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Marvel Comics Presents: Wolverine, Vol. 1

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Ever wonder what Wolverine gets up to when he's not out saving the world with the X-Men? More mayhem than you can shake a "SNIKT" at Here, Logan makes his first foray into Madripoor - an island nation where anything goes, and everything is for sale - in this prelude to Wolverine Classic Vol. 1 Collects Marvel Comics Presents #1-10. Ever wonder what Wolverine gets up to when he's not out saving the world with the X-Men? More mayhem than you can shake a "SNIKT" at Here, Logan makes his first foray into Madripoor - an island nation where anything goes, and everything is for sale - in this prelude to Wolverine Classic Vol. 1 Collects Marvel Comics Presents #1-10.


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Ever wonder what Wolverine gets up to when he's not out saving the world with the X-Men? More mayhem than you can shake a "SNIKT" at Here, Logan makes his first foray into Madripoor - an island nation where anything goes, and everything is for sale - in this prelude to Wolverine Classic Vol. 1 Collects Marvel Comics Presents #1-10. Ever wonder what Wolverine gets up to when he's not out saving the world with the X-Men? More mayhem than you can shake a "SNIKT" at Here, Logan makes his first foray into Madripoor - an island nation where anything goes, and everything is for sale - in this prelude to Wolverine Classic Vol. 1 Collects Marvel Comics Presents #1-10.

30 review for Marvel Comics Presents: Wolverine, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Chris Claremont has written some truly classic comics. This is not one of them. Overall, this collection isn't terrible but it's not what you would call good, either. At some point someone at Marvel okayed this pitch: "We want Wolverine to spend a lot of time in a fictional Asian city. When we say 'a lot of time' we mean most of the '80s. But he won't be Wolverine there. We'll put him in his costume on the covers of the books so people will buy them but the Logan they'll meet inside will be dres Chris Claremont has written some truly classic comics. This is not one of them. Overall, this collection isn't terrible but it's not what you would call good, either. At some point someone at Marvel okayed this pitch: "We want Wolverine to spend a lot of time in a fictional Asian city. When we say 'a lot of time' we mean most of the '80s. But he won't be Wolverine there. We'll put him in his costume on the covers of the books so people will buy them but the Logan they'll meet inside will be dressed head to toe in solid black spandex and he'll have an eye patch for some reason. We will call him...Patch. That is the extent of the thought we will put into this new identity for one of our most popular characters. People love Wolverine, the X-man, the superhero. But we're also willing to bet they will love Patch, the guy who hangs out at a place called the Princess Bar and gets into many scuffles with bad guys we will refer to exclusively as 'punkboys'. Marvel editor: "...hmm. I like this. Let's do it. After a decade or so, once this Patch thing has run its course, let's strip him of his adamantium. We will get another five to ten years worth of stories out of that too. Since people respond so strongly to the badass mutant with the unbreakable skeleton and claws, let's do something else entirely and see what happens." Marvel writer: "...ok. Why not?"

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Ekleberry

    More old-school Wolverine fun. Originally serialized as ten 8-page segments in Marvel Comics Presents, Claremont felt the need to recap frequently. Ah, comic writing in the 80s. I first read this in 1992 when it was collected as the one-shot Wolverine: Save the Tiger and recall enjoying it immensely. It was just as good this time around, packaged as the first volume of the Marvel Comics Presents: Wolverine paperback series, reprinting the Wolvie stories from the popular anthology comic. Wolverine More old-school Wolverine fun. Originally serialized as ten 8-page segments in Marvel Comics Presents, Claremont felt the need to recap frequently. Ah, comic writing in the 80s. I first read this in 1992 when it was collected as the one-shot Wolverine: Save the Tiger and recall enjoying it immensely. It was just as good this time around, packaged as the first volume of the Marvel Comics Presents: Wolverine paperback series, reprinting the Wolvie stories from the popular anthology comic. Wolverine visits Madripoor (a fictional Marvel Comics locale modeled after Singapore, and frequent Wolvie hangout) and no surprise, trouble ensues. In a nutshell, Wolvie goes up against the local crimelord Roche and his colorful minions, conflicted in the knowledge that Tyger Tiger (Jessan Hoan, from an earlier X-Men tale) will replace Roche at the earliest opportunity. When the dust settles, Wolvie allows her to operate as long as he can keep her in check- once again demonstrating the gray-area of Logan's morality to be as vast as the Canadian wilderness from which he hails. But that's part of why we like him so much isn't it? He has his own code of honor, and in his mind the world couldn't be more black and white.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Baba

    Collecting the Wolverine tales in Marvel Comics Presents #1 through to #10. The origin of the 'Patch' identity of Wolverine, which he undertook during the X-Men are 'dead' period in the late 1980s. This tale was subtitled 'Save the Tiger'; it recounts Wolverine's taking of sides in the organised crime war in Madripor with the former banker Jess Hoan from the pages of the X-Men who was originally kidnapped by the Reavers, before being freed by the X-men. A Claremont jam. 6 out of 12 Collecting the Wolverine tales in Marvel Comics Presents #1 through to #10. The origin of the 'Patch' identity of Wolverine, which he undertook during the X-Men are 'dead' period in the late 1980s. This tale was subtitled 'Save the Tiger'; it recounts Wolverine's taking of sides in the organised crime war in Madripor with the former banker Jess Hoan from the pages of the X-Men who was originally kidnapped by the Reavers, before being freed by the X-men. A Claremont jam. 6 out of 12

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ilaria Vigorito

    Di questo volume della Serie Oro - che raccoglie sia "Salva la tigre" che "Alta Marea" - si può dire che il taglio sia eminentemente avventuroso/da spy story, soprattutto nella seconda storia, che si svolge per buona parte del tempo dall'altro lato della cortina di ferro. Certo, non sono i fasti di "Origini" o "Arma X" e c'è il solito trope della bella gnocca che casca fra le braccia di Logan istantaneamente - e il mio pensiero vola a James Bond - ma il ritmo è sostenuto, i disegni sono ottimi e Di questo volume della Serie Oro - che raccoglie sia "Salva la tigre" che "Alta Marea" - si può dire che il taglio sia eminentemente avventuroso/da spy story, soprattutto nella seconda storia, che si svolge per buona parte del tempo dall'altro lato della cortina di ferro. Certo, non sono i fasti di "Origini" o "Arma X" e c'è il solito trope della bella gnocca che casca fra le braccia di Logan istantaneamente - e il mio pensiero vola a James Bond - ma il ritmo è sostenuto, i disegni sono ottimi e le battute sono credibili (i nemici, nel primo caso soprattutto, sono, come dire, PITTORESCHI, e Logan si è posto la domanda che tutti ci siamo posti guardando Razorfist: ma come diamine fa a svolgere compiti quotidiani SENZA LE MANI). Il personaggio di Jessan Hoan in "Salva la tigre" è stato comunque davvero interessante da seguire, mentre per quanto riguarda il plot twist sull'identità di Charlemagne, beh, A++++. "Alta Marea" mi è probabilmente piaciuto di più, ho apprezzato da morire le dinamiche tra Peter e Logan (erano ancora i tempi in cui si sapevano scrivere belle storie sull'Uomo Ragno), i sospetti, l'ironia della sorte ferocissima che ha colpito Peter e tutta l'introduzione sul suo stato mentale e sui suoi dubbi nell'essere un supereroe - era il periodo del costume nero, quello in Venom-style. Il tono da spy story durante la Guerra Fredda, poi, in un periodo come il 1990 in cui la cortina di ferro scricchiolava sempre di più, ha contribuito a dare una patina un po' noir a questa storia che non mi è dispiaciuta per niente. Insomma, un'altra lettura piacevolissima.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Crazed8J8

    Mediocre art (very dated at this point in time), and an odd tale. The pacing is odd, as the story is spread across 10 books. C-List characters,and Logan becomes Patch (for no explained reason other than he wears an eye patch). This story has minimal lasting implications other than it introduces Madripoor.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Richard Schaefer

    Gritty and fun. The fact that this story was originally serialized in 8 page installments means you get plot summaries what feels like every other page, but still a quick read and a nice precursor to the ongoing Wolverine series to follow.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kassilem

    These Marvel Comics Presents volumes seem to be what happens to Wolverine before anything that happens in the Essentials. I'm still trying to figure it out but it looks like there is these (all the way up to 116 chapters although some seem to be missing from this collection) sort of like a Wolverine season 1. Then the essentials which cover "wolverine season 2 with around 186 chapters. Then season 3 with 80 some chapters and season 4 with 20 chapters? That doesn't seem completely right, because These Marvel Comics Presents volumes seem to be what happens to Wolverine before anything that happens in the Essentials. I'm still trying to figure it out but it looks like there is these (all the way up to 116 chapters although some seem to be missing from this collection) sort of like a Wolverine season 1. Then the essentials which cover "wolverine season 2 with around 186 chapters. Then season 3 with 80 some chapters and season 4 with 20 chapters? That doesn't seem completely right, because then there’s other volumes with chapters 300 and on which I have no clue where to fit. Anyways, this prelude is about how Tyger Tiger became the crime lord of Madripoor and how Wolverine was involved. Interesting. Artwork is not what I like but I can put up with it for Wolverine.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Ledrew

    Great start to MCP, with an amazing story about Wolverine from his Madripor days, a horror tale starring Man-Thing, kung-fu starring Shang-Shi, and the first part of the multi-part "Fear Itself" arc starring Silver Surfer. Little bit for everyone in this issue, which was the point of MCP. This is "compressed" storytelling at its best, and something I think modern authors might struggle to accomplish. Shame, I think this format of MCP could use a comeback as a way of finishing storyrcs from cance Great start to MCP, with an amazing story about Wolverine from his Madripor days, a horror tale starring Man-Thing, kung-fu starring Shang-Shi, and the first part of the multi-part "Fear Itself" arc starring Silver Surfer. Little bit for everyone in this issue, which was the point of MCP. This is "compressed" storytelling at its best, and something I think modern authors might struggle to accomplish. Shame, I think this format of MCP could use a comeback as a way of finishing storyrcs from cancelled titles, a few pages at a time. :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This is a disappointing comic, given Claremont's previous strength in his two earlier Wolverine series. Granted, this one had severe constraints in its 8 page story segments ... but the problem is it's just not very interesting, even ignoring the introduction of characters like Razorfist (and Patch!) that seem like self-parody. Still, it creates an interesting new environ and some good characters for the first Wolverine continuing series. This is a disappointing comic, given Claremont's previous strength in his two earlier Wolverine series. Granted, this one had severe constraints in its 8 page story segments ... but the problem is it's just not very interesting, even ignoring the introduction of characters like Razorfist (and Patch!) that seem like self-parody. Still, it creates an interesting new environ and some good characters for the first Wolverine continuing series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Chris Claremont presents this story Wolverine in a very noir-ish way, or at least as noir as Marvel could get at the time in an all-ages anthology comic. Because of the nature of the short chapters necessitated by the original publication format, this story suffers from pacing issues. But all things considered, this wasn't bad and it sets up the solo Wolverine series nicely. Chris Claremont presents this story Wolverine in a very noir-ish way, or at least as noir as Marvel could get at the time in an all-ages anthology comic. Because of the nature of the short chapters necessitated by the original publication format, this story suffers from pacing issues. But all things considered, this wasn't bad and it sets up the solo Wolverine series nicely.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Roman Colombo

    Some classic Claremont and Buscema. It's a good Madripor story, and introduces Tyger Tiger to the Marvel Universe. Might find more later on. Marvel Comics Presents had a lot of classic Wolverine moments. Some classic Claremont and Buscema. It's a good Madripor story, and introduces Tyger Tiger to the Marvel Universe. Might find more later on. Marvel Comics Presents had a lot of classic Wolverine moments.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mikey The High School Librarian

    4 mini stories in this issue. Wolverine, Man Thing, Master of Kung Fu Shang-Chi, and the Captain. All are just small enough to make you interested. Normal formatted comics are like popcorn this formate is like M&Ms. bit sized. The Wolverine story seems like worth following.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Frank Byrns

    Story was not great, but Madripoor! Always a sucker for stories set in Madripoor. Also, the serial nature of the original presentation led to a lot of repetition (which is fine, just a bit jarring in a collected format). Just OK.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hackenberg

    Decent book that takes me back to my childhood. Best part is three stories in one. Nothing profound here but an enjoyable read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erik

    Story is just ok, but it is the first visit to Madripoor. One of the villains has swords for arms though, which is stupid even for a throwaway character.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cyn McDonald

    Wolverine stories from Marvel Comics Presents Wolverine #1 - 10

  17. 4 out of 5

    James

    Really like the Wolverine and the Man-Thing stories.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Webster

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Reyna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joey Hines

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zachary

  24. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  25. 4 out of 5

    Fried Potato

  26. 5 out of 5

    Minas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michael DeLong

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eric

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chip Follett

  30. 5 out of 5

    Richard

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