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How To Make A Negro Christian

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[What will be the benefit of giving enslaved Afrikans christianity?] "It is a matter of astonishment, that there should be any objection at all; for the duty of giving religious instruction to our Negroes, and the benefits flowing from it, should be obvious to all. The benefits, we conceive to be incalculably great, and [one] of them [is] there will be greater subordinatio [What will be the benefit of giving enslaved Afrikans christianity?] "It is a matter of astonishment, that there should be any objection at all; for the duty of giving religious instruction to our Negroes, and the benefits flowing from it, should be obvious to all. The benefits, we conceive to be incalculably great, and [one] of them [is] there will be greater subordination . . .amongst the Negroes (page 52)."


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[What will be the benefit of giving enslaved Afrikans christianity?] "It is a matter of astonishment, that there should be any objection at all; for the duty of giving religious instruction to our Negroes, and the benefits flowing from it, should be obvious to all. The benefits, we conceive to be incalculably great, and [one] of them [is] there will be greater subordinatio [What will be the benefit of giving enslaved Afrikans christianity?] "It is a matter of astonishment, that there should be any objection at all; for the duty of giving religious instruction to our Negroes, and the benefits flowing from it, should be obvious to all. The benefits, we conceive to be incalculably great, and [one] of them [is] there will be greater subordination . . .amongst the Negroes (page 52)."

30 review for How To Make A Negro Christian

  1. 5 out of 5

    Vannessa Anderson

    Author Makesi-Tehuti professes Afrikan people in the Americas-wrongly called Afrikan Americans, Black Americans, etc. have been, are and forever will essentially be Afrikans living whenever they may now live. We, like other Afrikans brutally stolen, are the extension of that first created human group. …” I find both statements laughable in that DNA testing will prove Afrikan people living in American or wherever they may now live bloodline is entangled with British, Irish, Scottish, French and Author Makesi-Tehuti professes Afrikan people in the Americas-wrongly called Afrikan Americans, Black Americans, etc. have been, are and forever will essentially be Afrikans living whenever they may now live. We, like other Afrikans brutally stolen, are the extension of that first created human group. …” I find both statements laughable in that DNA testing will prove Afrikan people living in American or wherever they may now live bloodline is entangled with British, Irish, Scottish, French and who knows what else and that makes them children of the country for which they were born. Afrikan people in America were not Stolen but sold by African people in Afrika for profit. My problem with books like this is they don’t tell the entire story but make the story so salacious to make the story believable to those who don’t know some History of how American Blacks came to be in America thus excusing the atrocious behavior of the Afrikans in Afrika. I can agree from what I’ve read is how enslaved Afrikans were not Christians when they were brought to America. I do recommend for How To Make A Negro Christian to be read not for its profoundness but for the information provided; however, I will recommend for some of the information to be challenged and verified through research for confirmation of accuracy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Dacons

    The typographical and grammatical errors as well as the unnecessary overuse of certain words in the analysis and critique were for lack of a better term too much. At the beginning of the book in a section titled "NOTE ON TONE OF WORK" I as was is somewhat insulted and taken aback by Makesi-Tehuti writing "Based on the copious amounts of literature I have read during my life I find that some of the best works for Afrikan people are not read by them because the "words are too big" or "it is dry an The typographical and grammatical errors as well as the unnecessary overuse of certain words in the analysis and critique were for lack of a better term too much. At the beginning of the book in a section titled "NOTE ON TONE OF WORK" I as was is somewhat insulted and taken aback by Makesi-Tehuti writing "Based on the copious amounts of literature I have read during my life I find that some of the best works for Afrikan people are not read by them because the "words are too big" or "it is dry and boring". He then goes on to write "With that in mind this writer has attempted to make this "easy reading" so as to grasp the widest possible Afrikan audience." To write this and then go on to criticize the the demeaning acts (though much greater and hardly comparable) of other was hypocritical and unnecessary. The reading of the original text gives us a glaring view into one of the many processes used (and to some degree still used) to keep a body of people, in this case enslaved Africans docile and going along with the plan the Master under the guise of being Christ's representative.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tiyahna Ridley-Padmore

    I read this book as part of a book club with another friend. As far as writing goes, this book was not the smoothest read. The writing was awkward, dry and error-filled. We had to purchase the book from a specific retailer and I got the impression that we were buying an unedited (maybe incomplete) book. All that said, I think this book is an important read. I was anticipating a book written by a social theorist who would unpack theories about how religion was weaponized as a tool to oppress and I read this book as part of a book club with another friend. As far as writing goes, this book was not the smoothest read. The writing was awkward, dry and error-filled. We had to purchase the book from a specific retailer and I got the impression that we were buying an unedited (maybe incomplete) book. All that said, I think this book is an important read. I was anticipating a book written by a social theorist who would unpack theories about how religion was weaponized as a tool to oppress and garner obedience. Instead, I got a book that included historical documentation put out by high ranking officials at the time, proving this expressed agenda. I really enjoyed this read and, although controversial, I think it's critical that we continuously strive to challenge and better understand the role of dominant power in shaping our current realities.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ray

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Let me read first

  5. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    A must read for all African American Christians

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Important to read l for historic purposes only

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dingindlela Dondololwamatshida

    Enlightening; spiritually uplifting.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jazzy

    it's ok it's ok

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tarnisha Jackson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nellie Ndirangu

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ngwako Makgopa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kamau

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stacey M.Gray

  14. 4 out of 5

    Marcez Lee

  15. 4 out of 5

    Hamed

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ndukza Mhlongo

  17. 5 out of 5

    Thimna Kheswa

  18. 5 out of 5

    Siphamandla Mbedla

  19. 5 out of 5

    Teena Ama

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gad Jeremie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Megan Hunt

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nganja Farmer

  23. 5 out of 5

    EMMANUEL TIMMY

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rcharlescbregmail.Com

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chrisshonda Prayor

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mcsleezy

  27. 4 out of 5

    charlie duning

  28. 5 out of 5

    Thokozani Kgotla's

  29. 5 out of 5

    Deshena

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nkembo Nkuka

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