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The Risk of Education: Discovering Our Ultimate Destiny

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This is an English translation of an Italian work first published in 1995. Based in Milan, Italy, Giussani heads the Communion and Liberation movement and is a council for the Congregation for the Clergy and the Pontifical Council for the Laity. He discusses education in terms of fundamental truths, in particular, the element of faith. It presents the argument that without This is an English translation of an Italian work first published in 1995. Based in Milan, Italy, Giussani heads the Communion and Liberation movement and is a council for the Congregation for the Clergy and the Pontifical Council for the Laity. He discusses education in terms of fundamental truths, in particular, the element of faith. It presents the argument that without the fundamental factors of tradition, the young person is merely a fragile leaf separated from its branch.


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This is an English translation of an Italian work first published in 1995. Based in Milan, Italy, Giussani heads the Communion and Liberation movement and is a council for the Congregation for the Clergy and the Pontifical Council for the Laity. He discusses education in terms of fundamental truths, in particular, the element of faith. It presents the argument that without This is an English translation of an Italian work first published in 1995. Based in Milan, Italy, Giussani heads the Communion and Liberation movement and is a council for the Congregation for the Clergy and the Pontifical Council for the Laity. He discusses education in terms of fundamental truths, in particular, the element of faith. It presents the argument that without the fundamental factors of tradition, the young person is merely a fragile leaf separated from its branch.

30 review for The Risk of Education: Discovering Our Ultimate Destiny

  1. 5 out of 5

    Teallia Gorman

    “He who looks at the characters [letters] in a book but doesn’t know their meaning, what they refer to, will praise the book with his eyes, but his spirit will not understand. But someone who can read will praise this work of art and also understand its meaning, for he will not only be to see, like everyone else, but will also be able to read. And only someone who has learned how to read can do so…” Augustine …Faith had to be presented as potentially capable of improving, enlightening, and enhanc “He who looks at the characters [letters] in a book but doesn’t know their meaning, what they refer to, will praise the book with his eyes, but his spirit will not understand. But someone who can read will praise this work of art and also understand its meaning, for he will not only be to see, like everyone else, but will also be able to read. And only someone who has learned how to read can do so…” Augustine …Faith had to be presented as potentially capable of improving, enlightening, and enhancing authentic human values. The second element was practical, in that the contents of faith had to be tested in action. Rational evidence could lead to faith only from within the experience of human need; and further, this need must be confronted from within a lived Christian reality, an involvement that would treat Christianity as a social, communal event. In short, we are at the mercy of the quicksands of freedom.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Barreca

    This was one of my favorite books this year. I might update the cover, but I thought it was highly relevant to education and really enjoyed the flocknote group I was in for it. It was a great group all in all.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    This is the most important book I've ever read on education, and it is one of the most important books I've read in recent years. Giussani himself is a warm and wise teacher with one thing in his vision at all times: the transformative Christ event. I came across Fr Giussani's name in one of Stratford Caledecott's books ("Beauty for Truth's Sake"), and was intrigued by this book title. That is all I knew about him when I purchased it and began reading it. Now, I can honestly say that Fr Giussani This is the most important book I've ever read on education, and it is one of the most important books I've read in recent years. Giussani himself is a warm and wise teacher with one thing in his vision at all times: the transformative Christ event. I came across Fr Giussani's name in one of Stratford Caledecott's books ("Beauty for Truth's Sake"), and was intrigued by this book title. That is all I knew about him when I purchased it and began reading it. Now, I can honestly say that Fr Giussani's ideas will be significantly influential to my vocations as teacher, pastor, and father. I want to read everything he wrote. Rather than include a summary of the book, I will offer four of the most important points Giussani makes in the book that left deep impressions: 1) Tradition is a working hypothesis. By this Giussani means that the Christian tradition (the "Regula Fide" as gathered from the storehouse of Christian teachings contained in the Scriptures and spiritual writings of the last 2,000 years) demands to be tested by young people. If the Christian tradition is passed along as something other than a workable structure, then young people will never allow it to be flexed in the face of challenges; rather, they will drop it quickly in the face of them and move onto skepticism or apathy. This hypothesis must be lived; otherwise, it's dead. 2) Faith is rational. Faith in Christ, so argues Giussani, answers the needs of the human heart in a way that nothing else does. It is the highest step on the ladder of rationality, because it is the step that brings us to God Himself. This is a major theme throughout his career. Faith is neither an assent to doctrinal teachings nor a reduction to mere moralism; it is, rather, the embrace of a Person, the continued relationship to Christ Jesus as He makes Himself known in every single moment. 3) The educator must be personally and passionately invested in his or her teachings and students. If education is about aiding the student into entering the totality of the real, then the educator must also be seeking this totality. He or she is not a hired hand, passing along information, but a leader who has an existential commitment. 4) The Christian has nothing to fear from the various systems of the world because in everything, God makes Himself known. It is only a weak and limpid theology, afraid of change and challenge, that is constantly on the attack. A secure theology sees the glimmer of God in absolutely everything, and is eager to grow, to learn, to evolve. This is a book that changes one's life.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Matt Lewis

    Masterfully written argument on the need for a holistic approach to education from the family and the school. Education is more than merely learning subjects but it is the formation of persons. Education is intended to form us into people who can seek virtue and can seek God. The only way to teach people about God meaningfully is to combine a way that makes faith reasonable but combines that reasonableness with experience. What good is knowing all this stuff about the faith without actually havin Masterfully written argument on the need for a holistic approach to education from the family and the school. Education is more than merely learning subjects but it is the formation of persons. Education is intended to form us into people who can seek virtue and can seek God. The only way to teach people about God meaningfully is to combine a way that makes faith reasonable but combines that reasonableness with experience. What good is knowing all this stuff about the faith without actually having experienced God for oneself? Giussani writes brilliantly about the subject of education and I would recommend this not only to people looking to work in education but also to parents because parents have the responsibility of being the first educators.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Will be reading again heading into teaching/ministry. A great read for anyone wanting to be more than just an educator of the faith but a transformative force in education. Guissani greatly inspires Pope JPII, Benedict and Francis’s pedagogies.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Gajdosik

    Ouch - my head. Such a little book but hard - for me - to unpack.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Conor

    Brilliant at points. The language is a bit dense at others.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Michal Paszkiewicz

    A very neat book that presents a strong case for teaching children critical thinking, presenting them with your own convictions and letting them be tested in adolescence.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eve

    the beauty of the Cross is that we can choose to walk away.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Zach

    Fr. Giussani is a genius. He’s incredibly insightful in his diagnosis of the current student culture and the solution.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Bauer

    Since I've started teaching CCD, I figured I'd re-read this. I read the 2nd edition, the one with the introduction by Stanley Hauerwas. Since I've started teaching CCD, I figured I'd re-read this. I read the 2nd edition, the one with the introduction by Stanley Hauerwas.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Fred

  13. 5 out of 5

    Hollisch

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beth Jones

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ines

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rute

  17. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  18. 4 out of 5

    Emily Strab

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elisabetta Dragotto

  20. 5 out of 5

    Luiza Costa

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

  23. 4 out of 5

    Eric Lee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul A.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Bruno

  28. 5 out of 5

    Norson Fernandez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Francois

  30. 4 out of 5

    Maria Reagan

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