be described but it picked up and resolved all the loose ends.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Tripp

    This is the 3rd book in the series and doesn't disappoint. In this homicide detective Maggie has retired and is visiting Ireland when a body washes up on the shore. The characters and the investigation capture the reader. I highly recommend this book, and all the author's previous books. I received a copy from Net Galley in exchange for my honest review. This is the 3rd book in the series and doesn't disappoint. In this homicide detective Maggie has retired and is visiting Ireland when a body washes up on the shore. The characters and the investigation capture the reader. I highly recommend this book, and all the author's previous books. I received a copy from Net Galley in exchange for my honest review.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina (AudreyHepburnOfBooks)

    Happy PUB Day! The Drowning Sea is a really good atmospheric murder mystery. What should have been a nice summer family vacation in Ireland turns deadly. When a body washes up on shore - Former Detective Maggie D’Arcy can’t resist the urge not to investigate further once she starts to notice clues being overlooked. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime and village politics come into play. I enjoyed seeing the investigation unfold outside of the active investigation - a different perspective. T Happy PUB Day! The Drowning Sea is a really good atmospheric murder mystery. What should have been a nice summer family vacation in Ireland turns deadly. When a body washes up on shore - Former Detective Maggie D’Arcy can’t resist the urge not to investigate further once she starts to notice clues being overlooked. Old secrets, hidden relationships, crime and village politics come into play. I enjoyed seeing the investigation unfold outside of the active investigation - a different perspective. The author does an amazing job of drawing in your attention to details with the landscape, now I want to go to Ireland. This is the third instalment in the Maggie D’Arcy series and now I have to read the first two. Not that I’m complaining and you can totally read this as a stand-alone. Check it out if you enjoy a good murder mystery novel with some police procedural aspects. Special thanks to minotaur books for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy Gray

    In this third in the Maggie D'Arcy mystery series, D'Arcy is vacationing on a rural peninsula in West Cork with her boyfriend and their two teens when she's drawn into a local case involving a real estate development and the deaths of several local immigrant workers. While Taylor's books always provide a lovely sense of place and interesting, complex characters, this title is my least favorite in the series. The mystery is less engrossing than in the first two books, and the resolution employed o In this third in the Maggie D'Arcy mystery series, D'Arcy is vacationing on a rural peninsula in West Cork with her boyfriend and their two teens when she's drawn into a local case involving a real estate development and the deaths of several local immigrant workers. While Taylor's books always provide a lovely sense of place and interesting, complex characters, this title is my least favorite in the series. The mystery is less engrossing than in the first two books, and the resolution employed one of my pet peeve tropes. The ending was so sudden that I went back and re-read it, thinking I'd missed something. Recommended for die-hard fans of the series, if only to keep up with the development's in D'Arcy's personal life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Carol lowkey.bookish

    This was an entertaining third book in the gripping mystery series by Sarah Stewart Taylor. My favorite part of this series is the way the author can set the scene, and Sarah Steward Taylor has done it again! She is a master at vividly describing a landscape and placing the reader smack dab in the middle of it! In this book it was an Irish coastal town with a mysterious (haunted?) house –sufficiently beautiful and creepy This is a bit different from the other books in the series because Maggie is This was an entertaining third book in the gripping mystery series by Sarah Stewart Taylor. My favorite part of this series is the way the author can set the scene, and Sarah Steward Taylor has done it again! She is a master at vividly describing a landscape and placing the reader smack dab in the middle of it! In this book it was an Irish coastal town with a mysterious (haunted?) house –sufficiently beautiful and creepy This is a bit different from the other books in the series because Maggie is not a detective anymore. I really like her as a detective working with her colleagues, so I hope Maggie becomes a PI or a detective again in future books in the series. The mystery was interesting and had sufficient twists and turns. I did not figure out the murderer until the end! I liked the family tension between Maggie dealing with her daughter’s teen years while navigating her new relationship with Connor. I can’t wait to see what is next for these characters. I received a complementary eARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review

  20. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Of the three books, so far, in this series, this is my least favorite. I think it's due to the transition for Maggie who is trying to decide what she wants to do. now that she has retired from the police force. She and her daughter Lilly have rented a cottage on the West Cork Peninsula to share with her boyfriend Conor and his son, Adrien. Will she find a way to continue her career in law enforcement by joining the Garda? As that big question looms over her she becomes involved with both a new c Of the three books, so far, in this series, this is my least favorite. I think it's due to the transition for Maggie who is trying to decide what she wants to do. now that she has retired from the police force. She and her daughter Lilly have rented a cottage on the West Cork Peninsula to share with her boyfriend Conor and his son, Adrien. Will she find a way to continue her career in law enforcement by joining the Garda? As that big question looms over her she becomes involved with both a new case and a decades old one. The body of a man missing for months washes up on the beach - accident or homicide? Then her landlady asks for her help finding answers about a decades old disappearance connected to Rosscliffe Manor, an abandoned manor house slatted for redevelopment into a hotel. Some locals are happy about it but others not at all. Which may be hiding a decades old secret? The atmosphere of the Irish village, the inhabitants and various issues addressed make for an enjoyable read. There are lots of characters to keep straight and that slowed the pace a bit as I tried to stay focused on their relationships. The setting alone makes this a great read. My thanks to the publisher Minotaur and to NetGalley for giving me an advance copy in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Thomasiana

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. If you like mysteries set in locations that feel like home and an exotic land at the same time, this book is for you. The Drowning Sea has many of the things I love- a beautiful setting on the Irish coast, a small town mystery where everyone knows each other and keeps their secrets, generations of families with secrets...I could go on but you get the idea. I enjoyed the characters and especially the budding romance between two young characters, Lilly and Alex. The way Sarah Stewart Taylor built t If you like mysteries set in locations that feel like home and an exotic land at the same time, this book is for you. The Drowning Sea has many of the things I love- a beautiful setting on the Irish coast, a small town mystery where everyone knows each other and keeps their secrets, generations of families with secrets...I could go on but you get the idea. I enjoyed the characters and especially the budding romance between two young characters, Lilly and Alex. The way Sarah Stewart Taylor built their relationship felt true and real for teenagers who are discovering love for the first time. The back story on the townies and their ancestors was one of my favorite parts. I loved learning more about Lissa's family and what truly happened at Rosscliffe House. The ending was partially a surprise. One part was obvious but the other was a shock. I read a lot of mysteries so it's nice when the answer takes me by surprise. I liked the different perspectives and the writing was well done. I will be reading more of Taylor's books in the near future! Thank you to the author and Netgalley for the ARC.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I enjoyed this contemporary mystery that had the shadowy feel of a gothic novel. The setting on a rocky cliff line along the coast of West Cork, Ireland, also played a major role in the atmospheric feel of the book, not to mention the abandoned and thought to be haunted manor house on the hill. This is the third book in a series featuring Maggie D’arcy, a former Long Island, NY, homicide detective, who happens to be vacationing on a remote peninsula with her daughter, boyfriend and her boyfrie I enjoyed this contemporary mystery that had the shadowy feel of a gothic novel. The setting on a rocky cliff line along the coast of West Cork, Ireland, also played a major role in the atmospheric feel of the book, not to mention the abandoned and thought to be haunted manor house on the hill. This is the third book in a series featuring Maggie D’arcy, a former Long Island, NY, homicide detective, who happens to be vacationing on a remote peninsula with her daughter, boyfriend and her boyfriend’s son when a body washes ashore on the rocks below the cliff where the manor house and their cottage sits. Maggie of course wants to find out who the dead man is, but the local authorities are reluctant to accept her help. She is thinking about moving to Ireland to be with her boyfriend but is facing many obstacles including the time and training needed to resume a career as a detective and maybe more importantly, the happiness and well-being of her teenage daughter who would be uprooted from her life back in New York. The author has written an interesting mystery with well-developed characters. I would recommend it to other readers. I would like to thank the publishers and NetGalley for allowing me to read an ARC of this book.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Excellent! A satisfying ending & that almost-at-the-end climactic scene--wow!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    I love reading mystery books and was delighted to have received an ARC of The Drowning Sea by Sarah Stewart Taylor. I really enjoyed this book and did not want to put it down. The length of this read (352 pages) was just about right for me. I did not read the first and second installment of this book, but after reading this book, I definitely plan to go back and read them. This book goes on sale June 21, 2022.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    I dunno. I loved the first one and the second one was decent but now it feels a bit tired. Maggie is living in Ireland and considering a move there. So there is a mystery but she is in the role of annoying bystander who happens to be an ex cop. Just mediocre.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Gloria Zak

    I enjoyed the characters. Would read more in the series. However, it introduced too many characters. Practically entire village. And the village history so I had some difficulty remembering who was who throughout the book and their importance. Ending was great.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    A cop who left Long Island, NY to be with her fiancé who is a professor of Irish history and hopes to join up with the Gardai, her teenage daughter who is still a mess following her father's suicide by the sea, and now a battered corpse on the beach. Was this man murdered, victim of an accident, or a suicide? It's a dangerous area and accidents or suicides are less than uncommon. There is a lot more to the current and history of the area, which also has a history of smuggling. Slow and steady in A cop who left Long Island, NY to be with her fiancé who is a professor of Irish history and hopes to join up with the Gardai, her teenage daughter who is still a mess following her father's suicide by the sea, and now a battered corpse on the beach. Was this man murdered, victim of an accident, or a suicide? It's a dangerous area and accidents or suicides are less than uncommon. There is a lot more to the current and history of the area, which also has a history of smuggling. Slow and steady investigation complete with a steady addition of deaths and suspects, plot twists, and red herrings. It is also a love letter to the beauty of the West Irish coast with exquisite imagery. A fine read! I requested and received a temporary e-book from St. Martin's Press/Minotaur Books via NetGalley. Thank you!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anne G. Kasaba

    Loved this book. The author did a masterful job of drawing me into the atmosphere of the Irish coastline. She drew such a vivid picture that I could close my eyes and be transported to that place. She also did an excellent job of showing the transition needed for an American police officer to become an Irish Garda. The story was well written and the characters multifaceted. The mystery was well plotted. When I say mystery I am actually referring to the deaths that occurred. There was a periphera Loved this book. The author did a masterful job of drawing me into the atmosphere of the Irish coastline. She drew such a vivid picture that I could close my eyes and be transported to that place. She also did an excellent job of showing the transition needed for an American police officer to become an Irish Garda. The story was well written and the characters multifaceted. The mystery was well plotted. When I say mystery I am actually referring to the deaths that occurred. There was a peripheral mystery spanning historical time periods. An excellent read! I received an arc of this book and voluntarily provided a review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ray Palen

    In Sarah Stewart Taylor’s latest Maggie D’Arcy mystery, THE DROWNING SEA, she has taken the former Suffolk County Homicide Detective from Long Island, NY, and set her on a summer vacation among the beautiful but dangerous cliffs of Ross Head in West Cork, Ireland. She is there with her teen-age daughter, Lilly, and sharing a scenic cottage with her boyfriend from Dublin, Conor and his teen-age son, Adrien. Maggie needs a new start after a rough finish to her time on the force in Long Island and In Sarah Stewart Taylor’s latest Maggie D’Arcy mystery, THE DROWNING SEA, she has taken the former Suffolk County Homicide Detective from Long Island, NY, and set her on a summer vacation among the beautiful but dangerous cliffs of Ross Head in West Cork, Ireland. She is there with her teen-age daughter, Lilly, and sharing a scenic cottage with her boyfriend from Dublin, Conor and his teen-age son, Adrien. Maggie needs a new start after a rough finish to her time on the force in Long Island and she also needs to sell her daughter on the idea of a potential permanent move to Ireland. This will be tough as Lilly is still going through difficulties following the death of her father just a bit over a year prior. Maggie is adjusting to the small village of Ross Head quickly, which is not only marked by its’ scenic cliffs and pounding sea but also the huge, abandoned castle-like structure that must have some serious history behind it. She has befriended Lissa Crawford who runs a local bakery shop and who also happens to be their landlady for the summer. One day while she is chatting with her a local Garda Detective named Anne Tobin stops by and informs Lissa that a Belgian tourist found the remains of a body on the beach that morning. It looks like the body belongs to a Polish worker who had been in the village for a while working on a lot of the new construction that has been going on there by the name of Lukas. Of course, Maggie cannot stay out of a potential case and has even contemplated going through Garda training should she stay permanently in Dublin. Conor takes the family to the village to dine at the local gastropub when they run into one of his academic colleagues, Grace, who invites them all to join their large table. Dining at their large table are number of local characters who all play big roles in this story. Sam Nevin is the main developer of the revitalization of Ross Head and is also looking to turn the ‘castle’ into a fully functional hotel. He is there with his much younger wife, Rochelle. Grace’s husband, Lorcan, is also a big cog in the wheel of this development machine from a financial standpoint. The manager of the gastropub, Barry, is a relative of Sam’s and is introduced to the group during the meal. It also ironic that the two waitresses running the table, Agnieska and Zuzanna, where of Eastern European descent and it turns out Zuzanna was the girlfriend of young Lukas who has recently been found deceased. The family ends their evening in the village with a visit to the local tavern where a local band is playing. The band is made up of mostly young men and the lead singer, named Alex, takes a shine to young Lilly and it’s not long before the two become an item. Alex, as it turns out, is also from Poland and was friends with the late Lukas as well as the waitresses from the gastropub. While at the tavern, Maggie meets many other local characters including one who seems particularly shady by the name of Anton. Maggie does some digging and finds out from her contact at the Garda that Ross Head has been under investigation for drug trafficking for a number of years and this could very well have played into the death of young Lukas as well as having a connection with the Polish workers in the village. Needless to say, her daughter Lilly’s new relationship with the pub singer Alex does not leave her with a warm and fuzzy feeling based on all of this information. It’s not long before a second body turns up on the beach and this time it is none other than that of Zuzanna, the girlfriend of Lukas. This definitely alerts Maggie to the fact that she may have been silenced for something she knew about her boyfriends death --- even with other people in the village trying to claim she took her own life out of grief. Now, both the Garda and Drug Enforcement officers have descended upon Ross Head bringing a halt to all construction and putting all residents there under suspicion for what could be a string of possible murders. THE DROWNING SEA makes for a perfect murder mystery novel because not only are we presented with numerous suspects but the motive for any potential murders may lie in the deep history of this village. Maggie has the opportunity to delve deep into that very history of Ross Head and it is fascinating. Ireland is a beautiful and mysterious place and Ross Head is no exception. Sarah Stewart Taylor deftly handles all of this and more without letting the narrative ever become overstuffed and the finale is quite suspenseful with more than a few surprises. I look forward to seeing this Long Island Detective convert to an Irish Garda as this series moves forward. Reviewed by Ray Palen for Book Reporter

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    The third novel in Sarah Stewart Taylor’s Maggie D’Arcy series finds Maggie at a crossroads. Formerly a Long Island cop, she’s now unemployed, and in Ireland with her daughter on holiday with her boyfriend, Connor and his son. The first novel was Maggie’s journey backwards: the looked for the killer of her cousin, who had disappeared in Ireland twenty years before. The second novel finds her investigating a crime that begins on a Long Island beach but has roots in Ireland. This third novel finds The third novel in Sarah Stewart Taylor’s Maggie D’Arcy series finds Maggie at a crossroads. Formerly a Long Island cop, she’s now unemployed, and in Ireland with her daughter on holiday with her boyfriend, Connor and his son. The first novel was Maggie’s journey backwards: the looked for the killer of her cousin, who had disappeared in Ireland twenty years before. The second novel finds her investigating a crime that begins on a Long Island beach but has roots in Ireland. This third novel finds her firmly in Ireland, planning to move there, and deciding what she should do as far as a new career. As the book makes obvious, she very much misses police work and hates being on the outside looking in (this is a clue to her eventual decision, but it’s hardly a spoiler). More than anything else, these novels are a love letter to Ireland. While the first two had more of a city focus, this one is out in the country, by the water, where Maggie finds a great deal of solace in running and in early morning swims in the very cold sea. The atmosphere, the detail of the landscape – Stewart Taylor takes her reader there. This book also boasts a nice, haunted, gothic, creepy mansion at the center of it all. The little village where Maggie and Connor are spending their holiday is centered around this old mansion, the “Big House” of past days, where many of the villagers worked and where one of them, Lissa, lived as a girl. She has sold the family home to developers and lives in a cottage where she paints and where she has a bird’s eye view of her former family home. Added into this mix is a scattering of Polish workers, in town to work the construction jobs springing up as the old house is developed into a hotel and as fancier cottages are being built. The natives are split on whether development is good or bad – I kept flashing back to the 80’s film, Local Hero, where one of the characters, talking about proposed development in a tiny, picturesque Scottish town, says “You can’t eat scenery.” Obviously, there’s a case for each side. Then there is the unexplained body that washes up on the beach, the body of a young Polish man who has disappeared several months in the past. Maggie is drawn to the mystery not only because that was her job, but because the dead man is connected to the young man her teenage daughter is now dating. She’s interested in the connections. This novel is very much about connections as Maggie is appreciating her connection with Connor; figuring out her changing connection to her teenager, Lilly; the connections she might be able to form in her possible new Irish home, and whether they will be as resonant as the long-established ones she had home in Long Island. She’s homesick, but she’s also looking forward. The book makes a case for community, for family connection, and ultimately, for connection to nature. The gentle mystery is an integral part of this beautifully written story, but it’s only a part. True to form, Stewart Taylor wraps things up with a bang. I felt like I’d been to Ireland after I closed the book, and I very much enjoyed the journey. I’m looking forward to seeing how Maggie’s next life decisions play out.

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