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Write These Laws on Your Children: Inside the World of Conservative Christian Homeschooling

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Homeschooling is a large and growing phenomenon in U.S. society—the National Center for Education Statistics recently reported that in the last decade it grew at twelve times the rate of public school enrollments. Yet information about this population is terribly incomplete. In this groundbreaking book, Robert Kunzman uses his unprecedented access to six conservative Chris Homeschooling is a large and growing phenomenon in U.S. society—the National Center for Education Statistics recently reported that in the last decade it grew at twelve times the rate of public school enrollments. Yet information about this population is terribly incomplete. In this groundbreaking book, Robert Kunzman uses his unprecedented access to six conservative Christian homeschooling families to explore the subset of this elusive world that most influences public perception and rhetoric about the homeschooling movement, from its day-to-day life to its broader aspirations to transform American culture and politics. From the Trade Paperback edition.


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Homeschooling is a large and growing phenomenon in U.S. society—the National Center for Education Statistics recently reported that in the last decade it grew at twelve times the rate of public school enrollments. Yet information about this population is terribly incomplete. In this groundbreaking book, Robert Kunzman uses his unprecedented access to six conservative Chris Homeschooling is a large and growing phenomenon in U.S. society—the National Center for Education Statistics recently reported that in the last decade it grew at twelve times the rate of public school enrollments. Yet information about this population is terribly incomplete. In this groundbreaking book, Robert Kunzman uses his unprecedented access to six conservative Christian homeschooling families to explore the subset of this elusive world that most influences public perception and rhetoric about the homeschooling movement, from its day-to-day life to its broader aspirations to transform American culture and politics. From the Trade Paperback edition.

30 review for Write These Laws on Your Children: Inside the World of Conservative Christian Homeschooling

  1. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Holley

    This book is cool 'n' stuff. I don't know what to tell you about it. It's about a teacher. He goes to people's houses and talks to them about homeschooling. The structure of the book follows Kunzman's interviews with various homeschooling families that live in states following all of the different regulating schemes available in the U.S., from zero regulation to required standardized testing and reporting. Some parents are good teachers; some parents are bad teachers. Some teachers are good teac This book is cool 'n' stuff. I don't know what to tell you about it. It's about a teacher. He goes to people's houses and talks to them about homeschooling. The structure of the book follows Kunzman's interviews with various homeschooling families that live in states following all of the different regulating schemes available in the U.S., from zero regulation to required standardized testing and reporting. Some parents are good teachers; some parents are bad teachers. Some teachers are good teachers; some teachers are bad teachers. I had an eclectic education. I went (in chronological order) to a private school owned by a cult, a Montessori school, a Seventh Day Adventist school, and a public high school. Before and between all of those, I was homeschooled. Probably, the public school was my best experience in terms of education. Above all, though, I learned almost everything I know from TV. I can sing O Come All Ye Faithful in Latin, so homeschool was good for that; I read The Catcher in the Rye in public school, so that made everything worth it; but, mostly my educational masters were Darkwing Duck and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I'm doing some research on homeschooling regulations in Oregon, and I came across this article that talks about the traditional parens patriae obligations of the State. Basically, parents have rights over children, and the State has rights over children (called parens patriae) because children have almost no rights of their own. So, that's the theory under which the State can take kids out of the home in situations of physical abuse. But what about educational abuse? Is there such a thing? Most people agree that it exists, but almost no one agrees about what it looks like. It strikes me that any educational system, no matter how public or private, could be guilty of educational abuse. The largest subset of homeschoolers is made up of conservative Christians. According to Kunzman, the documentary Jesus Camp puts the figure at 75%, but that is likely an exaggeration promoted by the Home School Legal Defense Association (p. 2). I have seen statistics in other articles that range from 72% to 86%, but it is undoubtedly a large number. All of the families Kunzman interviewed in this book were conservative Christians, but they each had different strategies for schooling and seemed to be in different economic classes. Homeschooling gained popularity after the 1972 Supreme Court Case Wisconsin v. Yoder , where the Court held that members of the Old Amish community could take their children out of school earlier than a state statute allowed. It became the interpretation of Yoder that parents have the sole right to direct the education of their children, though that right can be regulated by the state if it shows a sufficiently compelling interest. Apparently, according to the parens patriae article (which I believe was written by a Canadian, so take it with a grain of salt), the attorney who defended the Amish in the Yoder case (and who got the Court to significantly limit the State's parens patriae rights), William B. Ball, was buddies with Michael Farris, who co-founded the HSLDA in 1983. So, the conspiracy theory, as I understand it, is that they're part of that Falwell/Reagan/Schaeffer group that turned American politics into the fundamentalist Christian slumber party it is today. It's an interesting theory at least. That's not really part of this book, though the book vaguely hints at conspiracy theory in more of an, "OMFG, how did this happen?" way. What Kunzman does talk about, and I think it's absolutely fascinating, is the relationship between support for the homeschooling movement and racial integration of public schools. Although right now, African Americans are said to be the fastest growing subset of homeschoolers, "[t]he 2003 NCES data suggest that 77 percent of U.S. homeschoolers are 'white, non-Hispanic,' compared with 62 percent of the rest of the K-12 population" (p. 160). So, the idea is that not only is homeschooling a conspiracy theory, but it's also a racist way to avoid desegregation of schools. Probably, almost no one now would say that they were homeschooling in order to be racist. But it is interesting to me that the roots of homeschooling sound as dramatic and plotting as an episode of The Real Housewives of D.C.. Okay, maybe not that dramatic. Actually, Kunzman is not very critical of the choice to homeschool. It's obvious that he comes to the issue with skepticism, but he's very generous to the families, and it seems to me that he manages a great deal of objectivity in reporting their methods of education and contrasting them with his experiences as a public school teacher. The book ultimately has that ambivalent feel that I see whenever I read studies of socially stigmatized political minorities. He doesn't really advocate a solution in the end but more asks whether the social stigma is based in an overreaction of stranger danger, or actually based in bad education choices of homeschooling parents. It strikes me that a good solution would be for states to develop a definition of educational abuse that could be attributed to any type of educational system. It could have definitions of literacy, numeracy, and other vital educational goals, and ages by which children should achieve those goals or be tested for learning disabilities. A lot of the home v. public schooling debate involves playground finger pointing that basically comes down to, "No YOU'RE worse!" I think that the focus of regulation should be on actually educating TEH CHILDREN, not where the kids are sitting when they get educated.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    3.5 stars -- This is an interesting look into a an often-cloistered world. The author, a traditional school teacher, interviews a number of families practicing homeschooling to examine their methods and motivations. As one might imagine, the result is a mixed bag. While all of the parents here follow a conservative slant on Christianity, their willingness to allow their children interaction with those who do not share these beliefs vary. The quality of the education varies as well. There are chi 3.5 stars -- This is an interesting look into a an often-cloistered world. The author, a traditional school teacher, interviews a number of families practicing homeschooling to examine their methods and motivations. As one might imagine, the result is a mixed bag. While all of the parents here follow a conservative slant on Christianity, their willingness to allow their children interaction with those who do not share these beliefs vary. The quality of the education varies as well. There are children who seem to be truly exceptional and well-rounded in their education, and others who are struggling with basic skills and whose parents seem to view outsiders as nothing but bad influences. The parents who skip over educational content because they themselves do not understand it or are uninterested in it seem to exemplify the argument of the necessity of allowing more than one adult to participate in a child's education--no one person can be good at everything, especially as the student ages and subjects become more complex. The look at homeschool materials marketed specifically to conservative Christian parents was interesting and no doubt a little disturbing to some readers. Some of it is more balanced--explaining the rationales of both sides of an issue while still coming from a particular outlook, and I'm OK with that, even though I'm not religious myself. All parents raise their kids with the beliefs and values they themselves follow, whether they acknowledge so or not. To want to have materials in the home that reflects these values is understandable. However, the content generated by some of the more extreme publishers that seems intent on recruiting young kids as "culture warriors" and depicts all those who believe differently as an enemy to vanquish, should rightly disturb.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    This is a good book for people who are interested in homeschooling, whether from the inside or the outside. Dr. Kunzman is an educational consultant who has dealt with a lot of different types of education, and he treats the subject with respect even when he comes upon people with whom he disagrees greatly. He describes several homeschooling families, with different styles and different priorities, some of which seem to be doing it very well and others of which are really struggling. I disagree This is a good book for people who are interested in homeschooling, whether from the inside or the outside. Dr. Kunzman is an educational consultant who has dealt with a lot of different types of education, and he treats the subject with respect even when he comes upon people with whom he disagrees greatly. He describes several homeschooling families, with different styles and different priorities, some of which seem to be doing it very well and others of which are really struggling. I disagree with his conclusions (that all children should have some basic testing required, to "prove" that sufficient education is being achieved), but I enjoyed reading it. As a long-term homeschooler, I was both challenged and saddened by these case studies, but I think it was well worth the reading.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    Kunzman gives a very fair and evenhanded report on the trends and issues he found among conservative Christian homeschooling households. Some of the situations he describes I found disturbing as an educator, others were really inspiring. Before reading this book I had a clear idea in my head that public schooling would always be superior, and that homeschool kids always end up a little wacky. Those ideas were definitely challenged by this book. Kunzman's style is conversational and flows easily, Kunzman gives a very fair and evenhanded report on the trends and issues he found among conservative Christian homeschooling households. Some of the situations he describes I found disturbing as an educator, others were really inspiring. Before reading this book I had a clear idea in my head that public schooling would always be superior, and that homeschool kids always end up a little wacky. Those ideas were definitely challenged by this book. Kunzman's style is conversational and flows easily, making this a good book for travel or for when you want something easy yet substantive.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Johnnie

    Kunzman's agenda, which he states, is that home schools need regulations. He is honest about this motivation and it is clear in his slant of his research findings. Kunzman's agenda, which he states, is that home schools need regulations. He is honest about this motivation and it is clear in his slant of his research findings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Snell

    This book, by Robert Kunzman, is a survey of six conservative Christian homeschooling families, scattered across the country. Kunzman visits them each twice and interviews them and gives them all a survey, trying to discern their attitudes about education, democracy and the intersection of freedom and tolerance in a diverse society. Kunzman's primary concern about homeschooling is whether such indoctrination in the Christian religion can result in citizens capable of considering the points of vie This book, by Robert Kunzman, is a survey of six conservative Christian homeschooling families, scattered across the country. Kunzman visits them each twice and interviews them and gives them all a survey, trying to discern their attitudes about education, democracy and the intersection of freedom and tolerance in a diverse society. Kunzman's primary concern about homeschooling is whether such indoctrination in the Christian religion can result in citizens capable of considering the points of view of their fellow countrymen, even when those points of view are vastly different than their own. Can a homeschooled child listen to ideas and values that are foreign to his with any kind of fairness? To his credit, Kunzman embodies his own values. The portraits he draws of these six families are fair and kind, and while he highlights the problems each family has, he goes to great trouble to highlight their virtues even more. He disagrees with them in several areas, but he does them the honor of disagreeing with their best arguments, not their weakest ones, which makes him a better author than almost any other I've read on the subject. As in most books like this, some of the families come across much better than others. And unlike most authors, who would put the scary families first in order to draw you in with sensationalism, Kunzman opens and closes his book with the two best families, which is more than fair, it is kind. I don't agree with Kunzman on every issue, but I really enjoyed reading this book. The family portraits are fascinating - and alternately encouraging and disturbing - and the issues he raises are certainly worth thinking through.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    Write These Laws On Your Children is a glimpse of the world of conservative Christian homeschooling. I became fascinated by the topic of homeschooling when I used some homeschooling books to find resources for enriching my son's public school education. Robert Kunzman does a fantastic job of highlighting some of the strengths and weaknesses of homeschooling. However, he expresses his main reservations about homeschooling: the quality of education and how homeschooling affects the development of Write These Laws On Your Children is a glimpse of the world of conservative Christian homeschooling. I became fascinated by the topic of homeschooling when I used some homeschooling books to find resources for enriching my son's public school education. Robert Kunzman does a fantastic job of highlighting some of the strengths and weaknesses of homeschooling. However, he expresses his main reservations about homeschooling: the quality of education and how homeschooling affects the development of citizenship. Kunzman, an educator himself, spends time with several homeschooling families. He visits each family more than once over a two year period. Kunzman describes his time with each of those families. It is important to note that, while some of the families were clearly doing a disservice to their children by homeschooling them, others were providing top notch education. I think one of the things I liked best about the book was Kunzman's apparent even-handedness when describing the homeschooling experiences he witnessed. In between the chapters on the homeschooling families, Kunzman profiles homeschooling organizations and what he perceives to be the perils of homeschooling. Overall, Kunzman provides a balanced view of homeschooling, for better and for worse. If you have any interest in homeschooling you should definitely read this book, if only to learn about the perils of homeschooling. If you are an educator, reading this book would help counter any stereotypes you may have about homeschooling.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I would like to give 3 1/2 stars, but since I can't it gets a 3. This book was interesting. Kunzman is not a homeschooler, he is fact a past high school teacher, but he obviously sees the benefit of the option, and tries to take an objective view as he follows six families through a year or two. I enjoyed reading the view of an outsider as he sat in on homeschooling days with these families. They were all very different in their approaches and philosophy. He obviously sees the value in homeschoo I would like to give 3 1/2 stars, but since I can't it gets a 3. This book was interesting. Kunzman is not a homeschooler, he is fact a past high school teacher, but he obviously sees the benefit of the option, and tries to take an objective view as he follows six families through a year or two. I enjoyed reading the view of an outsider as he sat in on homeschooling days with these families. They were all very different in their approaches and philosophy. He obviously sees the value in homeschooling as an option, but never really understands the ultimate opinion they all shared-- that parents have the right to choose whatever education they want for their families. And that the state should not intervene. He never wavers from his original opinion that there should be a basic test to prove children as getting educated. The book is also labeled as a look into the world of "christian" homeschooling, but I think he fails on that point. He tries to understand the christian view point, but in the end I don't think he really does. This book was only really worth my time, because of the view it gave of the families, not from Kunzman's opinions.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    I thought the author did a good job trying to balance many issues surrounding homeschooling. I especially enjoyed the descriptions of how different families homeschooled. He talks about complex issues (different levels of homeschooling regulation across the country, differing teaching styles/skill levels of parent teachers, large number of curriculum packages for sale, etc).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    A very insightful and respectful look at homeschooling as it is practiced in six conservative Christian families. It has a lot to say not only about homeschooling, but more broadly about education, parenting, and how both of those things help produce a thriving democratic society.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

    It was good to see the different approaches the families took to homeschooling. I related to the last family the most.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

    Engaging and excellent journalism. Fascinating read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lize

    Excellently written, this is an attempt to shed some light on Christian homeschooling, something that is little-understood, and prone to, well, 'uninformed assumptions' by outsiders. The author profiled six families from across the country, and centered his research around some basic questions, like what kind of teaching and learning goes on, is there room for children to think for themselves and learn about the 'outside world', and to what extent should the state be involved in regulating homes Excellently written, this is an attempt to shed some light on Christian homeschooling, something that is little-understood, and prone to, well, 'uninformed assumptions' by outsiders. The author profiled six families from across the country, and centered his research around some basic questions, like what kind of teaching and learning goes on, is there room for children to think for themselves and learn about the 'outside world', and to what extent should the state be involved in regulating homeschooling? Interesting questions all, and I was often surprised by the answers the author uncovered. I came at the book with an open mind, as I've had some contact with home schooling (I've sold some of my work to a homeschooling science curriculum). I also know a couple of people who have homeschooled their kids with great results, and I think I would have personally thrived in an environment of being able to learn at my own pace. But as I read I became troubled, particularly by how adamantly opposed most of the parents were to any sort of state regulation or basic skills testing to chart their progress. Homeschooling is much like public or private schooling; when it’s good, it can be very, very good, and when it’s not, it can have repercussions for the rest of the child’s life. Kunzman presents examples of both in the families he profiles. The best results, just as in public school, seem to come from well-prepared, well-educated teachers with enough resources and motivation to carry out the task. It was fascinating (and sometimes scary) to see what different results the same religious philosophy can produce, like this father, whose teenaged son was still relying on his fingers for simple addition: “I’m not a wise man in the world’s things. I’m not even academically able to teach a lot of subjects and neither is my wife. We resolved in ourselves years and years ago that if we were able to teach our children character, teach them how to read so that they could read the Bible, we would have done all that is necessary for them to survive this world. And we’re not going to put ourselves up under other people’s ideas of what an educated person is. So we’ve taught each one of them that we would be just as proud to see them hanging off a garbage truck, knowing that they don’t lie, steal, cheat, and despise God.” He, unsurprisingly, opposes any sort of state regulation of anything, including child abuse. It bothered me to think that an accident of birth could have left me a functional illiterate at the whim of my parents, and how many people were out there ready to fight for their right to do so. I really liked the author’s journalistic approach. Neither hatchet job or puff piece, he presented the information and left me to make up my own mind, rather than proffering 300 pages of his opinion. That’s my favorite kind of non-fiction, and I wish more authors followed it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Robert Kunzman does an excellent job of showing a strong through shallow fair-mindedness in his book, which profiles six "conservative Christian" homeschooling families. I appreciate how he questions what the Homeschool Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) tells him about the demographics of homeschooling, though each of the families profiled are probably members. But, I can't help but see, even as he calls for homeschooling parents to be more open-minded and exposed to ideas different from their o Robert Kunzman does an excellent job of showing a strong through shallow fair-mindedness in his book, which profiles six "conservative Christian" homeschooling families. I appreciate how he questions what the Homeschool Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) tells him about the demographics of homeschooling, though each of the families profiled are probably members. But, I can't help but see, even as he calls for homeschooling parents to be more open-minded and exposed to ideas different from their own, just how mainstream his own educational views are. I guess that shouldn't be any kind of surprise, considering he taught high school and is a professor of education. It's not that he's not sometimes admirably and sometimes scarily kind when presenting these families (one of them believes in hitting their 2yo with a whip). He sees education as something measured by standardized tests, and he sees homeschooling moms switching their methods around as damaging to children (though he admits that schools themselves are susceptible to "fad diets" in education). In short, he doesn't see the kind of learning and development that occurs when education is more integrated into daily life. Also, he does have a preoccupation with civics/politics, and, even though he confesses to knowing plenty of schooled high school kids who aren't particularly engaged in the subject, he really, really wants the homeschoolers to be more involved, so, it becomes clear, that they will question their parents' worldview and move into something that is presumably closer to his own. He does not state that desire as frankly as I just did, but he's invariably focused on how the kids' ideas differ from the fathers' (who are, to a one, a pretty rigid and controlling bunch). Although I'm a longtime homeschooler with a bunch of kids, I don't really fit in with these families (my politics are a bit different and my own Catholic Christianity is the kind of thing they're trying to keep their kids away from), though I'm not sure Kunzman would've felt I was doing any better a job (as measured through the lens of institutional educational techniques), despite my kids' college grades and test scores and extensive reading lists. Kunzman clearly admires lots of things about homeschooling families and their relationships, and he strives to paint nuanced portraits. At the same time, he has obvious and definite blind spots regarding how education happens in the home environment.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Kost

    Kunzman is a professor of Education interested in its intersection with issues of citizenship and religion. He is also an eloquent writer with turns of phrase that made me swoon. Using six key informant families, he explores four questions within the context of conservative Christian homeschoolers: 1. What do homeschoolers do and why? Primarily, the parents feel strongly that they are responding to the biblical charge to educate their children [themselves] and that shaping children’s eternal sou Kunzman is a professor of Education interested in its intersection with issues of citizenship and religion. He is also an eloquent writer with turns of phrase that made me swoon. Using six key informant families, he explores four questions within the context of conservative Christian homeschoolers: 1. What do homeschoolers do and why? Primarily, the parents feel strongly that they are responding to the biblical charge to educate their children [themselves] and that shaping children’s eternal souls and raising them in godly ways trumps everything else. In comparison, academic preparation pales. The curricula vary widely in quality of content and implementation, though the structure tends to be quite loose precisely because the focus is on the family and God, not the academic material. 2. Do children learn to think for themselves? Alas, all parents find that, despite their best efforts, children do individuate and develop their own perspectives. The early foundation is sure to have some influence, however, (if only to provide something to reject later). 3. What do they learn about the relationship between faith and citizenship? The best efforts of the highly influential Home School Legal Defense Association and its civics program, Generation Joshua, notwithstanding, this varied from family to family. Some are passionate about congruity between faith and citizenship; others are libertarian and wish to avoid all governmental interference; others are entirely indifferent to the issue. 4. Should homeschooling be regulated? Parents generally opposed regulation, though Kunzman encountered limited opposition (except from the HSLDA) to his proposal of a very basic evaluation of literacy and numeracy. One of the strengths of this book is Kunzman’s examination of families in states that differed greatly in terms of their regulation, “ranging from essentially nothing (Indiana) to required testing (Oregon) to curriculum approval and/or review (Vermont).” This book challenges but remains sympathetic to true believers who are acting from their conscience. It is likely to inspire the reader to view Kunzman’s more recent work and research the impact of online education on the growth of homeschooling.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    An interesting look at conservative Christian homeschooling. Kunzman spends time describing six homeschooling familis in depth, then intersperses these depictions with related topics: homeschooling conventions, Generation Joshua, etc. The six families vary widely in educational effectiveness, willingness to interact with contemporary American society, belief in freedom of thought for children, etc., and thus provide a good overview of the range of Christian homeschooling going on today. What I An interesting look at conservative Christian homeschooling. Kunzman spends time describing six homeschooling familis in depth, then intersperses these depictions with related topics: homeschooling conventions, Generation Joshua, etc. The six families vary widely in educational effectiveness, willingness to interact with contemporary American society, belief in freedom of thought for children, etc., and thus provide a good overview of the range of Christian homeschooling going on today. What I found most intriguing, though, was the way in which Kunzman addressed the question of citizenship. Much like both God's Harvard and Leisureville (the other non-fiction books I've been reading these days), this book made me think about the responsibilites we have of citizens in America, and how such responsibilities can be interpreted differently - or merely shrugged off - by people. Clearly, in pulling their children out of the public sector, these families are saying something definite about how they view American culture. However, in many cases the intent is clearly not to withdraw from society at large, but to train up children in order to set them loose to change society. This is especially evident in the chapter on Generation Joshua. I do wish that this book had been written a year or so later, after the election of President Obama. I'd be curious to see the reactions of many to this.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cody

    It has taken me a while to settle my thoughts enough about this book to write a review that would be fair and not just an anti-homeschool diatribe. It's not that I am anti-homeschool - I'm not, or that I found the book unsettling to get through - I did, and let me explain why. I think Kunzman is so the right guy to tackle the subject matter - a well prepared researcher, skilled writer, and educator with a substantial background, practically and academically. The trouble I had with the book were It has taken me a while to settle my thoughts enough about this book to write a review that would be fair and not just an anti-homeschool diatribe. It's not that I am anti-homeschool - I'm not, or that I found the book unsettling to get through - I did, and let me explain why. I think Kunzman is so the right guy to tackle the subject matter - a well prepared researcher, skilled writer, and educator with a substantial background, practically and academically. The trouble I had with the book were with the subjects profiled. Most, not all, are people I would have difficulty relating to because of their attitudes toward the world around them and the people in it (and presumably, that would include me!). The motivations for some of these families to homeschool has everything to do with what works for them as adults/parents rather than what would provide the best benefit for their children. Does it truly best serve a child if their learning takes place around an adult's whims, schedule, and need to stay up half the night tending to stray teens? While a noble pursuit, does it best serve their own children? It seems that some of the profiled families sideline the growth and learning of their children not because of the decision to homeschool, but because of flawed reasoning and motives behind doing so. I guess what troubles me most about this book is the realization that those of us who choose non-homeschool options are guilty of the same thing.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kelley

    I checked this book out from the library because I wanted to read a book connected to education but I was pretty disappointed in their limited selection and dated offerings. This book however was published in 2009 and gave a really compelling study of conservative Christian homeschooling in the United States. Kunzman visits 6 families and records their interactions with him and the homeschooling lessons they follow. Also, he explores the connection between religion and education which I found to I checked this book out from the library because I wanted to read a book connected to education but I was pretty disappointed in their limited selection and dated offerings. This book however was published in 2009 and gave a really compelling study of conservative Christian homeschooling in the United States. Kunzman visits 6 families and records their interactions with him and the homeschooling lessons they follow. Also, he explores the connection between religion and education which I found to be really interesting. Some parts I skimmed through just because the author seems to babble on but overall it was a very interesting glimpse into the views of people I just don't really understand.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Very interesting take on an outsider's view of homeschooling. Reading between the lines you can tell he's terrified that the conservative Christians who homeschool their children will take over the country. Also a good example of the wide range of homeschoolers out there. It's not one cohesive movement with set standards. Some people should *definitely not* be homeschooling their children while others are doing an awesome job. Very interesting take on an outsider's view of homeschooling. Reading between the lines you can tell he's terrified that the conservative Christians who homeschool their children will take over the country. Also a good example of the wide range of homeschoolers out there. It's not one cohesive movement with set standards. Some people should *definitely not* be homeschooling their children while others are doing an awesome job.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    A person goes into the homes of a number of Christian homeschoolers to see how their homeschooling works. Or, in some cases, doesn’t work. It’s an interesting look into homeschooling in general, and I’d love to see a secular homeschooling book to go along with it. Worth your time if it’s a topic that interests you.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah

    I found this to be a very thoughtful, restrained examination of conservative Christian homeschooling from a former public school teacher and administrator, now an associate professor at the Indiana University School of Education.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Barnes

    I love how the writer took 5 years to publish this book. You can tell that he spent time with the families to get to know their inner dynamic and not what is 'just for show'. He put up some thought provoking questions to each family and to himself(and the reader). I love how the writer took 5 years to publish this book. You can tell that he spent time with the families to get to know their inner dynamic and not what is 'just for show'. He put up some thought provoking questions to each family and to himself(and the reader).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Need to come back to this again sometime... couldn't hold my interest right now. Need to come back to this again sometime... couldn't hold my interest right now.

  24. 4 out of 5

    LibraryLaur

    I found this look at different homeschooling families very interesting, and I felt like the author used a well-balanced and respectful approach in his interviews and observations.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    I've always been fascinated with homeschooling - mostly because I can't imagine doing it. This is a very well-written look inside a somewhat frightening experience... I've always been fascinated with homeschooling - mostly because I can't imagine doing it. This is a very well-written look inside a somewhat frightening experience...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    LC40.K86 2009 Oakland

  27. 5 out of 5

    Luke Hillier

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angie

  29. 4 out of 5

    Allison Gutowski

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

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