Hot Best Seller

Wasted: Why Education Isn't Educating

Availability: Ready to download

Never has so much attention been devoted to education. Everyone government ministers, social commentators and parents obsess about its problems. Yet we rarely ask why? Why is education a source of such concern? Why do many of the solutions proposed actually make matters worse? Tony Blair's 'education, education, education' slogan placed education at the forefront of politic Never has so much attention been devoted to education. Everyone government ministers, social commentators and parents obsess about its problems. Yet we rarely ask why? Why is education a source of such concern? Why do many of the solutions proposed actually make matters worse? Tony Blair's 'education, education, education' slogan placed education at the forefront of political agendas. But, perhaps the 'policisation' of education is part of the problem. Today, education is valued for its potential contribution to economic development, but it is no longer considered important for itself. Increasingly, the promotion of education has little to do with the value of learning per se or with the importance of 'being taught' about societies' achievements, so future generations have the intellectual ability to advance still further. Education has been emptied of its content. This book is a brilliant piece of analysis. It peers into the hollowness of the education debates and, drawing on thinkers from the ancient Greeks to modern critics, it sets out what we need from our schools.


Compare

Never has so much attention been devoted to education. Everyone government ministers, social commentators and parents obsess about its problems. Yet we rarely ask why? Why is education a source of such concern? Why do many of the solutions proposed actually make matters worse? Tony Blair's 'education, education, education' slogan placed education at the forefront of politic Never has so much attention been devoted to education. Everyone government ministers, social commentators and parents obsess about its problems. Yet we rarely ask why? Why is education a source of such concern? Why do many of the solutions proposed actually make matters worse? Tony Blair's 'education, education, education' slogan placed education at the forefront of political agendas. But, perhaps the 'policisation' of education is part of the problem. Today, education is valued for its potential contribution to economic development, but it is no longer considered important for itself. Increasingly, the promotion of education has little to do with the value of learning per se or with the importance of 'being taught' about societies' achievements, so future generations have the intellectual ability to advance still further. Education has been emptied of its content. This book is a brilliant piece of analysis. It peers into the hollowness of the education debates and, drawing on thinkers from the ancient Greeks to modern critics, it sets out what we need from our schools.

30 review for Wasted: Why Education Isn't Educating

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sue Lyle

    Frank furedi is a professor of sociology so I would have expected more evidence-based support for his very strong opinions. I found it off-putting that he frequently cited newspaper headlines to support his arguments and drew extensively on some sources whilst giving the impression of much wider evidence for his assertions. This is a polemic and written in a popular style - not appealing to an academic audience, but not sure who the lay audience would be. Lots of criticism of the rise of therape Frank furedi is a professor of sociology so I would have expected more evidence-based support for his very strong opinions. I found it off-putting that he frequently cited newspaper headlines to support his arguments and drew extensively on some sources whilst giving the impression of much wider evidence for his assertions. This is a polemic and written in a popular style - not appealing to an academic audience, but not sure who the lay audience would be. Lots of criticism of the rise of therapeutic education and mourning for the demise of adult authority, at first I thought I was reading a right ght wing commentary until I looked up his card-carrying Marxist credentials. I don't disagree with much of what he says, but his major thesis that adult authority is undermined and that is a bad thing for education is asserted not explained. I need a more scholarly, educational analysis and explanation to be convinced that this is the key to what is wrong with education today. Fully support his call for education to cease being subject to the whims of political parties, for teachers to be given a chance to educate rather than merely be required to implement policies and pedagogical experiments, but that's not going to happen any time soon. So we are left feeling thoroughly depressed about every aspect of our schools. There must be some good stuff going on somewhere!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rose

    I found that this picked up in interest further into the book, with the sections on socialisation being more interesting. However, it's clear that Furedi is speaking from the armchair. He doesn't seem to have, or to access, much direct knowledge of what's going on in schools. The book as a whole is theoretical, repetitive, and pretty dry. He repeatedly criticises teachers for having difficulty handling violent young children or persistent low-level disruption. He believes that reflects teachers' w I found that this picked up in interest further into the book, with the sections on socialisation being more interesting. However, it's clear that Furedi is speaking from the armchair. He doesn't seem to have, or to access, much direct knowledge of what's going on in schools. The book as a whole is theoretical, repetitive, and pretty dry. He repeatedly criticises teachers for having difficulty handling violent young children or persistent low-level disruption. He believes that reflects teachers' weakness and inadequacy, because surely these are trivial and timeless problems that are easily resolved by any competent educator. I'd like him to give it a try: take some of the challenging classes I have, and see how easy you find it. If you're not willing to do that, take seriously the reports of people who do do it every day and know what they're talking about.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jane Dugger

    This was a disappointment and a very dry read. It could have used a good editor. What few points the author made could have been done with less paper.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Francis Fish

    Furedi tries to work out how, after an inordinate amount of money and talent has been thrown at the problem, educational standards do not seem to have improved one jot and lots of young people leave school demotivated and passive. His central thesis is that education is a contract between the young and the old, where the old give the young the tools to understand and run the society they live in and carry it the contract forward to their children in turn. What's happened is that education has been Furedi tries to work out how, after an inordinate amount of money and talent has been thrown at the problem, educational standards do not seem to have improved one jot and lots of young people leave school demotivated and passive. His central thesis is that education is a contract between the young and the old, where the old give the young the tools to understand and run the society they live in and carry it the contract forward to their children in turn. What's happened is that education has been hijacked for all kinds of other purposes like propagandising health messages and reverse socialising parents not to smoke (for example). Crude social engineering and political correctness have replaced the more balanced curricula of yore, which weren't perfect but did engage the mind. The money has been spent on ensuring that these schemes, and all the data collection and top-down nagging and checking needed to enforce them, have been implemented. Not on education itself. There has also been the perception that the old Liberal Arts education (which most of the governing elite have been recipients of, by the way) is too hard, so it has been broken down into bite sized tasks that can be taught monkey-see-monkey-do to anybody who can repeat the chunks back to an examiner. This has been done as a kind of reverse-snobbery exercise against "elitism", and has disengaged the minds of the children. They know how to do things but not why. As a personal aside, it's no wonder kids are not engaged, it must be really boring to be on the receiving end of this, and it must also be quite upsetting to be condescended to in this way by people who obviously know far better than you do what you are capable of. It occurred to me that chunking things down like this allows bigger class sizes and is much cheaper than doing it properly, and I suspect that that is the real reason. They are training people to be better factory workers, following tedious processes all day and not having to show any initiative, in a world where all the factories are gone and no initiative means no food. This is the tragedy. I can't comment on the veracity of the facts and figures he quotes because I am not an academic and have not studied the area in any detail. Some of the leading pedagogues he quotes condemn themselves out of their own mouths and seem unable to see that they have done so. It's quite shocking that they show such a lack of rigour, and then see fit to say how our children should be educated.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Interesting book. I feel the author has a good grasp of the social constructs of the failures of education but not a strong grasp on the challenges teachers face. I think he needs to investigate more real classrooms in order to properly diagnose the issues, rather than relying on third hand advice via newspapers and popular media to remedy issues that have little to do with teachers.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Renée

    Ik vrees dat Furedi gelijk heeft over het gebrek aan gezag in het onderwijs (i.i.g in Nederland) en het leerlinggericht en -gestuurd onderwijs. Gezag of autoriteit van docenten is niet meer vanzelfsprekend, je weet wel, dat gezag waarbij kinderen vroeger (en nu nog in andere derde wereld landen of landen in heropbouw) stil en rechtop zaten, met twee woorden spraken en gewoon hun best deden in de les. In plaats daarvan is het vanzelfsprekend geworden dat leerlingen het niet kunnen helpen dat zij m Ik vrees dat Furedi gelijk heeft over het gebrek aan gezag in het onderwijs (i.i.g in Nederland) en het leerlinggericht en -gestuurd onderwijs. Gezag of autoriteit van docenten is niet meer vanzelfsprekend, je weet wel, dat gezag waarbij kinderen vroeger (en nu nog in andere derde wereld landen of landen in heropbouw) stil en rechtop zaten, met twee woorden spraken en gewoon hun best deden in de les. In plaats daarvan is het vanzelfsprekend geworden dat leerlingen het niet kunnen helpen dat zij moeilijk kunnen leren, zich niet kunnen concentreren tijdens de les of zich misdragen. Allemaal zijn ze zielig en hulpeloos, hebben ADHD, Asperger, dyxlexie. Het is vanzelfsprekend geworden dat de docent en de instelling met behulp van allerlei trukendozen de zwakke en gemankeerde leerling tegemoet komt (remedial teaching, rugzakjes, youtube filmpjes tijdens de les, discovery learning, onderwerpen leerlinggestuurd behandelen, intervisie om nieuwe ideeen op te doen hoe moeilijke leerlingen te benaderen met gekleurde bekers, ijsstokjes, advance organizers, stof hapklaar presenteren, schoudermassages, humor en zo verder). Ik kan me nog de ´avond van het onderwijs´ herinneren een jaar of wat geleden, ik geloof van de VPRO. Daarin zie je wat voor een heisa het tegenwoordig is om leerlingen geinteresseerd te houden, hoeveel tijd er verloren gaat met trukendozen. Volgens Furedi heeft dit eindeloze aanpassen aan de leerling ten eerste te maken met een afkeer van gezag. Gezag is een vies woord geworden. Het is anti-democratisch, neigt naar machtsmisbruik, naar blinde gehoorzaamheid en kijk wat daarvan gekomen is in de tweede wereldoorlog (dat laatste verzin ik er zelf maar bij). Ten tweede moet alle lesstof relevant zijn voor leerlingen, het moet binnen hun leefwereld passen en direct toepasbaar zijn in een later beroep, omdat dat hen zou motiveren om te leren, hen helpt om stof beter te onthouden en transfereerbaarheid bevordert. Ten derde moeten leerlingen leren creatief en innovatief te denken omdat ´de maatschappij voortdurend verandert´ en we geen machines willen onderwijzen maar mensen die hun hersens gebruiken om baanbrekende dingen te doen in de oh zo onzekere toekomst, waarvoor je wel eens uit de box moet. Daar komt de trukendoos dus weer bij kijken, want klassikaal eenrichtingsverkeer vindt men te weinig relevant, niet transfereerbaar genoeg en daagt leerlingen niet uit om zelf na te denken en het geleerde creatief toe te passen. Dus moet je de clown uithangen als docent om alles zo relevant, praktisch en uitdagend mogelijk te maken. Vandaar de dingen als iederwijsscholen, realistisch rekenen, competenties, discovery learning (eventueel guided), serious gaming, enz. Ik ben het dan niet eens met Furedi, die vindt dat dit het onderwijs inhoudelijk verslechtert en dat theorie binnen een traditioneel format altijd beter is. Want inderdaad, het onderwijs wordt er relevanter, praktischer en uitdagender van (uitdagender in de zin dat leerlingen geacht wordt zelf actief te interacteren met stof en de anderen). Het probleem is dat ook al deze vormen veel meer tijd kosten om te ontwikkelen en te implementeren, wat betekent dat niet alle belangrijke inhoud aan bod kan komen. Het is onmogelijk om al het onderwijs op zo´n manier vorm te geven. Iederwijsscholen laten leerlingen zelf aanklooien en dus verliezen leerlingen tijd met voetballen en de playstation of/en leren op een beperkt vlak, verondersteld dat je ze een basis in hoofdrekenen wil aanleren maar ook kennis van de topografie. Als de leerling hier geen interesse voor opvat, gebeurt het dus niet maar volgens Iederwijs is dat ook niet erg, want interesse groeit niet binnen een ´dwangmatig´ traditioneel onderwijs. En om leerlingen kennis bij te brengen van de architectuur in klassiek Griekenland is het zo veel makkelijker en sneller om over een tempel te vertellen aan de hand van een plaatje in een boek, dan om met excursie naar Athene te gaan of ze met behulp van een speciaal daartoe ontwikkelde app te laten navigeren in een virtuele tempel. Hoe ongelooflijk leuk en leerzaam ook, zo´n virtuele tour, iedere keuze daartoe houdt in dat je andere lesstof moet schrappen. Naast de hutspot aan innovatieve werkvormen, leidt de inhoud van het onderwijs tot een weinig samenhangend curriculum, mede door deze werkvormen en het ideaal van een leerling die vaardig is op nog veel meer gebieden dan alleen het analytische theoretische vlak. Ook daarin heeft Furedi een punt. Inhoudelijk is het onderwijs een hutspot van theorie op allerlei gebied en in losse vakken waar de samenhang zoek is, praktische vaardigheden (want we moeten leerlingen niet eenzijdig doen ontwikkelen op analytisch vlak maar ze ook leren creatief te zijn, motorisch vaardig, sociaal, muzikaal, een goed burger, presentatievaardig, gelukkig, verzorgd enz.). Zoals Furedi zegt, er is ´een onvermogen van de overheid en scholen om overtuigend een gemeenschappelijk stelsel van normen en waarden over te brengen´. Nu alles relatief en flexibel is, keuzevrijheid en socialisatie het grote goed en zingeving volledig subjectief, kan men het niet meer eens worden over de vraag wat onderwezen moet worden en het dus ook niet meer met gezag brengen. Moeten we antipestlessen geven of toch interreligieuze dialoog? Studiemethodes, seksuele diversiteit of vakoverstijgende projecten? Pietje vindt dat een vak Chinees onmisbaar is en volgens Christien kan het curriculum niet zonder een vak waarin leerlingen de natuur leren herwaarderen door er op uit te gaan in het bos. Je krijgt dus een vakkenpakket waarbij iedereen, net als in de politiek, schreeuwt om zijn eigen punten op de agenda te krijgen en omdat de een in 2012 harder schreeuwt dan een ander in 2013, wisselt het curriculum steeds. Continuiteit is ook maar achterhaald trouwens, alles wat nieuw is en glimt zal wel een verbetering inhouden. Naast gezag is ´oud´ ook een vies woord. Het punt is dat het wisselen van curriculum e.d. de geloofwaardigheid ervan doet verminderen en daarnaast en vooral: dat niet ALLES onderwezen kan worden. Er zullen keuzes moeten worden gemaakt en daarvoor is een allesomvattende en richtinggevende visie nodig die nu totaal ontbreekt. De titel van het boek zal provocerend bedoeld zijn, ´waarom kinderen niets meer leren´, maar dat vind ik dan weer pessimistische flauwekul. Kinderen leren nog steeds, maar ze leren van alles een beetje, ze leren andere dingen en op een andere manier. Ik geloof wel dat ze een paar dingen niet meer leren en dat is discipline, concentratie en een reden om te geloven dat dit onderwijs voor hen belangrijk is. Want hoe relevant je het ook maakt door eportfolio´s en wikischrijven met z´n allen, als je het niet eens kunt worden over de inhoud en de leerdoelen en alles gefragmenteerd en zonder gezag aanbiedt, waarom zou het leerlingen dan boeien? Met andere woorden: dit was een goed boek.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Olive Rickson

    I particularly enjoyed the section on authority and how authority can be a positive thing in education as schools are places where we take responsibility for children’s education and welfare which they cannot learn through their own experiences. This loss of authority feeds into denigrating of subject knowledge as being indicative of a wider problem of seeing schools as primarily institutions of socialisation rather than education which is reflected in standards of education being arbitrarily me I particularly enjoyed the section on authority and how authority can be a positive thing in education as schools are places where we take responsibility for children’s education and welfare which they cannot learn through their own experiences. This loss of authority feeds into denigrating of subject knowledge as being indicative of a wider problem of seeing schools as primarily institutions of socialisation rather than education which is reflected in standards of education being arbitrarily measured by exams. The reduction in standards is often attributed to symptoms of the problem rather than its causes. It also points to the many directions teachers are pulled to perform the role of therapists, childminders and parents . As such the role of schools and teachers becomes synonymous with any other adult in society. Furedi rightly points out this cannot be technocratically resolved by central government with tweaks around the edges of the curriculum. Particularly because often common values about society and education are often poorly defined. While I enjoyed his prognosis there is no meaningful solutions proposed except calling upon individual teachers to take their roles as educators ‘seriously’ and end to pedagogy and “experts”. Despite his advocacy for a knowledge based curriculum Furedi fails to propose a curriculum that would be free of controversy and engender knowledge, mostly because knowledge cannot exist in a vacuum. as such debates on what should be taught in schools will remain fraught.

  8. 5 out of 5

    R.P. Bosman

    Voor iedeen die in het onderwijs zit een erg interesant boek over de invloed van onze huidige tijd op ons onderwijs. Vernieuwingen, lessen in geluk, leren leren, etc. Hoe pedagogen het onderwijs socialiseren en hoe het onderwijs zijn doelstelling voorbij schiet. Terug naar onderwijzen en stoppen met al dat diagnosticeren van leerlingen. Interesant boek. Geeft absoluut niet alle antwoorden maar goed om eens een duidelijk onderbouwt verhaal als tegenhanger te horen van al dat zogenaamde vernieuwen Voor iedeen die in het onderwijs zit een erg interesant boek over de invloed van onze huidige tijd op ons onderwijs. Vernieuwingen, lessen in geluk, leren leren, etc. Hoe pedagogen het onderwijs socialiseren en hoe het onderwijs zijn doelstelling voorbij schiet. Terug naar onderwijzen en stoppen met al dat diagnosticeren van leerlingen. Interesant boek. Geeft absoluut niet alle antwoorden maar goed om eens een duidelijk onderbouwt verhaal als tegenhanger te horen van al dat zogenaamde vernieuwen binnen het onderwijs.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    Some good points, but I definitely did not agree with everything in this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Clifford

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wilte

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Adams

  13. 5 out of 5

    Spela

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jacquie Rogers

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erik Th

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  17. 4 out of 5

    Guy Willems

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christine Louis-Dit-Sully

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sushil Kumar

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt Kolbet

  21. 4 out of 5

    Myles

  22. 4 out of 5

    E A

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kritični Bralec

  24. 5 out of 5

    K

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gwilym

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nelson Nunes

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kieran Ford

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mrs V J Walker

  30. 5 out of 5

    Christophe Andrades

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...