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The Anti 9 to 5 Guide: Practical Career Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube

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Today, lots of women would love to integrate their passion with their career and are seeking advice on how to do just that. Michelle Goodman, a self proclaimed, "wage-slave" has written a fun, reassuring, girlfriend-to-girlfriend guide on identifying your passion, transitioning out of that unfulfilling job, and doing it all in a smart, practical way. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide Today, lots of women would love to integrate their passion with their career and are seeking advice on how to do just that. Michelle Goodman, a self proclaimed, "wage-slave" has written a fun, reassuring, girlfriend-to-girlfriend guide on identifying your passion, transitioning out of that unfulfilling job, and doing it all in a smart, practical way. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide realizes that not every woman wants the corner office, in fact, some women don't want to be in an office at all. Today's women are non-traditionalists, do it yourself sort of girls who want to travel the world, take up knitting, frolic in the land of freelancing but want to do it all without going broke. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide provides readers with the resources you need to have it all and still have a place to sleep. Michelle suggests great tips for easing into the life you want. With an entire chapter devoted to pursuing your passion on the side, The Anti 9-to-5 Guide encourages us to tweak our current career path or head down a new one, and ultimately succeed.


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Today, lots of women would love to integrate their passion with their career and are seeking advice on how to do just that. Michelle Goodman, a self proclaimed, "wage-slave" has written a fun, reassuring, girlfriend-to-girlfriend guide on identifying your passion, transitioning out of that unfulfilling job, and doing it all in a smart, practical way. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide Today, lots of women would love to integrate their passion with their career and are seeking advice on how to do just that. Michelle Goodman, a self proclaimed, "wage-slave" has written a fun, reassuring, girlfriend-to-girlfriend guide on identifying your passion, transitioning out of that unfulfilling job, and doing it all in a smart, practical way. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide realizes that not every woman wants the corner office, in fact, some women don't want to be in an office at all. Today's women are non-traditionalists, do it yourself sort of girls who want to travel the world, take up knitting, frolic in the land of freelancing but want to do it all without going broke. The Anti 9-to-5 Guide provides readers with the resources you need to have it all and still have a place to sleep. Michelle suggests great tips for easing into the life you want. With an entire chapter devoted to pursuing your passion on the side, The Anti 9-to-5 Guide encourages us to tweak our current career path or head down a new one, and ultimately succeed.

30 review for The Anti 9 to 5 Guide: Practical Career Advice for Women Who Think Outside the Cube

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Is it me or does taking one-year eight hour a day, five days a week cubicle assignments here and there not really count as "thinking outside the cube"? Aside from that head-scratcher, Goodman's book is a fun, speedy yet thoughtful look at all the steps a gal should take if she needs a different life than the nine-to-five cubicle farm grind. The book isn't for slackers, but rather those who need less paper-pushing, more flextime, travel, adventure or creativity, or just want to be their own boss. Is it me or does taking one-year eight hour a day, five days a week cubicle assignments here and there not really count as "thinking outside the cube"? Aside from that head-scratcher, Goodman's book is a fun, speedy yet thoughtful look at all the steps a gal should take if she needs a different life than the nine-to-five cubicle farm grind. The book isn't for slackers, but rather those who need less paper-pushing, more flextime, travel, adventure or creativity, or just want to be their own boss. It's basically a book for women who got a taste of cube life and decided that while they may or may not be good at it, they might go postal if they have to do it for thirty or forty years. 'The Anti 9-to-5 Guide' is all about helping you make that transition in a way that ensures you won't be living on ramen noodles and $.25 bagels for years before you find your way. The only downside? There are a lots of cubicle-bound males who could use this advice, but are put off by the invisible frilly pink bow that's wrapped around the book. Normally, I'd roll my eyes at this and tell them to get over it, but...the guide is pretty unapologetically female in focus. Ah well, they'll survive. And it's not like they can't read it and glean excellent bustin' out of the cube strategies anyway. But I'd recommend this gem to help nudge cubicle-bound corporate and non-profit office types from "I hate this! " to actual, you know, taking concrete steps toward work they actually enjoy AND get paid decently for....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Eileen

    Ok, I actually read this a couple months ago, so bear that in mind. That said, this was definitely worth checking out. MG's approach to leaving the traditional workforce is methodical and realistic. In the beginning, she explores how to figure out what on earth you want to do--very helpful, since I imagine many people besides me are totally stymied. Each chapter outlines the steps one might take to accomplish a different, more independent career: start your own business, move to working part-tim Ok, I actually read this a couple months ago, so bear that in mind. That said, this was definitely worth checking out. MG's approach to leaving the traditional workforce is methodical and realistic. In the beginning, she explores how to figure out what on earth you want to do--very helpful, since I imagine many people besides me are totally stymied. Each chapter outlines the steps one might take to accomplish a different, more independent career: start your own business, move to working part-time while pursuing side projects, shift to the nonprofit workplace, etc. Then, at the end of each section, she provides a more concise summary of steps, so you can get started without writing quite as many checklists. Instead, you can narrow your focus based on her guidelines. Starting any sort of independent moneymaking enterprise is going to be difficult; this book will help you organize your own head before beginning the approach.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Y

    I expected to find unconventional "fun" advice from a book so titled "anti" something very conventional and a cutesy cover. What I found was stuff I'd read from regular career advice books... so I naturally just skimmed over all of it, and didn't learn anything I didn't already know. I figure the author's idea of "outside the cube" means throwing in some girly pop culture references such as "if your boss is like so and so from Devil wears Prada" ... and quoting phrases uttered by characters from I expected to find unconventional "fun" advice from a book so titled "anti" something very conventional and a cutesy cover. What I found was stuff I'd read from regular career advice books... so I naturally just skimmed over all of it, and didn't learn anything I didn't already know. I figure the author's idea of "outside the cube" means throwing in some girly pop culture references such as "if your boss is like so and so from Devil wears Prada" ... and quoting phrases uttered by characters from sex and the city, erin brockovich and such. It's helpful to those who've never read any conventional career books, so I would entitle it- "career change primer- for twenty-something women who may want to explore other options but have no clue where to start."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    To be fully honest I didn't read the whole thing. I kinda skipped around to chapters I thought would be relevant to me after I stopped caring about the information presented in the first couple of chapters. I really liked the resources about careers abroad that she offered, but mostly it's just a book of encouragement for those too afraid to leave their steady paycheck and benefits to find something more in the creative niche. So, you go girl!! There. Now you don't need to read the book. To be fully honest I didn't read the whole thing. I kinda skipped around to chapters I thought would be relevant to me after I stopped caring about the information presented in the first couple of chapters. I really liked the resources about careers abroad that she offered, but mostly it's just a book of encouragement for those too afraid to leave their steady paycheck and benefits to find something more in the creative niche. So, you go girl!! There. Now you don't need to read the book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Skye

    A little dated because it is written about 10 years ago, but the philosophy remains. Good book and fun, engaging writing.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Similar entrepreneurial info to what can be found in the "Four-Hour Workweek" but with the added benefit of being written by a woman who seems more grounded than that other guy. But I'm not here for the entrepreneurial stuff, so the work-and-travel and work-and-values chapters seemed shorter than I would've preferred but still gave a good outline of factors to consider. Good things to think about in terms of doing your research while you still have a paycheck coming in (but I don't!). Also a good Similar entrepreneurial info to what can be found in the "Four-Hour Workweek" but with the added benefit of being written by a woman who seems more grounded than that other guy. But I'm not here for the entrepreneurial stuff, so the work-and-travel and work-and-values chapters seemed shorter than I would've preferred but still gave a good outline of factors to consider. Good things to think about in terms of doing your research while you still have a paycheck coming in (but I don't!). Also a good amount of cheering on the front of "it's ok to take work for a while to make ends meet, especially temp work which is not as obligatory feeling" -- had already been considering this route. Drops a lot of gendered [e.g. "businesswoman"] words so that you don't forget you're reading a book for *ladies*.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I work two, sometimes three, part-time jobs from home. Two are gratifying jobs for which I am well-trained and enjoy very much. Doing those things feels more like getting paid for my hobbies. The third job, with scheduled hours and a consistent paycheck, is the one I'd be happy not to do. I thought I would be able to identify with and learn much from this book. I had hoped to learn strategies and other hints to help me succeed at and carefully balance all three, but this book is not the tool I h I work two, sometimes three, part-time jobs from home. Two are gratifying jobs for which I am well-trained and enjoy very much. Doing those things feels more like getting paid for my hobbies. The third job, with scheduled hours and a consistent paycheck, is the one I'd be happy not to do. I thought I would be able to identify with and learn much from this book. I had hoped to learn strategies and other hints to help me succeed at and carefully balance all three, but this book is not the tool I hoped it would be. MG's writing style -- not to mention the fonts themselves-- is distracting. I couldn't finish skimming the first third.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Nathalia

    Very helpful for different situations. Doesn’t go incredibly in depth (each topic could have its own book) but it’s very good at giving you a detailed overview of what to expect, how to not make the common mistakes, and what the next best steps are.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melody Schreiber

    Summary Michelle Goodman offers solid advice geared to women who want to work in nontraditional jobs but don’t know where to begin. Drawing from her years as a freelancer, Goodman suggests practical, step-by-step changes one can make over time so that a transition to the entrepreneurial life doesn’t lead you back to your parents’ couch. Particularly salient in our troubled economy, The Anti 9 to 5 Guide should be consulted by anyone contemplating “life outside the cube.” Analysis Goodman begins by Summary Michelle Goodman offers solid advice geared to women who want to work in nontraditional jobs but don’t know where to begin. Drawing from her years as a freelancer, Goodman suggests practical, step-by-step changes one can make over time so that a transition to the entrepreneurial life doesn’t lead you back to your parents’ couch. Particularly salient in our troubled economy, The Anti 9 to 5 Guide should be consulted by anyone contemplating “life outside the cube.” Analysis Goodman begins by relating how she began freelancing. She was tired of the hours she spent in a cubicle, staring at a computer, doing work that gave her no satisfaction. So she quit. However, bills still come to those pursuing their dreams, and Goodman acquired a nice chunk of credit card debt as she built her now-successful freelancing career. The advice that she offers in her book is meant for like-minded women to experience similar success without the pitfalls Goodman discovered. Goodman advises getting your feet wet in your hobby-job before diving in headfirst—particularly if you have a mate, children, or pets that depend on you for food and shelter. She approaches broad topics such as figuring out what exactly you want to do; breaking into that industry; and making the time in your daily life to do so. She then explains the finer nuances of moving toward your dream: asking for a flexible work schedule at your 9-to-5; working from home; running your own business; pursuing activities that are meaningful both professionally and personally; and pursuing an unconventional or male-dominated career. At every step of the way, Goodman offers practical tips to maneuvering the technical details of launching an unconventional career (taxes, legal matters, wages—you know, the little things). At the end of each chapter, she also presents you with a checklist for conquering that lesson in small steps. Rather than trying to impose her own idea of a timeline, she suggests that you set goals that are achievable and comfortable for you. Plunging into the world of an alternative career is hard enough, and you need to do it at your own pace. The book offers easy, step-by-step advice for stepping out of your daily routine to try out new careers that may make you happy without making you go broke. Goodman advises that you establish your new business on the side first. Though that eats into your personal time, it also allows you to keep a paying gig—and if this is a job that you truly love, the sacrifice will not seem so great. If, after several months, your new career makes you happy and begins to pay the bills, then you are free to take the next step, whatever that may be. One of the most valuable aspects of the book is that it takes seriously the idea that not all were built for performance reviews and public transportation, and it acknowledges that everyone’s dream—and how they attain it—will be different. Goodman offers advice as varied as the careers that women dream of while staying relevant. Though she discusses potential pitfalls of many unconventional careers, such as what to do at about harassment at your male-centric job, her advice to do research first and to keep a cool head is applicable in any career path. Short and sweet appendices include guides to negotiating pay; temping; setting up a business; and an exhaustive list to resources on nearly any obstacle you will face. I would recommend this book to anyone (not just women) contemplating a career outside of the norm. After reading this book, I realized that though the freelance work I was doing was bringing in good money, it was not what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. I was putting my true dream on the shelf by filling my time with freelance work I thought liked because it paid well, not because I enjoyed it. Goodman’s advice to take slow steps that will have a minimal impact on your income was particularly relevant to me; if I’d quit my job immediately to pursue that freelance work, I would have found myself stuck in another unhappy career. However, by taking it slow and looking at all the angles of your dream, you will reduce your risk and maximize your returns—a solid business model no matter which career you choose! Michelle Goodman is a freelance writer and editor who lives in Seattle. She attended the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. For more by Michelle, check out her website, also titled The Anti 9 to 5 Guide.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Deirdre Skaggs

    I always read Michelle Goodman's articles on news websites, and her style of writing was what interested me enough to go out and buy this book. When you read her writing, you feel as though you are chatting with an old friend over coffee. If nothing else, the comfortable, you-can-do-it feel I got from reading i The Anti 9-to-5 Guide i was totally worth it. As for the actual advice in the book, I felt like Goodman did try to hit too many points in too few pages. Perhaps, though, this is because th I always read Michelle Goodman's articles on news websites, and her style of writing was what interested me enough to go out and buy this book. When you read her writing, you feel as though you are chatting with an old friend over coffee. If nothing else, the comfortable, you-can-do-it feel I got from reading i The Anti 9-to-5 Guide i was totally worth it. As for the actual advice in the book, I felt like Goodman did try to hit too many points in too few pages. Perhaps, though, this is because this book wasn't what I expected it to be. Many of the chapters focused on helping you figure out what you wanted to do with your outside-the-cube life; I expected the book to have more practical advice to follow once you had an outside-the-cube goal in mind. Even though I think the book could have contained more detail about some topics, Goodman does provide numerous resources throughout each chapter for you to follow up with. I can also see the "anti 9-to-5 action plan" at the end of each chapter coming in very handy when I need that extra push to realize my goals, however small or large. Overall, I would recommend this book. You can take it a chapter at a time, follow the "anti 9-to-5 action plan," and make steady progress toward your dream career, or you can breeze through it, picking up and putting down as time allows, and flagging the high points you know you'll find helpful later (my method). I think there's something for everyone in this book, and you can easily track down more information about your particular poison through the resources Goodman provides.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I've read a couple of books of this type in the last year - and this is by far the best. Equal part intensely practical and fun to read, [ author: Michelle Goodman] has done a great job of presenting what life is and can be like outside the cube. Each chapter contains an action plan in three or more steps, with measurable goals and action items that can be checked off - good if you're that sort of girl. What I think I appreciated the most was that she was honest about how hard it is or can be to I've read a couple of books of this type in the last year - and this is by far the best. Equal part intensely practical and fun to read, [ author: Michelle Goodman] has done a great job of presenting what life is and can be like outside the cube. Each chapter contains an action plan in three or more steps, with measurable goals and action items that can be checked off - good if you're that sort of girl. What I think I appreciated the most was that she was honest about how hard it is or can be to get outside the normal 9-5 working model. She says it's not the end of the world if you need to go back to the 9-to-5, or if other types of work arrangements don't work for you. After reading way too many the [say it in a weird voice, like you're talking about unicorns:] 'follow your dreams' type books, this was a breath of fresh air, and one that I'll probably pick up once I return my well-thumbed library copy. Recommended for anyone dissatisfied with their current gig who might be wondering about what life might be like in another type of job.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    I was really only looking for a pep talk, and some validation that I am not the only person who hates working a 9-to-5 office job, and for that reason this book really hit the spot. It also helps that Michelle Goodman does kind of what I want to do (she's a freelance writer, I'm more a freelance editor with fiction writing on the side). I appreciated the positive voice with which she wrote the book, all the stories of other women she included, and the statistics for making me realize I really am I was really only looking for a pep talk, and some validation that I am not the only person who hates working a 9-to-5 office job, and for that reason this book really hit the spot. It also helps that Michelle Goodman does kind of what I want to do (she's a freelance writer, I'm more a freelance editor with fiction writing on the side). I appreciated the positive voice with which she wrote the book, all the stories of other women she included, and the statistics for making me realize I really am not alone. This book does cast a wide net; it really could be for anyone who doesn't want a desk job and is thinking of doing something - anything - else. If you have already decided to quit your day job and you want specific how-to information, I would probably direct you somewhere else. But if you're kind of on the fence, I definitely recommend this. She gives great advice, some of which I'd already done, which confirmed I am on the right path.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kat

    As someone who panics at the thought of leaving my stable 9-to-5 income, I found this book to be really useful and inspirational for figuring out what to do next and how to start planning for that. Some of the chapters could have gone a little more in depth, I think, but I found the checklists really helpful, and I liked the book enough that I'm willing to purchase it. (Also, she recommends a number of other books that go more into detail about the specific topics she covers: longer-term volunte As someone who panics at the thought of leaving my stable 9-to-5 income, I found this book to be really useful and inspirational for figuring out what to do next and how to start planning for that. Some of the chapters could have gone a little more in depth, I think, but I found the checklists really helpful, and I liked the book enough that I'm willing to purchase it. (Also, she recommends a number of other books that go more into detail about the specific topics she covers: longer-term volunteering, starting your own business, travel jobs, etc.) Overall, I think this would be a good reference if you're just beginning to figure out what career shift you want to make, and need inspiration and lists and first steps to keep you on track. If you know the path you want to take, finding a specialized book would probably be more useful!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    i got this book because of its chapter on starting your own business but its a really useful book for organizing your life. aimed at people who know what their passion is, but have to have a day job to support themselves, this book helps you prioritize and organize so that you make sure your day job isn't interfering with what you really want to do. awesome. every chapter is broken down with steps at the end to get you working and checklist of what you should do and about how long it should take i got this book because of its chapter on starting your own business but its a really useful book for organizing your life. aimed at people who know what their passion is, but have to have a day job to support themselves, this book helps you prioritize and organize so that you make sure your day job isn't interfering with what you really want to do. awesome. every chapter is broken down with steps at the end to get you working and checklist of what you should do and about how long it should take you to complete each step. it's pretty tasky, i'm not going to lie. but procrastinators need someone to be a little pushy with them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I think that this book would be extremely helpful to anyone looking to make a move into a new career. Goodman offered many really excellent ideas and most of all, advocated really THINKING about the whys and hows and doing extensive research before taking the plunge. The book is written in a friendly, informal manner and provides task lists of what should get done before moving onto each step. Honestly, I should have spent more time with this book before returning it to the library - but I had it I think that this book would be extremely helpful to anyone looking to make a move into a new career. Goodman offered many really excellent ideas and most of all, advocated really THINKING about the whys and hows and doing extensive research before taking the plunge. The book is written in a friendly, informal manner and provides task lists of what should get done before moving onto each step. Honestly, I should have spent more time with this book before returning it to the library - but I had it through two renewals and I just knew I wasn't going to take the time right now to sit and really follow through.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lindz-o

    This book contains actual practical advice. Wow! I really appreciated the list of steps to take at the end of each chapter. I'm a big time sucker for lists, but this kind of step-by-step guide could be helpful to anyone. Goodman writes with a conversational tone that is fun to read. The inclusion of adventurous or travel-oriented jobs was a refreshing change from the normal career advice book. I felt excited, inspired, and brimming with ideas. I'd recommend this as a good, quick read for any cub This book contains actual practical advice. Wow! I really appreciated the list of steps to take at the end of each chapter. I'm a big time sucker for lists, but this kind of step-by-step guide could be helpful to anyone. Goodman writes with a conversational tone that is fun to read. The inclusion of adventurous or travel-oriented jobs was a refreshing change from the normal career advice book. I felt excited, inspired, and brimming with ideas. I'd recommend this as a good, quick read for any cube-dwelling person (not just women) fantasizing about unlocking the shackles of his/her boring, unfulfilling, soul-sucking job.

  17. 5 out of 5

    J

    Great book-- very insightful. Gave me a lot of information to consider and to help guide my way through any decisions regarding "escaping the cube." A pretty feminist book, too-- so props to that! A few concerns with not always being as intersectional as I need, and it had some problematic areas toward the end regarding sexual harassment and sexism in the work place a little too lightly for my beliefs, but overall, it was fairly frank in its explanations of what your expectations can and should Great book-- very insightful. Gave me a lot of information to consider and to help guide my way through any decisions regarding "escaping the cube." A pretty feminist book, too-- so props to that! A few concerns with not always being as intersectional as I need, and it had some problematic areas toward the end regarding sexual harassment and sexism in the work place a little too lightly for my beliefs, but overall, it was fairly frank in its explanations of what your expectations can and should be. I borrowed it from the library and bought a used copy online today when I got to the end so I can have its handiness on my shelf. :]

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    Sabrina leant me this book when I let her know that I wanted to think more about how I could spend more time on my writing while holding down my full time Museum Education job. I remember seeing this on Celia's update feed too. I think this book has a lot of practical tips, though the "Seal press style" gets a little grating. It has reinforced a lot of what I already know, which is do your research and get self-discipline. I guess I was hoping there was a way around that, but there never is when Sabrina leant me this book when I let her know that I wanted to think more about how I could spend more time on my writing while holding down my full time Museum Education job. I remember seeing this on Celia's update feed too. I think this book has a lot of practical tips, though the "Seal press style" gets a little grating. It has reinforced a lot of what I already know, which is do your research and get self-discipline. I guess I was hoping there was a way around that, but there never is when it's writing you're talking about.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Jonas

    Since this is written by a woman, this book was a nice change from all the career books I've read by men. The advice is relevant for anyone looking for something different than just a 9 to 5 job. This book was also very easy to pick up and read. It took me about a week, not bad. I haven't yet read "The 4 Hour Work Week" but it is on my list. I'm sure the advice and topics are similar. There's a million different ways to say the same thing. Great for anyone looking for flexibility and a change of Since this is written by a woman, this book was a nice change from all the career books I've read by men. The advice is relevant for anyone looking for something different than just a 9 to 5 job. This book was also very easy to pick up and read. It took me about a week, not bad. I haven't yet read "The 4 Hour Work Week" but it is on my list. I'm sure the advice and topics are similar. There's a million different ways to say the same thing. Great for anyone looking for flexibility and a change of pace.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Desiree

    Loved it! I really felt inspired by this book, and I was amused with the occasionally snarky tone (clever, not truly mean, but not dainty). It did make me feel both "too old" (most stories focused on 20-somethings, with a few others) and "not far enough" in life in terms of volunteering in fields I'm interested in and having achieved the sort of experience that would make someone want me on their board... yikes. Old and lacking accomplishment. Still; a terrific spring-board for long-term plans t Loved it! I really felt inspired by this book, and I was amused with the occasionally snarky tone (clever, not truly mean, but not dainty). It did make me feel both "too old" (most stories focused on 20-somethings, with a few others) and "not far enough" in life in terms of volunteering in fields I'm interested in and having achieved the sort of experience that would make someone want me on their board... yikes. Old and lacking accomplishment. Still; a terrific spring-board for long-term plans to not be a cube-dweller.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carly

    I loved this book. For one thing, Michelle Goodman is funny. She has a very cute, and sometimes cutting (in a good way) sense of humor. She makes coming up with a plan to get the hell out of your day job actually fun. But she also acknowledges that in order to "not work" you really do have to work. Your butt off. I'm looking forward to implementing my plan--as soon as I stop writing this book review on company time. I loved this book. For one thing, Michelle Goodman is funny. She has a very cute, and sometimes cutting (in a good way) sense of humor. She makes coming up with a plan to get the hell out of your day job actually fun. But she also acknowledges that in order to "not work" you really do have to work. Your butt off. I'm looking forward to implementing my plan--as soon as I stop writing this book review on company time.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Handmade Detroit

    An excellent overview of "escaping the cubicle," Goodman gives us a starting point for re-thinking your career path. Her advice on freelance and temp work, nomadic life and self-employment are the three I found most helpful. More inspirational than practical advice (though it is partly that), those already making the jump may want to skip this one. For those thinking about it or just starting to, this is highly recommended. An excellent overview of "escaping the cubicle," Goodman gives us a starting point for re-thinking your career path. Her advice on freelance and temp work, nomadic life and self-employment are the three I found most helpful. More inspirational than practical advice (though it is partly that), those already making the jump may want to skip this one. For those thinking about it or just starting to, this is highly recommended.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    well laid out. great practical advice and a wealth of resources for more research if any of the different paths to escaping the cube farm sounds promising. I really appreciated the lack of new-age mumbo jumbo about discovering your inner-true-self and career destiny by meditating on your strengths or whatever that seems to be rampant in the dissatisfied-with-your-job-and-wanting-to-find-something-that-doesn't-suck-your-soul-dry field. well laid out. great practical advice and a wealth of resources for more research if any of the different paths to escaping the cube farm sounds promising. I really appreciated the lack of new-age mumbo jumbo about discovering your inner-true-self and career destiny by meditating on your strengths or whatever that seems to be rampant in the dissatisfied-with-your-job-and-wanting-to-find-something-that-doesn't-suck-your-soul-dry field.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kyla Squires

    Yeah, that was an alright little book. Some good ideas and resources for getting out of your misery inducing job. The main drawback being that the book is American, and I'm not, so the advice on taxation, business laws and loans, and the endless harping on the importance of getting health coverage did not apply. Still, well written and presented, with lots of useful inter-net links for further research. Yeah, that was an alright little book. Some good ideas and resources for getting out of your misery inducing job. The main drawback being that the book is American, and I'm not, so the advice on taxation, business laws and loans, and the endless harping on the importance of getting health coverage did not apply. Still, well written and presented, with lots of useful inter-net links for further research.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tammy

    A good primer for those who are timid about questioning the status quo. Keep in mind that the author left the cube long ago and the book doesn't provide any magic formulas, but if you're looking to get your feet wet, it's worth a read. One of my co-workers saw me reading it on a plane and got excited, saying that she should read it, too, so if you just want to carry it around and see what like-minded individuals are attracted to it, that's an option, too. A good primer for those who are timid about questioning the status quo. Keep in mind that the author left the cube long ago and the book doesn't provide any magic formulas, but if you're looking to get your feet wet, it's worth a read. One of my co-workers saw me reading it on a plane and got excited, saying that she should read it, too, so if you just want to carry it around and see what like-minded individuals are attracted to it, that's an option, too.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    I am currently making the transition from freelancer to office job and it was a painful landing. This book has helped me see that it is possible to continue to have a creative life along with work and that there are steps i can take now if i want my creative career to sustain me full-time eventually. both practical and uplifting. i definitely recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    This is not super-in-depth about how to work for yourself - although it actually seems like a good outline of how to get moving on it. She's really upfront about the fact that you basically will have to do a lot of research and work to make something like that work. But I think it's sort of an inspiring book, and helpful for thinking through things. This is not super-in-depth about how to work for yourself - although it actually seems like a good outline of how to get moving on it. She's really upfront about the fact that you basically will have to do a lot of research and work to make something like that work. But I think it's sort of an inspiring book, and helpful for thinking through things.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    I read this book in one sitting. Having been a full-time freelancer for nearly a decade now, I found Michelle's book to be right on the money (sorry for the pun) regarding what it takes to work for yourself. Her advice is canny and her writing voice is a pleasure to spend time with! Check out her blog, too: http://www.anti9to5guide.com/ I read this book in one sitting. Having been a full-time freelancer for nearly a decade now, I found Michelle's book to be right on the money (sorry for the pun) regarding what it takes to work for yourself. Her advice is canny and her writing voice is a pleasure to spend time with! Check out her blog, too: http://www.anti9to5guide.com/

  29. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I really just rate this 5 stars cuz I'm glad it was written. It is not as anti-establishment as I expected, but it does give some good solid advice on how to work non-traditional hours. Not much more on non-traditional lives are explored, but it is thankfully not as gendered (esp of the traditional female or role of mother) as I expected. I really just rate this 5 stars cuz I'm glad it was written. It is not as anti-establishment as I expected, but it does give some good solid advice on how to work non-traditional hours. Not much more on non-traditional lives are explored, but it is thankfully not as gendered (esp of the traditional female or role of mother) as I expected.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bevin

    This was a cute book, but I think that's about it. If you have never thought about working for yourself or considered a job outside the box, this book will help. However, if this isn't your "first time at the rodeo", you will not necessarily learn anything new. I recommend for those thinking who are beginning to dip their toe in the freelance world! This was a cute book, but I think that's about it. If you have never thought about working for yourself or considered a job outside the box, this book will help. However, if this isn't your "first time at the rodeo", you will not necessarily learn anything new. I recommend for those thinking who are beginning to dip their toe in the freelance world!

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