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X-Men: X-Cutioner's Song

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An assassination attempt on Professor X by Cable sets in motion the events of this 12-part story involving the two X-Men teams, the government-sponsored X-Factor, and the paramilitary X-Force--formerly the New Mutants--against Stryfe, Apocalypse, and Mr. Sinister. Includes Uncanny X-Men #294-296, X-Factor #84-86, X-Force #16-18, and X-Men #14-16


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An assassination attempt on Professor X by Cable sets in motion the events of this 12-part story involving the two X-Men teams, the government-sponsored X-Factor, and the paramilitary X-Force--formerly the New Mutants--against Stryfe, Apocalypse, and Mr. Sinister. Includes Uncanny X-Men #294-296, X-Factor #84-86, X-Force #16-18, and X-Men #14-16

30 review for X-Men: X-Cutioner's Song

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    Adventures in ye olde tyme comix continues. Three and a half stars rounded down. Ooh, Jeff! Where are we going now? To 1992, Goodreader and it’s an X-Men crossover hullabaloo. Which X-Men are in this one? All of them. It’s a veritable clown car event. It makes you feel downright giddy at the thought, no? The core X-titles at the time are involved: The Uncanny X-Men, X-Men, X-Factor and X-Force. The basic story is this: During a Lila Cheney concert in Central Park, while creepy Gambit tries to put the mo Adventures in ye olde tyme comix continues. Three and a half stars rounded down. Ooh, Jeff! Where are we going now? To 1992, Goodreader and it’s an X-Men crossover hullabaloo. Which X-Men are in this one? All of them. It’s a veritable clown car event. It makes you feel downright giddy at the thought, no? The core X-titles at the time are involved: The Uncanny X-Men, X-Men, X-Factor and X-Force. The basic story is this: During a Lila Cheney concert in Central Park, while creepy Gambit tries to put the moves on Storm, Charles Xavier gives a nice little speech about peace, brotherhood, acceptance and unicorns. He’s roundly jeered by non-mutants proving the old adage: Humanity sucks! He’s also allegedly shot by Cable(!?!), who’s allegedly supposed to be a good guy. Jinkies! At virtually the same moment (i.e. a page turn away), Scott Summers (Cyclops) and Jean Grey are kidnapped by some of Apocalypse’s rogue Horsemen. As Xavier lies at death’s door for the fifty-third time, the X-Men and X-Factor (mutants who work for The Man) hunt down the rogue X-Force (formerly The New Mutants), who are led by Cable and greases the way for some hero-on-hero action. And of course things aren’t what they seem. They never are. Why you should read this? - A lot of crap was published by Marvel in the ‘90’s, and the X-titles were not immune, but this crossover is fairly coherent, focused and briskly paced and due to some of the writers involved (David and Nicieza) leavened with a decent amount of humor. It also avoids the plethora of unrelated subplots that Chris Claremont and other X-writers liked to invest in these titles. - The villains: Stryfe, leader of the Mutant Liberation Front, is Cable’s clone (before that concept lost most of its luster in the Spider-Man Clone Saga). Okay, all of its luster. It turns out he’s behind abducting Jean Grey and Cyclops. His motivation: a little quality time with Mom and Dad. Mom and Dad? It’s a long, long story, bub. So, get set for some hero-on-clone action. Mr. Sinister, Apocalypse (Cyclops: “Apocalypse? How can that be? I watched him die.” Sucker!) and an army of mooks round out the bad guys. Why you should avoid this? - The Art. Did I mention this is the ‘90’s? A lot of the worst elements of comic book art are front and center. Anatomically impossible women (and men). Panels that make the action particularly hard to follow – Is that a battle? Louis Pasteur? Jubilee baking cookies? Dark, brooding art work that grinds the pacing to a halt as the reader struggles to figure out what’s happening. Jae Lee. - The Cyclops/Jean Grey relationship, for me, ranks down near the bottom of the superhero couples list. It wasn’t until Wolverine made this a menage a tois, that anything resembling an iota of interest was garnered. They get married. Eventually. *yawn* Beyond the occasional “I know what you’re thinking” I get from Mrs. Jeff, having a girlfriend/wife who could read minds, would kind of put a damper on things. - Clones. clones. CLONES. Nuff Said. What’s the takeaway? In order to avoid future strife, hug the clone of your kids; otherwise, they’ll grow up to become villains with an army of henchman and kidnap you just to monologue you with obtuse sentiments about missed teddy bears and toy trains and cookies. And hugs. Bottom Line: In spite of my caveats, this was a decent read. Anyone who has an interest in the X-Men should definitely check out one of their better storylines from the not-too-distant past. Something reasonably cute for the Trish:

  2. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    Every story has a story and this comic is no different. When I was a kid there wasn't a comic book store nearby so I only got comics at the mall about 30 minutes away when my family would occasionally head to the mall. So as a kid I got one issue of this massive crossover event and of course it wasn't the first one so I had nearly no clue what was happening, but it had Wolverine, Cable, and Bishop in it so I was happy overall. Jump forward to my early 20's and I'm in a bookstore and see the coll Every story has a story and this comic is no different. When I was a kid there wasn't a comic book store nearby so I only got comics at the mall about 30 minutes away when my family would occasionally head to the mall. So as a kid I got one issue of this massive crossover event and of course it wasn't the first one so I had nearly no clue what was happening, but it had Wolverine, Cable, and Bishop in it so I was happy overall. Jump forward to my early 20's and I'm in a bookstore and see the collected works of the X- Cutioner's Song. Although I hadn't read a comic in nearly a decade, little kid me insists I have to get it so I did and I must say I was happy I did. So the X-Cutioner's Song revolves around an assassination attempt on Professor X from what appears to be the most unlikely of individuals Cable. Cable's team X-Force is hunted down for information on Cable and X-Factor assists as well. The problem is it wasn't Cable who did it, well not exactly.   It was in fact Stryfe a clone of Cable (there is a long elaborate back story) who happens to be confused.   He believes he's the real deal and Cable is his clone. The consequences of his confusion lead to dire circumstances that pull three X-titles, Apocalypse, Mr. Sinister, The Dark Riders, and the Four Horsemen in as well. I know not everyone loves crossover events, but for those who like them X-Cutioner's song is not one to be missed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I re-read this as part of my re-reading of Peter David's X-Factor run (the crossover 'event' happened smack bang in the middle of PAD's run on the Factor Folks) and, honestly, I kinda wish I hadn't bothered. X-Factor play a tiny role in this crossover and I could easily have just skipped it. In itself, this is also a pretty crumby story with some pretty lousy artwork in places. Its main interest for me was as a kind of historical document; it was like prising apart a piece of slate and finding a I re-read this as part of my re-reading of Peter David's X-Factor run (the crossover 'event' happened smack bang in the middle of PAD's run on the Factor Folks) and, honestly, I kinda wish I hadn't bothered. X-Factor play a tiny role in this crossover and I could easily have just skipped it. In itself, this is also a pretty crumby story with some pretty lousy artwork in places. Its main interest for me was as a kind of historical document; it was like prising apart a piece of slate and finding a fossil inside. This story featured some VERY early artwork by Jae Lee and Greg Capullo which bears very little resemblance to the MUCH better work they're creating these days. Anyway, tangent over; back ta the Factor...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Malum

    A bit too long and drawn out; this would have been fine at about half of its length. Oddly enough, my favorite part was the epilogue, where we get some sweet moments between some of the X-Men.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wreade1872

    Wow i thought it might get to 4 stars in the end but it screwed up so badly and gives so little closure that it dropped to 2 instead. Mostly its fine, some of the ideas are quite good but not implemented very well. The context of the event is far more problematic than the work itself. One of the major characters is Stryfe, a villian only in the X-Force comics who therefore means nothing to 3/4's of the heroes. In fact even in those X-Force comics he was largely forgotten about by this point as the Wow i thought it might get to 4 stars in the end but it screwed up so badly and gives so little closure that it dropped to 2 instead. Mostly its fine, some of the ideas are quite good but not implemented very well. The context of the event is far more problematic than the work itself. One of the major characters is Stryfe, a villian only in the X-Force comics who therefore means nothing to 3/4's of the heroes. In fact even in those X-Force comics he was largely forgotten about by this point as the writer only has one story trick they use which is the mystey villian. So you had Stryfe, the government agents hunting cable, the guy who deadpool works for and the X-ternals, all of which are relying on mystery to make them compelling. I thought finally we would get answers to one of these plot lines in this crossver but no. Also minor problem, jean and cyclops are all lovei-dovei in this throwing aside the intresting rift in their relationship being caused by cyclops having the hots for psylocke. Anyway... on its own its decent enough except for the completely empty conclusion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    C. Varn

    Scott Lobdell, Peter David, and Fabian Nicieza run head this massive crossover that is the height of early 90s X-madness: Jae Lee and Kubrick stand out as artists here. There is a background to shift and some of the awkwardness: Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld had increasingly driven sells at Marvel, and had taken over increasingly plot direction from the X-team writers. However, Image is founded and these artistic-creators leave Marvel for even more editorial freedom. So, with the exception of Peter Da Scott Lobdell, Peter David, and Fabian Nicieza run head this massive crossover that is the height of early 90s X-madness: Jae Lee and Kubrick stand out as artists here. There is a background to shift and some of the awkwardness: Jim Lee and Rob Liefeld had increasingly driven sells at Marvel, and had taken over increasingly plot direction from the X-team writers. However, Image is founded and these artistic-creators leave Marvel for even more editorial freedom. So, with the exception of Peter David's run on X-Factor, writers had previously been marginalized, which led ultimately to Claremont and other X-team classic writers leaving the line after a decade in some cases. Here, in this crossover, while the house style of X-men, with the exception of Jae Lee's work on X-factor, had been unquestionably altered by Jim Lee's art and the some of Lobdell and Nicieza still feel like they are mimicking the purple narrative prose of Claremont, it is a return to more classic writing. Now this was is a nostalgia read for me: it was better than I was expecting given how much this seen as the height of 90s crossover excess, but it was also not as good as I remembered. Yes, it is unwilling, you have four X-teams and tons of characters to keep up with. Sometimes heroic teams are fighting each other, other times villain teams are realigning, and even villains aid the main hero. The Summer's family nonsense and the five or six alternate time-lines intersecting with multiple X-men characters from completely different time lines poised over stopping the death of Professor X. Originally, Stryfe's files were included as trading cards in the sealed bags, and that is how I got this as young teen in 1992, and the info from these cards is included in this trade at the end. It's enjoyable, bloated, convoluted, and probably more relevant to those who remember the early 90s instead of those whose X-men was written by either Claremont (earlier) or Wheedon and Morrison later.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    This 12 part arc took place in the early 90's. X-Force has recently been established out of New Mutants, Scott and Jean were soon to be married, Wolverine still had his adamantium... ahhh the comic days of my youth... The story revolves around Cable being framed for the murder of Professor X, which turns out to not be a murder, but an infection of the techno-organic virus, AND it not being Cable who did it, but a clone from the future turned evil, calling himself Stryfe. Secondary stories involve This 12 part arc took place in the early 90's. X-Force has recently been established out of New Mutants, Scott and Jean were soon to be married, Wolverine still had his adamantium... ahhh the comic days of my youth... The story revolves around Cable being framed for the murder of Professor X, which turns out to not be a murder, but an infection of the techno-organic virus, AND it not being Cable who did it, but a clone from the future turned evil, calling himself Stryfe. Secondary stories involve a battle between X-Men, X-Factor, and X-Force when searching for Cable, and an arc with Apocalypse, which is still very early in his development as a character. Overall, this story is a little drawn out, but that is common for all comic stories of that era, but the nostalgia of reading something I haven't since I was a kid, eventually got me through it. I'm trying to fill the gaps in my knowledge of major X-Men storylines, and this was next. Excited about the next story: Fatal Attractions. Good memories of that one. This story, recommend, but only if you enjoy early 90's X-Men tales.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Case

    I’m not a fan of crossovers. At the core, what is a giant comics crossover other than simply an attempt to get you to buy more comic books? If done right, I suppose, a crossover might also be a chance to bring different characters together and spin a story that spans a couple universes or intertwines a few storylines, but honestly—I don’t think I’ve ever seen a crossover done well. (The Great Fables Crossover was certainly a disappointment, and I’m viewing Dark Cybertron as an unwelcome interrup I’m not a fan of crossovers. At the core, what is a giant comics crossover other than simply an attempt to get you to buy more comic books? If done right, I suppose, a crossover might also be a chance to bring different characters together and spin a story that spans a couple universes or intertwines a few storylines, but honestly—I don’t think I’ve ever seen a crossover done well. (The Great Fables Crossover was certainly a disappointment, and I’m viewing Dark Cybertron as an unwelcome interruption in my favorite regularly-scheduled comic book.) There’s so much that can go wrong. Crossovers often have the feeling of being written by a committee and then being put together on the page by a subcommittee, or an entire handful of subcommittees. And this is often I imagine exactly how it’s done. Because each comic title has its own writers and artists, usually with their own vision for the feel of the series and where the stories are going, the pacing and how they’re developed, and oftentimes slamming them together ends up just feeling like a train wreck. Now imagine trying to do that with something as huge and unwieldy as the various X-People Marvel lines, in their early-90s heyday. That’s pretty much exactly what you get with X-Cutioner’s Song. There’s one reason I bought this volume: nostalgia. I picked it up at a Marvel-themed gift-shop at Universal Studios as a teenager because as a kid I had been on the ground-floor of the launch of Marvel’s second X-Men title. I think I still have issue #1 of that “mutant milestone” floating around somewhere. As a young reader though, I was the primary target of this, the first major crossover involving the title, which was engineered solely to get a kids like me to shell out money for not just the normal X-Men comics but also the Uncanny X-Men, X-Factor, and X-Force. (They were doing the same thing with Spider-Man titles at the same time, calling it Maximum Carnage, and I remember a few of my friends scrambling to piece together the story through Amazing Spider-Man, Web of Spider-Men, and whatever other Spider-titles were running then.) Of course I couldn’t do this, and so there were always holes in the narrative. I wondered what had happened to my characters during their appearances in the other issues. And I had lost many of the issues I had managed to collect anyway, so I bought the volume. I re-read it again this summer for the same reason: nostalgia. That’s really the only reason there is to pick up this particular collection. The train wreck analogy actually works quite well here. In fact, I think I may have stumbled onto the solution for the X-Men’s faltering transition to the big screen: get Michael Bay to make this into a movie. Everything is ready for him: the thin veneer of plot involving Cyclops and Jean Grey getting kidnapped, Xavier being nearly assassinated, no one knowing what's going on, and a confrontation between Cable and his clone Stryfe. Pieces of information are dangled but never really resolved. (We learn pretty much nothing about the origins of Cable and Stryfe, though they dance around it the entire book.) The lurching narrative is liberally interspersed with wild melees in which X-Factor fights X-Force, X-Men fight X-Force, X-everyone fights various villains, and Cable and Stryfe fight each other. Apocalypse and Mr. Sinister make random, fairly inexplicable appearances and disappearances. Women (and men!) wear spandex. Cable, Wolverine, and Bishop hang out on a space station. Listing all these things actually makes it sound like more fun than it was. I think part of the problem with the various X-Men titles is that there’s just so much backstory that at some point it gets nearly impossible to keep track of it all. I looked up the entries for Cable and Cyclops on Wikipedia after reading this, for example, to see if I could answer the questions that this volume did not. It was dizzying. There’s something very compelling to such a Byzantine history, but it also makes it largely inaccessible. It also makes something like X-Cutioner’s Song incredibly unsatisfying as a stand-alone piece. (Though at the end of the day, this is what comic book companies want, right? Because otherwise you might not buy the next issue.) This volume was especially maddening as it didn’t even tie up the crossover pieces that it developed. The story “began,” for instance, with the X-Force on the run because X-everyone-else though that the X-Force leader, Cable, had assassinated Xavier. X-Force, which consists of the younger, next generation of mutants, go head to head with some of their former mentors and trainers. This wrinkle was actually kind of compelling. There was also some good tension as the X-Force de facto leader, Cannonball, accompanied the X-Men to carry out missions while the rest of his team languished in captivity. But you know what? The volume ended with absolutely no resolution on this score at all. Some of the heroes end up on the Moon to witness the final Cable/Stryfe confrontation, and then that’s it. We don’t even get a hint or an afterword or something explaining what happens to the kids in X-Force (or why Cable had abandoned them in the first place or what happens to them after he disappears). There’s a distinct impression that the compilers simply did not care enough to tell us. Another indication of this lack of care: a table of contents to help keep all the different issues in this volume straight and then the omission of page numbers from any page in the volume. If there’s a bright spot in this volume (besides the nostalgia for trading comic books on the playground and creating our own X-characters during recess), it’s the art in the X-Factor issues. I don’t know who was drawing those issues and I don’t care enough to wade through all the names to find out, but it’s a marked departure from the generic (though not bad) comic book art throughout the rest of the book. I remember that as a kid though it drove me nuts. It was almost too noir, definitely not as realistic as the artwork in the other X-titles (using the term realistic, of course, very loosely). Looking back though, it seems the freshest and most original part of the book. I wonder what happened to those characters after this chapter was complete. Because on the one hand that’s the appeal of long-running comic titles like these: you know the stories keep going on and on and on. On the other hand though, that’s the problem: the stories go on, but the characters never change, not really. Wolverine will always be the exact same person. Apocalypse will always come back. We’ll go through the same variations of the same stories over and over again, but—since (in some respects) I’m no longer twelve—I find I don’t have the patience to play.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Harris

    This is one ginormous, bloated crossover event that threw in pretty much every X-character and team of the time (save for Excalibur) and mixed them altogether in a messy, crazy, complex story. Some people have said those qualities make this book a chore to read for those who aren't very knowledgeable of pretty much all things X-Men related, but to me, it epitomizes a lot of the best qualities of 90s comics, too, rather than just longwinded super villain speeches (Stryfe), plenty of shouting, sco This is one ginormous, bloated crossover event that threw in pretty much every X-character and team of the time (save for Excalibur) and mixed them altogether in a messy, crazy, complex story. Some people have said those qualities make this book a chore to read for those who aren't very knowledgeable of pretty much all things X-Men related, but to me, it epitomizes a lot of the best qualities of 90s comics, too, rather than just longwinded super villain speeches (Stryfe), plenty of shouting, scores of characters that most fans wouldn't be able to name, etc. What made this storyline a lot of fun for me was that it DID bring in all the major players -- Apocalypse, Mr. Sinister, and Stryfe are three of the most iconic X-Men villains, and they each had their own agendas that were intriguing, especially since one of them ended up temporarily on the X-Men's side. X-Force, X-Factor, and both X-Men strike teams all had big parts in the battles that took place, including some infighting between the groups based on a misunderstanding over who had shot Professor Xavier (oops, should I have mentioned that part from the get-go?). Cyclops and Jean Grey are major players in the story's goings-on, as is Cable, and those three, along with Stryfe, are really at the heart of what makes the X-Cutioner's song, well... sing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Willow

    I read this book for one reason and one reason only: because Cable makes a pun about having an evil clone. And, honestly? That was literally the only good thing about this story. Sure, it set up a lot of things that came after it throughout the 90s right up until Grant Morrison took over with New X-Men 114 in the early 00's but on its own NOTHING HAPPENS!!! For 12 issues everyone just sort of faps about and then it's over. That said, it's a really great pun. Also, can we talk about how 90s that p I read this book for one reason and one reason only: because Cable makes a pun about having an evil clone. And, honestly? That was literally the only good thing about this story. Sure, it set up a lot of things that came after it throughout the 90s right up until Grant Morrison took over with New X-Men 114 in the early 00's but on its own NOTHING HAPPENS!!! For 12 issues everyone just sort of faps about and then it's over. That said, it's a really great pun. Also, can we talk about how 90s that panel is? So many muscles and guns and POUCHES!!!

  11. 5 out of 5

    TinTin Kalaw

    It's been a long time since I've read an X-title and had to make sense of the events leading up to this one. In fact, I only read this because a podcast that I was listening to has an episode about it. Anyway, apart from my initial confusion, it was an okay read for me. It's has a convoluted plot devised by Stryfe--whose existence is also another convoluted story--filled with excessive (and a few of it needless, in my opinion) fight scenes, that all boils down to mommy and daddy issues. In which It's been a long time since I've read an X-title and had to make sense of the events leading up to this one. In fact, I only read this because a podcast that I was listening to has an episode about it. Anyway, apart from my initial confusion, it was an okay read for me. It's has a convoluted plot devised by Stryfe--whose existence is also another convoluted story--filled with excessive (and a few of it needless, in my opinion) fight scenes, that all boils down to mommy and daddy issues. In which "mommy" and "daddy" still have no freakin' clue why "son" was having a tantrum that has devastating effects on others. In fact, this cross-over only gave more questions than answers given the premise that "fans will finally know Cable's origin story in this".

  12. 5 out of 5

    Wade McGinnis

    It was so much fun to pull out this graphic novel and take a trip down the memory lane of mid-90's X-Men stories. So much fun in fact that I was inspired to sort through my huge bins of comics to get the individual Phalanx Covenant issues together and read those again for the first time in 20 years. I'm half tempted to start reading Generation X all over, too! Anyway, this is a great nostalgic story with the complex Summers family history at its core. I was surprised that my mind had held on to It was so much fun to pull out this graphic novel and take a trip down the memory lane of mid-90's X-Men stories. So much fun in fact that I was inspired to sort through my huge bins of comics to get the individual Phalanx Covenant issues together and read those again for the first time in 20 years. I'm half tempted to start reading Generation X all over, too! Anyway, this is a great nostalgic story with the complex Summers family history at its core. I was surprised that my mind had held on to certain panels after all this time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Darius

    I feel like in 1983 I'd have loved this arc. Lot's of interesting stuff going on, but I kind of know the direction it's heading and instead of the story resolving anything I know about these characters it kind of has an extensive climax that just ends. I feel like in 1983 I'd have loved this arc. Lot's of interesting stuff going on, but I kind of know the direction it's heading and instead of the story resolving anything I know about these characters it kind of has an extensive climax that just ends.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    i read a few of these issues when they came out, thought it might make sense all gathered in one volume. terribly written and illoed. marvel did the artists, writers and editors a favor by putting the isbn on the spine rather than their names.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frank Taranto

    Too much going on and only so-so art.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    Better than the last X-Men crossover, although still stuck in the spirit of the 90s X-Men comics, where everything was a mystery and nothing could be completely set in stone.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex E

    The 3 X-teams team up against Stryfe, Apocalypse, Mr. Sinister, Acolytes, the MLF, and more... all while Xavier lays dying after getting shot with a techno virus. This one was a rollercoaster of an event folks. This storyline is when I really started reading the X-Men. I just remember as a kid seeing all the madness that is the lives of the X-Men and being so blown away. I think there is a big nostalgia factor in reading this for me, and to be honest I was pleasantly surprised by how good it is The 3 X-teams team up against Stryfe, Apocalypse, Mr. Sinister, Acolytes, the MLF, and more... all while Xavier lays dying after getting shot with a techno virus. This one was a rollercoaster of an event folks. This storyline is when I really started reading the X-Men. I just remember as a kid seeing all the madness that is the lives of the X-Men and being so blown away. I think there is a big nostalgia factor in reading this for me, and to be honest I was pleasantly surprised by how good it is when rereading it. So this reveals the true origins of Cable and Stryfe and how closely their lives are intertwined with Scott and Jean. Stryfe is the would be assassin of Professor X, and he nearly succeeds if not for Apocalypse helping him (yes that's right APOCALYPSE) to purge the techno virus from his body. The origin of Cable and Stryfe is such an example of comic book craziness, but it makes for great fodder for the 90's X teams. I think one of the great thing about the 90's is how the three teams: X-Men, X-Force, and X-Factor, really started crossing over and intertwining for events like this. This type of dynamic is something that still happens to this day. The art is... hit and miss for me. It's of course, very 90's - plenty of pouches and giant non-sensical guns around- but still the art fits the tone well - for the most part. It's a product of it's time, with fan favorites like Jae Lee, Greg Capullo, and the first Marvel works of Andy Kubert ( who's art is awesome in this by the way). Besides Kubert however, Lee and Capullo are still developing their style, so don't expect to see their signature art in this one (but mullets a plenty!). Overall - pretty batshit insane storyline that perfectly sums up the 90's X-Men. And if you can follow along with the insane quasi-scientific reasons they give for situations that happen in this crossover, or just have a bit of nostalgia to help you through, then this wont disappoint.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Nostalgia vs. reality - it's pretty hard to grade the things that we loved when we were younger, when we began to discover the things that we'd later be passionate about... X-Cutioner's Song feels like it was written in a very specific period of Marvel comics history, and definitely within the history of the X-Men. There are illustrations in this comic that stick out clear as day in my memory, and specific lines that jump off of the page - but the writing itself is vague and really just props up Nostalgia vs. reality - it's pretty hard to grade the things that we loved when we were younger, when we began to discover the things that we'd later be passionate about... X-Cutioner's Song feels like it was written in a very specific period of Marvel comics history, and definitely within the history of the X-Men. There are illustrations in this comic that stick out clear as day in my memory, and specific lines that jump off of the page - but the writing itself is vague and really just props up a flurry of combat: a battle royale of X-Force, X-Factor, X-Men, and a bunch of randos - it's tough to care deeply about what is going, aside from the technovirus inflicted upon Xavier. Lots of action sequence artwork - some of it is quite good. The writing... well. That being said, there were lasting consequences to this series, and I remember being fairly affected by it at the time of publication. I've always identified X-Men as one of those comics that is so far up it's own ass about superpowers and invincibility and machoism, and comics that this really remind me of why. The way characters like Cable, Wolverine, and Bishop were written are so typical of a specific image portrayed as manly at the time... it's kind of fun to look back and remembering that Wolverine was a chainsmoker, and wondering why I ever idolized him - the crude, mindless berserk was never anything I could particularly identify with. Or one could hope? Lots of thoughts on this one, not much that is articulate. Much nostalgia. I'll always love the X-Men, and always wonder why I didn't notice when the writing wasn't great!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike Keskeys

    I remember getting these comics individually when they first were released in the fall of 1992. It’s a very 90s X-men story, heavy in continuity from comics from years before, that if you’ve been reading this whole time, it makes sense and is very intriguing but if you’re coming on to this for the first time it’s a bit of a mess.

  20. 4 out of 5

    James

    This was all about style for me, and I love this early 90s X-book stuff. You get to see all of the X-teams from that time mix it up with many cool villains. There are a couple surprises, too. I thought it was awesome.

  21. 5 out of 5

    The Glassed And The Furious

    Not my favorite X-Men out there. I find I enjoyed Chris Claremont's Uncanny X-Men more than Scott Lobdell's. But that's just personal preference. I still liked this series though and I can recommend this as part of the X-Men universe as a must read. Not my favorite X-Men out there. I find I enjoyed Chris Claremont's Uncanny X-Men more than Scott Lobdell's. But that's just personal preference. I still liked this series though and I can recommend this as part of the X-Men universe as a must read.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Scherer

    A singular peek into the ’90s, which were...very, very extra.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sinclair Duncan-Mercer

    This was one of my favorite story as a kid, so I thought a reread was in order. It was a nice trip back to 90's but the magic doesn't hold as well as I had hoped. This was one of my favorite story as a kid, so I thought a reread was in order. It was a nice trip back to 90's but the magic doesn't hold as well as I had hoped.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Ballendine

    Peak 90s.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Earl

    One of the best X-Men storylines that I got to read, especially with all the X-Men teams coming together.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vikas

    3.5 stars. Fun to read, but kind of weak and disappointing story-wise. Stryfe was a cool new villain though.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Markiewicz

    My first X-men crossover. Marvel should make this into a movie once they bring the X-men into the MCU.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Justin

    As the first major X-Men event since the artists of all of the X-Titles left en masse to form Image comics, The X-Cutioner's Song crossover had a lot to live up to. The story begins when Professor Xavier is gunned down by an assassin that appears to be X-Force's mysterious leader Cable. At the same time, Cyclops and Jean Grey are kidnapped by the mutant terrorist Stryfe. The resulting conflict features battle after battle (X-Factor vs. X-Force, Cable vs. Wolverine and Bishop, Stryfe vs. Apocalyp As the first major X-Men event since the artists of all of the X-Titles left en masse to form Image comics, The X-Cutioner's Song crossover had a lot to live up to. The story begins when Professor Xavier is gunned down by an assassin that appears to be X-Force's mysterious leader Cable. At the same time, Cyclops and Jean Grey are kidnapped by the mutant terrorist Stryfe. The resulting conflict features battle after battle (X-Factor vs. X-Force, Cable vs. Wolverine and Bishop, Stryfe vs. Apocalypse) until the dramatic conclusion, where we find out (almost) everything we need to know about Stryfe and his motivation for causing such mayhem. The writing is a blessing and a curse. I love the general idea behind this series, which attempts to clean up the Summers family tree as well as pitting major villains Stryfe and Apocalypse against each other. The Xavier assassination storyline was also handled well, as was the hunt for X-Force. Unfortunately the story dragged on about a month's worth of issues longer than it should have, becoming so bloated that it needed a recap issue halfway through. The dialogue was also pretty bad, though it was pretty much the standard for the X-Titles in the 1990's. All I can say is thank God for Grant Morrison and Joss Whedon's recent X-Men revamps. The art is hit and miss. While Jae Lee, Andy Kubert, Brandon Peterson, and Greg Capullo would all become big names in their own rights, at the time their work was still a bit rusty, and they had to fill some pretty big shoes. You could tell though, that by the end of the series they had all become a lot more comfortable with the characters. Like many of these major X-Men crossover events, The X-Cutioner's Song doesn't quite live up to its potential. It's useful in that it tightened up the meandering Cable/Stryfe/Summers storyline (albeit not completely) and effectively swept away c-list villains like the Dark Riders and the Mutant Liberation Front. It also set the stage for events like the Fathers & Sons storyline as well as the advent of the Legacy Virus. It's an important event in X-Men continuity, and one that any serious X-fan needs to check out.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Well, it is easy to hate on comic-book crossovers, especially those of the mutant variety. Having said that, I think this one was rather underrated. The art was generally above-average or better (probably the last X-crossover that was the case with, though to be fair I haven't been paying much attention since the turn of the millennium), only having three writers involved kept things fairly smooth from a tone-of-writing standpoint, some really good characterization, and (perhaps most importantly Well, it is easy to hate on comic-book crossovers, especially those of the mutant variety. Having said that, I think this one was rather underrated. The art was generally above-average or better (probably the last X-crossover that was the case with, though to be fair I haven't been paying much attention since the turn of the millennium), only having three writers involved kept things fairly smooth from a tone-of-writing standpoint, some really good characterization, and (perhaps most importantly), this was where Fabian Nicieza and Scott Lobdell really began to find their own voices as X-Writers. It surely was daunting to have to follow in the footsteps of such writing legends as Chris Claremont and Louise Simonson, but it really seemed like it was around this time they started feeling truly comfortable with Writing Large in the way Marvel's Mighty Mutants tend to demand. Yes, it's always somewhat compromised when doing a big crossover. But these guys (and I can't leave out Peter David, who also contributed mightily to the storyline) came through under less-than-ideal circumstances (remember, it was but a few months previous that the mass artist exodus to Image hit the X-titles particulalrly hard) with a solid, action-packed story that was probably better than it had any right to be.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maurice Jr.

    This collection encompasses all of the X-books (both x-Men titles, X-Factor and x-Force) and explores the relationship between Cable and Stryfe, who share the same face. Cable has been off in time, but someone looking like him shot Professor X and nearly killed him. Stryfe did it, but Cable of course is blamed. This leads to the X-Men and X-Factor hunting down X-Force to squeeze Cable's location from them. This series has it all- inter-team struggles, the Cable/Stryfe relationship, Mr. Sinister an This collection encompasses all of the X-books (both x-Men titles, X-Factor and x-Force) and explores the relationship between Cable and Stryfe, who share the same face. Cable has been off in time, but someone looking like him shot Professor X and nearly killed him. Stryfe did it, but Cable of course is blamed. This leads to the X-Men and X-Factor hunting down X-Force to squeeze Cable's location from them. This series has it all- inter-team struggles, the Cable/Stryfe relationship, Mr. Sinister and Apocalypse and a focus on Scott summers- and his bloodline. I enjoyed it immensely.

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