Hot Best Seller

The Immortal King Rao

Availability: Ready to download

In an Indian village in the 1950s, a precocious child is born into a family of Dalit coconut farmers. King Rao will grow up to be the most accomplished tech CEO in the world and, eventually, the leader of a global, corporate-led government. In a future in which the world is run by the Board of Corporations, King’s daughter, Athena, reckons with his legacy—literally, for he In an Indian village in the 1950s, a precocious child is born into a family of Dalit coconut farmers. King Rao will grow up to be the most accomplished tech CEO in the world and, eventually, the leader of a global, corporate-led government. In a future in which the world is run by the Board of Corporations, King’s daughter, Athena, reckons with his legacy—literally, for he has given her access to his memories, among other questionable gifts. With climate change raging, Athena has come to believe that saving the planet and its Shareholders will require a radical act of communion—and so she sets out to tell the truth to the world’s Shareholders, in entrancing sensory detail, about King’s childhood on a South Indian coconut plantation; his migration to the U.S. to study engineering in a world transformed by globalization; his marriage to the ambitious artist with whom he changed the world; and, ultimately, his invention, under self-exile, of the most ambitious creation of his life—Athena herself. The Immortal King Rao, written by a former Wall Street Journal technology reporter, is a resonant debut novel obliterating the boundaries between literary and speculative fiction, the historic and the dystopian, confronting how we arrived at the age of technological capitalism and where our actions might take us next.


Compare

In an Indian village in the 1950s, a precocious child is born into a family of Dalit coconut farmers. King Rao will grow up to be the most accomplished tech CEO in the world and, eventually, the leader of a global, corporate-led government. In a future in which the world is run by the Board of Corporations, King’s daughter, Athena, reckons with his legacy—literally, for he In an Indian village in the 1950s, a precocious child is born into a family of Dalit coconut farmers. King Rao will grow up to be the most accomplished tech CEO in the world and, eventually, the leader of a global, corporate-led government. In a future in which the world is run by the Board of Corporations, King’s daughter, Athena, reckons with his legacy—literally, for he has given her access to his memories, among other questionable gifts. With climate change raging, Athena has come to believe that saving the planet and its Shareholders will require a radical act of communion—and so she sets out to tell the truth to the world’s Shareholders, in entrancing sensory detail, about King’s childhood on a South Indian coconut plantation; his migration to the U.S. to study engineering in a world transformed by globalization; his marriage to the ambitious artist with whom he changed the world; and, ultimately, his invention, under self-exile, of the most ambitious creation of his life—Athena herself. The Immortal King Rao, written by a former Wall Street Journal technology reporter, is a resonant debut novel obliterating the boundaries between literary and speculative fiction, the historic and the dystopian, confronting how we arrived at the age of technological capitalism and where our actions might take us next.

30 review for The Immortal King Rao

  1. 5 out of 5

    Henk

    An impressive and well thought out work, on human nature and how this remains (unchanged) throughout time and different communities in upheaval There is a kind of action that resembles inaction, and it’s the kind of action society is based on Very impressive, I highly enjoyed this debut that with a steady hand guides the reader from rural post-World War II India to start-up Silicon Valley’s earlier times and then the near future, threatened by climate change. In my view Vauhini Vara her writing can An impressive and well thought out work, on human nature and how this remains (unchanged) throughout time and different communities in upheaval There is a kind of action that resembles inaction, and it’s the kind of action society is based on Very impressive, I highly enjoyed this debut that with a steady hand guides the reader from rural post-World War II India to start-up Silicon Valley’s earlier times and then the near future, threatened by climate change. In my view Vauhini Vara her writing can go toe to toe with the best of Emily St. John Mandel, while being far superior to The Every of Dave Eggers or Booker shortlisted The New Wilderness from Diane Cook. The Immortal King Rao follows the life of one man, the titular King Rao, from family ties in 1960’s to loneliness and isolation in 2040’s. The chapters intersperse and shed light on his childhood, adolescence and his old age. Along the way institutional overreach, mind/internet integration, the story of a start-up resembling Apple and the immigrant experience plus sexism against his wife play prominent roles. Societal upheaval is a theme in all the three timelines, with one character in the near future remarking: I was retrained as a influencer, like everyone in our trait Also AI has taken on a large role: It’s the algo that decides Don’t you think it is strange that we talk about the algo like our grandmothers did about god? Not sure if the mixed telling of the story works better than the three sections separate, but the whole dynamic of family turning into business, from interactions based on community to transactional, and the wider social order transformation, manages to convey clearly nonetheless. Struggle for survival also consistently plays a role, more pronounced in the further away past and near future than in the 1980's, but even there in the getting first to market of the computer companies. There is a Frank Gehry campus and a co-CEO who is best friends with Gwen Paltrow. Parts of the government being auctioned off to pay for debts, partly caused by Covid-19. All was once again well in the world after a Board is established of the largest companies, that have amalgamated into a global shareholder government, like an extrapolation into the future of Sally Rooney her vision on economics. Still there is resistance: For the dead are not powerless one character notes on the Indian expropriation that Seattle is based upon. Another character observes that Existence is change and even one of the main characters, one of the victors, turns out to be not so sure in victory as expected: That he was capable of all of this scared him Who in the final analysis should be held responsible? is the uneasy question at the end of this impressive book. In a way it does what the MaddAddam trilogy of Margaret Atwood tried as well: what is human nature, and is there cause for hope or despair? There is no clear cut answer to the question, but it is clear that Vauhini Vara is an author to look out for and I hope her debut is noted and celebrated!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Gumble's Yard - Golden Reviewer

    Published in the UK today 2-6-22 This intelligently written book is effectively an intriguing mix of two different genres: Indian family saga - think say Arundhati Roy’s earlier work) with a US immigrant angle (think Salman Rushdie in particular) Dystopian tech story – think somewhere on a spectrum between the rather clumsy execution of Dave Eggers and the literary obliqueness of Emily St John Mandel (but borrowing the naming conventions of Margaret Atwood). One of the more obvious comparisons in Published in the UK today 2-6-22 This intelligently written book is effectively an intriguing mix of two different genres: Indian family saga - think say Arundhati Roy’s earlier work) with a US immigrant angle (think Salman Rushdie in particular) Dystopian tech story – think somewhere on a spectrum between the rather clumsy execution of Dave Eggers and the literary obliqueness of Emily St John Mandel (but borrowing the naming conventions of Margaret Atwood). One of the more obvious comparisons in the latter is Jennifer Egan, and particularly her latest “Candy House” which contains a remarkable amount of overlap in terms of the underlying tech device which drives the plot: Egan had the Collective Consciousness and “Own Your Unconsciousness” App and Vara the “Harmonica” and “Clarinet”; the tech visionary behind it – Egan had Bix and Vara her eponymous character; the groups actively opposing and opting out – Egan’s Eluders, Vara’s Exes; and even the ambiguous relationship of the tech visionary’s children – Bix’s son Gregory and King’s daughter Athena – to both their father and his technological legacy. Another comparison that sprang to my mind overall was to Preti Taneja’s Desmond Elliot Prize winning “We That Are Young” which is a recasting of King Lear to the family (and particularly the daughters) of an Indian oligarch (in this case though “Tempest” serves as potential but less explicit template): albeit that novel is almost entirely set in India. I also was reminded a little – for very different reasons – of the Booker and Women’s Prize shortlisted “Great Circle”, of which I remarked there were at least 5 good novels in the book – which added together lead to a book that was simultaneously too long and unsatisfying in every aspect. Here I think its clear there are two potential novels interwoven (plus a whole Piketty style meditation on capital, even a digression into indigenous American beliefs), but Vara makes a choice to keep the overall book to a managable length so leading to a novel I thought was actually pretty well executed with some really clever links (one example below); albeit at the expense of including storylines which seemed extraneous (but were at least brief). The eponymous subject of the book is from a family of relatively well-off but Dalit coconut farmers – as oldest son of the oldest son (albeit his father, married to the sister of King’s mother who died giving birth slumps into languor after King’s grandfather’s death – leaving King’s Uncle to take charge) he is the heir apparent to the business – one becoming increasingly lucrative under his Uncle’s Patronage, although always struggling with anti-Dalit prejudice. He is also, as result partly of his heir status and partly due to a family disaster (of which we learn much more later) sent off for an English language education and thriving in his computing studies at University is recruited as a graduate student in the US. There, together with his graduate sponsor and his sponsor’s daughter (who in turn becomes his lover and wife) the three of them set up a nascent personal computing business, which starts with more of a home kit Sinclair/ZX feel but overtime combining say the PC selling skills of a Microsoft, the design genius of Apple and the data monoploy of a Facebook – their firm named Coconut – becomes the world’s most valuable firm. The final step to world domination starts when a financial crisis/COVID hit US government agree a plan to effectively outsource most of their work as government to a small group of large firms (Walmart, JP Morgan and of course Coconut). These firms , who form a Board of which King Rao becomes chair, then over around 10 years sign similar agreements for around a third of the world before (and this is where the backstory takes its extreme/dystopian turn) effectively setting up as a supranational organisation and effectively abolishing national states, with King now CEO of a kind of supercharged version of the British East India company (as an aside this linkage, and the way that the latter was largely responsible for the perpetuation of a Caste system which would otherwise have died out which also permits one of the many discussions in the novel of societal structures and hierarchies - is a perfect example of the control and intelligence that the author brings to her writing and the way she dies up the seemingly disparate storylines). Overtime the book then heads firmly into the kind of binary/extreme changes which characterise the dystopian genre. Society evolves into a combination of capitalist tech utopia and Chinese style state surveillance and control – with individuals deemed as Shareholders and with money/taxes replaced by a form of Social Capital, all moderated by an all purpose Algo(rithm) which also runs the legal system – an Algo I would describe as all powerful although it seems unable or unwilling to really deal with the threat of climate change, which at some point in the history of the novel has passed a tipping point. King Rao’s fall comes when he pushes too hard and too early a product – the Harmonica – which contains an injection of genetic code to allow individuals to access the internet from their thoughts. Some resulting deaths invigorate the long running resistance to the Board/Algo and leads to a deal whereby Rao has to stand down and the Exes are allowed to go off grid on a group of globally distributed Islands – the Blanklands, portrayed to those still under the Algo world as badlands but in practice a kind of principled anarchic/pure communist society. The story is actually told/written down by Rao’s daughter Athena who (we learn almost from the first chapter) is under arrest charged with the murder of her father and is drawing her case together for judgment by the Algo no behalf of the collective global Shareholders. Athena was born after King’s wife died from a frozen embryo - her name is based on the Zeus/Athena legend although Miranda would be a better name as King Rao (whose legend only grows in his exile – including the belief he has found the key to prolonging his life, hence his nickname) raises her in exile and complete isolation on an island. There she realises as she grows up that he has used her as a prototype for his next development of the Harmonica – the Clarinet, which allows people access to each other’s memories and which also forms Rao’s real answer to how to achieve immortality for himself and ultimately for a humanity he feels is doomed (by the storage of stories and memories – something which becomes a closing coda to the novel). Athena then rebels against her father and joins the Exes where she encounters more of her past than she expects, while having to navigate (my phrase) the Brave New World they are creating. Athena’s access to Rao’s memories facilitates the multi-strand nature of the novel with chapters moving between a number of different timelines: Rao’s upbringing in India in his sprawling Dalit family – which includes a number of strands which I felt were left rather hanging and which I was really unsure added to the novel; Rao’s early time in the US which was one of the strongest sections I felt; Athena’s own early life – this part can at times be exposition heavy as she sets out what she has learnt from her father of his own back story albeit it is interesting over time how this links to what she currently discovers both from other but more so from her father’s own memories; Athena’s time with the Exes – this part was interesting albeit not always convincing (perhaps like Miranda she adapts a little too soon to meeting people for the first time) and at times a little didactic as we get a theory of capital relationships, and its interaction with technological change, through the ages. Overall I felt this was a novel which could easily have not worked but instead held my interest throughout to the extent that many of the criticisms I had of individual elements were secondary to my overall enjoyment of this thoughtfully written and thought provoking book. My thanks to Atlantic Books, Grove Press for an ARC via NetGalley.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Therese

    The book tells the story of an Indian Untouchable, King Rao, whose mantra that there’s no problem that can’t be solved and his beyond genius computer skills end up literally changing the world. He and his wife start a company called Coconut (think Apple), that over time evolves into a super corporation that, as private industry, can provide the world’s people with whatever they need, better than the governments of their own countries ever possibly can. The company and its Algo (algorithm) ends u The book tells the story of an Indian Untouchable, King Rao, whose mantra that there’s no problem that can’t be solved and his beyond genius computer skills end up literally changing the world. He and his wife start a company called Coconut (think Apple), that over time evolves into a super corporation that, as private industry, can provide the world’s people with whatever they need, better than the governments of their own countries ever possibly can. The company and its Algo (algorithm) ends up ruling the world, whose citizens become its shareholders. Basically divided into three parts: we learn of King’s childhood in The Garden in India, where the family fortune is made harvesting coconuts; King’s immigration to the US where he marries, starts his company and rises to power; and the life of his daughter and her fate, after being accused of killing her father. (We learn this very early on, so no spoiler.) While there are some interesting concepts here, the plot lines and characters were difficult to follow and piece together. A thumbs down for this one, at least for me. @bookbrowse

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    There was something déjà vu in reading The Immortal King Rao not long after finishing Jennifer Egan’s Candy House. Both books, at their core, are about brilliant tech entrepreneurs who invent ways to gain access to every memory ever had. Egan’s version is a new technology called Own Your Unconscious – sharing every memory in exchange for access to others. Vara’s version is an Internet-connected device called The Harmonica, which provides access to all memories. Both books present estranged citize There was something déjà vu in reading The Immortal King Rao not long after finishing Jennifer Egan’s Candy House. Both books, at their core, are about brilliant tech entrepreneurs who invent ways to gain access to every memory ever had. Egan’s version is a new technology called Own Your Unconscious – sharing every memory in exchange for access to others. Vara’s version is an Internet-connected device called The Harmonica, which provides access to all memories. Both books present estranged citizens who have rejected the new way, called the “eluders” in Candy House and the “exes” in Immortal King Rao. I am not suggesting that either of these talented authors “borrowed” from the other; the books are being published at almost the same time. I do think it is an interesting commentary on our post (or present) pandemic society that writers are exploring the theme of memory preservation and human longing for real connection. The concept of an India-born biotechnological genius and his daughter, Athena Rao, who tries to escape him after being implanted with his memories to make him immortal, is compelling. King Rao’s Coconut Corporation is evocative of the Apple Corporation with a dystopian spin – a corporate-run government where everyone (at least everyone who doesn’t opt out) is a Shareholder. Everything is determined by an algorithm (or ALGO), which is unerringly spot-on with where capitalism appears to be heading. Equally compelling is the human-interest story. There’s a touch of Miranda, from Shakespeare’s The Tempest, in Athena. The technological aspects do not undermine or overshadow the human elements: the complicated relationship between father and daughter, the themes of betrayal and love and longing and understanding, and the courage it takes to open up to one another. The end message is poignant and timely: as we continue to drive ourselves to extinction, what if we could “gather up our stories and hold on to them for safekeeping?... Wouldn’t that be our best shot at proving to the universe that, once upon a time, we were here?” A big thanks to W.W. Norton Company and BookBrowse for the privilege of being an early reader.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Kolber

    Mind-blowing, epic, and full of love, this speculative and historical fiction novel (what a combination!) is for fans of Battlestar Galactica and The Maddaddam Trilogy. The world Vauhini has built here unfolds slowly but coalesces in a complete and believable alternative reality where technology and capitalism stand in for humanity and democracy. I love the background of King Rao and his family coconut farm in India, and how the history of his ancestors blend with the dystopian science fiction o Mind-blowing, epic, and full of love, this speculative and historical fiction novel (what a combination!) is for fans of Battlestar Galactica and The Maddaddam Trilogy. The world Vauhini has built here unfolds slowly but coalesces in a complete and believable alternative reality where technology and capitalism stand in for humanity and democracy. I love the background of King Rao and his family coconut farm in India, and how the history of his ancestors blend with the dystopian science fiction of his and his family's future. This is a phenomenal debut that will pull you in and make you think. I loved it! Can’t wait to see it with a cover 😉. Thanks to ABA and the publisher for an early look at this book for the Indies Introduce program.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Vivek Tejuja

    When I started reading this book, I didn’t know where it would go at all. In fact, even when I was mid-way, I didn’t have a clue about the progression of the plot. There is so much going on in this close to 400-pages book of love, family, climate change, death, of how memories function, and magic as well somewhere down the line. I was also kind of shaken by the way the Internet is reimagined in a sense – of how it will take over the world, and the role the corporations would play in this. The Im When I started reading this book, I didn’t know where it would go at all. In fact, even when I was mid-way, I didn’t have a clue about the progression of the plot. There is so much going on in this close to 400-pages book of love, family, climate change, death, of how memories function, and magic as well somewhere down the line. I was also kind of shaken by the way the Internet is reimagined in a sense – of how it will take over the world, and the role the corporations would play in this. The Immortal King Rao breaks genres. Yes, it does seem literary on the surface, but it also goes beyond that – it is speculative fiction, historical fiction, dystopian even, and not for a minute does Vauhini Vara make you stop turning the pages. There were times I was reminded of Moustache by S. Hareesh while reading the book. Then, I was reminded of Jejuri by Arun Kolatkar, given the lyricism of the prose. There is also only one way to read this book and that is to give in. The story begins in the India of the 1950s. A young man is born into a Dalit family of coconut farmers in a remote village in Andhra Pradesh. He is named King Rao (I love the irony about this, which is also seen in other instances throughout the book). He studies in Seattle and rises up the ladder in the Silicon Valley to become a famous CEO of a tech-company, aptly titled Coconut Corporation. This is where of course the author’s skill of being a technological journalist shows, in the way that she makes you believe it all. In all of this, we meet Athena – the very talented daughter of King Rao who is trying very hard to escape him after being implanted with his memories (the idea to make him immortal – hence the title) is extremely fascinating. She is raised by him on a remote island after her parents’ divorce. This aspect of a single-parent and that too a father unfolds itself very cleverly later on in the book. The core of this novel perhaps is not technology as it seems at first glance. There is an almighty algorithm as well that will run everything, and humans aren’t needed to apply in the company but after all it is humanity and the need to be keep it all together that will run the planet. Vauhini’s writing appears to be simple but it is so layered and dense (all in a good way) at almost every page. It is reflective of the past, of how we are living now, and takes into account the entirety of the future or perhaps what is coming for mankind. As Athena grapples with her father’s memories and what they stand for, forever jostling between his reality and hers, I could see traces of Atwood’s Maddaddam Trilogy, where a world unfolds slowly but takes the reader to this completely believable alternative reality where technology and capitalism have replaced human emotions as we know it. Fathers and Daughters have always been depicted in literature so very often with a lot of emotion at play. Vara tends to not do that, which is quite refreshing. The relationship between King and Athena is very Shakespearean (had to be) – reminding the reader mainly of King Lear and the Tempest. The constant back and forth of wanting to be loved by her father and constantly seeking his validation makes Athena also seem weak but that is not the case. She is her own person and yet seeks the anchor in her father. There is also the Dalit narrative that is told through flashback – painful memories that come to fore – told by Athena as she spends time in a jail cell. The revolution, subjugation, and the collective consciousness through one man is repeatedly communicated and done so in a satirical and sardonic manner. Not once does Vara lose the believability factor when it comes to her characters or even the fantastical plot for that matter. I would also like to mention the role of wit and humour in this book that Vara employs to the fullest. The oddness of certain situations – of dreams merging with reality, of Rao’s internal musings through Athena’s recollections (well, not really hers) could only have been managed by a writer who sees and recognizes the absurdity within. There are three distinctive timelines in the book only for them to merge seamlessly, not seeming separate at all. Vara forces us (well in that sense, almost) to look at the world that we want to look away from. The world full of its eccentricities, absurdities, the greedy world, about Shareholders, and how it all comes together with one Dalit family’s lives and histories. It is almost fascinating, but also heartbreaking to read those portions – just to understand that the technique of magic realism is employed to make the reading of Dalit lives bearable. In all of this, there is also a lot of beauty and grace in the novel that cannot be missed. It is about the stories we tell ourselves in order to live and continue living, no matter what. The resilience of Athena, King Rao, and even King Rao’s wife Margie is what makes the reader grow to love them despite their inherent flaws and warts for all to see. The Immortal King Rao is no less than an epic tale of human relationships. Of a daughter getting to know her father in death more than when he was alive. Of how relationships are so estranged not only between lovers but also parents and children, who cannot see eye-to-eye. It is about the future and yet looking into the past at all times, realizing that one cannot work without the other, almost to the point of it being inside your head. The book is about moments that pass us by and in the grander scheme of things, while may not seem much, they do account for something.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kristenelle

    I'm SO glad I finally finished this. This book disgusted me on multiple levels. First of all, there are tons of gratuitous, gross-out moments. See content warnings for some examples. Second, there is just tons of gratuitous cruelty. It seems completely pointless and is miserable to read. Third, the only reason I didn't dnf this (I definitely should have!) is because the book comes across like it is trying to be super deep and say something profound about human nature or something. I wasn't getti I'm SO glad I finally finished this. This book disgusted me on multiple levels. First of all, there are tons of gratuitous, gross-out moments. See content warnings for some examples. Second, there is just tons of gratuitous cruelty. It seems completely pointless and is miserable to read. Third, the only reason I didn't dnf this (I definitely should have!) is because the book comes across like it is trying to be super deep and say something profound about human nature or something. I wasn't getting it, but I thought that it might be worth finishing to find out if it does ever say something profound. Nope. It just ends. And oh my god I hated it so much. Do not pick up this book. This book takes itself way too seriously. I really thought that maybe it would end up being warranted. Anarchism as a term was used correctly. That is rare. Bakunin and Proudhon were name dropped. I had such high hopes that this was going to really explore political/economic systems in a meaningful way. Capitalism is portrayed as dystopic and bad.....but also not? The Indian caste system was portrayed and lightly discussed. Just, absolutely nothing meaningful was said or explored. It was just portrayed in all its boring, miserable glory. Maybe it was just trying to say that humanity is miserable, cruel, and hopeless regardless of any system or accomplishment. Which, puke. That isn't deep and I don't think it is true. The prose isn't bad, nor is it especially beautiful. I did notice that people's breath was described many times in many strange ways. As a reader, I don't really feel like I need to know what people's breath smells like to begin with, but the descriptions were strange and all very different. The only one I actually remember was "honeysuckle." The story goes back and forth in time between a couple perspectives. I didn't find that hard to follow. I listened to the audio and it was fine. Thank you NetGalley for granting my request for this audio arc in exchange for an honest review. Sexual violence? Yep. Other content warnings? Violent, fatal child birth; gruesome murder; live, human dissection; divorce; torture and murder of lowest caste Indian boys; animal death; needles; medical experimentation; human skin made into a costume; suicide; adoption; gun violence; poverty; racism.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sahitya

    The whole naming conventions in this book and the dystopian ultra capitalistic system were definitely not the strong parts, but I surely enjoyed all the story in the past, especially in the coconut plantation and then Rao’s development of his business. It may have all the trappings of sci-fi but where the writing shines is in the human story - the exploration of the emotions and relationships. I may not have been fully satiated with it but I definitely enjoyed the writing and look forward to wha The whole naming conventions in this book and the dystopian ultra capitalistic system were definitely not the strong parts, but I surely enjoyed all the story in the past, especially in the coconut plantation and then Rao’s development of his business. It may have all the trappings of sci-fi but where the writing shines is in the human story - the exploration of the emotions and relationships. I may not have been fully satiated with it but I definitely enjoyed the writing and look forward to what the author publishes next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    AndiReads

    This title is on all the Spring What to Read Lists and it's easy to see why! Athena Rao is on trial from jail her jail cell. Essentially she is on trial for her life as she speak to the shareholders of the board of the directors that oversees the working of the ENTIRE world. In this dysopian speculative fiction story, capitalism is truly king. . This capitalist nightmare is comprised of three stories - the birth of King Rao and his Dalit childhood in the small village in India, the arrival of Rao This title is on all the Spring What to Read Lists and it's easy to see why! Athena Rao is on trial from jail her jail cell. Essentially she is on trial for her life as she speak to the shareholders of the board of the directors that oversees the working of the ENTIRE world. In this dysopian speculative fiction story, capitalism is truly king. . This capitalist nightmare is comprised of three stories - the birth of King Rao and his Dalit childhood in the small village in India, the arrival of Rao in the US for grad school and his "great" world changing invention and finally, Athena's recounting of the events that led to his death. In this story, King Rao is Steve Jobs or Jeff Bezos or maybe both with the addition of Eli Musk! He will remain immortal through his memories which are implanted in his daughter as well as his monster corporation the behemoth Coconut Corporation ( which is equal google + apple + Tesla). This is an epic tail for anyone who loves capitalist spoofs, dystopian stories and dark satire. If you like satire, being behind the smoke and mirrors of popular culture or just really love great writing, #TheImmortalKingRao is for you! #wwNorton #NetGalley #NetGalleyReads #WwNorton&Company

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melki

    I'm throwing in the towel at slightly over the halfway point, so I won't be assigning a star rating.. It's a beautiful, well written book, and I'm sure it's going to win all sorts of awards, but I'm just not enjoying it, and forcing myself to read it every day isn't making me like it any more. Best of luck to the author, and a big thank you to W,.W, Norton for the ARC. I'll try to pass it on to someone who will love it. I'm throwing in the towel at slightly over the halfway point, so I won't be assigning a star rating.. It's a beautiful, well written book, and I'm sure it's going to win all sorts of awards, but I'm just not enjoying it, and forcing myself to read it every day isn't making me like it any more. Best of luck to the author, and a big thank you to W,.W, Norton for the ARC. I'll try to pass it on to someone who will love it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    niri

    so thoughtful, expansive, beautifully written, and so very intricate

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bakertyl

    This is one of those books that does so well I love it, yet don't like it anyway. A women is in prison and has to tell us her father's memories so she can be judged. The father is a Steve Jobs-meets-Jeff Bezos-meets-Jesus Christ character, a man who helped change our world into something leaning more into Star Trek or 1984. A computer company ends up running the entire planet, with Steve Jobs being represented by King Rao and Apple represented by Coconut. The plot unwraps slowly, beautifully. We f This is one of those books that does so well I love it, yet don't like it anyway. A women is in prison and has to tell us her father's memories so she can be judged. The father is a Steve Jobs-meets-Jeff Bezos-meets-Jesus Christ character, a man who helped change our world into something leaning more into Star Trek or 1984. A computer company ends up running the entire planet, with Steve Jobs being represented by King Rao and Apple represented by Coconut. The plot unwraps slowly, beautifully. We find our world warped by global warming, the failure of humanity to cure capitalism and embracing running towards extinction because the ad revenue is just too good to pass up. There are some Idiocracy (https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/) vibes, as governments run out of money they outsource their function to King Rao and his company. Eventually, an almighty algorithm just runs everything, humans need not apply. Don't like this, or trust it? Then you can move to a wonderful selection of islands and just make it work, go on, it's your right to give up literally everything and go to an undeveloped chunk of land to settle it, no Internet, electricity, just you and your desire to be free. Enough people take this option, our main character ends up living there and the plot continues. The story revolves around a small group of characters, told in flashbacks and our girl is forced to remember her father's memories (brain implanted computer chips that are a big part of the plot later on), so we see his childhood, moving to America and college, meeting his wife, building their empire, overlapped with her life, her decisions, her sins. The story and writing are top notch, excellent. The characters feel real, believable, and are the focus of the story. The future technology is believable but we don't spend too much time in the details, the technology just develops and we move back to the people. The point of her telling this story from her prison cell is so she can be judged, and the ending just disappointed me. You may love the ending, so good luck, a bunch of other early reviewers love it. It's just not for me. But the rest of the book is so good, its worth it. **I received this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Avni Nahar

    3.5. Great premise and mostly well-written but wanted much more from the ending

  14. 5 out of 5

    amanda eve

    3.75 stars. It was good, but I was waiting for it to be great.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This book would probably benefit from a re-read, as it’s complex and I didn’t have the bandwidth to give to it properly—I’ve been very distracted by many things going on, and it’s not book you want to read when you’re distracted. But even still, I got a lot out of it, enjoyed it, and strongly recommend it. It’s a hard book to describe. I tried telling a friend about it and struggled to be succinct. The titular King Rao is a Steve-Jobs-like figure, an immigrant who builds a huge tech empire that, This book would probably benefit from a re-read, as it’s complex and I didn’t have the bandwidth to give to it properly—I’ve been very distracted by many things going on, and it’s not book you want to read when you’re distracted. But even still, I got a lot out of it, enjoyed it, and strongly recommend it. It’s a hard book to describe. I tried telling a friend about it and struggled to be succinct. The titular King Rao is a Steve-Jobs-like figure, an immigrant who builds a huge tech empire that, depending on how you read it, gets away from him and turns the near future into a sort of climate- and tech-dystopia. And by “near future” I mean the dystopia Vara imagines set in the next few decades. It is a terrifyingly plausible dystopia where nation-states have ceded control to corporations. There is no public anything, it’s all privately run by corporations, all overseen by The Board of Corporations. Of which King Rao was the first CEO. Citizens are now “shareholders.” One of the books first scenes is of Rao’s secret daughter, Athena, in jail, writing her section of the book as an appeal to the audience, whom she addresses as “Dear Shareholder.” She is accused of a crime, and this appeal is her attempt to exonerate herself or at least mitigate her punishment. The punishment ultimately will be decided by The Algo (algorithm), as humans have been found to be too biased and emotional to render judgments about ... well, anything. But she does have a shot of swaying things in her favor by winning over Shareholders—and that’s you, dear reader. If this sounds like speculative fiction with too much world-building, it really isn’t. Vara only occasionally lets herself flower into explanations of how all this works; for the most part she keeps it tight and immediate; you don’t feel like you’re in another world. It feels very current and real. It’s also only half the novel, this spec-fic stuff. The other half involves the backstory of King Rao, who comes from a coconut farm in southern India, the farm being a bit of wealth that unexpectedly falls into the hands of Rao’s Dalit family. Dalits are the outcasts of India’s caste system, normally shut out of business ownership. Rao is the oldest son of an oldest son, so as much of a scion as a Dalit is allowed to be. The family’s resources go to getting him educated and off to America, where he can make enough money to send back home. Vara had to extensively research this part of the book, which is loosely based on her own father’s Dalit upbringing in a coconut grove in rural India. Vara was born and raised in North America and had no idea really what life was like in her family’s ancestral village. She visited the village to interview her extended family and to see the geography for herself. She asked her father to review and correct the relevant parts of her novel. I’m still figuring out how this backstory, which is interleaved with Athena’s backstory and then Athena in jail, ties into the theme of the novel. Like what made Vara spend SO much of the novel on Rao’s youth? Whatever her thematic intentions, it certainly is interesting. The extended family has many colorful characters who are easy to keep track of, and some of the anecdotes—like Rao being ferried across a canal by a Charon-like oarsman—are so vivid, they will stick with me forever. Perhaps so much time is spent with young Rao (who is called “King” because they wanted to call him Raj but an Anglophile relative insisted on the English version of that word) because, as we know from early on, Athena’s memories become intermingled with Rao’s, so in a sense as she retells her own story, she is also retelling his. She’s the narrator of the whole thing; therefore she is the author, as it were, of Rao’s ultimate fate—maybe more so than her own. Vara worked as a tech journalist for years before and during the writing of this novel, including as stint with the Wall Street Journal. Surely that must have had something to do with her indictment of Big Tech, or her dark imaginings of where governments and corporations are heading. Another key thread of the novel is that the climate is becoming unlivable, as “Hothouse Earth” has already started and is now an unstoppable force. While I’ve seen this book labeled as “cli-fi,” it’s not nearly as central a thread as the tech/corporate dystopia. Even if it wasn’t as central, it was still difficult and depressing to read her descriptions of the pandemics and raging wildfires “of the future,” which are very much happening now. (The book was published in 2022, so she’d already lived through some of this pandemic and a number of Western wildfires as she finished writing it.) One of the most poignant aspects of the book is how King Rao really sees himself as a good guy, as a hero. He sees the increasing tech infiltration of our lives as an unmitigated good. (His wife, Margie, seems less interested in crafting a narrative of herself as a hero—she likes the money, she likes the power, and she seems okay with that—but we also never get her POV.) Even as things start to go sideways, Rao clings to this hero version of himself, and to the idea that the sweeping changes he made to society were in the best interests of humanity. Vara does a good job pointing out how easy it is to fall into both of these traps: the “you are the hero of your own story” trap, and the “technical advances always lead to better societal outcomes” trap. People live longer, healthier lives! People are more interconnected! On average, incomes are rising! She spends enough time allowing characters to extoll the virtues of progress that you can see how we could easily end up like this. In fact, it feels (as all good dystopian fiction does) like a prediction—like we are going to end up exactly like this if we don’t start doing things differently. One other thing I want to say about this book is that there are moments of intense lyricism, though lyricism doesn’t seem to be something the author feels the need to dwell on. I found myself re-reading, or relistening to, a number of passages. The one about “white lace” hit me at just the right time and made me cry. I suppose ultimately you could summarize the book as “The American Dream Is Actually A Nightmare.” That would tie together Rao’s extensive backstory and humble beginnings with the capitalism-skepticism of the other half of the book. What King (who is a genuinely sympathetic character) builds is an empire that he believes will truly save the world—and as an immigrant, as someone from humble beginnings, what could be more American Dream than that? But in the end, this dream destroys him … and everything else. Edition note: the audiobook is narrated by Soneela Nankini, who is a perfect choice for this novel. She is of East Indian descent so she can pronounce things correctly, but also she’s a very good narrator generally, I’ll be looking for more of her work.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tory

    DNF at 38%. I found myself skimming huge chunks of this, and didn’t feel like I was missing anything. The story just isn’t interesting to me and the writing is very long winded.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Todd Mitchell

    I’m in awe of The Immortal King Rao’s complex and utterly engaging structure and style. It’s a page-turner that masterfully weaves together story threads across place, culture, time, perspective, and genre to create a riveting narrative that gives insight into both our possible future, and our current global, social, and technological challenges. The novel has elements of sci-fi, historical fiction, dystopian fiction, and contemporary literary fiction, all blended into a reading experience that I’m in awe of The Immortal King Rao’s complex and utterly engaging structure and style. It’s a page-turner that masterfully weaves together story threads across place, culture, time, perspective, and genre to create a riveting narrative that gives insight into both our possible future, and our current global, social, and technological challenges. The novel has elements of sci-fi, historical fiction, dystopian fiction, and contemporary literary fiction, all blended into a reading experience that feels rooted in cultural and literary traditions, while being completely new and fascinating. Written in an elegantly crafted, fast-paced story-telling voice that pulls no punches, the story moves to a breath-taking finish with a balanced mix of unexpected turns and coruscating insights. This artful merging of commentary on our present, reflections of our past, and cautionary depictions of our future is a thrilling read that left me with plenty to think about. In short, if you're looking for a well-written, highly inventive, compelling, and thought-provoking exploration of our global society and where we might be heading, look no further than The Immortal King Rao.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Williamson

    The Immortal King Rao is a very intriguing and well written story that is extremely appropriate for the time we are living where big tech dominates our lives in more ways than ever envisioned. It tells a story of a dystopian society of an Indian man who invents a computer and social order that treats every person in the world as a shareholder. Each person's actions raise or lowers your shares. Like any corporation there is a Board that oversees the new world order and an algorithm that decides t The Immortal King Rao is a very intriguing and well written story that is extremely appropriate for the time we are living where big tech dominates our lives in more ways than ever envisioned. It tells a story of a dystopian society of an Indian man who invents a computer and social order that treats every person in the world as a shareholder. Each person's actions raise or lowers your shares. Like any corporation there is a Board that oversees the new world order and an algorithm that decides the value or payment of your actions. Initially King Rao and his wife are busy creating new products but then King Rao disappears. He moves to a small island with his daughter Athena. Athena has been given all her father's memories. Athena loves her dad and her life until her father is unable to answers her questions. She leaves her father, joins a group known as the Exes and lives on Bainbridge Island where they don't live by the rules and algorithm of the Coconut. Reminded me of "Station Eleven" and as I previously stated the book seemed extremely appropriate of our current love / hate relationship with big tech. I enjoyed it very much and highly recommend it especially to fans of "Station Eleven".

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    A dystopian what if that deals with an Indian man who comes up with a computer and social order which treats every person in the world as a shareholder and everything you do raises or lowers those shares. There is a board that heads up the new world order and an algorithm that decides the value or payment of your actions. For a while King Rao and his wife revel in their new kingdom and are busy creating new products but then they split and King Rao disappears. He lives away from the mainland off A dystopian what if that deals with an Indian man who comes up with a computer and social order which treats every person in the world as a shareholder and everything you do raises or lowers those shares. There is a board that heads up the new world order and an algorithm that decides the value or payment of your actions. For a while King Rao and his wife revel in their new kingdom and are busy creating new products but then they split and King Rao disappears. He lives away from the mainland off Seattle on a small island with his daughter Athena who has never known anyone else and has been given all of her father's memories to teach her. Athena loves her dad and is happy on the island until she has questions he can't answer. She leaves and joins a group known as the Exes who have fled the system and live on Bainbridge Island where they live unhampered by the rules and algorithm of the Coconut. Athena knows her father's version of what happened and now she will see a different side of the same truth and come full circle. The writing style and new social order reminded me of STATION ELEVEN. The idea of biotechnology and an algorithm deciding everything seemed very close to real life and there were enough characters that may or may not remind you of some tech pioneers. Other themes that play a big role is the importance of family and that we humans have ignored climate changes for so long that we are past the point of fixing anything. There is much to think about in this book and I think it will appeal to tech supporters and luddites alike for different reasons. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kea4

    I just could not get into this book. I liked the idea but it just never clicked for me. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade... I just could not get into this book. I liked the idea but it just never clicked for me. https://theworldisabookandiamitsreade...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Samruddhi

    In the Acknowledgements section on the last page, the author says a relative told her not to take this book seriously. I think it was the perfect way to describe this limp cold fish of a novel. When I read The Observer, Literary Hub, Vulture and others hyping this novel and saw it in the Most Anticipated Lists of the year, I hoped so ardently that this might be different than the other NRI-written corpses of novels that tend to get 'famous' or published at all simply because of their degrees and In the Acknowledgements section on the last page, the author says a relative told her not to take this book seriously. I think it was the perfect way to describe this limp cold fish of a novel. When I read The Observer, Literary Hub, Vulture and others hyping this novel and saw it in the Most Anticipated Lists of the year, I hoped so ardently that this might be different than the other NRI-written corpses of novels that tend to get 'famous' or published at all simply because of their degrees and alma maters. To say the least, The Immortal King Rao is closer to a teenager's fan fiction-turned-into-a-novel. Only a White Lens would find anything remotely 'worthy' here. Sold as a Dystopian, Science-Fiction, Speculative Fiction novel, it doesn't fulfil any of these genres' requirements. I have read better Dystopian, Sci-fi YA novels!!!! Though it's Adult Fiction, never once did it engage my attention right from page one despite my excitement to read it. I can't get enough of speculative/dystopian/sci-fi: some of my favourites since teenage have been Fahrenheit 451, Brave New World,1984, Kafka on the Shore, The Metamorphosis, The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, The Handmaid's Tale, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World, Station Eleven and too many more to count. This novel is nowhere near the same league neither in the same spectrum as these genre books! The Immortal King Rao is about ‘King’ Rao- it’s more a family saga than anything remotely dystopian/sci-fi/speculative. It’s insulting to all the books in the genre to call this one dystopian. Because any reader would ask this basic tenet of a good dystopian: where's the world-building?! The plot seemed like it was mocking logic, the mystery seemed something simply inserted to keep a reader’s interest to the last page (probably because the author might have known nothing else would sustain it), the lens was suffocatingly White but guised under the pretext of a flimsy protagonist who comes off more a s a misogynistic solipsistic prick. The author is preoccupied in repeating how everyone’s breath smells at every moment, piggy-back riding on current headlines and articles to spin them into the plot and expanding on them in futility, presenting ethnicity in a gross distorted view, trying to explore caste and colonialism (but the attempt ended up being more white-washed and extremely artificial and one-tone) and trying to assert that ‘capitalism is evil’ but then somehow later changing her tune and saying capitalism can save you too?! Half the text is littered with historical facts like the paragraphs about the Wright Brothers which I could have looked up in an encyclopedia had I wanted to… There’s also a White bias in the author’s prose - “a picture window that brought strong white American sunlight surging in.” I almost gagged reading this line. It’s clearly a debut and a shoddy one at that, I don’t undertsand the hype around this novel at all!! If the prose had possessed even a fingernail's length of skill or imagination, the text could have been more bearable but the style is bland and flat, it sucked the joy out of reading! Several times, I wanted to stop reading the book at all but I grit my teeth painfully and endured to find somehting redeemable but there’s not a sliver till the end… The only other ethnic person is Vietnamese -who’s also racist for some reason and a tattle-tale and showed as ‘out to get people of other ethnicities’ and having ‘ a subservient expression in front of the white security guard as if he expected a pat on the head and. a biscuit’!!! My eyes bugged out at this farcical line stating nonsensical behaviour! The dialogue is badly stunted and I can't imagine a real person speaking in this way! But everyone else of course in the universe of this book, is a white American- no African Americans/Latinos etc, basically no people of colour except one Vietnamese man with a fleeting impression. The author goes on and on about ‘King’ Rao’s Dalit identity, simply inserting what they face because of caste in limp sentences, ultimately going nowhere with it. A Dalit man has rarely been a powerful protagonist of a novel and I had high expectations but she just sand-papered the entire character! None of the others- neither the daughter Athena nor the wife Margaret were sketched adequately and I don’t even want to get started on the flimsy convoluted family life staged in ‘Kothapalli’ a South-Indian village where King Rao is born. I have a bone to pick with the simplistic, narcissistic name ‘King’ for the central character- it doesn’t translate well if she meant it to replace the equivalent of ‘Raja’ in Hindi or Telugu and it’s nicknames read terribly in the novel. This is why I've always maintained that NRIs should never base their books in a country they have never experienced, they only present a white-washed version of things heard from their families. None of the names or characters are especially memorable or have any sort of arc. It seems like the author wrote the sentences as she heard them and it’s all just tedious telling, doesn’t build a picture of the village or the American cities or the supposedly ‘dystopian’ world. There's the pretentious and elitist name-dropping of Pierre-Joseph Proudhon (who is dropped four times and used to elucidate how much the daughter Athena knows of politics and philosophy), Mikhail Bakunin- the Russian philosopher on a close second, the Havels and the Goodmans. The problem with this casual elitism is that the author simply inserts their sentences verbatim and never shows/expands the point she wants to make. So what's the point of the name-dropping? A thoroughly unreadable story, I knew nothing after Tomb of Sand would digest well but this book especially sits like bitter nauseous buds in my mouth. If you want to read a family saga there are many others better constructed. If you want dystopian, sci-fi, speculative I’m sure any other book in the genre is better than this one. “Most anticipated” to “Most disappointing overhyped” novel of the year would be more correct. Definitely wouldn’t recommend even at gunpoint! Do. Not. Read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Divya Pal Singh

    Frightfully prescient story about a near-future dystopian world succumbing to irreversible global warming, with a variant of Facebook (now ominously called Meta) and its Board of Directors replacing sovereign governments and ruling humanity in the form of a supranational entity. Levels of consumerism determine one’s social status, surrogacy is par for the course, children are sold for survival, economic disparity persists. A person who has been seduced by the consumer value system, whose ident Frightfully prescient story about a near-future dystopian world succumbing to irreversible global warming, with a variant of Facebook (now ominously called Meta) and its Board of Directors replacing sovereign governments and ruling humanity in the form of a supranational entity. Levels of consumerism determine one’s social status, surrogacy is par for the course, children are sold for survival, economic disparity persists. A person who has been seduced by the consumer value system, whose identity is dissolved in and amalgam of the accoutrements of mass civilization, and who has no roots in the order of being, no sense of responsibility for anything higher than his own personal survival, is a demoralized person. The system depends on this demoralization, deepens it, is in fact a projection of it into society...A dangerous force underlying both of these economic models, a mindless cycle of economic production and consumption that relied on co-opting the collective brain and brawn of the human species, thus annihilating the human soul. A novel concept introduced is a chimera of software and genetic engineering that lodges in the brain, sequesters carbon and silicon and ‘constructs’ an organic chip that connects an individual to the internet. The different temporal narrative streams are quote tiresome to read.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carolina- Timber Oaks LFL

    The Immortal King Rao was such an intriguing book. Told in the narrative voice of Athena, Rao's daughter, the novel follows the rise and fall of software engineer turned world ruler. This alternative reality felt very feasible under the hand of Vauhini Vara. I enjoyed both Rao's childhood in India, as well as the development of a corporate world government in which citizens are shareholders and their fate is determined by an algorithm. I also enjoyed the concept of the 'harmonica', Rao's last in The Immortal King Rao was such an intriguing book. Told in the narrative voice of Athena, Rao's daughter, the novel follows the rise and fall of software engineer turned world ruler. This alternative reality felt very feasible under the hand of Vauhini Vara. I enjoyed both Rao's childhood in India, as well as the development of a corporate world government in which citizens are shareholders and their fate is determined by an algorithm. I also enjoyed the concept of the 'harmonica', Rao's last invention, which allows one's mind to connect directly to the internet. This book is ideal to discuss both ethics and the responsibility of governments. It would make a great book club pick.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This is the best new novel I’ve read in a very very very long time. Stunning achievement and a total blast to read—the pages kept turning, compulsively. Come for the dystopia, stay for the incredible historical writing and the searing critique of capitalism.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Isa

    Horrifyingly prophetic. The author is a genius.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sonya

    Reviewed for BookBrowse. I received a pre-publication edition. I recommend this book for those fascinated by the rise of IT and its impact on our everyday lives, the global economy, and politics. That story is fictionalized through the story of King Rao and his invention of “Coconut,” mimicking the rise of Apple Computer. Told in three timelines, the birth, and early years of King Rao as a Dalit (untouchable) in India, through his rise as a software genius in Seattle and the founding of Coconut, Reviewed for BookBrowse. I received a pre-publication edition. I recommend this book for those fascinated by the rise of IT and its impact on our everyday lives, the global economy, and politics. That story is fictionalized through the story of King Rao and his invention of “Coconut,” mimicking the rise of Apple Computer. Told in three timelines, the birth, and early years of King Rao as a Dalit (untouchable) in India, through his rise as a software genius in Seattle and the founding of Coconut, and in the future when the internet and software algorithms rule the world and take over our brains. The Shareholders relinquish their decision making and government to the Algorithm; the Exes have moved away and live a communal existence on islands set aside for their use. The modern-day story of the rise of Coconut is interesting and probably parallels Jobs or Gates or a combination of both. However, I found the stories in India sometimes confusing when I lost track of so many names of Rao family members; and the future world seems naively developed. The naming convention is silly – Coconut, Clarinet (for the memory implants), and Algo (for the algorithm). King Rao’s story is told through implanted memories in his daughter Athena, which is not always clear that that is what is happening. The writing is mostly quite skilled, but dialogue deteriorates and is unrealistic in parts. That said, many sections are strong and a fascinating read.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sayari Debnath

    a noteworthy debut

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dani Leopold

    Maybe the wrong time to be reading something so dystopian? Close to a 3 but sometimes was a bit too much

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sangeetha Sankaran

    Vara put out an ambitious debut. The book is told from the perspective of Rao's daughter and flip flops between 3 timelines: (1) her father's childhood in India, (2) how her father built his company after immigrating to the US, (3) the dystopic future she finds herself living in. Of the three timelines, I was least interested in #2, maybe because it's the representation that we typically get for AAPI work. I think it is best to go in completely blind about the tech and how the dystopia is structu Vara put out an ambitious debut. The book is told from the perspective of Rao's daughter and flip flops between 3 timelines: (1) her father's childhood in India, (2) how her father built his company after immigrating to the US, (3) the dystopic future she finds herself living in. Of the three timelines, I was least interested in #2, maybe because it's the representation that we typically get for AAPI work. I think it is best to go in completely blind about the tech and how the dystopia is structured. I really enjoyed the world building and reveals. I found it interesting to see something as archaic as caste also discussed in the same context as "futuristic" things — climate change, social networks, AI. As much as we want to be evolved from it and claim it's a thing of the past, caste systems continue to impact who gets to be involved in shaping our collective futures. And sadly, as proven at Cisco and other American companies, biases against people still run deep. I hope that we continue to see the fostering of creative talent regardless of background or birth across all disciplines, art and science alike.

  30. 4 out of 5

    whatjensreading

    In "The Immortal King Rao," the story centers on the life of King, an Untouchable, in an Indian Village, flip flopping between the 1950s and a dystopian future run by a corporation. The book was in depth about the experiences and impacts of the Rao family through multiple generations. I truly had such high expectations for this book after seeing it on lists for most anticipated books of 2022, but I couldn't get into it, and I tried. The flow of the book was confusing and hard to follow, without e In "The Immortal King Rao," the story centers on the life of King, an Untouchable, in an Indian Village, flip flopping between the 1950s and a dystopian future run by a corporation. The book was in depth about the experiences and impacts of the Rao family through multiple generations. I truly had such high expectations for this book after seeing it on lists for most anticipated books of 2022, but I couldn't get into it, and I tried. The flow of the book was confusing and hard to follow, without enough story in each chapter/timeline on the characters, on the events, etc.. Nothing in this story made me want to flip (the hypothetical) page, and learn more about the life of King Rao, his family, and the future would hold for him. https://www.howjenexists.com/recent-r...

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...