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Get Rich or Lie Trying: Ambition and Deceit in the New Influencer Economy

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More than one fifth of children want to become influencers and it's easy to understand why. What if you could escape economic uncertainty by winning the internet's attention? What if you could turn the adoration of your social media followers into a lucrative livelihood? But as Symeon Brown explores in this searing exposé, the reality is much murkier. From IRL streamers in More than one fifth of children want to become influencers and it's easy to understand why. What if you could escape economic uncertainty by winning the internet's attention? What if you could turn the adoration of your social media followers into a lucrative livelihood? But as Symeon Brown explores in this searing exposé, the reality is much murkier. From IRL streamers in LA to Brazilian butt lifts, from sex workers on OnlyFans to fraudulent cryptocurrency schemes, these are the incredible stories that lurk behind the filtered selfies and gleaming smiles. Exposing the fraud, exploitation, bribery, and dishonesty at the core of the influencer model, Get Rich or Lie Trying asks if our digital rat race is costing us too much. Revealing a broken economy resembling a pyramid scheme, this incredible blend of reportage and analysis will captivate and horrify you in equal measure.


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More than one fifth of children want to become influencers and it's easy to understand why. What if you could escape economic uncertainty by winning the internet's attention? What if you could turn the adoration of your social media followers into a lucrative livelihood? But as Symeon Brown explores in this searing exposé, the reality is much murkier. From IRL streamers in More than one fifth of children want to become influencers and it's easy to understand why. What if you could escape economic uncertainty by winning the internet's attention? What if you could turn the adoration of your social media followers into a lucrative livelihood? But as Symeon Brown explores in this searing exposé, the reality is much murkier. From IRL streamers in LA to Brazilian butt lifts, from sex workers on OnlyFans to fraudulent cryptocurrency schemes, these are the incredible stories that lurk behind the filtered selfies and gleaming smiles. Exposing the fraud, exploitation, bribery, and dishonesty at the core of the influencer model, Get Rich or Lie Trying asks if our digital rat race is costing us too much. Revealing a broken economy resembling a pyramid scheme, this incredible blend of reportage and analysis will captivate and horrify you in equal measure.

30 review for Get Rich or Lie Trying: Ambition and Deceit in the New Influencer Economy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jendella

    This is a compulsive read, probing the tangled web of internet hustles in the digital economy. Beyond the voyeuristic satisfaction (and schadenfreude?) that we usually get from a well-told scammer story, this is a pertinent examination of where we are at the cross section of late capitalism, rampant individualism, sickening inequality and the dominance of Big Tech. Engaging, insightful and at times challenging read. Definitely making me think twice about the ways that I engage with the attention This is a compulsive read, probing the tangled web of internet hustles in the digital economy. Beyond the voyeuristic satisfaction (and schadenfreude?) that we usually get from a well-told scammer story, this is a pertinent examination of where we are at the cross section of late capitalism, rampant individualism, sickening inequality and the dominance of Big Tech. Engaging, insightful and at times challenging read. Definitely making me think twice about the ways that I engage with the attention economy.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    Actual rating 4.5/5 stars. Review to follow.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erika Johansen

    As someone who's never been very engaged with social media, I have felt contempt for the entire influencer model without knowing much about how it actually works. I bought this book in an attempt to see what's what, but what Brown outlines here is far more sad than contemptible: an entire generation is growing up with its self-worth tied to financial success. That may be nothing new in theory, but the lengths of deceit (including self-deceit) and debasement these kids are willing to engage in wh As someone who's never been very engaged with social media, I have felt contempt for the entire influencer model without knowing much about how it actually works. I bought this book in an attempt to see what's what, but what Brown outlines here is far more sad than contemptible: an entire generation is growing up with its self-worth tied to financial success. That may be nothing new in theory, but the lengths of deceit (including self-deceit) and debasement these kids are willing to engage in while chasing the dream are pretty dreadful. I was prepared for a book on this subject to be fairly technical and sludgy, but Brown's prose is engaging and I was hardly able to put the book down. Definitely a nasty eye-opener for us Luddites.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aja

    Crucial reading if you're going to exist on the internet. I thought some of the critiques about the Black Lives Matters folks was a little harsh. But the plastic surgery chapter was absolutely horrifying. Sometimes this book swings and misses but when it doesn't ... it's a homerun. Crucial reading if you're going to exist on the internet. I thought some of the critiques about the Black Lives Matters folks was a little harsh. But the plastic surgery chapter was absolutely horrifying. Sometimes this book swings and misses but when it doesn't ... it's a homerun.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gemma Milne

    This is a cracking read about the influencer economy, the modern hustler / scammer affliction, and the capitalistic and cultural conditions us Millennials have lived through that are (partially) to blame. Each chapter focuses on a different online community / ‘sector’ of influencers / scam - from cosmetic surgery, MLMs and BLM ‘activists’, to day traders, fast fashion and live-streamers - if nothing else, I very much enjoyed learning about the communities I’ve not been exposed to and diving deepe This is a cracking read about the influencer economy, the modern hustler / scammer affliction, and the capitalistic and cultural conditions us Millennials have lived through that are (partially) to blame. Each chapter focuses on a different online community / ‘sector’ of influencers / scam - from cosmetic surgery, MLMs and BLM ‘activists’, to day traders, fast fashion and live-streamers - if nothing else, I very much enjoyed learning about the communities I’ve not been exposed to and diving deeper into those I’ve brushed up against at times. Symeon is a journalist, which doesn’t always guarantee a well-written and -researched book, but the systemic approach to storytelling, the way the characters are brought to life, and the combination of purposeful prose and sharp wit make this a delight to read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Erik Nygren

    Loved this. Great piece of journalism covering a wide range of contemporary issues stemming from the social media/influencer economy space. A lot of happenings in this space are hard to boil down and explain simply, as much of it comes down to the UX of the platforms where they occur, and usually an intimate knowledge of platforms feel like a requirement to grasping trends or movements emerging from them. Not in this case, this book does a great job explaining social media tech in layman terms, e Loved this. Great piece of journalism covering a wide range of contemporary issues stemming from the social media/influencer economy space. A lot of happenings in this space are hard to boil down and explain simply, as much of it comes down to the UX of the platforms where they occur, and usually an intimate knowledge of platforms feel like a requirement to grasping trends or movements emerging from them. Not in this case, this book does a great job explaining social media tech in layman terms, even truly bizarre concepts like alt-right IRL twitch streamers with text-to-speech monetisation systems (yeah that’s a thing) makes sense. Before reading this I thought I wouldn’t be surprised, but I was surprised to the extent that everything is a scam in this space. But social media is not something to take a smug “revenge of the nerds” stance to if you don’t interact much with it, considering the large share of the world’s population's attention being spent there. Also worth pointing out that this is not just about political discourse, but things like beauty standards, hyper individualisation and defining what success looks like. It’s hard to see good solutions for these types of tech platforms, as the follower model naturally lends itself to encouraging pyramid schemes, just as anxiety creeps in and expectations are set unnaturally high within the platform’s userbases. Keep your sanity intact and only communicate via ASCII art ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ .......I ....../ \

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emilia Barnes

    It’s not the book to reach for if you want to feel better about civilisation, but that doesn’t mean it’s not an interesting read. Well researched, well written and intelligently analysed—usually this sort of history is better when enough time has passed for a historical perspective to even be possible. But actually, this book provides urgent context to a lot of things you will have already heard of; and supplement with a lot you probably haven’t, to do what good long-form reporting is supposed t It’s not the book to reach for if you want to feel better about civilisation, but that doesn’t mean it’s not an interesting read. Well researched, well written and intelligently analysed—usually this sort of history is better when enough time has passed for a historical perspective to even be possible. But actually, this book provides urgent context to a lot of things you will have already heard of; and supplement with a lot you probably haven’t, to do what good long-form reporting is supposed to do, before a history can be put together.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    a collection of some of the jankiest business models i've ever had the pleasure of reading about a collection of some of the jankiest business models i've ever had the pleasure of reading about

  9. 4 out of 5

    Carla King-Molina

    A really compelling and easy read outlining the dark side of the influencer economy. From the evangelist undercurrent of new age male targeted MLM’s to outlining the hypocrisy of shilling fast fashion with feminist messaging - this book is a really good reflection on how the internet economy has made losers out of almost everyone

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Lynn Smart

    I don't normally go for nonfiction books, but this one sounded fascinating, and I'm glad I went for it. Symeon offers deep insight into the damage done to the world as well as our mental and physical health by the influencer economy. Things I'd never have connected are made startlingly clear – such as the damage done by the fast-fashion industry, which is supported and turned into an even bigger monster by influencers sharing the products on their timelines. And while I was vaguely aware of the I don't normally go for nonfiction books, but this one sounded fascinating, and I'm glad I went for it. Symeon offers deep insight into the damage done to the world as well as our mental and physical health by the influencer economy. Things I'd never have connected are made startlingly clear – such as the damage done by the fast-fashion industry, which is supported and turned into an even bigger monster by influencers sharing the products on their timelines. And while I was vaguely aware of the damage done to women's self-esteem by influencers and filters alike, I didn't realise it had gotten so bad. When I was in my twenties, we pretty much just wanted to be skinny and tan with shiny hair and big boobs, and maybe have smaller noses. Now girls in their twenties want huge lips, tiny noses with impossibly narrow bridges, chiselled jawlines, massive tits and butts out of proportion with their body types – basically, they all want to look like one of those ridiculous filters that makes everyone look like an anime character. And to make it more terrifying, dodgy surgeons are promising to make these twisted realities happen! Oh, by the way, if you suffer from morbid curiosity like me and look up the woman whose boob job went so bad...well, just make sure you do it on an empty stomach. Forgive me, I'm rambling. Really good nonfiction books make me ramble, overexcited to share what I've learned. Please go read this book and then come ramble with me.

  11. 4 out of 5

    El

    Thank you to NetGalley and Atlantic Books for providing me with an eARC in exchange for review. This book covers so much ground about the nature of online hustle culture and how capitalism and individualism permeate so much of online society across the board. To list a fair number of things it covers: dropshipping, dodgy cosmetic surgery, Vidcon, streamers, MLMs, so many pyramid schemes(!), influencers flouting advertising standards, big tech companies, hyper-consumerism, fast fashion, cryptocurr Thank you to NetGalley and Atlantic Books for providing me with an eARC in exchange for review. This book covers so much ground about the nature of online hustle culture and how capitalism and individualism permeate so much of online society across the board. To list a fair number of things it covers: dropshipping, dodgy cosmetic surgery, Vidcon, streamers, MLMs, so many pyramid schemes(!), influencers flouting advertising standards, big tech companies, hyper-consumerism, fast fashion, cryptocurrency, dodgy financial products, activism as branding, Theranos, WeWork and Nigerian internet scammers. The structure of the book flows really well, the segues between chapters are great, and overall it's just really enjoyable to read whether you know anything about the above or not. The book also ties together all these themes, stories and scams into overarching analysis about the decay of capitalism as millennials age into it, and how a culture of individualism and a lack of accountability feed a culture of deceit and corruption, evident perhaps most clearly at the highest levels of government in the UK. Highly recommend.

  12. 4 out of 5

    JAMES SMITHER

    I enjoyed this and would recommend it. As someone who came of age before the internet's heyday, it was an excellent (and accessible) introduction to both the economics and the sociology of this bizarre (to me) influencer phenomenon, which makes celebrities out of people who have never done anything or come within touching distance of traditional channels to fame and fortune. As someone who works in risk and compliance, I particularly enjoyed the convincing explanation of how much of this activit I enjoyed this and would recommend it. As someone who came of age before the internet's heyday, it was an excellent (and accessible) introduction to both the economics and the sociology of this bizarre (to me) influencer phenomenon, which makes celebrities out of people who have never done anything or come within touching distance of traditional channels to fame and fortune. As someone who works in risk and compliance, I particularly enjoyed the convincing explanation of how much of this activity is essentially not just smoke and mirrors but actually a succession of profoundly fraudulent pyramid schemes - over which cliffs thousands of followers continue lemmings-like to throw themselves every day. If anything, I wanted more. I felt like the author only scratched the surface of certain aspects and would have liked to hear more from him - other than perhaps a desire to capture such a fast-moving zeitgeist, did it need to be quite so short? Perhaps this will be fodder for volume 2, perhaps he worries about the attention-deficit audience for this topic (!) or perhaps he feels it has been covered elsewhere, but examples I'd be curious to see covered include: the children's social media economy; the mental health impact on both influencers and followers of various aspects of the ubiquitous perfect-body / #thinspo / #fitspo obsession, including on men; the privacy and cyber security aspects; and the political / conspiracy theory angle beyond #BLM.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    actually relevant!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anna Stephenson

    Bit of a shame really – it wasn't ever bad, exactly, it just felt lacking. The text is snappy, and you could never call it rambling, but it just doesn't seem to end up anywhere. I feel like this is a person who writes competent, mostly clean long read copy – and this is several long reads put together. There was, for me, little that felt like it was deepening anything beyond the initial few chapters or going in a particular direction. I felt like a lot of the chapters could have been in any order Bit of a shame really – it wasn't ever bad, exactly, it just felt lacking. The text is snappy, and you could never call it rambling, but it just doesn't seem to end up anywhere. I feel like this is a person who writes competent, mostly clean long read copy – and this is several long reads put together. There was, for me, little that felt like it was deepening anything beyond the initial few chapters or going in a particular direction. I felt like a lot of the chapters could have been in any order. I appreciated the author's breadth of coverage and interviewees, going beyond the global north and lots of influencer stereotypes, but I felt a level of depth and direction that I was looking for was too often missing. I'm disappointed with some of the editing, too – I feel it's possible the author was let down. Despite concise, decent prose with the odd bit of wit or occasional insightful turn of phrase, there are odd things left in that just don't make sense, like (not verbatim) 'X was now unable to make rent, despite still sending regular chunks of money back home to Y country'. Things like that should have been caught by a sharper, more attentive editor. I don't like editing in my head on a sentence level as I read, and it's especially frustrating when it happens too many times with someone who can clearly write fairly well. This might be a good one to buy for someone like a younger brother or a second-career mum navigating the internet for the first time in a more directly professional way. There's nothing too startling or revelatory to people who already distrust influencers and are concerned by the ethics and welfare of wannabes. There's more information, some bits of it interesting, but as a book this doesn't work too well for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Parwiz Dušana

    I flew through this book a few days ago and almost forget it all already. Brown's writing style is in keeping with a popular journalistic style which makes it both very readable and a little forgettable. This isn't a bad thing and it certainly makes the text accessible, which is crucial given the subject matter - anyway, it's turned out to be a selling point as I'm going to buy a copy of this for younger members of my family who are a little more inside this world than I am. I knew about a lot o I flew through this book a few days ago and almost forget it all already. Brown's writing style is in keeping with a popular journalistic style which makes it both very readable and a little forgettable. This isn't a bad thing and it certainly makes the text accessible, which is crucial given the subject matter - anyway, it's turned out to be a selling point as I'm going to buy a copy of this for younger members of my family who are a little more inside this world than I am. I knew about a lot of this stuff before reading; Big Tech, Turkish BBL's, fast fashion, the world of influencers, OnlyFans stars. What Brown does really well is provide the key information, while getting plenty of first hand interviews with those who are embedded in this world. At no point does Brown look down on anyone, he's consistently empathetic and curious. I found some of the interviews to be fascinating, dystopian and quite sad (not in a pejorative sense, but in a way that just made me think 'jesus, it must be really hard to have that sort of relationship with your own body'). One line which particularly struck me and made me think 'how the hell did we get here so fast?' was; '"Now when I use the filter it does not change my face." She is beaming with pride'. The most interesting part of the book for me was the chapter on Chidera, the Slumflower - this was probably because I hadn't heard of her before, and also because it was the chapter in which Brown's frustration at the whole influencer economy was the most pronounced. The line 'intersectional Thatcherism' was quite memorable. The subject matter on show here is hard to look at, it's miserable really. It's a sickening story of the powerful preying on the vulnerable.

  16. 4 out of 5

    YourMoodyAunt

    I was lured into reading this book by the catchy cover and title because I have the mental maturity of a 12 year old. Flipping to the first page and finding out the author was male made me hesitate; it was a book that would cover influencers, most of whom tend to be women and men tend to judge women on the internet unnecessarily harshly, but i decided to give it a chance solely based on the reviews. I am so glad that i did. I feel like it’s a book everyone would benefit from reading, from the per I was lured into reading this book by the catchy cover and title because I have the mental maturity of a 12 year old. Flipping to the first page and finding out the author was male made me hesitate; it was a book that would cover influencers, most of whom tend to be women and men tend to judge women on the internet unnecessarily harshly, but i decided to give it a chance solely based on the reviews. I am so glad that i did. I feel like it’s a book everyone would benefit from reading, from the person who has been seduced by the seemingly easy money found in internet fame to the ordinary person not in the know who is likely to fall for an internet scam. I could tell that this story was told by a reporter, someone who thoroughly researches before forming an opinion. I usually struggle with works of non-fiction because when there is no discernible storyline storytelling usually gets lost along the way. Not here, though. I was spellbound from beginning to end. Gut gemacht!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan O'Neill

    Concise and readable book on the influencer economy and how minorities and those on lower incomes fall into the false promise of celebrity and fortune courtesy of social media companies. Does a really good job at presenting the perils of those who fall victim to pyramid scheme-like practices from self promoting 'hustlers' or suffer horrific physical and mental health issues and botched surgeries as they pursue the look desired by hype fashion brands on social media. Ultimately the journalist pre Concise and readable book on the influencer economy and how minorities and those on lower incomes fall into the false promise of celebrity and fortune courtesy of social media companies. Does a really good job at presenting the perils of those who fall victim to pyramid scheme-like practices from self promoting 'hustlers' or suffer horrific physical and mental health issues and botched surgeries as they pursue the look desired by hype fashion brands on social media. Ultimately the journalist presents the new influencer economy as a terrible symptom of late stage capitalism, one which could get worse post-pandemic with so many people forced online. The depths it leads people to - being racially abused for money, pitting communities against each other, etc - are told through personal testimonies and good research which outline how disastrous the message of ruthless individualism can be.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    A compulsive read about the rise of influencer culture and the scams and lies involved in selling an image. Brown looks at the way individuals have risen to online fame and used their platform, with many grasping for the elusive dream of success and wealth that social media makes look deceptively easy. He reports on the exploitative nature of capitalises preying on vulnerable people to sell their product, get rich quick scams that have lost people thousands, individuals who have had extreme and A compulsive read about the rise of influencer culture and the scams and lies involved in selling an image. Brown looks at the way individuals have risen to online fame and used their platform, with many grasping for the elusive dream of success and wealth that social media makes look deceptively easy. He reports on the exploitative nature of capitalises preying on vulnerable people to sell their product, get rich quick scams that have lost people thousands, individuals who have had extreme and botched surgery so as to appeal to the Instagram algorithm. We all know that social media distorts reality but this book really examines the frightening depths of its dark side and does so in a fascinating way. Thank you to NetGalley and Atlantic for the advanced copy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fon

    “As our way of life resumes post-pandemic, we have to ask ourselves what constitutes a good life and an economy that delivers happiness and security for the greatest number of people. Until this is resolved, the emphasis on individual wealth and prodigious overnight success at a time of income insecurity will continue to combine with social media platforms to reward dishonesty.” 3.5 stars. Not a fan of the writing (took alot of willpower to get through each chapter), but I ended up learning more “As our way of life resumes post-pandemic, we have to ask ourselves what constitutes a good life and an economy that delivers happiness and security for the greatest number of people. Until this is resolved, the emphasis on individual wealth and prodigious overnight success at a time of income insecurity will continue to combine with social media platforms to reward dishonesty.” 3.5 stars. Not a fan of the writing (took alot of willpower to get through each chapter), but I ended up learning more about the dark side of the influencer economy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rukiya

    I read this book in one sitting. ‘Get Rich or Lie Trying’ is a real insight into the deceitful influencer economy most have been curious and tempted to explore as a fast track to success and financial freedom. This book has changed my perspective on not only online influencers, but the role we all play in glorifying ordinary people brave enough to publicly fake it until “they make it”.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maria

    About the dark side of influencer marketing and the online attention economy. Good chapters about how some companies basically make a liing out of their customers dreams of becoming paid influencers. Great chapters about the spread of pyramid games online and good chapters about what it does to people, when attention from other people is their livelihood. Best quotes: "YouTube is child's play. Your landlord kicking you out because you can't pay rent, that's a problem!" About the dark side of influencer marketing and the online attention economy. Good chapters about how some companies basically make a liing out of their customers dreams of becoming paid influencers. Great chapters about the spread of pyramid games online and good chapters about what it does to people, when attention from other people is their livelihood. Best quotes: "YouTube is child's play. Your landlord kicking you out because you can't pay rent, that's a problem!"

  22. 4 out of 5

    chris

    i was v excited for this & while it delivered on telling interesting, measured stories of people who are both victims and perpetrators of the “influencer economy”, i felt it didn’t consistently follow up on these anecdotes with enough analysis. really interesting stuff in here & still worth a read but wish there’d been stronger arguments throughout. the author’s stance on sex work also felt v unclear & somewhat unsympathetic towards sex workers.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Adeva

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m not sure what I expected from this book, but I expected a little more. Even though the book reinforced my stance on not taking part in influencer culture, a lot of what the book covered were things I already knew. A chapter that was really interesting to read though was “Black Lives Matter, Here’s My Cash App”, as it addressed the rise of influencers profiting from faux activism. It was also quite refreshing to read interviews of people whose actions were being interrogated and not sided wit I’m not sure what I expected from this book, but I expected a little more. Even though the book reinforced my stance on not taking part in influencer culture, a lot of what the book covered were things I already knew. A chapter that was really interesting to read though was “Black Lives Matter, Here’s My Cash App”, as it addressed the rise of influencers profiting from faux activism. It was also quite refreshing to read interviews of people whose actions were being interrogated and not sided with by the author.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Read this if you consume the internet I told so many of these stories to anyone that would listen. Brilliantly put together summary of how the internet has really kind of fucked society in a lot of ways balanced with the opportunity it has afforded many that wouldn't get it otherwise perhaps. Such a good read. Will recommend for anyone half interested in social media and marketing morality. Read this if you consume the internet I told so many of these stories to anyone that would listen. Brilliantly put together summary of how the internet has really kind of fucked society in a lot of ways balanced with the opportunity it has afforded many that wouldn't get it otherwise perhaps. Such a good read. Will recommend for anyone half interested in social media and marketing morality.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    This was another Rebel Book Club read. The intro and outro of this book really soared for me. I loved Symeon Brown's insights. I also appreciated that this made the topic accessible to a broad audience. That said, I wanted a bit more depth. From hearing him speak at our monthly meeting I understand that he cut a couple hundred pages before publishing--I would have loved to see those included, personally. Interesting take on influencer culture regardless. This was another Rebel Book Club read. The intro and outro of this book really soared for me. I loved Symeon Brown's insights. I also appreciated that this made the topic accessible to a broad audience. That said, I wanted a bit more depth. From hearing him speak at our monthly meeting I understand that he cut a couple hundred pages before publishing--I would have loved to see those included, personally. Interesting take on influencer culture regardless.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jennie Godfrey

    This was such an insightful read. A few months ago I closed down my Instagram and Facebook accounts after reading An Ugly Truth and this book really underlined the decision to do so. It takes a look at some aspects of influencer culture I was unaware of, and some I was, and really dissects each one in a rigorous but highly readable way - exposing the ‘get rich quick’ myth as just that.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elissar Haidar

    Great read! Being in my mid-20s meant that this book touched upon many topics that I have found interesting/problematic and Symeon connected it all together wonderfully. He has a great point of view and this is evidently very well-researched. This should be a compulsory read for everyone that regularly engages with social media.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Franz Schrepf

    Read as part of "Rebel Book Club". Some interesting insights into the business models of influencer marketing driven businesses which oftentimes border into the realm of scams. If you're very interested into the world of influencer scams and plastic surgery this book is for you, however it's a short read with relatively few "shocking" revelations. Read as part of "Rebel Book Club". Some interesting insights into the business models of influencer marketing driven businesses which oftentimes border into the realm of scams. If you're very interested into the world of influencer scams and plastic surgery this book is for you, however it's a short read with relatively few "shocking" revelations.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    Interesting eye opener on the reality of the net economy and what can be behind the glitter. Different cases and reality, a well researched and well written book. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Verity W

    *****Copy from NetGalley in return for an honest review ***** A sobering look at the changes that social media has brought to the world - particularly when it comes to the blurring of lines between real and fake and the Wild West of promotions, adverts and sponcon. A lot to think about - especially as the world starts to reopen after the pandemic and potentially try to turn their pandemic hustles into their new normal.

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