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Korgi, Book 1: Sprouting Wings

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Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Perfect for fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, Jeff Smith' Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Perfect for fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, Jeff Smith's Bone, or Andy Runton's Owly, Korgi is a charming all-ages epic that is sure to capture your heart.


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Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Perfect for fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, Jeff Smith' Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Perfect for fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, Jeff Smith's Bone, or Andy Runton's Owly, Korgi is a charming all-ages epic that is sure to capture your heart.

30 review for Korgi, Book 1: Sprouting Wings

  1. 4 out of 5

    Seth T.

    As Christian Slade's book is entirely without words (save for the introductory page), it's a pretty quick read. But it's the kind that fills you with bubbles of joy. It may actually be the cutest thing I've ever read. Korgi, vol. 1 follows a single misadventure of Ivy and her little friend Sprout (one of the titular Korgis, a race of "fox-like" creatures). The characters have a sense of life and joy about them but the real pleasure is the Korgis themselves. The two-page spread featuring the hust As Christian Slade's book is entirely without words (save for the introductory page), it's a pretty quick read. But it's the kind that fills you with bubbles of joy. It may actually be the cutest thing I've ever read. Korgi, vol. 1 follows a single misadventure of Ivy and her little friend Sprout (one of the titular Korgis, a race of "fox-like" creatures). The characters have a sense of life and joy about them but the real pleasure is the Korgis themselves. The two-page spread featuring the hustle and bustle of Korgi Hollow (the central village of the story) is an absolute wonder as we see Korgis (which really just look like Welsh Corgis) of all shapes and sizes engaged in numerous tasks around town. I think my favourite was the one large enough to act as another character's noble steed. In reality, Korgi is just a pile of cute overload and while there is some story going on, we may have to wait for future volumes to note any real sense of development.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Rawlins

    I picked this up because, I confess, I own a corgi myself, and I thought my wife would think it was cute. Then I read it - silent, epic, beautiful - as good an all ages read as I've encountered since Bone. Before I even left the store, I had to have all three volumes. I'd recommend it to anyone with a soft spot for the kind of stories that enchanted them when they were a child, presented in such a way as to satisfy even the most mature reader. Also, hope the monster gets his eyeball back eventual I picked this up because, I confess, I own a corgi myself, and I thought my wife would think it was cute. Then I read it - silent, epic, beautiful - as good an all ages read as I've encountered since Bone. Before I even left the store, I had to have all three volumes. I'd recommend it to anyone with a soft spot for the kind of stories that enchanted them when they were a child, presented in such a way as to satisfy even the most mature reader. Also, hope the monster gets his eyeball back eventually.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dimitris Papastergiou

    A simple, well duh.. (it's for children) fantasy story about a girl and her dog. No story, well.. there is but yknowwhatImsayin'.. about a girl going on adventures with her dog and getting to trouble. Why I picked this up? The artwork. I loved it. The art is beautiful in this one! I would recommend this for artists for sure! Edit: Second read around because I got the rest of the volumes and I liked it again, amazing artwork! A simple, well duh.. (it's for children) fantasy story about a girl and her dog. No story, well.. there is but yknowwhatImsayin'.. about a girl going on adventures with her dog and getting to trouble. Why I picked this up? The artwork. I loved it. The art is beautiful in this one! I would recommend this for artists for sure! Edit: Second read around because I got the rest of the volumes and I liked it again, amazing artwork!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Megan (ReadingRover)

    The art is super cute in this graphic novel but there could have been more to the story. There just wasn't much of a plot (which had nothing to do with it being wordless). I thought I would have enjoyed it a lot more based on the description and cover. But super cute pups so yay! The art is super cute in this graphic novel but there could have been more to the story. There just wasn't much of a plot (which had nothing to do with it being wordless). I thought I would have enjoyed it a lot more based on the description and cover. But super cute pups so yay!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Murat G.

    Cuteness overload! How can someone doesnt love Ivy and Sprout at all? Yep, maybe story is not that gripping.. So, Just think it as a "feel good cortoon" and enjoy the unique art drawing :) Cuteness overload! How can someone doesnt love Ivy and Sprout at all? Yep, maybe story is not that gripping.. So, Just think it as a "feel good cortoon" and enjoy the unique art drawing :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jayaprakash Satyamurthy

    Oh no! This is just too cute!! The style is very classic, reminding me of old fashioned children's book illustrations with its skilled draughtsmanship and lively line. We are introduced to delightful woodland village where Mollies - pixie-like creatures - and their Korgis lead an idyllic life amongst various magical denizens. It isn't all frolics in the meadows and Ivy and her Korgi, Sprout, face some very scary perils before winning through. Absolutely charming and not just cutesy. But it is su Oh no! This is just too cute!! The style is very classic, reminding me of old fashioned children's book illustrations with its skilled draughtsmanship and lively line. We are introduced to delightful woodland village where Mollies - pixie-like creatures - and their Korgis lead an idyllic life amongst various magical denizens. It isn't all frolics in the meadows and Ivy and her Korgi, Sprout, face some very scary perils before winning through. Absolutely charming and not just cutesy. But it is supercute!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This is a rather charming story told soley in pictures. While technically a children's book, it can be adored by anyone who loves dogs. It is a good blend of story and fantasy. I love Ivy and Sprout. Really good. This is a rather charming story told soley in pictures. While technically a children's book, it can be adored by anyone who loves dogs. It is a good blend of story and fantasy. I love Ivy and Sprout. Really good.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tahlia Riley

    I can't believe that someone thought to create this, but I'm so happy it exists. Korgi is so whimsical and cute. The art style is really unique in this somehow sparse yet intricate way. And the story is told entirely through the drawings! (I'm clearly on some weird kick of graphic novels based on dogs) I can't believe that someone thought to create this, but I'm so happy it exists. Korgi is so whimsical and cute. The art style is really unique in this somehow sparse yet intricate way. And the story is told entirely through the drawings! (I'm clearly on some weird kick of graphic novels based on dogs)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Steve Scordino

    The only words in the book is a short introduction. Kids at 4-6 would really enjoy following the progress of the story. Great art. Kind weird to call it a graphic novel since there isn't any novel to it. Good kid book. The only words in the book is a short introduction. Kids at 4-6 would really enjoy following the progress of the story. Great art. Kind weird to call it a graphic novel since there isn't any novel to it. Good kid book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Gustafson

    ugh I wish I were small enough/corgis were big enough that I could ride them everywhere. Also wish I could live in a woodland magic forest with a whole bunch of corgis

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Lynn Thomas

    I'm just going to say it, this is the cutest comic I have ever encountered, and I don't think anything will top it. Filled with myth and magic, KORGI is a story about a girl and her dog told entirely without words. With the exception of a brief into, the story of Ivy and Sprout is shown through gorgeous black and white drawings. It's a simple story--girl leaves town and finds adventure, but that doesn't mean it's boring. Charming and lush, this is a tale that children and adults will enjoy in equ I'm just going to say it, this is the cutest comic I have ever encountered, and I don't think anything will top it. Filled with myth and magic, KORGI is a story about a girl and her dog told entirely without words. With the exception of a brief into, the story of Ivy and Sprout is shown through gorgeous black and white drawings. It's a simple story--girl leaves town and finds adventure, but that doesn't mean it's boring. Charming and lush, this is a tale that children and adults will enjoy in equal measure. Especially if they've ever loved a corgi.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Mcnulty

    What a sweet little story! I have a corgi and my friend thought I might enjoy this book. I really like the artist's style and I found the drawings to be fun and interesting. It made me smile and right now that can be kinda tough to do. :) What a sweet little story! I have a corgi and my friend thought I might enjoy this book. I really like the artist's style and I found the drawings to be fun and interesting. It made me smile and right now that can be kinda tough to do. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Punk

    A day in the life of a young girl and her korgi, in the forest village where they make their home. Wordless, with black and white art that reminds me of an Alice in Wonderland woodcut. It seems like a generic fantasy forest world until you come across the giant friendly alligator (unexplained), or the flying saucer that crashlanded into the hills (also unexplained), and then there are the korgis, who look like corgis, assist the villagers with their work, and are also magic. This is cute, but slig A day in the life of a young girl and her korgi, in the forest village where they make their home. Wordless, with black and white art that reminds me of an Alice in Wonderland woodcut. It seems like a generic fantasy forest world until you come across the giant friendly alligator (unexplained), or the flying saucer that crashlanded into the hills (also unexplained), and then there are the korgis, who look like corgis, assist the villagers with their work, and are also magic. This is cute, but slight, and I didn't get much from it except for creeping suspicion that the korgis were being exploited by the villagers for their labor. Sorry. The world has ruined me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Summary (CIP): This combination of adventure and fantasy is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl named Ivy, her corgi dog Sprout and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. REVIEW: The wordless format and the very lush and expressive pen and ink drawings make this new graphic novel series very accessible to all levels of readers, including limited English proficiency (LEP) readers. The volume felt a little over cute to me, but I can see how this woodland fantasy fills a Summary (CIP): This combination of adventure and fantasy is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl named Ivy, her corgi dog Sprout and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. REVIEW: The wordless format and the very lush and expressive pen and ink drawings make this new graphic novel series very accessible to all levels of readers, including limited English proficiency (LEP) readers. The volume felt a little over cute to me, but I can see how this woodland fantasy fills a niche and will appeal to most young readers (and certainly any corgi dog lovers). My favorite part was finding out that Ivy’s corgi, Sprout, is a fire-breather! Now that’s a handy dog trick... SLJ: Positive. "Finding a middle ground between the slapstick fantasy of Jeff Smith's beloved Bone series (Scholastic/Graphix) and Andy Runton's sweet and wordless Owly books (Top Shelf), Korgi will draw in fans of graphic fiction, fantasy, fairies, dogs, and good old storytelling." PW: Positive. "Slade's illustrations are so expressive and full of life that the pages radiate the feelings of his characters, and the lack of dialogue is hardly noticed. Korgi is as intricately illustrated, rich and fully imagined as an animated film."

  15. 4 out of 5

    Raina

    I'm definitely a dog person, but Corgis are a breed I've never particularly liked (might have something to do with my Girl Scout leader's bitey series of pups). So maybe I shouldn't have bothered. This is wordless, and gorgeously illustrated (some of it looks like the most intricate ballpoint pen doodle you've ever seen), and follows the adventures of the girl on the cover and her friend, a seemingly anthropomorphized title creature. The dogs live in trees (although the way their treehouses are d I'm definitely a dog person, but Corgis are a breed I've never particularly liked (might have something to do with my Girl Scout leader's bitey series of pups). So maybe I shouldn't have bothered. This is wordless, and gorgeously illustrated (some of it looks like the most intricate ballpoint pen doodle you've ever seen), and follows the adventures of the girl on the cover and her friend, a seemingly anthropomorphized title creature. The dogs live in trees (although the way their treehouses are drawn makes this seem only a magical possibility, given doggish physical limitations). And giants and ogres and other monsterish humanoids are around. meh, I think I'm too serious for this stuff. I need to know more of the inner workings of the world to be into it. And I don't have a corgi obsession to pull me through.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Did you know Corgi's are magical? Me neither, but apparently they are and they live with a people called Mollies (which apparently are fairies)! It is entirely a picture book. No words, just pictures to tell the story. I loved it. My favorite part was when the little corgi shot fire from his little adorable mouth. I will say, though, they left those bad guys on fire. Like, I know they were in mortal danger; however, it is a little concerning that the monsters were just burning to death and every Did you know Corgi's are magical? Me neither, but apparently they are and they live with a people called Mollies (which apparently are fairies)! It is entirely a picture book. No words, just pictures to tell the story. I loved it. My favorite part was when the little corgi shot fire from his little adorable mouth. I will say, though, they left those bad guys on fire. Like, I know they were in mortal danger; however, it is a little concerning that the monsters were just burning to death and everyone was like 'No big deal. They are bad guys.' That said. I loved this book and plan to flip through the rest.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kaethe

    Like Owly, this is a wordless graphic novel. It isn't visually similar at all; the drawing here is richly detailed, rather than simplified and cartoonish. If you weren't already a fan of corgis, a glimpse through a magical village full of them will make you one. Like Owly, this is a wordless graphic novel. It isn't visually similar at all; the drawing here is richly detailed, rather than simplified and cartoonish. If you weren't already a fan of corgis, a glimpse through a magical village full of them will make you one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Diz

    This comic presents a wordless fantasy story in which little dogs are magical creatures. The black-and-white art is done is a very nice sketchy style. However, there are some panels that seem more decorative than narrative in purpose. Also, the plot is a pretty standard fantasy plot. It might be a nice way to introduce children to fantasy, though.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    "Pile of cute," Seth Hahne says. Indeed. But he was more charmed by it than I was... not that engaged, nor were my 6. 7 and 8 year old kids. "Pile of cute," Seth Hahne says. Indeed. But he was more charmed by it than I was... not that engaged, nor were my 6. 7 and 8 year old kids.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ron Baxley

    By: Ron Baxley, Jr., fantasy and “Oz universe” author with YBR Publishing and author and scripter of the international-award-winning fantasy Corgi graphic novel series for ages 10-100 (or older), “Ziggy Zig-zags the Light and Dark Fantastic” Visually Strong, Charming Fantastical Adventure Yet with Haphazard Stream of Consciousness Four out of Five Stars “Korgi, Book 1, ‘Sprouting Wings’ ”, a graphic novel by Christian Slade, certainly tells a good story visually. However, the book certainly needs i By: Ron Baxley, Jr., fantasy and “Oz universe” author with YBR Publishing and author and scripter of the international-award-winning fantasy Corgi graphic novel series for ages 10-100 (or older), “Ziggy Zig-zags the Light and Dark Fantastic” Visually Strong, Charming Fantastical Adventure Yet with Haphazard Stream of Consciousness Four out of Five Stars “Korgi, Book 1, ‘Sprouting Wings’ ”, a graphic novel by Christian Slade, certainly tells a good story visually. However, the book certainly needs its written introduction with the talking toad Wart, scroll-keeper and historian of Korgi Hollow, and the book’s cast of characters listing. Without both, some young readers and even others may be confused. Within the graphic novel, the adventures of an elf-like young girl Ivy (only the elf-like or faery-like creatures are called Mollies) in a woodland area, Korgi Hollow, in another world with Corgi-like canines called Korgis (with a k) tend to be rather stream of consciousness or a bit disorganized at times. (A real human child’s playtime and adventures tend to be this way anyway, and I think this aspect will appeal more to young readers.) Also, this is a fantasy world, and magical creatures such as the monster Gallump and his cronies do tend to pop out randomly in fantasy for all ages at times. Within the fantasy graphic novel, Ivy has her own Korgi pup Sprout who she goes on adventures and misadventures with in and around Korgi Hollow. What is visually stunning is the black and white pen and ink world (with an “Olde Worlde” look) the author and illustrator Slade creates that like the myths of the Welsh people, has Corgis or, in this case, Korgis assisting the elves or fairies or, in this case Mollies, with transportation, carting things around, and more. The cross-hatching and use of lights and darks and the anatomy of the little people, Korgis, and monsters as well as the setting of the woods, caverns, and other areas are all a feast for the eyes in Slade’s world-building. Also, having a Corgi, Ziggy, for eight years and having created my own graphic novel series and fiction based upon him, I must say Slade’s drawings of Sprout’s (and other Korgis’) actions/mannerisms, expressions, and anatomy are spot-on. (I later learned he and his family have two Corgis of their own who are probably models for the graphic novels.) What I particularly enjoyed was Slade knowing that Corgis, despite having stubby legs, have strong back legs which they can use to jump high – almost as high as kangaroos at times. Sprout has to do this a few times while in peril. Slade’s written description in the Cast of Characters section of Corgis or Korgis being like foxes (particularly with the ears) and having big smiles is apt as well, reminding me of my Ziggy. Again, telling (or really showing) the story with about 90 percent visuals or more works for the most part (with some exceptions) as it did in the book “Hugo”, and the mostly visual graphic novel, therefore, becomes more accessible to those with early literacy. There are some surprises along the way which I will not spoil – some of which reminded me of the original “The Dark Crystal” and of the work of J.R.R. Tolkien. Within this graphic novel, Ivy is a strong, adventurous female protagonist who is brave in the face of the peril she encounters. Sprout, her Corgi, is brave as well, and, through his bravery, reveals some secrets about himself. Gallump, the aforementioned monster, and his minions are among the ones who provoke him unintentionally to reveal his secrets. In addition to Sprout, Ivy has a few surprises about herself. At least one of the surprises involving Ivy seemed a bit deus ex machina. But only the pickier adults who read it will probably think this. Next, the well-drawn yet seemingly (to the narrative) incongruous wrecked flying saucer on page 29 is never really explained fully, even visually, in Book 1 but is explained later in the series. (A visual in one book in this series usually foreshadows something from another book later on.) The flying saucer, which somewhat works as a teaser or cliffhanger in its non-traditional spot, is something out of science fiction placed into fantasy. Nevertheless, the line is often blurred between those two, and fantasy and science fiction are always lumped together in the same genre and sections in bookstores and libraries. In short, the first “Korgi” graphic novel has strong, well-drawn visuals and cute, well-drawn Korgis (and one particular Korgi) in a haphazard, slightly disorganized fantastical misadventures along with a strong girl protagonist and sidekick with revealed secrets that children and the young at heart will love.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tirzah

    I don’t consider myself a dog person (or any other animal person), yet I always thought corgis were adorable and I am almost always beguiled by a fantasy story. As I took a moment to glance through Korgi before shelving it, I began to realize this story was a fun mixture of cute corgis and suspenseful magical adventure. It is wordless, so it does not take long to read and the plot is simple to follow. Neither of these elements makes it less enjoyable to read. This book is sometimes described as I don’t consider myself a dog person (or any other animal person), yet I always thought corgis were adorable and I am almost always beguiled by a fantasy story. As I took a moment to glance through Korgi before shelving it, I began to realize this story was a fun mixture of cute corgis and suspenseful magical adventure. It is wordless, so it does not take long to read and the plot is simple to follow. Neither of these elements makes it less enjoyable to read. This book is sometimes described as a book for all ages – not sure about that. Young fans of graphic novels, magic, and dogs will certainly like it, but I would advise parents to glance through it before giving it to sensitive readers as there are some creatures that could scare them. Adults who won’t take it too seriously and still have the inner kid in them will also have fun reading Korgi. *Book 3 is darker than Book 1 and 2. There is a Book 4 that was published in 2016, but I have not had an opportunity to read it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Round Lake Area Public Library

    Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Illustrator and author Christian Slade has a soft spot for corgis and you can tell in this loving and adventurous graphic novel about them. Discover the place of Korgi Hollow and allow Korgi is a gorgeously illustrated woodland fantasy about a young girl. Ivy, her Korgi cub, Sprout, and their amazing adventures in Korgi Hollow. In this first volume in the series, Ivy and Sprout discover some interesting things about themselves as they stray from their village and face danger for the first time. Illustrator and author Christian Slade has a soft spot for corgis and you can tell in this loving and adventurous graphic novel about them. Discover the place of Korgi Hollow and allow it to take you on a fun, fantasy journey. In book one, we meet Ivy and her Korgi cub Sprout. Find out what makes both of these characters unique and special and what creatures they must defend themselves from. Every page is filled with impressive illustrations that certainly tells a great story and makes you want to read more. Ivy and Sprout are learning more about their powers and their enemies are learning about them as well. What will happen in book 2?

  23. 5 out of 5

    Katie Louisell

    Though this is a children's graphic novel, I think any age group would love this book. The art style is gorgeous and the plot-as basic as it is- makes it a fun, quick read. In actuality, I would rather call this a picture book than a graphic novel, as there are literally no words in the story except for the first page. I really liked this idea, as it allowed me to enjoy the art without interruptions from narration. However, there were a lot of things I found confusing due to this as well-there w Though this is a children's graphic novel, I think any age group would love this book. The art style is gorgeous and the plot-as basic as it is- makes it a fun, quick read. In actuality, I would rather call this a picture book than a graphic novel, as there are literally no words in the story except for the first page. I really liked this idea, as it allowed me to enjoy the art without interruptions from narration. However, there were a lot of things I found confusing due to this as well-there was no explanation for Sprout's fire-breathing capabilities, nor the spaceships (why are there spaceships in a woodland area?). However, I think over the next few books in the series, these will be explained (hopefully). What I found interesting was the hint of darkness Slade puts in the book with the monsters, more than what I expected for a children's book. Overall, I really loved this book-it was cute, funny, and beautifully drawn, and I'm excited to read the following books.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allison Macaluso

    1. Ivy and Sprout face their first adventure together. Ivy is a fairy and her faithful Korgi pup sprout is always by her side. They face challenges together and fight against monsters and beasts all along, Ivy is sprouting her wings to become a Fairy. 2. Although there are no words on the page, you can stay on on a page for hours. Thinking about the illustrations and meaning behind it all allows the reader to make their own connections and predictions about the story. The exciting adventures of 1. Ivy and Sprout face their first adventure together. Ivy is a fairy and her faithful Korgi pup sprout is always by her side. They face challenges together and fight against monsters and beasts all along, Ivy is sprouting her wings to become a Fairy. 2. Although there are no words on the page, you can stay on on a page for hours. Thinking about the illustrations and meaning behind it all allows the reader to make their own connections and predictions about the story. The exciting adventures of Ivy and Sprout. 3. Korgi The Cosmic Collector by Christian Slade 4. NO QUOTES- Book does not contain any words.

  25. 5 out of 5

    RLL22018 Danielle Razo

    What caught my eye about this book was that it wasn't as depressing as all the other graphic novels I read. This book is colorful, whimsical, and has corgis-- what more do you want from a book? I thought it was a nice touch to have a female protagonist going through this adventurous journey. I would introduce this book to younger audiences because it is a fun read. However, I would also have this available in a high school classroom. High schoolers are never too old to enjoy a good book, especia What caught my eye about this book was that it wasn't as depressing as all the other graphic novels I read. This book is colorful, whimsical, and has corgis-- what more do you want from a book? I thought it was a nice touch to have a female protagonist going through this adventurous journey. I would introduce this book to younger audiences because it is a fun read. However, I would also have this available in a high school classroom. High schoolers are never too old to enjoy a good book, especially one that encourages them to invent their own story line.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Stumbled across this book by accident and had to look into it. After all... who can pass up a cute Corgi... or I should say in this case a Korgi. There are no words in this book, except in the little introduction and the explanation of what the different creatures are in the back. It was a quick read, but also very action packed if you take in the pictures and really watch what is happening. I'm impressed by the fact that a book without any words could pull me in and make me wonder what is going Stumbled across this book by accident and had to look into it. After all... who can pass up a cute Corgi... or I should say in this case a Korgi. There are no words in this book, except in the little introduction and the explanation of what the different creatures are in the back. It was a quick read, but also very action packed if you take in the pictures and really watch what is happening. I'm impressed by the fact that a book without any words could pull me in and make me wonder what is going to happen next, but it really did it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica O

    I was very disappointed by this book. It looks fabulous, and the description on the cover sounded fun, but it didn't really live up to my expectations. It's mostly wordless (the introduction is told through words instead of pictures), and a couple of wordless books are things I number among my favorites, so that's not the reason I didn't like it. Just something about the flow of the story left me feeling let down. I'm sure this would be a good way to introduce a child to wordless books, but I don I was very disappointed by this book. It looks fabulous, and the description on the cover sounded fun, but it didn't really live up to my expectations. It's mostly wordless (the introduction is told through words instead of pictures), and a couple of wordless books are things I number among my favorites, so that's not the reason I didn't like it. Just something about the flow of the story left me feeling let down. I'm sure this would be a good way to introduce a child to wordless books, but I don't recommend it as the "all ages" book it claims to be.

  28. 5 out of 5

    zOdAê aKAê

    such a cute / compelling story that doesn’t even use words !! this book is what i wanna give to reluctant readers, beginning readers, ppl w dyslexia bc it would make ur comprehension so much greater. i think the art of silent story telling is hard to convey oftentimes and is not seen as often now. 10/10. it also like features a strong sweet femme & her puppy who has superpowers he is discovering. coming of age & a femme dog story !!! we love to see it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becca

    I love pitching this series to others for the art and the wordless storytelling. Sometimes I get kids at work (the library) who aren’t confident in their reading skills but still want a story to enjoy. This series gives them an opportunity to develop reading comprehension and have fun in the process. I’m a huge fan of corgis, too!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    A gorgeously sketched, wordless graphic novel that will make you skip through the forest pretending to have wings, with a smiling canine trotting behind you on a quest for carpets of moss, acorn caps for fairy hats, and shelf moss to store trinkets on. Great for sparking the imaginations of early elementary children and the young at heart.

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